Animal Protein Compared to Cigarette Smoking

Image Credit: Ralf Kunze / Pixabay. This image has been modified.

Dialing Down the Grim Reaper Gene

Only about 1 in 10,000 people live to be a 100 years old. What’s their secret? I discuss this in my video Animal Protein Compared to Cigarette Smoking.

In 1993, a major breakthrough in longevity research was published about a single genetic mutation that doubled the lifespan of a tiny roundworm. Instead of all worms being dead by 30 days, the mutants lived 60 days or longer. This lifespan extension was “the largest yet reported in any organism.” This methuselah worm, a “medical marvel,” is “the equivalent of a healthy 200-year-old human.” All because of a single mutation? That shouldn’t happen. Presumably, aging is caused by multiple processes, affected by many genes. How could knocking out a single gene double lifespan?

What is this aging gene—a gene that so speeds up aging that if it’s knocked out, the animals live twice as long? It’s been called the Grim Reaper gene and is the worm equivalent of the human insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor. Mutations of that same receptor in humans may help explain why some people live to be a hundred and other people don’t.

So, is it just the luck of the draw whether we got good genes or bad ones? No, we can turn on and off the expression of these genes, depending on what we eat. Years ago I profiled a remarkable series of experiments about IGF-1, a cancer-promoting growth hormone released in excess amounts by our liver when we eat animal protein. Men and women who don’t eat meat, egg white, or dairy proteins have significantly lower levels of IGF-1 circulating within their bodies, and switching people to a plant-based diet can significantly lower IGF-1 levels within just 11 days, markedly improving the ability of women’s bloodstreams to suppress breast cancer cell growth and then kill off breast cancer cells.

Similarly, the blood serum of men on a plant-based diet suppresses prostate cancer cell growth about eight times better than before they changed their diet. However, this dramatic improvement in cancer defenses is abolished if just the amount of IGF-1 banished from their systems as a result of eating and living healthier is added back. This is one way to explain the low rates of cancer among plant-based populations: The drop in animal protein intake leads to a drop in IGF-1, which in turn leads to a drop in cancer growth. The effect is so powerful that Dr. Dean Ornish and colleagues appeared to be able to reverse the progression of early-stage prostate cancer without chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation—just a plant-based diet and lifestyle program.

When we’re kids, we need growth hormones to grow. There’s a rare genetic defect that causes severe IGF-1 deficiency, leading to a type of dwarfism. It also apparently makes you effectively cancer-proof. A study reported not a single death from cancer in about 100 individuals with IGF-1 deficiency. What about 200 individuals? None developed cancer. Most malignant tumors are covered in IGF-1 receptors, but if there’s no IGF-1 around, they may not be able to grow and spread.

This may help explain why lives appear to be cut short by eating low-carb diets. It’s not just any low-carb diet, though. Specifically, low-carb diets based on animal sources appear to be the problem, whereas vegetable-based low-carb diets were associated with a lower risk of death. But low-carb diets are high in animal fat as well as animal protein, so how do we know the saturated animal fat wasn’t killing off people and it had nothing to do with the protein? What we need is a study that follows a few thousand people and their protein intakes for 20 years or so, and sees who lives longest, who gets cancer, and who doesn’t. But, there had never been a study like that…until now.

Six thousand men and women over age 50 from across the United States were followed for 18 years, and those under age 65 with high protein intakes had a 75 percent increase in overall mortality and a fourfold increase in the risk of dying from cancer. Does it matter what type of protein? Yes. “These associations were either abolished or attenuated if the proteins were plant derived,” which makes sense given the higher IGF-1 levels in those eating excess protein.

The sponsoring university sent out a press release with a memorable opening line: “That chicken wing you’re eating could be as deadly as a cigarette.” It explained that “eating a diet rich in animal proteins during middle age makes you four times more likely to die of cancer than someone with a low-protein diet—a mortality risk factor comparable to smoking.” And when they say “low-protein diet,” what they actually mean is getting the recommended amount of protein.

“Almost everyone is going to have a cancer cell or pre-cancer cell in them at some point. The question is: Does it progress?” said one of the lead researchers. That may depend on what we eat.

“[T]he question is not whether a certain diet allows you to do well for three days,” a researcher noted, “but can it help you survive to be 100?” Excessive protein consumption isn’t only “linked to a dramatic rise in cancer mortality, but middle-aged people who eat lots of proteins from animal sources…are also more susceptible to early death in general.” Crucially, the same didn’t apply to plant proteins like beans, and it wasn’t the fat; the animal protein appeared to be the culprit.

What was the response to the revelation that diets high in meat, eggs, and dairy could be as harmful to health as smoking? One nutrition scientist replied that it was potentially dangerous because it could “damage the effectiveness of important public health messages.” Why? Because a smoker might think “why bother quitting smoking if my cheese and ham sandwich is just as bad for me?”

This reminds me of a famous Philip Morris cigarette ad that tried to downplay the risks of smoking by saying that if we think second-hand smoke is bad, increasing the risk of lung cancer 19 percent, drinking one or two glasses of milk every day may be three times as bad with a 62 percent higher risk of lung cancer. What’s more, doubling the risk is frequently cooking with oil, tripling our risk of heart disease is eating non-vegetarian, and multiplying our risk six-fold is eating lots of meat and dairy. So, they conclude, “Let’s keep a sense of perspective.” The ad goes on to say that the risk of cancer from second-hand smoke may be “well below the risk reported…for many everyday items and activities.” So, breathe deep!

That’s like saying we shouldn’t worry about getting stabbed because getting shot is so much worse. Or, if we don’t wear seatbelts, we might as well have unprotected sex. If we go bungee jumping, we might as well disconnect our smoke alarms at home. Two risks don’t make a right.

Of course, you’ll note Philip Morris stopped throwing dairy under the bus once they purchased Kraft Foods.


The IGF-1 story is so pivotal that it’s one of the first video series I ever produced for NutritionFacts.org. I’m so glad I was able to release this long-awaited update. If you want a blast from the past, watch the original series starting with Engineering a Cure.

For more parallels between the tobacco industry and the food industry, see:

What about the mobile phone industry? Does Cell Phone Radiation Cause Cancer?

For more on healthy aging and longevity, see:

It’s important to note the so-called low protein intake is actually the recommended protein intake, which is associated with a major reduction in cancer and overall mortality in middle age, under age 65. But did you notice that it says not among older individuals? All of this is covered in my video Increasing Protein Intake After Age 65.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Discuss

Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.


148 responses to “Dialing Down the Grim Reaper Gene

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Just to be sure, could someone confirm that when Dr. Greger uses the word (or quotes research using the word) “meat,” he means the flesh of _all_ animals—mammals, birds, fish/sea”food”, and (even) those creatures that creep & crawl? (Such as the roundworms mentioned above in that experiment!) Or does he only mean flesh & milk from mammals and flesh & eggs of birds? When talking to others who don’t pay much attention to what (or whom!) they eat, I find it helpful to use the word “flesh” instead of “meat” no matter what type of animal “provides” the muscle/organ substance. Yet even among many conscientious eaters, there is often confusion between the two terms “meat” and “flesh” … and thus I ask the question. I’ll appreciate any thoughtful replies. Thanks!

    1. Thorn,

      He is quoting studies and the only way to know what the person who framed the study meant is to go back to the study.

      In that case, the meat-eaters were being compared to lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegans.

      I do believe I have checked fish and that it still raised IGF-1, but I couldn’t find it when I just searched PubMed, so I think it was mentioned in one of the studies Dr. Greger cited, but I don’t have time to search it out.

      Generally, when they use a different wording when “fish” is moved to the vegetarian column. It would be pesce-vegetarian. Fowl is always included in the meat category. Fish is the only meat which moves between the two categories.

      1. Are you guys looking for something that give you “permission” to consume fish? Haven’t you heard about the mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB’s). plastics, & pharmaceuticals that are found in the tissues of farmed & wild fish? The list goes on. What about depleting the oceans of aquatic life? There’s nothing in the animal kingdom that your body needs that you can’t get from a healthy plant-based lifestyle. I would recommend “Killer Fish” by Brian Clement for a real education on fish. Dr. Gregor rocks – love the great info he provides!

        1. Thanks, but I’m not looking for permission.

          Says Dr. Weil: “If wild Alaskan salmon is too pricey for your food budget, you can buy canned sockeye (red) salmon in the supermarket; it’s all wild. It will give you the same omega-3 fatty acids found in fresh or frozen Alaskan wild salmon.”

          https://www.drweil.com/diet-nutrition/food-safety/how-can-you-tell-if-salmon-is-really-wild/

          P.S. You probably meant to type “Greger,” not “Gregor.”

          1. Omega 3s are also in seeds like chia, flax, and hemp, and even walnut and brussel sprouts, so fish aren’t even necessary to get this type of healthy fatty acid.

    2. Dear Thorn324,

      The way I break it down is:

      “There are only two types of food on the planet…plant, or animal.”

      It maybe oversimplified, but it’s easier to understand when I’m explaining to others.

  2. “Men and women who don’t eat meat, egg white, or dairy proteins have significantly lower levels of IGF-1 circulating within their bodies”
    – – – – –

    Does this imply egg yolks are good to go? Why weren’t they included in this study?

      1. The video has a graph showing higher protein = longer life in cancer patients. He completely ran away from the results diverting his discussion to RDA, effects of protein on muscle building, etc. So the question remains, why does high protein consumption in old adults possibly optimize health span and longevity? He did not answer the question.

        1. He has a separate video on this subject

          https://nutritionfacts.org/video/increasing-protein-intake-age-65/

          The short answer is that nobody knows.

