Filled Full of Lead

Filled Full of Lead
4.78 (95.56%) 9 votes

Standard rifle bullets disperse tiny lead fragments throughout the flesh of wild game, raising public health concerns about lead poisoning in those who consume venison, based on a study of white-tailed deer shot by hunters.

Discuss
Republish

Given this new data suggesting that the consumption of flesh from wild animals causes less inflammation, those who continue to eat meat might benefit from switching to something like venison—but it depends on what kind of ammo you use.

The “potential for human dietary exposure” to “lead bullet fragments in venison from rifle-killed deer.” “Human consumers of wildlife killed with lead ammunition may be exposed to health risks associated with lead ingestion.”

They took X-rays of “30 eviscerated carcasses of White-tailed Deer…shot by hunters with standard lead-core copper-jacketed bullets under normal hunting conditions.” For those thinking, wait a second, can’t you just kind of dig out the bullet like you see on all those old Westerns? Well, you don’t understand modern ammunition.

“All carcasses showed metal fragments and widespread fragment dispersion.” How many fragments? An average of 136. So they went to the store, and scanned the resulting meat packages, revealing tiny metal fragments in the ground meat packages from 80% of the deer. And most of those fragments were lead. They “conclude that people risk exposure to bioavailable lead from bullet fragments when they eat venison from deer killed with standard lead-based rifle bullets and processed under normal procedures. At risk in the U.S. are some ten million hunters, their families, and low-income beneficiaries of venison donations.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to: Malis via Wikimedia Commons and National Park Service.

Given this new data suggesting that the consumption of flesh from wild animals causes less inflammation, those who continue to eat meat might benefit from switching to something like venison—but it depends on what kind of ammo you use.

The “potential for human dietary exposure” to “lead bullet fragments in venison from rifle-killed deer.” “Human consumers of wildlife killed with lead ammunition may be exposed to health risks associated with lead ingestion.”

They took X-rays of “30 eviscerated carcasses of White-tailed Deer…shot by hunters with standard lead-core copper-jacketed bullets under normal hunting conditions.” For those thinking, wait a second, can’t you just kind of dig out the bullet like you see on all those old Westerns? Well, you don’t understand modern ammunition.

“All carcasses showed metal fragments and widespread fragment dispersion.” How many fragments? An average of 136. So they went to the store, and scanned the resulting meat packages, revealing tiny metal fragments in the ground meat packages from 80% of the deer. And most of those fragments were lead. They “conclude that people risk exposure to bioavailable lead from bullet fragments when they eat venison from deer killed with standard lead-based rifle bullets and processed under normal procedures. At risk in the U.S. are some ten million hunters, their families, and low-income beneficiaries of venison donations.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to: Malis via Wikimedia Commons and National Park Service.

Doctor's Note

The new data I refer to in the beginning makes reference to yesterday’s video, Modern Meat Not Ahead of the Game. Lead has also been found in protein powder supplements (see Heavy Metals in Protein Powder Supplements); Ayurvedic medicine supplements (see Get the Lead Out); and other animal products (see Cannibalistic Feed Biomagnification). Maybe in shot kangaroo meat too (again, see Modern Meat Not Ahead of the Game). Like mercury in tuna (see Nerves of Mercury), no level of lead consumption can be considered safe. So, what’s the least unhealthy meat? Find out tomorrow in Good Grub: The Healthiest Meat.

For further context, check out my associated blog post, Lead Poisoning Risk From Venison.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

33 responses to “Filled Full of Lead

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. The new data I refer to in the beginning is a reference to yesterday’s video-of-the-day Modern Meat Not Ahead of the Game. Lead has also been found in protein powder supplements, ayervedic medicine supplements, and other animal products. Maybe in shot kangaroo meat too? Like mercury in tuna, no level of lead consumption can be considered safe. So what’s the least unhealthy meat? Find out in tomorrow’s video-of-the-day Good Grub: The Healthiest Meat.

    If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.




    0
      1. Here’s my lunch that Got the Lead out:

        Sweet & Spicy Lentil, Ginger Curry Quinoa, tossed with Arugala Salad–Absolutely delish!




        0
        1. Yummmm.

          My lead-free lunch was: a baked home-made felafel burger topped with spinach and my own made-up mixture of quinoa, kale, broccoli and mushrooms tied together with a home-made “cheesy” cashew sauce.  I had organic grapes and strawberries for dessert.  Also yumm!  Also lead-free!




          0
            1. I will butt in and tell you how I make “cheese” sauce!
              1 cup water
              3/4 cup raw cashews
              1 tsp salt
              3 Tbsp nutritional yeast flakes
              1 tsp onion powder
              1/4 tsp garlic powder
              1/2 cup pimentos (roasted red peppers)
              2 Tbsp lemon juice
              4 drops Tabasco Sauce or cayenne powder

              Blend in a blender until very  smooth, bring to a boil, turn head down and simmer for a couple of  minutes. ( If you boil the cashews a few minutes before using them,they seem to blend smoother. Pour the boiling water off and use cold to blend with.) 

