Flashback Friday: Four Nuts Once a Month

Flashback Friday: Four Nuts Once a Month
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A single serving of Brazil nuts may bring cholesterol levels down faster than statin drugs and keep them down even a month after that single ingestion.

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This is one of the craziest articles I saw all year. A single consumption of high amounts of Brazil nuts improves the cholesterol levels of healthy volunteers. OK, that’s interesting. They gave 10 men and women a single meal containing zero, one, four, or 8 Brazil nuts, and found that the ingestion of just that single serving almost immediately improved cholesterol levels. LDL, so-called “bad” cholesterol levels in the blood were significantly lower starting just nine hours after the ingestion of nuts, and by no insignificant amount, nearly 20 points within a day. Even drugs don’t work that fast. It takes statins like four days to have a significant effect. But that’s not even the crazy part. They went back and measured their cholesterol five days later, and then 30 days later. Now keep in mind they weren’t eating Brazil nuts this whole time. They had just that single serving of Brazil nuts a month before and their cholesterol was still down 30 days later. It went down and stayed down, after eating just four nuts… That’s nuts!

And no, the study was not funded by the Brazil nut industry.

Interestingly, four nuts actually seemed to work faster than the 8 nuts to lower bad cholesterol and boost good cholesterol. These results suggest that eating just four nuts might be enough to improve the levels of LDL-c and HDL-c for up to 30 days, and maybe longer—they didn’t even test past 30.

Now normally, when a study comes out in the medical literature showing some too-good-to-be-true result like this you want to wait to see the results replicated before you change your clinical practice, before you recommend something to your patients, particularly when the study is done on only 10 people, and especially when the findings are literally just too incredible to be believed. But when the intervention is cheap, easy, harmless, and healthy—eating four Brazil nuts a month—then in my opinion, the burden of proof is kind of reversed. I think the reasonable default position is to do it until proven otherwise, so now every month I eat four Brazil nuts. In conclusion, a single serving is sufficient, without producing liver and kidney toxicity. I should hope not, but what they’re referring to is the high selenium content of Brazil nuts, so high that four eaten every day may actually bump us up against the tolerable daily limit for selenium, but not something we have to worry about it we’re just eating four once a month.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Allison J-B via Flickr.

This is one of the craziest articles I saw all year. A single consumption of high amounts of Brazil nuts improves the cholesterol levels of healthy volunteers. OK, that’s interesting. They gave 10 men and women a single meal containing zero, one, four, or 8 Brazil nuts, and found that the ingestion of just that single serving almost immediately improved cholesterol levels. LDL, so-called “bad” cholesterol levels in the blood were significantly lower starting just nine hours after the ingestion of nuts, and by no insignificant amount, nearly 20 points within a day. Even drugs don’t work that fast. It takes statins like four days to have a significant effect. But that’s not even the crazy part. They went back and measured their cholesterol five days later, and then 30 days later. Now keep in mind they weren’t eating Brazil nuts this whole time. They had just that single serving of Brazil nuts a month before and their cholesterol was still down 30 days later. It went down and stayed down, after eating just four nuts… That’s nuts!

And no, the study was not funded by the Brazil nut industry.

Interestingly, four nuts actually seemed to work faster than the 8 nuts to lower bad cholesterol and boost good cholesterol. These results suggest that eating just four nuts might be enough to improve the levels of LDL-c and HDL-c for up to 30 days, and maybe longer—they didn’t even test past 30.