          The long answer is that it may be cause and effect or ut may be just another case of ‘correlation doesn’t equal causation. Older people are more likely to be malnourished, have poor appettites and poor dentition. And low incomes (so their ability to spend money on lobster, salmon and steak is much less than younger employed people). Low protein intake may just be a marker for bad teeth, poor appettites, poverty etc.which would explain the association with increased mortality. More studies are needed to find out the answer.

          I’m personally sceptical that there is a causal relationship but as I say nobody knows for sure.

          1. Dr Michael Greger makes the statement ‘Two (lung cancer) risks (smoking and dairy consumption) dont make a right’. Giving credence to the big myth that dairy causes lung cancer.

            https://nutritionfacts.org/2019/07/11/dialing-down-the-grim-reaper-gene

            However, is Dr Greger simply channelling ‘Philip Morris’ when making this statement? Make up your own mind …based upon the evidence. The following is a synthesisation of current evidence from pooled analyses/meta-analyses and systematic reviews:

            Seven meta-analyses explored associations between dairy products and risk of lung cancer. All seven meta-analyses showed non-significant associations between ‘all-dairy products’, milk, low-fat milk, yogurt or cheese consumption and risk of lung cancer.
            https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/1/e023625

            This is confirmed by the following meta-analysis from China:

            ‘Our study indicates that intake of dairy products or calcium was not statistically associated with the risk of lung cancer. This negative finding provides a conclusive answer to the disease association issue based on current evidence, and suggests that further efforts should be made to find other nutritional risk factors for lung cancer’.

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753428/

            1. Sound like weak science to me – meta analyses of observational studies aren’t usually cnsidered to provide ‘conclusive ‘ answers to anything.

              That said, I got the impression that Greger was merely sarcastically quoting Philip Morris.

              In any case, high fat dairy seems to significantly associated with increased CVD risk

              ‘What did predict risk of cardiovascular disease was “fat swapping.” When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.’

              https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

        1. Barb, I’m not Paul, but thanks for that interesting link :-).

          Aside: In general, I doubt anyone needs to eat any animal protein, except perhaps for some subjective psychological benefit. My 100% WFP diet provides more than 1g/kg body weight per day, usually around 1.3g/kg/d, more than enough even with strength training. It would be difficult to get less b/c it comes from beans/legumes incl. soy and nuts/seeds.

          1. By the way, if you look at the interesting article posted by Darryl, you will see that it states “In light of these aging-retardant, pro-longevity effects of protein- restricted diets observed in rodents, why then do low protein intakes (as a fraction of total calories) predict increased mortality risk in aging humans? One possibility is that, at a time in life when sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and frailty pose a growing risk to health and survival, the anti-anabolic effects of protein restriction become counterproductive. In a prospective study targeting older adults, those whose baseline energy-adjusted protein intake was in the top quintile lost 40 % less lean mass during 3-year follow-up than those whose protein intake had been in the bottom quintile (Houston et al. 2008). Other studies have correlated higher protein intakes in the elderly with higher bone mass, or, prospectively, less loss of bone mass and lower fracture risk (Kerstetter et al. 2000; Rapuri et al. 2003; Hannan et al. 2000; Misra et al. 2011). There is a growing consensus among gerontologists that protein requirements are higher in elderly people than in younger people (Bauer et al. 2013).”

            In other words, there seems to be quite a few studies indicating higher protein in the elderly is lifespan promoting. Veggies are great but I don’t think they are the entire story.

            1. As each cup of ‘Black Beans’ contributes to 30% of your daily protein needs, just one more cup of ‘Black Beans’ per day.

              1. Right. Beans are great all around. I eat 1.5 cups per day (following a suggestion made by Dr. Greger I have learned to eat them with my oats in the am).

                1. I don’t eat beans every day (but I do have a slab of organic nothing-added peanut butter, or almond butter) on toasted sourdough bread every day at lunchtime. This passes as “legume,” yes? At least in the peanut gallery.

                  Every couple of weeks, after having them soak in a huge pot overnight, I cook me up some beans. Black, red, chickpeas, black-eyed peas or whatever. Start them early in the morning (electric stove), turn off the burner when I head out and about…and then when I return later I continue to (slow) cook them. No hassle, I make sure they’re thoroughly cooked. There’s enough of the little suckers to last quite a few meals. Some of it I leave “down,” and the rest I put in glass jars and stick up in the freezer.

                  I’m having me some beans for dinner tonight. *_^

                  1. YR, Interesting. I never think to freeze beans. Should try it. But I do make a lot of split pea soup and lentil soup (these are my wife’s primary carb as it helps keep her blood sugar levels down unlike whole grains).

            2. 言語学者 (gengo-gakusha)

              My thought also: That “at a time in life when sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and frailty pose a growing risk to health and survival”…, could it be that the ‘elderly’ can benefit from a little more IGF-1 as do growing children?

            3. gengo-gakusha, yes, I was reading the article and also Darryl’s comments and I am mulling all of this over. First though, I must be doing something right… I have been in shape most of my life, but I have more muscle now than ever. It’s almost embarrassing. I use the word veggies loosely to describe my whole diet really. Grains, beans and lentils, veg and fruit, coffee and tea. Whether or not adding fish would be advantageous or not is something to consider, but in the meantime, I will focus on getting a bit more beans in.

              I think YR is doing great with her yoga. One of the features of the Okinawan people’s lifestyle was that they continued to sit down on the floor and got up many times a day. Staying mobile is sooo important.

              1. Barb, if it ain’t broke, why fix it?

                Like the guy who fell off the top of the Empire State Building said to those who looked with horror from their office windows as he catapulted to the sidewalk below: “I’m okay SO far!” :-D

              2. Barb, It sounds like you have a great lifestyle. More muscle? Nothing to be embarrassed about there!

                I agree YR ‘s yoga is a great form of exercise. Balance is also something to be worked on. But I am wondering if she also alternates legs when she uses her rebounder the way she does arms with her dumbbells.

                1. Hmmm…. Trouble with that, I’d have to take one foot off the rebounder…jump into the sky, you might say….and thus tempt fate. One of my affirmations is, “No more falls, no more broken bones.”

                  My bod is happy with the way I’m treating it now. Both feet stay put, and bounce, bounce bounce.

                  *Heading out…..*

            4. ‘there seems to be quite a few studies indicating higher protein in the elderly is lifespan promoting. Veggies are great but I don’t think they are the entire story.’

              This implies that veggies and protein are two different things. There many veggie (ie plant) sources of protein.

              Most of those studies claiming increased protein intake in the elderly are lifespan promoting are observational studies and subject to confounding. Just like studies that find that being overweight in the elderly is lifespan promoting eg
              During a mean follow-up of 3.46 ± 1.87 years (median 4.2 years [range 1.6 to 5.34 years]), 248 patients died. Those who died had lower baseline BMI than those who survived (24.1 ± 4.2 vs 26.3 ± 4.6 kg/m2; p < .0001). The age-adjusted mortality rate decreased from 24 to 9.6 per 100 patient-years from the highest to lowest BMI quartile (p < .001). BMI was associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality even after controlling for sex. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model identified that even after controlling for male gender, age, renal failure, and diabetes mellitus, which increased the risk of all-cause mortality, elevated BMI decreased the all-cause mortality risk.'

              https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2173925/&#039;

              1. >>This implies that veggies and protein are two different things

                Well, actually they are two different things. Vegetables contain protein as a component among many other things, so they couldn’t be identical. And of course I realize that vegetables contain protein, it the discussion was in the context of eating lots of vegetables while maintaining a low protein intake.
                In the kind of informal ‘give and take’ typical of this forum, I think it was quite clear what I was getting at, so I won’t belabor it. Your rather odd comment above aside, I get your general point and although not quite convinced, will keep it in mind.

                1. Correction: “And of course I realize that vegetables contain protein. The discussion was in the context of eating lots of vegetables while maintaining a low protein intake.”

                2. Perhaps I should add that my discussion with Deb was not meant as support for eating animal food, which I oppose. All my protein comes from plant foods, especially beans/legumes, nuts/seeds and grains. My

                3. To be honest, that statement gave me the impression that the two were mutually exclusive, which was the point that I was trying (poorly) to make..

                  When I wrote the comment, I was thinking about the general perception out there that meat, fish, eggs and dairy foods are protein. And about that very common popular question about how do vegetarians/vegans get their protein?

                  The meat and dairy industries have done an excellent job of equating their products with protein in the public mind. I’m uneasy when we here fall into the same trap.

  3. Seems low protein results apply to middle age and younger only. Here’s the last conclusion statement from the study Doc cites:

    “These results suggest that low protein intake during middle age followed by moderate to high protein consumption in old adults may optimize health span and longevity.”

    So Doc, why is higher protein for older folks beneficial?

    1. I recently listened to an interview talking about it.

      Older people process protein less efficiently.

      Older people tend to stop eating enough calories. They said that it was because of things like trouble chewing and swallowing and loss of the sense of taste for most foods. (They lose most taste buds except they can taste sweets is what experience tells me)

      Anyway, they have done studies and older people lose the ability to do functional tasks if they don’t have enough protein. It isn’t so much disease, but the quality of life changes dramatically.

      1. There was an exception if the person had kidney problems and it didn’t help men in one study, but it particularly helped people who had hip or knee replacements because it is about muscle loss.

    2. Sufficient IGF1 is required to maintain body composition as its involved in glucose, fat and protein metabolism. Older people, especially those over 80, can have very little IGF-1 Too little could result in frailty, among other things. Cf. Victor Longo’s The Longevoty Diet for some discussion.