               To make macaroni and cheese, I add 2 Tbsp olive oil and 3/4 cup almond (or other) milk to the sauce.  I use 2 cups of uncooked macaroni for this amount of sauce.  Of course you have to cook the macaroni first!    Mix the sauce in the macaroni, put in a casserole dish, top with “buttered” crumbs and bake till hot.  enjoy




              0
                1. Sounds delicious..except it’s high in fat (even if good fat) and high in salt, which makes my osteoporosis worse. Guess I’ll have to pass. There’s vegan and healthy vegan. I’ll cherish a few cashews, and stay with my beans and greens!




                  0
            2.  BPCveg:  Doug’s recipe looks good.  I’ve made similar recipes in the past and liked them to varying degrees.

              Unfortunately, the one I referred to above was something that I just made up on the spot without keeping track of ingredients or amounts.  I definitely could not recreate it.  I know I threw some cashews and water to barely cover in a professional-style blender.  Then I put in nutritional yeast and a bit of smoked salt and  lemon juice.  I’m pretty sure I added some other ingredients until I liked the taste, but darn if I remember now what they were.

              Since you ask about cheese, I have to mention that I *just* discovered the book Vegan Artisan Cheese by Miyoko Schinner.  I ordered it from Amazon.  The reviewers rave about the book and the recipes being incredibly true to the “real” thing.  I have a feeling that after trying those recipes that I will be redefining the what counts as “the real thing”.

              What I can say about the various vegan “cheese” sauces that I have made so far: They may be yummy, and they can definitely take the place of a traditional cheese or cheese sauce, BUT they are really, clearly NOT cheese in taste or texture.  Miyoko is reported to have solved both problems.  I’m very excited about trying it.

              Good luck with your cheese sauce adventure.  (And thank you Doug for sharing your recipe.)




              0
  2. so true. as well, there’s been a decades-old  epidemic of ‘mad cow’ in wild critters :
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/wild-game/MY01079
    With game there are a few health-related precautions to keep in mind: Chronic wasting disease (CWD). Similar to mad cow disease, CWD is found in deer and elk. While human infection is a potential concern, there have been no verified cases. To minimize risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that hunters who harvest deer or elk from known CWD-positive areas consider having the animal tested for CWD before consuming the meat…

    http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/savvy-scientist/the-slow-march-of-chronic-wasting-disease/563
    …From an infectious disease standpoint, CWD is far more frightening than BSE. In BSE, the infectious prions are normally confined to tissues of the nervous system. People get exposed to BSE prions in mad cow beef only because slaughterhouse conditions often splatter brain matter indiscriminately, and it only takes a milligram or so of infected tissue to transmit the prions.In CWD, however, the bad prions manifest throughout an infected animal’s tissues and secretions: they show up in its saliva, its blood, its bones, its feces, its urine, and its muscles…




    0
    1. Interesting!
      All the more reason to show why I went plant-based. 

      Why worry about a disease that turns your brain into swiss-cheese.
      Just turn to the plants and not only save each other, but the animals and the Planet.
      ;-}




      0
  3. If you’ve ever had to deal with hunters, you’ve probably noticed that their reasoning abilities have seemed… impaired. Now we know that there might be at least a partial answer- besides the fact that their parents are usually close relatives.




    0
    1. That is a very ignorant statement. Not all hunters are idiots. Some actually are very respectful of animals and the environment, taking only what they need to survive. Not all of us live in areas where we can shop at Whole Foods, but we do the best we can with what we’ve got. And we also don’t insult those that make different choices.




      0
    1. Deer Antler tips is used in Chinese Medicine to “rejuvenate and strengthen” the body. However, this is based on the belief that if one takes in specific animal tissues that one will take on the characteristics of that animal (i.e., strength). There is absolutely no scientific evidence that deer antlier tips provide any nutritional value or have special “powers” to strengthen or rejuvinate. The best way to rejuvenate and strengthen the body is by consuming a whole food plant-based diet filled with phytonutrients that have been shown by science to rejuvenate the body.




      0
  4. I am very familiar with consuming animals killed by bullets, what we do is cut away the parts that are ‘shell shocked’ or discolored and bloodied by high velocity impact. If it looks at all suspicious it is cut away and left for the magpies on the mountain side usually, sometimes at home as it is being cut up if not detected in the field…




    0
  5. Perhaps the neck or head shot is the better option for humane slaughter while minimizing lead exposure? Projectiles free of lead are not available for many popular calibers suitable for harvesting deer.




    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This