Now normally, when a study comes out in the medical literature showing some too-good-to-be-true result like this you want to wait to see the results replicated before you change your clinical practice, before you recommend something to your patients, particularly when the study is done on only 10 people, and especially when the findings are literally just too incredible to be believed. But when the intervention is cheap, easy, harmless, and healthy—eating four Brazil nuts a month—then in my opinion, the burden of proof is kind of reversed. I think the reasonable default position is to do it until proven otherwise, so now every month I eat four Brazil nuts. In conclusion, a single serving is sufficient, without producing liver and kidney toxicity. I should hope not, but what they’re referring to is the high selenium content of Brazil nuts, so high that four eaten every day may actually bump us up against the tolerable daily limit for selenium, but not something we have to worry about it we’re just eating four once a month.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Allison J-B via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

I’d be curious to hear if anyone experiences similar results. Even if the study was just a fluke, Nuts May Help Prevent Death by improving the function of our arteries (Walnuts and Artery Function) and fighting cancer (Which Nut Fights Cancer?) and inflammation (Fighting Inflammation in a Nut Shell).

Even eating nuts every day does not appear to result in expected weight gain (Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidence), so enjoy!

In fact, in my Daily Dozen I recommend eating ¼ cup of nuts or seeds every day (or 2 tablespoons nut butter).

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

180 responses to “Flashback Friday: Four Nuts Once a Month

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    1. So this has never been replicated? This video goes way back, have any anecdotal reports from individuals who saw this video years ago?

      1. So this has never been replicated? This video goes way back, have any anecdotal reports from individuals who saw this video years ago?
        ————————————————————————-
        Yeah, I wish someone, even the Brazil Nut association ‘-) would do a follow up to determine if it is the selenium or something else in the nut that creates that result. I take selenium almost daily and would like to know if that supposedly gives me the same result if I take a bigger dose once a month.

        1. The adage more is better does not apply to medications and supplements as the human body has limitations to its need for them and requires controlled dosages to avoid overdosing.

          1. The adage more is better does not apply to medications and supplements as the human body has limitations to its need for them and requires controlled dosages to avoid overdosing.
            ————————————————————————————————-
            I agree if your talking about maintenance.

            However, when supplementing for medicinal curing, you have to go with the efficacious dose.

      2. My friend tried this and her doctor was stunned her cholesterol dropped 20 points. She said his jaw dropped when she told him what she’d been eating.

      3. GOING NUTS OVER BRAZILS?
        Wade asked, “So this has never been replicated? This video goes way back, have any anecdotal reports from individuals who saw this video years ago?”
        ———————————————-
        As a nefarious former president liked to comment, “I’m glad you asked that question…” Because Brazils contain a rich supply of methionine, which more than one study notes is associated with tumor promotion. Tumors not only crave glucose and iron, but are very partial to anybody who supplies them with their methionine dose.

        Better to cut down on methionine, altogether, and reduce cholesterol by the best means known– not ingesting the stuff, in the first instance.

        1. I’d be curious to see the studies that definitively prove that it’s specifically methionine, separate from the food it is contained in that causes tumor production AND that this holds true for whole food vegan sources. My research into most things like this has taught me to be wary of such generalizations.

          1. You will note the term “associated” is used with tumor incidence and growth, which already indicates the research did not define a causal relationship. However, for both you and Fumblefingers, the association is there. Regarding whether four nuts monthly is an acceptable additional risk, that is something only you can determine. Cutting down smoking to “only” one cigarette per week follows similar logic.

      4. I began to consume brazil nuts as suggested soon after this study was first made known and continue to do so. However I have had several serum lipid tests since when I have my annual medical checkup. There has been no reduction in my LDL levels in any given year. I continue to consume brazil nuts now because I assume that they in some way may contribute to my health. Perhaps, as someone else suggested, there may be a genetic component to the LDL lowering ability of these particular nuts.

        1. Roger,

          Your absolutely correct. The brazil nut intake and its impact is very much a personal issue. At present there are 25 identified genes that code for selenoproteins in our bodies. So lots of variations are present. Composition and evolution of the vertebrate and mammalian selenoproteomes. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22479358 and for a deeper dive see the OSU site at: https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/selenium#reference3

          Interestingly most of us, with minor exceptions don’t suffer from a deficient selenium level and testing is a bit of an enigma. Some practitioners will use our glutathione levels (main antioxidant) or one of the direct tests such as Spectracel Labs.