      1. Gengo,

        Yes, too little IGF-1 can be a problem in elderly because they tend to not eat enough calories, but too high IGF-1 was still also an issue even in elderly males in their 70’s with risk for cardiovascular events. Too low and too high both were risks, but one article I read said that when they look at too low causing problems, the people often are eating few calories, but those calories tend to come from refined carbs.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258605/

        I am not sure that WFPB without refined carbs would have the same risk factor regarding too high or too low IGF-1 because, after a certain age, everybody is low in IGF-1. The question would be whether the Whole Food Plant-Based Adventists would need to eat meat to raise their IGF-1 after a certain age or if IGF-1 would raise the cardiovascular risk for them.

        Meaning, can they just eat more proteins from plant sources and maintain function or is it IGF-1?

        1. Personally, I avoid them, because they appear to interfere with benefits if methionine reduction in experiment.

          There are other plausible reasons why low protein intake creates problems in the elderly and not younger groups. For one, the elderly people tend to be more sedentary, and consume fewer calories overall, so one can imagine less than 10% energy out of a 1500 kcal diet would put one into generalized protein insufficiency, compromising immune response and bringing frailty.

          Also worth noting that the 10% energy from protein is remarkably low. Under 7% of the subjects in the cited study ate at this level, and most whole food plant based diets would be planted well above. Perhaps WFPB diets centered around particularly low protein staples like cassava might be under 10%. I strongly suspect that a <10% protein diet in the NHANES III cohort eating American foods would be heavy in refined oils, added sugars, and alcohol for calories, and this may confound the results.

          A more athletic elderly person, eating plenty of calories from say whole-grain pasta, would be pretty close to that 10% threshold, yet at no danger of generalized protein insufficiency. They also wouldn't face issues posed by the oils, sugar and alcohol required to get far below it.

          1. This is such useful information Darryl! I, along with many others on this forum, fit into the wfpb aging very active/athletic group. I eat really well, but not much over 1500 to 1800 calories. When I think of low protein in diets of the elderly, tea, toast and jam comes to mind, not beans and greens of the wfpb menu. Anyway, thank you again!

      1. McCarty is a prolific writer and supplement entrepeneur while DiNicolantonio is an equally prolific author and committed saturated fat/cholesterol/sodium sceptic. Tthey have co-authored many provocative/speculative hypotheses. Fascinatingly, McCarty appears to favour a ‘vegan’ diet while DiNicolantonio is a very well-known keto/low carb advocate. Odd bedfellows indeed. Anyway i’d suggest that a good dose of caution is warranted when considering any and all of their speculations.

        Interesting hypothesis on their part of course but low protein intake as a consequence of poor appettite, poverty, dentition, malnourishment retc in the elderly could equally well (and more simply) explain the association with increased mortality.

        https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/James_DiNicolantonio
        http://catalyticlongevity.org/mark-mccarty/

      2. As always I place a high value on Daryl’s posts. I just wanted to note from the study listed:
        “Mark McCarty owns a small nutraceutical company, one of whose products contains N-acetylcysteine; James DiNicolantonio has no conflicts of interest.”

    3. Hi, paul! It is sometimes recommended that older adults consume more protein because older adults tend to be less active than younger ones, and therefore consume fewer calories. In order to ensure adequate nutrient intake with fewer calories, it is necessary to increase the nutrient density of the diet. This may not be an issue for more active seniors with healthy appetites. I hope that helps!

  4. Wow – I am convinced this applies, not just to cancer, but possibly all tumors. I was diagnosed with acromegaly 3 years ago. 2-1/2 years ago I had a heart attack and became plant-based vegan. I had been vegetarian since childhood (when I found out what meat was!), but was still eating eggs and some cheese. I had the pituitary tumor removed 2 years ago. Since then my IGF-1 has slowly gone down to normal without medication and the tumor has not returned. I believe that is because I have not been feeding it. It was not getting much animal protein before the heart attack, which is likely why I am still alive and for 2-1/2 years it has got zero. Most acromegalics don’t live past 50 – I am 76.

  5. This is somewhat in agreement with Dr Longo’s Longevity Diet, which in addition to plant protein, it advocates for low mercury fish 3 times a week for those under 65 (in order to hit 0.31-0.36 g of protein/pound of body weight, with at least 30g in one sitting). Does anyone know how to get 30g of whole plant protein in one sitting?

    Dr Longo also recommends adding eggs and cheese if you are over 65 in order to meet the greater protein requirements of the elderly (I do not recall if he gave a daily amount for this).

    The study used in this blog says:-“high protein intake was associated with reduced cancer and overall mortality in respondents over 65, but a 5-fold increase in diabetes mortality across all ages”

    So what are people over 65 supposed to eat? If they eat high protein, they reduce cancer mortality but increase their chances of getting diabetes! Can plants alone meet the high protein requirements when of the elderly?

    1. I’ll stick with Dr. Gregor – there are plenty of vegetable sources of protein that do not contain added sugar. The natural sugar on fruit and vegetables will never give you diabetes, but animal protein will contribute to it.

    2. “If they eat high protein, they reduce cancer mortality but increase their chances of getting diabetes!”
      – – – –

      Maybe “high” should be defined here. Just how much is considered “high”?

      1. Thanks for posting that, Barb!

        I watched that recently, but already didn’t remember that vegetable intake was the answer for muscle wasting in the elderly.

        “Is there anything we can do, diet-wise, to protect our aging muscles? Vegetables. Consuming recommended levels of vegetables was associated with cutting the odds basically in half of low muscle mass. Why? The alkalizing effects of vegetables may neutralize the mild metabolic acidosis that occurs with age, and, you know, it may be that little extra acid in our body that facilitates the breakdown of muscle.

        I’ve talked about this before, how muscle wasting appears to be an adaptive response, to acidosis. We appear to get a chronic low-grade acidosis with advancing age because our kidneys start to decline, and because we may be eating an acid-promoting diet—which means a diet high in fish, pork, chicken, and cheese, and low in fruits and vegetables.”

        1. I think I was stumped by the protein and cancer risk flipping at 65.

          I remember pausing and trying to think it through.

          I wish they had differentiated between plant and animal protein for that study.

          1. Trying to understand why the protein and cancer would flip at 65. I am happy that it didn’t say IGF-1, which is what I thought they were talking about. It is protein increases IGF-1 and causes cancer in the young people. Low protein – without the IGF-1 spike – causes it in the elderly. Acidity? Could the PH Miracle guy have had a point? Is the cancer growing by something other than IGF-1?

            “So, the so-called low protein intake is actually the recommended protein intake—associated with a major reduction in cancer, and overall mortality in middle age, under age 65. But note, it says not in older populations. When it comes to diabetes deaths, lower overall protein intake is associated with a longer life at all ages. But for cancer, it seems to flip around age 65.”

            It seems to flip around age 65?!?!

            Okay, backing up. BEFORE 65, eating high animal protein increases the risk of death from Diabetes 73-fold and moderate levels increases the risk of death from Diabetes by 23% and at the baseline none of the people started with Diabetes, so it is get it and die faster.

            Okay, I just saw it. The graph was protein and cancer, not IGF-1. The study was talking IGF-1, but that chart was about protein.

            Sorry, some of us have to watch the videos and read the transcripts and then watch the video and pause at every chart.

            Okay, so he covered the RDA and there was no difference between the RDA for protein for young people or old people, so the RDA should be the same. Plus, adding protein doesn’t help improve muscle mass.

            And, Gengo, the Japanese study shows that if the elderly are exercising, they only lost a trivial amount of muscle mass and some of them gained it.

            1. Okay, low protein is never a risk for death from Diabetes, but after age 65 low protein is a risk for Cancer, even though low protein should seem to lower IGF-1 and AGE should ALSO lower IGF-1.

              What affects Cancer, but NOT Diabetes?

              Wait, okay, if they are low protein, they have to be low meat and vegetable.

              So, what is left, oil? Refined carbs?

              But refined carbs would affect Diabetes death, right?

              Some sort of drink like Boost?

              1. Still, what is driving the Cancer growth if not IGF-1?

                Methionine? Acid? Something toxic in Boost or Ensure?

                Ensure: Water, Corn Maltodextrin, Sugar, Blend of Vegetable Oils (Canola, Corn), Milk Protein Concentrate, Cocoa Powder (Processed with Alkali), Soy Protein Isolate.

                Boost: Water, Glucose Syrup, Sugar, Milk Protein Concentrate, and Less than 2% of Vegetable Oil (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn), ‡Vitamins and Minerals, Soy Protein Isolate, Gum Acacia, Fructooligosaccharides, Inulin (from Chicory), Cellulose Gel and Gum, Salt, Soy Lecithin, Carrageenan, Natural Flavor, Stevia Leaf

                1. Okay, so my hypothesis is that people who are elderly are told to take Boost or Ensure when they start losing too much muscle mass and that Boost and Ensure don’t kill people who have Diabetes, but they kill the people who have Cancer, even if they are still low in protein and perhaps low in IGF-1.

                  It is hard to tell which ingredient to point to, but I will say oil.

                  1. I can point to the soy isolate which could raise the IGF-1.

                    Milk proteins cause Cancer to grow has been shown in other studies.

                    So, I have to point to all of it.

                    1. Are there any researchers in the house?

                      Are we killing our elderly people with these drinks????

                      Boost, Ensure, do you have people listening? Could we have a chocolate vegetables drink? Maybe with some beans so that there could still be some fiber?

                    2. Okay

                      Theory 1 acid
                      Theory 2 something in the nutritional drinks
                      Theory 3 is the hyper Homocysteine thing from not eating Folate or supplanting B12
                      Theory 4 Supplements being given because people aren’t eating enough.

