Image Credit: Ryan Conroy / US Air Force. This image has been modified.

How to Prevent Heart Disease in the Womb

The strategy of trying to prevent heart disease risk in childhood has been described as radical, but is the concept really so radical? What truly would be radical would be to adopt this concept and actually do something about our #1 killer epidemic. “The alternative is to continue indefinitely to rely upon the late and incompletely effective strategies, with their recognized costs, for detecting and treating already established risk factors” like high cholesterol levels that may have been causing progression of the disease their whole lives. As I discuss in my video Heart Disease May Start in the Womb, “a failure to diagnose and treat risk factors in youth may miss an opportunity to prevent the long-term consequences of [heart] disease,” the leading cause of disability and death in the United States for both men and women.

We could prevent 90 percent of heart attacks. Such a claim would have seemed outrageous 50 years ago, but now we know stopping this epidemic is achievable. There are two ways we can do this. The first is the clinical medicine approach, in which physicians identify kids at risk and vigorously advocate lifestyle changes or drug them. However, “[t]his model can, at best, be applied to only a few individuals, because physician effort is limited”—we have 15-minute doctor visits—“preventive care is not reimbursed, and interventions directed toward individuals are often ineffective because they are not supported by the surrounding culture.” To stop the disease process completely, one may have to go to an almost exclusively plant-based diet, something that hasn’t been officially recommended for fear of “discouraging” the public. But our job as physicians is to tell the truth and let the public decide.

That’s why, to prevent atherosclerosis, we need broad social and cultural changes that pervade the entire population. The evidence justifies igniting a veritable social movement that eventually will be supported officially by the powers that be. “The goal of eliminating 90% of [coronary heart disease] is feasible,” but the “cultural and societal changes necessary to achieve this goal won’t be easy, and they won’t happen soon, but it’s time to start.”

So, it may be that the newest Academy of Pediatrics-approved guidelines for universal cholesterol screening of all children, starting around age nine, might actually be too conservative. How about starting at age two? That’s “when parents are generally engaged and vigilant about well-child checkups and when there are additional opportunities for provider-parent education about the importance of diet, exercise, and a healthy lifestyle,” not only for their kids but for themselves as well, because atherosclerosis can start even before birth and depend on what our moms ate.

Fatty streak formation occurs in human fetal arteries and is worsened greatly by how high the pregnant mother’s cholesterol is. In one study, arteries were obtained from spontaneous miscarriages and premature newborns who died within 12 hours of birth around the end of the second trimester. They looked at the arteries of fetuses from mothers with normal cholesterol levels and from pregnant moms with high cholesterol, and fetal arteries from mothers with high cholesterol contained significantly greater lesions.

This suggests not only that heart disease may start much earlier than we had previously assumed, but that it also depends on maternal cholesterol levels. So, atherosclerosis might not just start out as a nutritional disease of childhood, but also as a nutritional disease of pregnancy.


And I thought my video Heart Disease Starts in Childhood was a shocker! Just like it’s Never Too Late to Start Eating Healthier, it’s evidently never too early either.

More on healthy pregnancies in:

Some of my videos on raising healthy kids include:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Discuss

Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.


38 responses to “How to Prevent Heart Disease in the Womb

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  1. Interesting.
    Seems as total cholesterol levels go up usually with weight as the average womans weight goes up so goes the risk to infants.

    Will the truth on cholesterol and all the rest win out…I would not be so sure.
    My guess is they put kids on statins at some point in time.12 years old instead of a religious confirmation or coming of age ceremony..here kid your first statin. Necessary we have decided on the basis of these lesions, a human genetic problem all most have it.

    I would not bet on truth justice and the American way leading out in this thing. Seems they will find a way to restrict us to mainstream media sooner or later to see to it we do not receive contrary information. In fact the Net Neutrality remove may in the end be that thing.You Tube facebook and others already self censor, why not things that may affect the bottom line of their corporate breatheren? How much would one have to pay say goggle to drop this or that from search result to produce what we want out there not necessarily the truth. Why would that be illegal? It seems it is not, it would not be . No regulation….that is our future. And of course regulation is demonized at every break in the road.

    I am not optimistic.

    1. Came across this…
      Mark Twain once said, “Truth is mighty and will prevail. There is nothing wrong with this, except that it ain’t so.”