          Good work on keeping tabs on your levels and recognizing your bodies response.

          Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    2. Tom,

      That is fascinating!

      I ended up reading it and Alzheimer’s is one of the groups and I ended up reading some studies and reviews on selenium and Alzheimer’s.

      https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Silvia_Cozzolino/publication/40041214_Nutritional_status_of_selenium_in_Alzheimer's_disease_patients/links/53f1eb020cf2f2c3e7fc9aa1/Nutritional-status-of-selenium-in-Alzheimers-disease-patients.pdf

      I am going to hold onto the Brazil nuts.

      Maybe do 1 Brazil nut and 2 Walnuts per day or something like that.

      1. One might want to check their water quality report as selenium is in most drinking water and in many places is too high and must be lowered by water treatment before piping to homes.

    3. Hi I found in an indivisual study in a group of 10 patient who referred to my office because of high LDL level after two amounts of 4 nuts daily consumption the level of LdL reduced down to 40 percent surprisingly compared to usage of 20 mg usage of statins.

      1. I have always eaten very well and am very lean but my LDL was OFF the charts at 227. After 8 weeks of following my plan of eating almonds and nuts as well as 2 tbsp psyllium and oat bran in water twice per day and some dry oatmeal in smoothie.. plus taking an artichoke supplement, my LDL dropped to 64. …i have MS so the brain/fat situation is trickier than average. When the regular doc said statin I informed him that was for lazier people..that ‘I’ve got this..’…. ;-) No drugs..not ever..not even for MS. I deal with numb feet and hands and a bit of fatigue but otherwise I do quite well.

        1. Wow, that’s amazing! Here’s my story:

          My LDL dropped from 143 to 123 after reducing my weight from 116 to 110 (I’m over 5’5″ tall) and limiting nuts to 1 or 2 tablespoons of walnuts, one tablespoon hemp and one of flax. I was used to having lots of almond butter. I’m going to try your technique. I’ve never heard of an artichoke supplement. Where did you get yours?

          My oxidized cholesterol was high and my LDL particles were small, hence the push. My all-time worst was a total cholesterol of 297 (now it’s 189) and an LDL of 173, even after I started a plant-based diet with no more than a few ounces of animal products a year.

          1. you should also try the amla powder (greger made video about it as well)
            ive been trying to make small shots of amla powder turmeric powder ginger powder and peber
            tastes horrible, but given the potential results greger demonstrated. its worth it :p

            1. I do amla powder, pepper, and turmeric in fruit smoothies and you can’t taste anything bad if the taste is really an issue. Although a smoothie is considerably more work than a “shot” I suppose.

          2. I’ve never heard of an artichoke supplement. Where did you get yours?
            ———————————————————————————————–
            Joy, maybe Lucia was referring to inulin made from artichoke. Here are some things with inulin in them and a few words about it. Below I will post the link where this information came from.

            Jerusalem artichoke/sunchoke
            Jicama
            Artichoke
            Asparagus
            Onion (including onion powder)
            Leeks
            Garlic (including garlic powder)
            Green/unripe bananas
            Wheat

            Note that Jerusalem artichokes are especially high in inulin and can provoke excess gas and bloating in people who generally have no digestive sensitivity. Since Jerusalem artichokes happen also to be exceedingly delicious, it can be hard to control portions when offered a seasonal sunchoke soup or side of mashed sunchokes. If you’ve never had them before, I might suggest being conservative with your first foray so you don’t overdo it!

            https://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/2015/05/05/what-is-inulin-chicory-root-fiber

        2. Lucia, Tell me more! i too have MS and am not (yet) on any meds and would like to keep it that way! Ihave read Dr. Wahl’s book, and would lkie to know more about how our diets can ward off symptoms.

        3. Please explain the MS connection?? I also have it but my neurologist has never mentioned anything nutritional. Although I eat high protein, low carb, low fat.