                    3. I forgot

                      Sedentary people who aren’t getting Vitamin D at all.

                      Does Vitamin D affect Cancer and not Diabetes?

                    4. I don’t like the supplement answer unless it has to do with low protein makes people vulnerable, but I like the low Vitamin D one because a vegan woman went carnivore to finally raise her Vitamin D even though she was getting sunlight, so higher protein might have more Vitamin D.

                    5. The change having a start date means that the body is the clue and that puts the muscles wasting higher on my list. I have to see if homocysteine levels are related to age.

                    6. Homocysteine does increase around age 65, but it is associated with both cancer and with stroke and heart attack which are Diabetes mortality things.

                      It would have to affect cancer more than it affects Diabetes-related ways to die.

                    7. Deb, Milk proteins cause cancer?

                      Dairy consumption – Cancer Associations?

                      A pooled analyses/meta-analyses and systematic review:

                      1. Oesophageal cancer, no association (4 meta-analysis), or reduced risk (2)
                      2. Gastric cancer, no association (10 meta-analysis, or reduced risk (1)
                      3. Pancreatic cancer – no association (8 meta-analysis)
                      4. Colorectal cancer – no association ( 20 meta-analysis), or reduced risk (9)
                      5. Prostate cancer – no association (13 meta-analysis), reduced risk (2), and increased risk (13)
                      6. Ovarian cancer – no association (26 meta-analysis), increased risk (3)
                      7. Endometrial cancer – increased risk (1 meta-analysis)
                      8. Breast Cancer – no association (8 meta-analysis), reduced risk (3), increased risk (2)
                      9. Bladder Cancer – no association (5 meta-analysis), reduced risk (3), increased risk (1)
                      10. Renal Cancer – no association (1 meta-analysis)
                      11. Lung Cancer – no association (7 meta-analysis)
                      12. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – no association (5 meta-analysis), increased risk (4 meta-analysis)
                      13. Multiple myeloma – no association (2 meta-analysis)
                      14. All-cause mortality – no association (1 meta-analysis)
                      15. Cancer-specific mortality – no association (2 meta-analysis), significant decreased risk (1)

                      https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/1/e023625

                      Like it or not, this summarises the entire research effort in this domain. What can we conclude from it?
                      1. These figures demonstrate the risk of getting cancer from dairy consumption is probably less than drinking tap water (trihalomethanes).
                      2. Milk consumption most probably reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (note, where milk is in direct contact with our insides)
                      3. Whilst the evidence is inconclusive, milk consumption should be moderated in elderly males with a family history of prostate cancer. As a precaution.
                      4. Milk does not increase the risk of lung cancer, as claimed by Dr Greger.
                      5. There is either no association or a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, and cancer-specific mortality with dairy consumption. Given the nature of scientific research, these are the numbers which should be of principle interest to those objectively interested in this subject. Those with a different agenda will instead religiously cherry-pick studies better coinciding with their belief systems. Just to maintain the myth.

                      Phil.

                    8. Phil

                      Deb’s comment concerned milk proteins not dairy foods per se. In any case observational studies like those you quote are vulnerable to confounding – eg if dairy replaces other more carcinogenic foods (eg red meat, alcohol etc) you would expect to find a zero or even ‘protective’ effect.

                      That said, I too am sceptical about the casein switches cancer on and off claim, It is bases on experiements in rats fed highly carcinogenic agents. How relevant this is to humans not fed toxic agents is debatable. As far as I know, the only effect for casein shown in humans concerns prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality.

                      In any case, high fat dairy seems to significantly associated with increased CVD risk and this is a good reason to avoid it

                      ‘What did predict risk of cardiovascular disease was “fat swapping.” When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.’

                      https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

                      If people are going to eat dairy,then, low fat dairy seems the safest option (and this is what most dietary guidelines recommend) although even this would probably be a no-no for men given it would necessarily be higher in protein (as a % of total calories) and therefore potentially up protstate cancer risk).

                2. Deb, when I saw Milk Protein Concentrate on the list of ingredients, I immediately thought of T Colin Campbell and how he could turn cancer growth on and off by the amount of casein he fed mice.

                  I sure hope I never have to consume either of those products!

                  1. Yes, I thought the same thing about the oil and the milk and I believe soy isolates increased cancer, too. It is a cancer stimulating drink. The question is whether people start drinking it around 65 and I would have said 75 or 80 is when doctors start pushing it, but they have pushed things like Glucerna and eggs on my cousin when they were worried about his muscle loss at exactly 65, so maybe muscle loss increases right then if you aren’t exercising and eating your vegetables.

                    I looked up sedentary life and sleep disruption as independent factors and I think sedentary life fits in it. Sleep disruption is a factor with cancer, but low protein doesn’t necessarily fit. Though that is just based on too much protein at night can disrupt sleep. Not sure if too low nutrition would be the factor in the too low protein group and if something is missing for production of melatonin or something.

                    https://www.roswellpark.org/media/news/sedentary-lifestyle-drastically-increases-risk-dying-cancer

                    https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/lack-of-sleep-and-cancer-is-there-a-connection

                    1. The question would be if sleep disturbances have a sudden escalation at age 65.

                      And whether low protein becoming a factor is only in the sedentary group. If the group exercises does that change the protein risk factor?

                    2. I think the Boost and Ensure intake is encouraged in response to actual muscle wasting from sedentary lifestyle and not eating vegetables, this would probably also be related to the homocysteine from lack of vegetables and people would also be pressured to supplement. Or Boost and Ensure are how they supplement, I think.

              2. Here’s an example meal that satisfies the protein requirements….

                The DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.8grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, or 0.36 grams per pound which averages to
                56 grams per day for the average sedentary man. 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman.

                Breakfast:
                Peanut free Nuttzo = 6 grams / 2 tbsp
                4 tbsp = 12 grams

                Slice of whole grain toast = 4 grams add banana, or eat with apple slices.

                Lunch or Dinner: Lentil soup = 8 grams/cup 1.5 cups = 12 grams
                +
                Salad with pumkin seed, sunflower seed and/or walnut, lemon tahini dressing = 13 grams

                Lunch or Dinner: Hummus = 1 cup = 19 grams + carrots

                Total grams (not including the Essential amino acids in veggies or snacks) ~ 60 grams

        2. Deb, I don’t think it is a complete answer. The body is energy efficient – if you do not keep challenging it with resistance exercise, you will lose muscle over long enough periods of time, unless you had little to begin with. Same thing for aerobic exercise and aerobic capacity (VO2 Max), required to keep the brain sharp. When I stopped heavy weight lifting for several years after age 60, I lost a lot of muscle but was eating lots of veggies. It’s not easy getting it back at age 72. Use it or lose it.

          1. You are talking heavy lifting and re-building muscles and I know that Dr. Greger encourages exercise, but the studies are about whether people can do functional things like getting dressed and that is what is related to protein. In Japan, there is a study where the men’s muscles went up, and, yes, that was entirely related to the fact that they suddenly wanted more muscle and started exercising, but the studies are not about that.

            But that doesn’t change that certain dietary patterns have been results for not losing muscle.

            You probably would have lost more muscle if you had been eating a lot of animal products and no vegetables.

            1. Deb, Studies are about different things. In my case it was about heavy lifting, but what I said is not restricted to that. If all you do is lift some groceries a few times per week and walk a mile per day at a lazy pace, you will lose both muscle and strength as well as aerobic capacity. Where I work out, there’s a retired physician in his mid-80s – he does a pretty hard work out but with lighter weights and you can tell he’s in good shape for his age. If he stopped, I am quite confident that over several years, he would lose a lot of his physical capacity but no doubt, still be able to tie his shoes and stand up. If that’s what someone is interested in, then fine. But anyone interested in actually maintaining the physical capacity of someone decades younger, then that person will have to work for it.

            2. Deb, Here is an overview by Dr. Mirkin, well-known sports medicine physician, on the benefits of exercising as one ages, and in particular the value of vigorous exercise and interval training (intensity trumps duration). Dr.
              Mirkin is not talking about slow walks and grocery shopping.

              http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/cyclists-age-better.html ” Two exciting studies show that older men and women who have cycled for many years do not have the markers of aging found in non-exercising people (*Aging Cell*, March 8, 2018). Their muscle size and strength, amount of body fat, levels of hormones such as testosterone, and blood cholesterol levels were close to those of much younger people. Their maximal ability to take in and use oxygen was more like that of people in their twenties than in non-exercisers of their own age group. Incredibly, the cyclists’ immunity did not show the deterioration that is expected with aging. These studies focused on cyclists, but similar results would probably be found with other types of sustained exercise. ”
              ____ https://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/preventing-loss-of-muscle-with-aging.html

              * “I*f you don’t exercise vigorously, expect to lose muscle size and strength as you age. Between 40 and 50 years of age, you lose about eight percent of your muscle size. This loss increases to 15 percent per decade after age 75. The people who lose the most muscle usually are the least active, exercise the least and are the ones who die earliest. Older people who lose muscles are four times more likely to be disabled, have difficulty walking and need walkers or other mechanical devices to help them walk (*Am J Epidemiol*, 1998; 147(8):755–763). The authors say “Exercise decreases body fat and obesity, increases muscle strength, improves balance, gait, and mobility, decreases likelihood of falling, improves psychological health, reduces arthritis pain, and heart attacks, osteoporosis, cancer, and diabetes.” ______ https://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/how-exercise-prolongs-your-life.html “We have abundant data to show that people who exercise live longer than those who do not exercise. Now we have the Copenhagen City Heart Study which begins to examine which sports are associated with living the longest (*Mayo Clinic Proceedings*, Sept 2018;93(12)). People who played tennis lived an average 9.7 years longer than people who do not exercise, compared to badminton (6.2 years), soccer (4.7 years), cycling (3.7 years), swimming (3.4 years), jogging (3.2 years), calisthenics (3.1 years), and health club activities (1.5 years). This study followed 8,577 people for up to 25 years. Twelve percent were primarily sedentary while 66 percent reported exercising regularly. Those who exercised only occasionally were not included in the data.”