  2. Why not eat some Fish?

    Pregnant? Say Yes to Seafood!
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/16/AR2007021602259.html

    Maternal seafood consumption in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood (ALSPAC study): an observational cohort study – The Lancet

    http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673607602773/fulltext

    Mothers who eat oily fish could help improve their child’s gut health
    https://dailym.ai/2xM0yUm

  3. Dr Greger please don’t use the word womb; it’s a uterus. You’re an MD and you wouldn’t call a penis a dick in an article, or an anus a butt-hole, or a urethra a pee-tube so why the word womb? What’s wrong with it’s actual name, uterus?

    1. Ambrosia, womb is not a slang word or even a colloquialism. All the other words you mentioned are. There’s nothing wrong with using the word ‘womb’. Just because he’s a doctor doesn’t mean he has to be dry & clinical with his word usage.

      1. I agree. Womb is not a slang word.

        And he is writing for people and people might not even know what a uterus is, but they know what a womb is.

    2. Let’s see if I can remember the Hail Mary prayer. We’re talking former Catholic here. Nah, I’ll just do a search:

      “Hail Mary, full of grace.
      Our Lord is with thee.
      Blessed art thou among women,
      and blessed is the fruit of thy womb,
      Jesus.
      Holy Mary, Mother of God,
      pray for us sinners,
      now and at the hour of our death.
      Amen.”

      We little kids were quite familiar with that womb word. :-)

  4. Statistically, the older one gets, the higher their cholesterol and the lower their risk of heart disease and stroke. Statistically more people with low and normal cholesterol have heart attacks than people with high cholesterol. High cholesterol is a symptom, not a cause, of a dietary deficiency of natural vitamin C complex which is Not just ascorbic acid. If mothers would change their diet Before conception and continue it thru gestation, the problem would be eliminated. High cholesterol is actually a low grade form of scurvy causing weakened vascular walls that crack and leak blood slowly while the body tries to repair the cracks with calcium first to glue the cracks shut (arteriosclerosis) because it doesn’t have enough collagen to repair it properly. Then it takes normal cholesterol and oxidizes it (normal cholesterol won’t stick) to fill in the rest of the cracks, cover it over and make it smooth again so blood cells don’t get damaged by the calcium deposits (atherosclerosis).
    Lowering cholesterol is treating the symptom and not the cause!
    Linus Pauling’s work proved you can’t cure scurvy with commercial vitamin C (ascorbic acid) but only with a full vitamin C Complex. Our bodies have an enzyme that has one purpose… get rid of ascorbic acid… so it can get at the complex of nutrients inside when we get it from eating plants. The inner nutrient complex stimulates collagen production which repairs our connective tissues including vascular walls keeping them intact and flexible.
    Linus Pauling’s work also proved that low amounts of ascorbic acid don’t really help us until we get into the thousands of mgs (1 gram +) which causes higher production of the enzyme and forces elimination of the high ascorbic acid and some other garbage gets carried out with it. We get better on high doses of ascorbic acid not by what it’s doing for us but by what our bodies are doing to get rid of it!
    We need cholesterol to make all our hormones, antibodies for the immune system, a major part of our brain, and every single cell wall is dependent on it. God made 5 organs to make most of our cholesterol and if stressed to the limits, every cell can produce cholesterol. Why would our bodies make something bad for us?

    1. “Statistically more people with low and normal cholesterol have heart attacks than people with high cholesterol.”…

      please provide proof of a scientific observational sort published to support this contention.

        1. Nancy;  REFERENCES:KameC,Babazono A, Yamamoto E. Estimation of effect of lipid lowereing treatment ontotal mortality rate and its cost effectiveness determined by interventionstudy of hypercholesterolemia, Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2007 Jan;62(1):39-46

           Weverling-Rijnsburger, AW et al. Total cholesterol and risk ofmortality in th oldest old. Lancet 1997; 350:1119-1123

           Iribarren, C et al. Cohort Study of serum total cholesterol andin-hospital incidence of infectious diseases. Epidemiology and Infection1998;121:335-347 21

           Schatz, IJ et al. Cholesterol and all-cause mortality in elderlypeople from honolulu heart program; A cohort study. Lancet 2001;358:351-355

           — and related to that last study:  http://www.abc.net.au/Catalyst/

          | | |

          |

           Jacobs MB:”HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy and peripheral neuropathy:” AnnInter Med. 1994 Jun 1;120(11);970