          1. Hi there,

            Dr. Greger recommends taking it but we’re not sure if it’s necessary for optimal health, so that is why it’s not on the daily dozen. Hope that helps!

  1. My wife and I eat 1 Brazil nut per day, Monday thru Friday. That’s about 50% of the RDA for selenium per day. No risk there; only benefits. Just wondering if there is any advantage to “loading up” on Brazil nuts by eating 4 at once, and only doing it 1-2 times per month?

    1. They have revised the daily value for selenium downwards.from that still seen on some food labels.

      One Brazil nut per day may in fact deliver more than the RDA. To this of course, we have to add selenium in other foods (and supplets) to calculate our total selenium intake. According to the US National Institutes of Health

      ‘Brazil nuts contain very high amounts of selenium (68–91 mcg per nut) and could cause selenium toxicity if consumed regularly.’

      1. There is a reason why Brazil nut butter is not a common sight in stores. Selenium toxicity by the spoonful is not a good product.

      2. Brazil nuts contain very high amounts of selenium (68–91 mcg per nut) and could cause selenium toxicity if consumed regularly.

        Toxicity is around 400mcg per day. One nut per day doesn’t get close. Selenium is needed, for one thing, to neutralize hydrogen peroxide in the thyroid from iodine oxidation.

            1. Note that the RDA is not an upper limit – just the recommeded daily allowance.

              If you are ‘well within’ the RDA, perhaps you need to increase your intake?

              Perhaps best to check local selenium levels first though since you might be getting more from local water supplies and produce than the averages seen in food databases.

        1. Hello, I just read that the amount of selenium in Brazil nuts varies considerably from under 50 mcg to maybe around 500 mcg per nut depending on where in Brazil they are harvested. Yikes! I’d like to buy some organic Brazil nuts (on Amazon) but which one? Although I would start with 1 per week, I’m afraid of the wide variation. Any suggestions?

        1. Interesting that they give an ounce of Brazil nuts (6 to 8 nuts) on their chart.

          Brazil nuts, 1 ounce (6–8 nuts) 544

          When I was reading the studies, they said that people with Alzheimer’s tend to be deficient.

          And that the amount is related to it being in the soil and in many places it isn’t in the soil very much anymore.

      3. Yeah, I was just looking at that.

        https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-Consumer/

        It would appear that whenever you find something that’s “too good to be true,” it might also be a double-edged sword. Those in this discussion who are saying one Brazil nut provides more than the NIH recommended value are correct: 70-90µg per nut > 55µg.

        And from the NIH page you can see why Dr. G says 4/day bumps you up near the upper limit, 400µg.

  2. This reminds me of something I read (was it here or somewhere else?) that taking a DHEA supplement once a month rather than the bottle directions of once a day, was found healthier.

    1. So have the 2013 figures for benefits and dosage levels been confirmed, or qualified?

      I don’t think it’s helpful for an organization to re-post an old statement about a study without an intro or PostScript about the follow up on the original research.

      1. Lida, your question to Michele got me looking through the transcipts. In the study, the cholesterol levels started to drop within 9 hours, and in 1 day were down 20 points. I read studies including those of Dr Ornish where the changes in cholesterol were recorded. In many of them the cholesterol numbers dropped quickly often reaching their lowest levels of the trial within 14 days (these were not nut studies, just wfpb type). .
        In my own case, my ldl dropped from 168 to 96 in less than a month but has done a slow crawl back up since. My point is that it seems cholesterol levels can change quickly if indeed they are going to change at all.

  3. I have been eating one brazil nut a week, or four/month, for the selenium. After watching this video, would it be better to eat four at once, once per month? Or would I get the same cholesterol lowering effect by ingesting the same four over a full month? Too bad I can’t test this myself!

      1. As far as I know, all cholesterol tests that report total, triglycerides, LDL, and HDL use a calculation from the other three values to estimate LDL. Direct LDL measurements are available, e.g., from Quest Diagnostics, but I haven’t seen any home extraction kits for direct LDL.