              1. Gengo,

                Yes, I have looked at that and I wasn’t disagreeing with you.

                I don’t know if you can exercise and not have to worry about the acidosis in elder years. You still would have to worry about high IGF-1 even in your mid-70’s. Can you just work out and not even have to worry about any of the rest of it? Do the vegetables matter if you are lifting weights? I suspect understand the vegetable mechanism is part of it.

                ” Consuming recommended levels of vegetables was associated with cutting the odds basically in half of low muscle mass.”

                Cutting the odds of low muscle mass in 1/2 just by eating vegetables is the emphasis.

                I am emphasizing the vegetables because some of us have no idea how much protein we eat most of the time, but we do understand whether we are eating vegetables or not.

                1. My point is we are talking about whether people need more IGF-1 or protein or whether they can eat more vegetables.

                  Almost nobody probably keeps track of their IGF-1 and there is still a risk of health problems if they are too high in IGF-1 at 75, so it would be infinitely hard to figure that factor out.

                  But, yes, if there is an age where they can just eat the 15 servings of tofu, it has to wait at least until after 75.

                  As far as keeping track of protein, the elderly right now are not computer literate for the most part. The ones here are and the ones here are the most likely to be the ones keeping track of protein. Some of us are trying to just keep track of whole foods and don’t want to do the food journals. I used to do them and they took up so much of the day.

                  I liked Pritikin’s answer that if you are eating enough calories, you are getting enough protein. Is that no longer true for the elderly? If they are eating enough calories, is protein still a problem? Because when they talk about it, they always say that they aren’t eating enough calories.

                  There are calorie supplements. If it is calories.

          2. “When I stopped heavy weight lifting for several years after age 60, I lost a lot of muscle but was eating lots of veggies. It’s not easy getting it back at age 72. Use it or lose it.”
            – – – –
            I agree, gengo. I think the reason I have muscle-y hands is because I’ve been playing the piano nearly every day since I was six years old. Wherever I’ve lived over the years, I made sure I had me one of those! For a short time in NYC when I couldn’t afford a piano, I bought a steel-string (ouch!) guitar, and learned how to play that. (I graduated to a nylon-string.)

            Then there’s the yoga exercises I’ve been doing for “covers mouth” years. Let’s say many. Every day, poses like the plough and shoulder stand, etc. Am very grateful I kept that up all this time too. Including my good buddy the rebounder, of course. Plus getting out and walking or going somewhere every day. These things we have to keep doing, or yes, we “lose it.”

            1. Forgot to say I also lift 8-lb weights every day. One arm one day, the other the next. Gotta alternate, not do both arms every day.

        3. “which means a diet high in fish, pork, chicken, and cheese, and low in fruits and vegetables.”
          – – – –

          Once again I wonder: What do they call “high”? Are they’re saying all those items three times a day, seven days a week? Yes, I agree this would not only be high in animal protein, but also extremely gagworthy. :-(

          What about if we had, say, fish two times a week with occasional 1/2 cups of organic unsweetened yogurt? Would that be considered high?

          Naturally (in my case, anyway), this would also include LOTS of veggies and fruits…some whole grains too.

          — Old Crone (*_^)

        4. At least 50% of ‘muscle wasting’ is NOT USING THEM. Dr. Greger in his daily dozen recommends at least one hour of vigorous exercise EVERDAY.

    3. Al, I follow Dr, Longo’s advice to have about 30 grams of protein after a run or fairly long resistance exercise. A few options for me, are black soybean spaghetti that has 25 grams of protein per serving. Combine that with some high protein veggies for the rest. And yes, I know some consider that too processed.
      For me after running or hiking for miles, especially in this heat, I appreciate having this option.
      Tempeh is another food I have routinely. Lentils combined with quinoa works also.
      Just some examples.
      Realize that a serving of foods like broccoli, asparagus, spinach etc. have about 2 grams of protein each. Good breads made from whole grain have at least 3 grams a slice.
      Basically whole grains plus legumes combined with other vegetables will get you there.
      I do then limit protein in other meals, eat large salads, veggie soups, etc.

      1. Thanks Marilyn.
        Like you, I also limit protein amounts in all except 1 meal.
        I have tried to stick with whole plant sources but I could use a break from the tofu smoothies and hummus! I will look into the soybean spaghetti .

  6. I wonder if this is the whole story. I am one of 5 children. Two of my sisters died in their early 40s from cancer yet my mother is still alive at 92 and my father lived to 83.

    1. Roderick,

      Yes, on my mother’s side of the family, I have a family where my great-grandmother and grandmother and my great-grandmother’s sisters and grandmother’s sisters all had longevity. Many of the males and my mother died in their 50’s. Heart attack for a few, but cancer for most of them. My mother’s father died of cancer the year she was born. My mother’s grandfather dropped dead of a heart attack at a friend’s house. My mother died of cancer at 53 years old.

      I can say that the older generations did go through many seasons of calorie restriction and animal food restriction. I have shared that before, but I will share it again because it may help you process your family if there is anything similar.

      The older women came from seasons of rationing, like the Depression and WWII and poverty until maybe the 1950’s. They didn’t have refrigeration and didn’t eat meat all of the time. They gardened and canned vegetables and ate fruit and vegetables as the main part of their meals. They didn’t have big grocery stores or convenience stores or microwaves or microwave dinners. They didn’t have processed food at all. Christmas, the “special gift” was an orange. They were not eating a lot of salt or sugar until the 1960’s and were not gaining 5 pounds on treats at the holidays. Breakfast was slow cook oatmeal and berries or popcorn in milk and I think it was my grandmother’s best friend who started the popcorn thing. Dinner was often as simple as baked bean sandwiches and I have since talked to other people whose parents were from that generation and they mentioned the same baked bean sandwiches, which did not carry on until my generation.

      They never embraced the microwave dinners, nor did they spend all of their money on happy meals at McDonalds.

      The men smoked and drank and had other risk factors but the women up until my mother lived long lives.

      I grew up eating a ridiculous amount of processed food and junk food, but I became allergic to meat when I was a young person and have outlived my mother’s age, but I don’t think I am going to outlive those funny women who made me laugh all of my youth. My great-grandmother was the funniest woman I have ever known and I am so happy that she lived into my 30’s.

      1. What is interesting to me is that I was no meat, but every type of junk food and processed food and refined carb in the universe along with all the artificial sweeteners and soda coming out of my ears and I outlived my mother who was meat in moderation. Chicken or fish for dinner. A bologna sandwich or liverwurst or tuna for lunch and microwave popcorn or rice cakes for a snack.

        She ate so modestly that it was so hard to believe that my father who would wolf down everything and try to eat half of her meals would outlive her by decades.

  7. Dr Greger makes the statement ‘Two (lung cancer) risks (smoking and dairy consumption) dont make a right’. Giving credence to the claim that dairy causes lung cancer.

    https://nutritionfacts.org/2019/07/11/dialing-down-the-grim-reaper-gene

    However, is Dr Greger simply channeling ‘Philip Morris’ when making this statement? The following is a synthesisation of current evidence from pooled analyses/meta-analyses and systematic reviews:

    Seven meta-analyses explored associations between dairy products and risk of lung cancer. All seven meta-analyses showed non-significant associations between ‘all-dairy products’, milk, low-fat milk, yogurt or cheese consumption and risk of lung cancer.

    https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/1/e023625

    This is also confirmed by the following meta-analysis from China:

    ‘Our study indicates that intake of dairy products or calcium was not statistically associated with the risk of lung cancer. This negative finding provides a conclusive answer to the disease association issue based on current evidence, and suggests that further efforts should be made to find other nutritional risk factors for lung cancer’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753428/

    1. Phil

      You have made this same comment before. So i will offer pretty much the same response.

      First, I think that Dr Greger was sarcastically echoing the Philip Morris argument.

      Secondly, observational studies like those you quote are vulnerable to confounding – eg if dairy replaces other more carcinogenic foods (eg red meat, alcohol etc) you would expect to find a zero or even ‘protective’ effect.

      Thirdly, the Chinese study you quote overstates its case. Meta analyses of observational studies can’t conclusively show or disprove causality. All it shows is that academics and research scientists are just as prone to blowing their own trumpet as anyone else.

      That said, I too am sceptical about the casein switches cancer on and off claim, It is based on experiments in rats fed highly carcinogenic agents. How relevant this is to humans not fed toxic agents is debatable. As far as I know, the only effect for the milk protein casein shown in humans concerns prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality.

      In any case, high fat dairy seems to significantly associated with increased CVD risk and this is a good reason to avoid it

      ‘What did predict risk of cardiovascular disease was “fat swapping.” When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.’

      https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

      If people are going to eat dairy,then, low fat dairy seems the safest option (and this is what most dietary guidelines recommend) although even this would probably be a no-no for men given it would necessarily be higher in protein (as a % of total calories) and therefore potentially up protstate cancer risk).

  8. Love all Dr. Greger’s videos, as usual. But I was wondering why there are no more year in review DVD’s available for free viewing after 2016? Will there be ones coming for 2017 and 2018? Thanks!