           Formaglio M, Vial C:”Statin induced neuropathy: myth or reality?” Rev Neurol (Paris).2006 Dec;162(12):1286-9.

           de Langen JJ, vanPuijenbroek EP: “HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors and neuropathy: reports tothe Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre.” Neth J Med. 2006Oct;64(9):334-8

           Law M, Rudnicka AR:”Statin safety: a systematic review.” Am J Cardiol. 2006 Apr17;97(8A):52C-60C

           Gaist D, Jeppesen U,et al: “Statins and risk of polyneuropathy: a case-control study.”Neurology. 2002 May 14;58(9):1333-7

           Golomb BA, McGraw JJ,Evans MA, Dimsdale JE: “Physician response to patient reports of adversedrug effects: implications for patient-targeted adverse effectsurveillance.” Drug Saf. 2007;30(8):669-75

           Brescianini S, MaggiS, Farchi G, Mariotti S, Di Carlo A, Baldereschi M, Inzitari D; ILSA Group. Lowtotal cholesterol and increased risk of dying: are low levels clinical warningsigns in the elderly? Results from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging. JAm Geriatr Soc. 2003 Jul;51(7):991-6

           Schupf N, Costa R,Luchsinger J, Tang MX, Lee JH, Mayeux R. Relationship between plasma lipids andall-cause mortality in nondemented elderly. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005Feb;53(2):219-26

            JAMA01;285:2486-2497

           Circulation92;86:1046-1060

           Int J Epidemilo97;26:1191-1202

           Ipidemil Infect98;121:335-347

           Psychiatry Res07;150:105-108

           Am J Psychiatr95;152(3):419-423

           J Clin Psychiatr94;55:252-254

           Am J Med 77;62:707-708

           Am J Epidemiol06;PMID16905642 [epub ahead of print]

           Biofactors99;9:267-272

           
          “Plasma HDL cholesterol and the risk of myocardial infarction:A mendelian randomization study,” The Lancet, May 17, 2012.(doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60312-2) http://www.spacedoc.net/cause_statin_side_effects

           http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2009/12/31/nerve_problem-with-lipitor-and-crestor-anns-story/

           http://web.mit.edu/mwpstr/www/brody/

           http://www.Thincs.org 

          http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN64637517/  http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/Statins_Pregnancy_Sepsis_Cancer_Heart_Failure.html#do_statins_cause_sepsis

          http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154289.php  http://blogs.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/2008/02/statins-and-muscle-pain.html  http://people.csailmit.edu/seneff/statins_muscle_damage_heart_failure.html http://heathread.net/statincardiomyop.htm   
          http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/Statins_Pregnancy_Sepsis_Cancer_Heart_Failure.html#statins_and_heart_failure

          http://www.bottomlinesecrets.com/article.html?article_id=48907  http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/midlife_cholesterol_alzheimers.pdf

           http://newsweek.com/id/57953/page/4

           http://people.csailmit.edu/seneff/alzheimers_statins.thml

           “S5-01-05:Multi-center, randomized, double-blind, pacebo-controlled trial of Simastatinto slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” Alzheimer’s AssociationInternational Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease, Volume 4, Issue 4, Supplement1, July 2008, Page T200

           http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed/18525127?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=6

           Just a few References above from many.

          Othersources you should read include:

           www.StatinNation.net

           GreenMedInfo.com – 1595 articles just on statin-inducedpathologies, all hard-referenced to peer-reviewed biomedical research sourcedfrom the US National Library of Medicine.

           The Physician Desk Reference for all the statin drugs and their listedside effects.

           
          “Cholesterol is Not the Culprit” by Dr. Fred Kummerow… (Spoiler Alert!:  …it’s the trans fats! (hydrogenated oils)

          1. Most all of your study is referencing statin drugs and side effects from statin drugs or all cause mortality.

            Yes peoples on statins often do not respond and due to side effects do go off them. Overall cholesterol in the blood may or may not translate to artery clogging plaque. Statins do nothing do remove existant plaque. Yes a typical heart patient will be put on statins following a cardiac event, do they then go on to have another cardiac event with a lower cholesterol level in the blood due to the statins..sure. Very common.

            All cause mortality, very many medical conditions and illnesses to include alzheimers will reduce blood cholesterol level. IN fact loss of body weight itself causes lower cholesterol levels. Lower body weight is often a commonly found condition prior to a finding of death..its happens in hospice care and nurseing home care all the time.