  4. I have been thinking about the lab tests.

    I haven’t wanted to do any the first year of WFPB.

    Thanksgiving is my 2nd year at this site, but January 1st is my 2nd year since I gave up dairy.

    Maybe I will do a New Years lab test.

    1. in the study, they ate four nuts in one sitting.

      As the title says … ‘four nuts once a month’ and ‘A single serving of Brazil nuts may bring cholesterol levels down faster than statin drugs and keep them down even a month after that single ingestion.’

  5. should nuts not be soaked overnight?.. Makes them less palatable but more digestible ?….. to low roast them after is not always an option with a proper dehydrator.

    1. Soaking them will make them more digestible but also ensure that we derive more calories from eating nuts – which may not be what we want.

  6. There are chain labs locally. Just call them up and ask what they charge for a particular test. Ask if you should be fasting. Ask if is done by fingerstick or blood draw. Most fingerstick, they will tell you results at the time. Also some pharmacy do fingerstick tests without doctors order. Also, some grocery chains like Winn Dixie have test offers. They place a sign out on the entrance way. Go in and test is done at a card table while you sit. Occasionally they advertise free cholesterol but try to uptalk you into other tests for payment. This is all fine with me. This might be helpful to test Brazil nuts .

  7. Why risk your health, just eat fruits, vegetables , and some legumes, and you WON’T have cholesterol problem! All the reductionist studies compare sick people (those on SAD diet) to a group eating this or that food that has this or that nutrient, then suggest that we should eat this or that food because eating them showed improvement in sick people! Most conditions people suffer from ARE CAUSED by the food they eat. Change your diet to HUMAN food, and you won’t be sick. You WON’T need this or that study to improve your sickness. Please, Dr. Greger, stop promoting nuts, that is really nuts!

    1. Reza,

      For the past year and a half I have been reading comments around the internet and certain groups, such as the post-menopausal women, haven’t had the lab numbers even after years on WFPB, without oil or salt or sugar.

      People do still have problems with cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure and homocysteine, etc.

      Many of the post-menopausal women don’t lose weight and it isn’t even uncommon to read comments like that.

      I look at a lot of sites and people don’t always get the miraculous corrections.

      It still feels better psychologically that I did switch to WFPB, but it doesn’t always work that people lose 50 pounds and correct their numbers.

      .

      1. Deb,

        About your comment that many post-menopausal women don’t lose weight: My mother, who lived to be 93 (even after 3 different cancers and many other issues) noted that as she became older, she had to cut back on her food in order to avoid gaining weight. The first to go was desserts and sweets, her indulgences. I think she also cut back on portion sizes. Women who don’t do that may end up gaining weight; they can’t keep eating as they did in their 20s and 30s.

        I’ve heard the expression that our metabolism “slows” as we get older. No doubt due in part to our decreased activity levels.

        I lost weight just as menopause was starting, by practicing portion control and making healthier choices, and I kept that weight off by not going back to my old eating habits — my changes were a change for life. Even though I was a vegetarian, there are many junk foods that are vegetarian and even vegan!

        After my husband and I switched to Plant Based Whole Foods eating a few years ago, we both lost more weight. He’d lost weight after we first met 12 years ago the same way I did earlier — portion control and healthier choices. Plus, he’d switched to vegetarian eating, since I do all the cooking. Now we are almost the weights we were in high school, at ages 76 and 68. But our goal was improved health, not weight loss. Because we thought our weights were fine before starting PBWF eating, and had no idea they could go even lower.

        We don’t sweat the details; we eat veggies and fruit, beans and whole grains, and some nuts and seeds, using the Daily Dozen for general guidance. We practice portion control only when eating the occasional treat of dessert, etc.

        1. Dr. J.

          I cut out sweets and desserts and soda and junk food a few years ago and then cut out refined carbs and grains and dairy and oil and then nuts and seeds and avocado and I still haven’t lost weight.