    1. I think it is a complicated answer.

      He was doing those at McDougall conferences and the year that it stopped, Mary had shoulder surgery, Dr. McDougall broke his leg, the McDougall’s lost their home in the Santa Rosa fires and Dr. McDougall retired from clinical practice and gave his practice to his children.

      Will Dr. Greger do conferences with the younger generation of McDougalls, or find a new place to do his year in reviews? That is a good question, but this past year was writing How Not To Diet and that one would make a good year in review topic, but I looked at his schedule and the ends of this year and next year don’t look like he will be doing them, though if he switched where he will do them, then, I could be wrong.

      1. I liked them, too.

        Just writing those sentences, I have a soft spot for Dr. McDougall. He reminds me of the males from the older generations. A bunch of characters in some ways. Anything at all might come out of their mouths during debates, but then, you peer into their hearts and see someone trying to seriously save the world and someone who would fall in love at first glance and who would mess things up in such dramatic ways, and then, have a sense of humor about himself right when you least expect it. I genuinely have a permanent soft spot for Dr. McDougall and I laugh because I also have a permanent soft spot for Dr. Fuhrman and it is as if they both maybe wear their weaknesses on their sleeves and then, you just have people either get offended and walk away or just see the biggest rainbow right there in the middle of the rain and storm clouds and that probably says more about me than it does about either of them. They both save lives and are such wonderfully flawed heroes. Someday, the Stepford wives cleaned up, no visible flaws heroes will probably show up and be the ones the press loves, but this cast of characters will be the ones my heart loves.

            1. Laughing.

              Yes, I have a permanent soft spot for Dr. Greger, too.

              From the first time I heard the grandmother story and saw his face as a young person and from the first pun I heard from him and his grandmother and my grandmother both had the switch from being sweet to being cantankerous with brain problems at the end of life.

              Dr. Barnard also had a father with Alzheimer’s and a family which was meat-oriented.

              And, for Dr. Ornish – who shares my history of having been suicidal and shares a focus on how important love is. I watched the recent panel discussion with Dr. Ornish and T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Greger and Dr. Ornish is the always so polite and thoughtful and such an encourager.

              And, I genuinely have a soft spot for Colin, too, but he is Javert to me.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpgiw1i94Io

              1. “And, for Dr. Ornish – who shares my history of having been suicidal and shares a focus on how important love is.”
                – – – – –

                Well, we can’t have that happen again….it’s all in the past. Yes, ’tis said you can’t love others UNTIL you love yourself.

                Didn’t you once post that you were a “cutter”? :-(

                https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=cutter

                1. When I was being abused as a teenager and couldn’t get anyone to listen. Yes. It didn’t help all that much. It was almost a prayer, but also a way of dealing with the fact that I was starting to numb up and was dying on the inside and had started to wonder if I could handle dying on the outside. It was almost a wondering, “Would it hurt?”

                  1. That stopped by the time I escaped to college and then to California. In California, they were big on hitting couches with big plastic bats or punching bags.

                    Honestly, I wasn’t angry with the person who abused me, I was angry at not being listened to.

                    I ended up in the creative end of the world. There was a woman who wrestled through her own abuse by doing a creative production called “All the Rage” where writers could write out their frustration about it and that and play therapy were what helped me.

                    Counseling was a ridiculous waste of time. I suspect though if I had a counselor more like Dr. Lisle, at least it would have been funny.

                    1. That was a long time ago.

                      Oops, I forgot to have a soft spot for Jeff at Vegsource.

                      I immediately had a soft spot when he put up “How to spot fake news on the internet” and he stands up and talks about how delicious his meal from Dr. Fuhrman was.

                      I laugh because he is in some ways so fascinating because he is going to put up Dr. Fuhrman’s image in a negative way and talk about his survey as if he and Dr. Greger cooked the books and knew it and then, he is going to deny that he was talking about Dr. Fuhrman and then he is going to say that he eats nuts after making such a big deal about it and then, he is going to immediately subconsciously put up the fact that he likes Dr. Fuhrman’s food.

                      Him being so confused and being so vocal about it is the kind of endearing I can handle from a very far distance.

                    2. I think, some of us being related to an infamous person who may have been trying to be heroic or not and having a best friend who is also related to an infamous person, who also may have been trying to be heroic or not, I have a soft spot for seriously flawed usually trying to be heroic people who are sometimes not trying to be heroic.

  9. I live in an independent living complex for people 62 and over. Several years ago, one of the residents (although in great health) was urged to move in with one of her children. So she did.

    A daughter still lives here. Today — and every time I see her — I ask about her mother. I’m amazed at the answer she gives when I ask what she eats. “Anything she wants,” is the answer. Her mother is now 105.

    I’d love to know what elderly former movie stars “eat in a day.” As we speak, Olivia de Havilland is 103. (Back in the day, I was told I looked like her. ^_^)
    Kirk Douglas, if he’s still here on December 9, will also turn 103.

    Then there are those in their nineties….like Betty White, Rhodna Fleming (who will turn 96 next month), and I’m sure many others. Not too shabby! Lifestyle, positive thinking, exercise is important, of course, but what DO they eat in a day?

  10. The article is old so the ages will be wrong, but there are a lot of old vegetarians and vegans and some are calorie restriction oriented.

    Betty White is intermittent fasting, but she is sneaky. She credits hot dogs and vodka for her longevity, but she has been vegan for 30 years.

    Cicely Tyson – 93 vegan

    Bob Barker – 94 vegetarian

    Cloris Leachman – 91 vegetarian

    Doris Day 92 vegetarian

  11. This is a very interesting read and further motivates me to switch to a vegan diet, which I’ve been debating for sometime now. One thing that is a bit confusing is that there are so many established benefits to increased IGF-1 and HGH levels including antiaging benefits and others. How do these benefits stack up against the negatives outlined in this blog post?

    1. Hi I’m a RN health support volunteer. That is a great question. Some of those things like IGF-1 and HGH are promoted for the benefits, especially in the athletic world and having things like muscle building effects, anti aging, increased metabolism, and increased athletic performance. And they may very well have these short term and cosmetic effects. But when you actually look at morbidity and mortality, the effects excess growth factors are pretty concerning. Excess growth factors will promote growth of muscle mass potentially, but can also accelerate cancer growth, inflammation, and disease progression. We need a certain level for physiological processes and certainly don’t wont a deficit, but excess can be disease promoting. Some cancer drugs are designed to target these growth factors for that reason:
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3614012/

      A healthy plant based diet should promote optimal levels of IGF-1 whereas a diet heavy in meat, dairy, and processed foods may promote excess levels and promote disease and inflammation.

      All the best,
      NurseKelly

  12. If IGF-1 is such a dangerous and life shortening gene, how do you explain the thousands of aging people around the world using Human Growth Hormone to raise their IGF-1 levels to improve their health, fitness and body composition and experiencing less disease and less mortality, at least in non-randomized trials. At the annual A4M meetings presentations on the physiological effects of HGH, there has not been reported any increases in cancer nor mortality since these meetings started in 1995.

    We have seen no cancer cases nor deaths amongst our older population using replacement doses of HGH in our age management clinic. Dr. Chein in Palm Springs, an early advocate of HGH use in aging people reported no cases of cancer amongst over 800 older patients he treated for an average of 10 years with HGH. Anecdotal to be sure, but never-the-less, if higher levels of IGF-1 were that unsafe, you would expect more cancer and deaths in an older population followed for a decade.

    1. Not really. There are no randomised controlled trials supporting your beliefs.

      It may be good business but I am not sure it is good medicine

      ‘IGF-I is a protein hormone similar in structure to insulin and is regulated in the body by growth hormone (GH). Levels of GH and IGF-I decline progressively with age in both men and women and this drop is thought to be related to deteriorating health conditions found with advanced age. In an attempt to combat aging some people use GH as its actions elevate IGF-1.This study however showed that older men who had higher levels of IGF-I were more likely to die from a cancer-related cause in the following 18 years than men with lower levels.’
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100301091417.htm

      Low IGF-1 may be a marker for various disease states. However, directly addressing the disease state causing the low IGF-1 levels may be a better option than raising IGF-1 levels.

      1. As I said, clinical experience with our patients as well as many other anti-aging practitionershave not seen increases in cancer nor death rates. In fact we have seen no cancers and no deathsin the last 20 years.  The same thing was said about testosterone replacement years ago, and  it is pretty well established scientifically that TRT does not cause prostate cancer and therefore increased cancer mortality The same is true for heart attacks, strokes and C-V morbidity/mortality. In fact, it is just the opposite IMHO.  I am convinced enough of the benefits that I have taken injectible testosterone for 25 years now and am quite healthy and cancer free. My father died of metastatic prostate cancer at age 63 y/o and I am nowclose to 70 y/o with a PSA of 2.5.
        There will probably never be a randomized placebo controlled, double blind trial of HGH as it would take thousands of aging patients followed  for many years, which financially would be quite expensiveand Pharma does not seem to be interested in such a trial. The federal government also haszero interest in extending the length and quality of people’s lives.  So it will continue be an off label use by those who read the medical literature and decide for themselveswhether to use it or not, which is the case with many other treatments such as other hormones, pharmaceuticals,nutritional supplements, chiropractic care, accupuncture, homeopathy, exosomes, etc.
        Which is perfectly fine by me. People should have the freedom to pursue life extendingor quality-of-life enhancing treatments as they see fit in consultation with their medical practitioners.