            Two things occurring at the same time does not necessarily causation.
            I can produce any number of studies which show high cholesterol levels as a negative and apart cause of heart disease. Even the AHA agrees to that.

            1. Here is a conclusion on the issue from the NIH in their heart lung area…
              https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/high-blood-cholesterol

              Yes first page high cholesterol leads to arterial plaque…and on and on treatment options the whole nine yards.
              Not a isolated study in reference to the issue with confounding elements found within but a statement of considered fact generated by all the hundreds of studies out there.

              1. Here is a abstract from one of your lead studies cited…
                “A systematic review of cohort studies, randomized trials, voluntary notifications to national regulatory authorities, and published case reports was undertaken to assess the incidence and characteristics of adverse effects in patients treated with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. For statins other than cerivastatin, the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in 2 cohort studies was 3.4 (1.6 to 6.5) per 100,000 person-years, an estimate supported by data from 20 randomized controlled trials. Case fatality was 10%. Incidence was about 10 times greater when gemfibrozil was used in combination with statins.”

                This is all about statin use and their side effects. No one here is advocating statin use.
                This is simply not related to you claim at all.

                ARe you just citing studies throwing them up upon this wall and hoping some of them stick….seems so..

      1. Tons of Research, to numerous to list all of them here.However, start with these and other sources…
        KameC, Babazono A, Yamamoto E. Estimation of effect of lipid lowereing treatment on total mortality rate and its cost effectiveness determined by intervention study of hypercholesterolemia, Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2007 Jan;62(1):39-46 Weverling-Rijnsburger, AW et al. Total cholesterol and risk of mortality in th oldest old. Lancet 1997; 350:1119-1123 Iribarren, C et al. Cohort Study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases. Epidemiology and Infection 1998;121:335-347 21 Schatz, IJ et al. Cholesterol and all-cause mortality in elderly people from honolulu heart program; A cohort study. Lancet 2001;358:351-355 and related to that last study: Catalyst | | | | | |

        |

        | | | | Catalyst At Catalyst we know that science is a dynamic force for change. Each week Catalyst brings you stories from Austr… | |

        |

        |

        Jacobs MB: “HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy and peripheral neuropathy:” Ann Inter Med. 1994 Jun 1;120(11);970 Formaglio M, Vial C: “Statin induced neuropathy: myth or reality?” Rev Neurol (Paris). 2006 Dec;162(12):1286-9.
        de Langen JJ, van Puijenbroek EP: “HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors and neuropathy: reports to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre.” Neth J Med. 2006 Oct;64(9):334-8 Law M, Rudnicka AR: “Statin safety: a systematic review.” Am J Cardiol. 2006 Apr 17;97(8A):52C-60C Gaist D, Jeppesen U, et al: “Statins and risk of polyneuropathy: a case-control study.” Neurology. 2002 May 14;58(9):1333-7 Golomb BA, McGraw JJ, Evans MA, Dimsdale JE: “Physician response to patient reports of adverse drug effects: implications for patient-targeted adverse effect surveillance.” Drug Saf. 2007;30(8):669-75 Brescianini S, Maggi S, Farchi G, Mariotti S, Di Carlo A, Baldereschi M, Inzitari D; ILSA Group. Low total cholesterol and increased risk of dying: are low levels clinical warning signs in the elderly? Results from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Jul;51(7):991-6 Schupf N, Costa R, Luchsinger J, Tang MX, Lee JH, Mayeux R. Relationship between plasma lipids and all-cause mortality in nondemented elderly. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):219-26 JAMA 01;285:2486-2497 Circulation 92;86:1046-1060 Int J Epidemilo 97;26:1191-1202 Ipidemil Infect 98;121:335-347 Psychiatry Res 07;150:105-108 Am J Psychiatr 95;152(3):419-423 J Clin Psychiatr 94;55:252-254 Am J Med 77;62:707-708 Am J Epidemiol 06;PMID16905642 [epub ahead of print] Biofactors 99;9:267-272 http://www.spacedoc.net/cause_statin_side_effects http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2009/12/31/nerve_problem-with-lipitor-and-crestor-anns-story/ http://web.mit.edu/mwpstr/www/brody/ Thincs – The International network of cholesterol skeptics | | | | | |