        1. As for TRT, I understand that the current position is that

          ‘Given the growing prevalence of testosterone deficiency in our population and the increased use of TTh, the goal of this review is to present the history and emerging evidence in regards to this controversy. CV safety concerns are mostly based on a few studies and trials that have been noted to have multiple flaws and limitations. However, the most recent data has found no association between TTh and the development of CV disease. Nevertheless, until this controversy is clarified with larger clinical trials, health-care professionals should continue to inform their patients about the possible CV risk when prescribing TTh products to patients.’
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5924961/

          Re HGH therapy, Harvard has this to say:

          ‘To evaluate the safety and efficacy of GH in healthy older people, a team of researchers reviewed 31 high-quality studies that were completed after 1989. Each of the studies was small, but together they evaluated 220 subjects who received GH and 227 control subjects who did not get the hormone. Two-thirds of the subjects were men; their average age was 69, and the typical volunteer was overweight but not obese.

          The dosage of GH varied considerably, and the duration of therapy ranged from two to 52 weeks. Still, the varying doses succeeded in boosting levels of IGF-1, which reflects the level of GH, by 88%.

          As compared to the subjects who did not get GH, the treated individuals gained an average of 4.6 pounds of lean body mass, and they shed a similar amount of body fat. There were no significant changes in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, HDL (“good”) cholesterol, triglycerides, aerobic capacity, bone density, or fasting blood sugar and insulin levels. But GH recipients experienced a high rate of side effects, including fluid retention, joint pain, breast enlargement, and carpal tunnel syndrome. The studies were too short to detect any change in the risk of cancer, but other research suggests an increased risk of cancer in general and prostate cancer in particular
          ……………………… GH does not appear to be either safe or effective for young athletes or healthy older men. But that doesn’t mean you have to sit back and let Father Time peck away at you. Instead, use the time-tested combination of diet and exercise. Aim for a moderate protein intake of about .36 grams per pound of body weight; even big men don’t need more than 65 grams (about 2 ounces) a day, though athletes and men recovering from illnesses or surgery might do well with about 20% more. Plan a balanced exercise regimen; aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise, such as walking, a day, and be sure to add strength training two to three times a week to build muscle mass and strength. You’ll reduce your risk of many chronic illnesses, enhance your vigor and enjoyment of life, and — it’s true — slow the tick of the clock..’
          https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/growth-hormone-athletic-performance-and-aging

      2. The Rancho Bernardo study you quoted was not a trial of HGH administration butan observation of native IGF-1 levels. In reality the IGF-1 levels of both groups were rock bottom low.  Typically we try to achieve  IGF-1 levels in our patients of 300 – 500, which is still only about 1/2 of what it was when these people were in their late teens. It is a physiologic,not supra-physiological dose.
        Again we have no financial stake in this……..patients obtain their HGH fromthird party sources. We provide a service monitoring the dose and bloodchemistry changes. There are no harmful effects at typical replacement dosagesand most every client feels and functions better as well as shedding body fat.That means they are less insulin resistant and less likely to develop Type IIdiabetes. That means they are at lower risk of atherosclerosis andprobably cancers as well.

        1. Thanks Randy but I prefer to rely on good quality studies published in the professional literature rather than the assurances of people selling alterantive health services of this kind.

          ‘In older men with low testosterone, one year of testosterone treatment improved bone density and corrected anemia of both known and unknown causes, but also increased the volume of coronary artery plaque, according to results reported from the Testosterone Trials (T Trials). Testosterone treatment had no effect on memory or other cognitive function. The results are reported in two journals coming out this week.

          The T Trials were conducted at 12 sites across the country in 790 men age 65 and older with low levels of testosterone and symptoms to which low testosterone might contribute. The studies were funded primarily by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health. Additional funding came from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, all part of NIH. Additional funding, and the study drug and placebo, were provided by AbbVie Pharmaceuticals.’
          https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-supported-trials-testosterone-therapy-older-men-report-mixed-results

          And according to this 2017 paper on HGH therapy

          ‘AGHD should not be confused with states of functional GHD, such as obesity and aging. Aging is associated with a physiological decline in GH and IGF-I secretion, sometimes referred to as “somatopause” 13– 19. It is important to emphasize that neither the safety nor the benefits of GH administration to re-establishing “youthful” GH levels in pituitary-replete adults have been demonstrated to justify the use of GH as an anti-aging agent, and in most countries it is illegal to prescribe GH for off-label indications 17–’
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5691372/

          1. Suite yourself.
            In the European Heart Journal in Aug 2015 a study of 83,000 VA men followed for and average of 4.6 – 6.2 years found that those men who used testosteroneand achieved “normal levels” had a 24% reduction in heart attacks, a 36% reduction in strokes and a 50% reduction in death from any cause compared to menwho were not given testosterone.
            Furthermore, in the Jan. 2018 European J of Endocrinology a study was publishedthe followed 1167 men aged 30 – 60 for 18 years. The found those in the lowestblood testosterone level (10th percentile) had a 60% greater mortality than thosewhose T level was in the 10th and 90th percentiles.  A meta analysis in the Nov. 2015 J of the American Heart Assn looked at over100 testosterone studies and found low testosterone to be associated withabnormal EKG readings. The also found men with higher T levels were 25%less likely to suffer a cardiac arrest.
            You and I can site studies all day long. I am in the trenches treatingaging men with and without heart disease. Universally their experiencemirrors mine. They feel and function better, gain strength, energy andlibido and NO one has had a heart attack, sudden death or died of cancer.Our clinic has been going for 20 years. I think if there was a problem witheither therapy we would have seen it by now.
            I would prefer to be in the hormone replacement camp rather than the “I’ll wait for a double blindplacebo controlled study that comes out to prove testosterone and/or HGH therapyimproves survival” camp. At 70 y/o I don’t have time to wait for a study that will probablynever get done for all sorts of reasons.
            But that’s just me.

    1. I asked, “Are you connected, business-wise, or are you just a satisfied customer?”

      Never mind. Clicking your name showed me that you are the former.

    2. #yiv0625129016 img { outline:none;text-decoration:none;width:auto;max-width:100%;height:auto;display:block;} #yiv0625129016 body { width:100%;min-height:100%;} #yiv0625129016 blockquote:before { color:#ccc;font-size:4em;line-height:0.1em;margin-right:0.25em;vertical-align:-0.4em;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016postmatic_ad:before { text-align:right;color:gray;font-weight:bold;font-size:10px;margin-bottom:5px;display:block;margin-right:10px;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016twitter-tweet:before { color:#ccc;font-size:4em;line-height:0;margin-right:0;vertical-align:0;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016nc_socialPanel a:hover { background-color:#343434;} @media screen and (max-width:480px){ #yiv0625129016 #yiv0625129016the_title { font-size:17px !important;line-height:normal !important;} #yiv0625129016 table.yiv0625129016wrap { width:100% !important;padding:0% !important;} #yiv0625129016 table.yiv0625129016wrap .yiv0625129016container { padding:0;border:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016wrap { padding:0;border:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016padded { padding:2% !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016header { border:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016credit { text-align:left !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016left { width:100% !important;float:none !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016right { width:100% !important;float:none !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016padding img { width:auto !important;height:auto !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016widgets { padding:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016midwidget { padding:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016wrap { padding:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016logo { margin:20px 20px 15px 20px;width:80%;max-width:90%;} #yiv0625129016 #yiv0625129016content img { float:none !important;margin:10px auto !important;} #yiv0625129016 img.yiv0625129016avatar { float:left !important;} #yiv0625129016 #yiv0625129016content img.yiv0625129016avatar { float:left !important;clear:left !important;margin:0 10px 0 0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 #yiv0625129016content img.yiv0625129016reply-icon { float:left !important;clear:left !important;margin:0 10px 0 0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016gallery br { display:none !important;clear:none !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016gallery-item { margin:5px auto !important;float:none !important;display:block !important;width:100% !important;text-align:center !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016ngg-gallery-thumbnail-box { margin:5px auto !important;float:none !important;display:block !important;width:100% !important;text-align:center !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016gallery-item img { margin:0 auto !important;display:block !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016ngg-gallery-thumbnail-box img { margin:0 auto !important;display:block !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016gallery-caption { width:auto !important;text-align:center !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016sd-social-icon .yiv0625129016sd-content ul li a { width:20px !important;min-height:20px !important;} #yiv0625129016 #yiv0625129016comments { margin:0 !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016depth-2 { margin-bottom:15px !important;border-left:1px solid #ddd !important;padding-left:5px !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016depth-3 { margin-left:10px !important;margin-bottom:15px !important;border-left:1px solid #ddd !important;padding-left:5px !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016depth-4 { margin-left:10px !important;margin-bottom:15px !important;border-left:1px solid #ddd !important;padding-left:5px !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016depth-5 { margin-left:10px !important;margin-bottom:15px !important;border-left:1px solid #ddd !important;padding-left:5px !important;} #yiv0625129016 div.yiv0625129016bypostauthor > div:first-child { background:url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/postmatic/assets/icons/et.png) !important;padding:4px !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016comment-date { float:none !important;text-align:left !important;margin-right:0 !important;margin-left:62px !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016footer .yiv0625129016gutter { display:block !important;} #yiv0625129016 .yiv0625129016reply-content { margin-left:25px;} #yiv0625129016 h3.yiv0625129016reply { margin-left:40px !important;} #yiv0625129016 h3.yiv0625129016reply small { margin-left:0 !important;} } | NutritionFacts.org |

      | | YR (YeahRight) added a comment in reply to Dialing Down the Grim Reaper Gene. YR (YeahRight) Doing my own research and coming to my own conclusions involves searching the ‘net. (I see there are 14,000,000). I’m not about to become a human guinea pig and just pop the stuff — don'[t like pills, etc. Are you connected, business-wise, or are you just a satisfied customer?Does the Mayo Clinic carry any clout?https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/growth-hormone/art-20045735 Reply to this email to reply to YR (YeahRight). You’re invited to respond by replying to this email. If you do, it may be published immediately or held for moderation, depending on the comment policy of Dialing Down the Grim Reaper Gene. Recently in this conversation…
      SteveJuly 13th, 2019 10:07 pmThis is a very interesting read and further motivates me to switch to a vegan diet, which I’ve been debating for sometime now. One thing that is a bit confusing is that there are so many established benefits to increased IGF-1 and HGH levels including antiaging benefits and others. How do these benefits stack up against the negatives outlined in this blog post?ReplyRandy Ice PT, CCSJuly 14th, 2019 12:15 pmIf IGF-1 is such a dangerous and life shortening gene, how do you explain the thousands of aging people around the world using Human Growth Hormone to raise their IGF-1 levels to improve their health, fitness and body composition and experiencing less disease and less mortality, at least in non-randomized trials. At the annual A4M meetings presentations on the physiological effects of HGH, there has not been reported any increases in cancer nor mortality since these meetings started in 1995. We have seen no cancer cases nor deaths amongst our older population using replacement doses of HGH in our age management clinic. Dr. Chein in Palm Springs, an early advocate of HGH use in aging people reported no cases of cancer amongst over 800 older patients he treated for an average of 10 years with HGH. Anecdotal to be sure, but never-the-less, if higher levels of IGF-1 were that unsafe, you would expect more cancer and deaths in an older population followed for a decade.ReplyYR (YeahRight)July 14th, 2019 1:29 pmDoing my own research and coming to my own conclusions involves searching the ‘net. (I see there are 14,000,000). I’m not about to become a human guinea pig and just pop the stuff — don'[t like pills, etc. Are you connected, business-wise, or are you just a satisfied customer?Does the Mayo Clinic carry any clout?https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/growth-hormone/art-20045735Reply Reply to this email to reply to YR (YeahRight). I am the Clinical Coordinator of a Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement program. I’ve also used HGHfrom time-to-time and am familiar with its benefits personally. I have no financial stake nor does ourclinic in those who use HGH. We prescribe it for those who are deficient and interested in replacing it forhealth improvement purposes.
      I put the Mayo Clinic in the same category as WebMD. My suggestion is you talk to experts in the fieldof age management medicine who are independent of Big Pharma and have the same experiencewith HGH that we have have……….no deaths, no cancer and improved health and energy. It’s been usedby thousands of people around the world since 1995 when it became commercially available……….we are well past the “guinea pig” stage. You can find an expert near you by searching the American  of Anti-Aging Medicine physician directory.
            https://www.a4m.com/            You may wish to attend any one of the several educational meeting they host that can also           be found on their website.
                 HGH administration is not by an oral capsule BTW. It is a subcutaneous injection of 1 – 3 IU’s            on a 5 – 7X/week basis after being reconstituted with sterile water. |

      | |

      | | | You received this email because you’re subscribed to discussion of Dialing Down the Grim Reaper Gene. unsubscribe | | Sent from NutritionFacts.org. |

      1. WOW! Impressive bunch of words (copy/paste)! Somewhere in your reply, I found “You can find an expert near you by searching the American of Anti-Aging Medicine physician directory.”

        Thanks, I’ll keep that in mind, if and when I should ever be interested. Am doing more than terrific right now. Don’t wanna knock the boat.

        Maybe others at this site would be interested, however.

        1. I chirped: “Maybe others at this site would be interested, however.”
          – – – –

          For instance, Lonie. Every day he downs a zillion or more semi-interesting concoctions of his own making. He might be creating some new ones as we speak. :-D

          1. Wikipedia is a sellout to Big Pharma……….I never use nor recommend it.They are into censorship just as FB, Google, Twitter and Pinterest are. No thanks…………I’ll take freedom of speech anytime.

            1. Big Pharma undoubteredl shades the evidence to its financial advantage.

              However, it would be beyond naive to think that alternative health practitioners don’t do exactly the same thing. And their claims are proabaly less scrutinised than Big Pharma’s.

              1. I am not saying Pharma is against HGH use in aging adults……..however that market ismassively larger than the stunted children’s market. My question then is why hasn’t Pharmafunded a large longitudinal study of HGH in adults to answer the questions people frequentlyraise. If the results were positive, then the FDA could officially approve its use for adults and insurancewould cover it. Instead here it is 24 years after its commercial introduction and it is used “off label”in adults and not covered by insurance.

              2. It’s Randy from Hair & Body Rejuvenation Clinic in Temecula. I’d like to be able to refer customers to you, so I’ve added you to my network on Alignable, a site exclusively for business owners to n…

                Hi,

                It’s Randy from Hair & Body Rejuvenation Clinic in Temecula.

                I’d like to be able to refer customers to you, so I’ve added you to my network on Alignable, a site exclusively for business owners to network with each other.

                Accept my invitation

                Accept my invitation ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZqb2luJTJGaTE5NTM1NDIyNi0zNjgzMTYtY2ZjMWY3YTdhNTNmZmQyNjVlYzgyNzRhOSZ1PSUzQzcyODk4NDc3LTU2MjktNGEzZS1hNzA0LWIwMTEyOTk3NGRkNCU0MGVtYWlscy5hbGlnbmFibGUuY29tJTNF )

                (Note: this invite expires in 24 hours)

                If you no longer wish to receive these type of emails, you can unsubscribe ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZlbWFpbF91bnN1YnNjcmliZXMlM0Z1dWlkJTNEcHJvbXB0LWJjYzBjOWE4ODA2NTE4YmJkMWM4MzA2MjJkNWQ3N2M4JTI1NDBlbWFpbC5nb3Bvc3RtYXRpYy5jb20mdT0lM0M3Mjg5ODQ3Ny01NjI5LTRhM2UtYTcwNC1iMDExMjk5NzRkZDQlNDBlbWFpbHMuYWxpZ25hYmxlLmNvbSUzRQ== )

                Alignable ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkYmdT0lM0M3Mjg5ODQ3Ny01NjI5LTRhM2UtYTcwNC1iMDExMjk5NzRkZDQlNDBlbWFpbHMuYWxpZ25hYmxlLmNvbSUzRQ== ) 205 Portland Street

                Boston MA 02114

              3. Hi,

                This is Sara Jones from Alignable. I wanted to make sure you received the invitation from Randy Ice.

                Due to demand in your local area, we’re limiting the number of businesses that can join at this time.

                Since you were invited by a current user, I’ve extended your signup window through the end of today to make sure you don’t miss out!

                Sign up now ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZqb2luJTJGYnBjbHcyczd3ZXRtY3RuYmx3Xzl6YSZ1PSUzQ2FmY2UwNzcyLTI5YTYtNDBlMC1hN2RlLTI0ZDlkZTMyMDY1NyU0MGVtYWlscy5hbGlnbmFibGUuY29tJTNF )

                Best,

                Sara Jones

                Alignable Cedar Falls Community Manager

                P.S. if you don’t want invitations from other business owners, you can unsubscribe here ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZ1bnN1YnNjcmliZSUzRnV1aWQlM0Rwcm9tcHQtYmNjMGM5YTg4MDY1MThiYmQxYzgzMDYyMmQ1ZDc3YzglMjU0MGVtYWlsLmdvcG9zdG1hdGljLmNvbSZ1PSUzQ2FmY2UwNzcyLTI5YTYtNDBlMC1hN2RlLTI0ZDlkZTMyMDY1NyU0MGVtYWlscy5hbGlnbmFibGUuY29tJTNF )

    3. It’s Randy from Hair & Body Rejuvenation Clinic in Temecula. I’d like to be able to refer customers to you, so I’ve added you to my network on Alignable, a site exclusively for business owners to n…

      Hi,

      It’s Randy from Hair & Body Rejuvenation Clinic in Temecula.

      I’d like to be able to refer customers to you, so I’ve added you to my network on Alignable, a site exclusively for business owners to network with each other.

      Accept my invitation

      Accept my invitation ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZqb2luJTJGaTE5NTM1NDIyNC0zNjgzMTYtN2UwMjRjMWQwYzJlZWUyMmI0N2FhYzI2YSZ1PSUzQzE4MjcwNTQzLWRjNDEtNDBhZi1iNzZiLWI0M2I1ZDhmZjQ0NSU0MGVtYWlscy5hbGlnbmFibGUuY29tJTNF )

      (Note: this invite expires in 24 hours)

      If you no longer wish to receive these type of emails, you can unsubscribe ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkZlbWFpbF91bnN1YnNjcmliZXMlM0Z1dWlkJTNEcHJvbXB0LWM2NDMzNDM2NTBlYTU3YzgyODJiMjM3MzVjMTFjY2MxJTI1NDBlbWFpbC5nb3Bvc3RtYXRpYy5jb20mdT0lM0MxODI3MDU0My1kYzQxLTQwYWYtYjc2Yi1iNDNiNWQ4ZmY0NDUlNDBlbWFpbHMuYWxpZ25hYmxlLmNvbSUzRQ== )

      Alignable ( https://emails.alignable.com/c/bD0lMkYmdT0lM0MxODI3MDU0My1kYzQxLTQwYWYtYjc2Yi1iNDNiNWQ4ZmY0NDUlNDBlbWFpbHMuYWxpZ25hYmxlLmNvbSUzRQ== ) 205 Portland Street

      Boston MA 02114

  13. Wouldn’t a good digestive enzyme taken with food and a proteolytic/systemic enzyme taken away from food help with a protein over load and possibly help reduce the 1GF-1 gene?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This