        |

        | | | | Thincs – The International network of cholesterol skeptics By Uffe Ravnskov Thincs – The International network of cholesterol skeptics | |

        |

        |

        http://www.controlled-trial.com/ISRCTN64637517/ Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis.
        | | | Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis.
        | |

        |

        Statins Don’t Lower Risk Of Pneumonia In Elderly | | | | | |

        |

        | | | | Statins Don’t Lower Risk Of Pneumonia In Elderly Taking popular cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, such as Lipitor® (atorvastatin), does not lower the risk of pn… | |

        |

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        http://blogs.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/2008/02/statins-and-muscle-pain.html Statins and Myoglobin: How Muscle Pain and Weakness Progress to Heart, Lung, and Kidney Failure | | | | | |

        |

        | | | | Statins and Myoglobin: How Muscle Pain and Weakness Progress to Heart, Lung…
        | |

        |

        |

        statin induced heart disease | | | statin induced heart disease | |

        |

        Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis.
        | | | Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis.
        | |

        |

        http://www.bottomlinesecrets.com/article.html?article_id=48907 http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/midlife_cholesterol_alzheimers.pdf http://newsweek.com/id/57953/page/4 http://people.csailmit.edu/seneff/alzheimers_statins.thml “S5-01-05: Multi-center, randomized, double-blind, pacebo-controlled trial of Simastatin to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease, Volume 4, Issue 4, Supplement 1, July 2008, Page T200 http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed/18525127?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=6 Just a few References… Other sources you should read include: Statin Nation II GreenMedInfo.com – 1595 articles just on statin-induced pathologies, all hard-referenced to peer-reviewed biomedical research sourced from the US National Library of Medicine.
        The Physician Desk Reference for all the statin drugs and their side effects.

      2. He’s almost certainly referring to this study (all the cholesterol ‘sceptic’ websites do)
        http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/majority-of-hospitalized-heart-75668

        This is about people admitted to hospital AFTER a heart attack. It has been known for a long time that heart attacks cause cholesterol to decline yet those websites and their self-proclaimed cholsterol experts do not seem to know (or choose not to say) that cholesterol levels measured after heart attacks will be lower than they were before the myocardial infarction occurred eg

        ‘Both total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased significantly (by 9%) in the 24 hours after admission and by 13% and 17% respectively on day 4’
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26233997

    2. Dr.Travis how can you discern the difference between the body making cholesterol and dietary cholesterol. Are you implying that the body doesn’t make enough? Would God make an imperfect system? You seem to be saying that the self made cholesterol is responsible for the high amount of cholesterol in people, when most consume large amounts of animal fat/cholesterol, which seems to be the problem.

      1. Mori;Cholesterol is NOT the problem!!  …   It’s a symptom!Dietary cholesterol is way too big of a molecule to be absorbed directly!It must be broken down to small parts before being able to be absorbed.Cholesterol is essential to life!  Without enough parts to make it the easy way, the body can resort to making it in each and every cell if needed.98% of all cholesterol in the blood is made by the liver!The other 2% is made by other organs.None comes from the diet!
        The real problem is the processed oils and fats (trans fats) that man has made and messed up God’s perfect system!
        High cholesterol is protective!  Low cholesterol is damaging!See the web site for all the references I posted.
        “Big Pharma” wants you to believe that cholesterol is the problem because they have drugs that damage your liver so it can’t make enough and lo and behold your numbers go down!  That all a big fat lie!!!So what! They make over 12 BILLION dollars a year on just Lipitor alone!!Who wouldn’t lie for that kind of money?Dr Travis

        1. “Who wouldn’t lie for that kind of money?Dr Travis”

          Peoples lying for other reasons to include those who sell pet projections that only they and their select few followers know and believe in, Most all of which, are convolutions of known standing scientific study.
          Peoples lie for varying reasons. To whit expressing studies on statin drugs safety and claiming they have a to do with high cholesterol being A OK.

          1. Another study…I will not go through each one as there are simply to many. I can assume those chosen at random speak for the lot…this a partial quote from the Lancet study on HDL…
            ” These results challenge several established views about plasma HDL cholesterol. First, these data question the concept that raising of plasma HDL cholesterol should uniformly translate into reductions in risk of myocardial infarction. We raise the strong possibility that a specific means of raising of HDL cholesterol in human beings—namely, inhibition of endothelial lipase—will not reduce risk of myocardial infarction. In animal models, inhibition or deletion of the endothelial lipase gene increases HDL cholesterol concentrations,27 but there has been debate as to the consequent effect on atherosclerosis. One report suggested that mice deleted for Lipg on an Apoe knockout genetic background have decreased aortic atherosclerosis,28 but a subsequent study showed no effect of Lipg deletion on aortic atherosclerosis.29″

            So reviewing the study itself it is specific to HDL and the raising of HDL was a large part of the issue as mentioned above Raising HDL not lowering overall cholesterol…

            This spaghetti thrown on the wall little of it appears sticking.

            Produce one study yes one study that most closely reveals your point….there must be one

        2. Except high cholesterol isn’t protective “Dr.” Travis. All of your studies showing that cholesterol is linked to lower mortality are in the elderly populations. This exact scenario is why we can’t rely on observational studies and correlation to deduce causation. You have your causes reversed and you aren’t taking confounding variables (disease) into account.

          The elderly in those studies with low cholesterol have diseases like cancer, liver disease, hypothyroidism, anemia, and malnutrition which are lowering their cholesterol and causing them to die sooner than those with normal cholesterol. The cholesterol is acting as a marker for health, not something that is protecting their health.

          1. It’s the nutritional deficiencies that cause everything from cancer, hypothyroidism, anemia, malnutrition, etc.  Cholesterol is a marker for those nutritional deficiencies… not the cause.Don’t get so wrapped up in the rut you’re in that you can’t see over the edges to the world around you.  The cholesterol myth is propagated to promote profits… not health.   If you start with a presupposed position on anything that is in error, then anything you derive from that position will be in error and totally unscientific.
            That is what the public has been fed by years of propaganda has restricted your view of the truth!

            1. Dr Travis.
              Read this that you wrote and think long and hard about it:
              “If you start with a presupposed position on anything that is in error, then anything you derive from that position will be in error and totally unscientific.”

    3. Sorry Dr Travis but this is highly misleading.

      The people who tell you this don’t mention that the cholesterol levels of heart attack patients are measured after heart attacks not before. Since heart attacks and (cardiovascular) surgery lower cholesterol levels, no wonder many heart attack patients appear to have ‘normal’ or low choleserol levels. In one study for example, coronary artery bypass surgery reduced cholesterol levels by 77%.
      http://journal.chestnet.org/article/S0012-3692(16)35525-8/pdf
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26233997
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12478816
      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002962915357529

      All this has been known for many years but the cholesterol and statin ‘experts’ that you appear to follow never mention this sort of thing.

      Just as they never mention the fact that older people tend to be sicker than younger people, experience more falls and undergo more surgery. They are also more likely to have Alzheimer’s and cancer. All of these things are known to lower cholesterol levels. I have a pile of references if you are interested.

      Since higher cholesterol is ‘normal’ in older people, the association between lower cholestreol evels and increased mortality risk in old age is understandable. For most older people declining cholesterol levels will be a marker of disease states or trauma. For a minority, they will be the result of genetic factors, a healthy diet and lifestyle and/or statin use. None of those latter things are associated with higher mortality risk in old age. Quite the opposite to my knowledge.

      The claims about statins are equally false. While dietary and lifestyle changes are far preferable to drug use, statins have been extesively studied. They reduce mortality and total adverse events. The evidence for this is overwhelming and no credible authority anywhere in the world disputes it.

  5. Seems like they need to start at pregnancy.

    THAT is when women are paying the most attention.

    After the birth, they often are sleep-deprived and are trying to figure everything else out.

  6. To anyone who watches the video, “Heart Disease May Start In The Womb”, please also scroll down & read Joe Caner’s comments in the comment section. They’re worth the read (or re-read, as the case may be).

  7. Reply to several comments:
    Cholesterol is essential to life! None of the dietary cholesterol is absorbed intact (it’s too big) but is broken down into constituent parts and then absorbed and used to re-manufacture the cholesterol needed. Therefore, in our perfect system (if man hasn’t screwed it up with manufacturing), if we don’t get enough nutrients to make enough cholesterol the easy way, the body will make it’s own the best it can to survive. (Spoiler Alert… at the bottom…)

    References for those that need them:
    KameC, Babazono A, Yamamoto E. Estimation of effect of lipid lowereing treatment on total mortality rate and its cost effectiveness determined by intervention study of hypercholesterolemia, Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2007 Jan;62(1):39-46

    Weverling-Rijnsburger, AW et al. Total cholesterol and risk of mortality in th oldest old. Lancet 1997; 350:1119-1123

    Iribarren, C et al. Cohort Study of serum total cholesterol and in-hospital incidence of infectious diseases. Epidemiology and Infection 1998;121:335-347 21

    Schatz, IJ et al. Cholesterol and all-cause mortality in elderly people from honolulu heart program; A cohort study. Lancet 2001;358:351-355

    — and related to that last study: http://www.abc.net.au/Catalyst/

    Jacobs MB: “HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy and peripheral neuropathy:” Ann Inter Med. 1994 Jun 1;120(11);970

    Formaglio M, Vial C: “Statin induced neuropathy: myth or reality?” Rev Neurol (Paris). 2006 Dec;162(12):1286-9.

    de Langen JJ, van Puijenbroek EP: “HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors and neuropathy: reports to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre.” Neth J Med. 2006 Oct;64(9):334-8

    Law M, Rudnicka AR: “Statin safety: a systematic review.” Am J Cardiol. 2006 Apr 17;97(8A):52C-60C

    Gaist D, Jeppesen U, et al: “Statins and risk of polyneuropathy: a case-control study.” Neurology. 2002 May 14;58(9):1333-7

    Golomb BA, McGraw JJ, Evans MA, Dimsdale JE: “Physician response to patient reports of adverse drug effects: implications for patient-targeted adverse effect surveillance.” Drug Saf. 2007;30(8):669-75

    Brescianini S, Maggi S, Farchi G, Mariotti S, Di Carlo A, Baldereschi M, Inzitari D; ILSA Group. Low total cholesterol and increased risk of dying: are low levels clinical warning signs in the elderly? Results from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Jul;51(7):991-6

    Schupf N, Costa R, Luchsinger J, Tang MX, Lee JH, Mayeux R. Relationship between plasma lipids and all-cause mortality in nondemented elderly. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):219-26

    JAMA 01;285:2486-2497

    Circulation 92;86:1046-1060

    Int J Epidemilo 97;26:1191-1202

    Ipidemil Infect 98;121:335-347

    Psychiatry Res 07;150:105-108

    Am J Psychiatr 95;152(3):419-423

    J Clin Psychiatr 94;55:252-254

    Am J Med 77;62:707-708

    Am J Epidemiol 06;PMID16905642 [epub ahead of print]

    Biofactors 99;9:267-272

    “Plasma HDL cholesterol and the risk of myocardial infarction: A mendelian randomization study,” The Lancet, May 17, 2012. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60312-2)

    http://www.spacedoc.net/cause_statin_side_effects

    http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2009/12/31/nerve_problem-with-lipitor-and-crestor-anns-story/

    http://web.mit.edu/mwpstr/www/brody/

    http://www.Thincs.org

    http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN64637517/

    http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/Statins_Pregnancy_Sepsis_Cancer_Heart_Failure.html#do_statins_cause_sepsis

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154289.php

    http://blogs.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/2008/02/statins-and-muscle-pain.html

    http://people.csailmit.edu/seneff/statins_muscle_damage_heart_failure.html

    http://heathread.net/statincardiomyop.htm

    http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/Statins_Pregnancy_Sepsis_Cancer_Heart_Failure.html#statins_and_heart_failure

    http://www.bottomlinesecrets.com/article.html?article_id=48907

    http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/midlife_cholesterol_alzheimers.pdf

    http://newsweek.com/id/57953/page/4

    http://people.csailmit.edu/seneff/alzheimers_statins.thml

    “S5-01-05: Multi-center, randomized, double-blind, pacebo-controlled trial of Simastatin to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease, Volume 4, Issue 4, Supplement 1, July 2008, Page T200

    http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed/18525127?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=6

    Just a few References above from many. Other sources you should read include:

    http://www.StatinNation.net

    GreenMedInfo.com – 1595 articles just on statin-induced pathologies, all hard-referenced to peer-reviewed biomedical research sourced from the US National Library of Medicine.

    The Physician Desk Reference for all the statin drugs and their listed side effects.

    “Cholesterol is Not the Culprit” by Dr. Fred Kummerow MD…
    (Spoiler Alert!: …it’s the trans fats! (hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils)

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