          I do have a fairly big salad every day – mostly it is a lot of mushrooms and a box of beans in greens. I don’t eat the whole thing at one setting. It generally takes me 2 days, because kale is so filling.

          But I don’t know yet if I will lose weight.

          I thought going off dressings with oil and staying away from faux cheeses and nut butters and starchy vegetables would help, but I am the person who can eat too much kale.

          I do have rye crisps and hummus, but that is a recent addition and 2 rye crisps are 40 calories. I do load them up with no-oil hummus.

          I guess I just don’t know if I will lose weight or not, but either way, if I do it is without potatoes or root vegetables or grains or nuts or avocado or pasta or bread, etc.

          1. Dr. J.

            Intermittent fasting and Keto don’t work well for women either.

            I am down to just salad and beans and rye crisps and have even gotten rid of most of the vegetables in my salads, but I do know that I work at a seated job and don’t sleep at night and eat too late at night and don’t eat breakfast at all.

            I am just saying that it has almost been 2 years and I am not really losing weight. I am not gaining and that is such a good thing.

            I didn’t drop a clothes size or even a half clothes size and I had cut back most of it over a year before that and didn’t lose an ounce, but I am doing well at not gaining.

            1. Saw the discussion about weight for WFPB older women, wanted to “weigh in”. Ha. I am in that menopausal age group and WFPB primarily since about age 40. Weight was not a problem for me in my 40s on the WFPB method–that helped me drop about 10 pounds–but after getting into the 50s, I experienced about a 10 lb weight gain due to it, very frustrating. The only change was my age. I was bummed. I tried cutting out wine, bread, etc. and nothing moved the needle. I also did an hour hike most days of the week.

              After alot of experimentation, I found something that worked: I just had to recalibrate my activity. I had to add more activity and make sure I got active at least 2 x per day. But not tough stuff, mostly adding plain old walking, to what I was doing already. In fact I moved so I wasn’t able to hike every day, just plain old walking, plus some yoga, some weights, etc. That extra seem to fix it…took about 3 months but weight gradually went back to where it was before, thankfully. Now I am back to eating what I want (Gregor style, of course).

              Also highly recommend Fitbit to keep you motivated to do 10,000 steps. I combined that with a program called grokker.com which then integrates to show me the # of minutes I exercise each week. For whatever reason, I find it extremely motivating!

              I did read there was a study (if you can call it that, but interesting anyway) that older women who walked after meals lost weight. I don’t always time it after meals but it often turns out that way. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3119587/ Maybe there is something to that.

              Not sure if that helps, but wanted to share what worked for me, because I totally understand your frustration.

            2. Deb, are you getting enough calories?

              Eating too few calories can cause a major decrease in metabolism.
              Although a calorie deficit is needed for weight loss, it can be counterproductive for your calorie intake to drop too low.
              When you dramatically lower your calorie intake, your body senses that food is scarce and lowers the rate at which it burns calories.

    2. Reza, lots of people DO have high cholesterol in spite of eating a wfpb diet. Even with low dose statins, no salt, oil, sugar, my cholesterol is too high.

      I tried the four brazil nuts eaten at the same time (as in the study), once per month for over 6 months and… nothing.

      I tried selenium supplements, and… no change.

      Amla, ditto.

      3 apples per day, same.

      In order for me to get my ldl down below 100 mg/dl, I have to eat the diet Fumbles described the other day. Fruit, vegetables, no grains, no beans ( occasional smattering of lentils are ok), no starchy veg, and low bmi (below 17 or 18) and on losing trend. As soon as the scales even thinks about moving upwards, my cholesterol rises faster disproportionately. Weight is connected to cholesyerol levels, and probably moreso in some than others.

      If you can tolerate psyllium, I was told that 1 tbsp per day will bring it down about 40 pts.. Fiber is not my issue, but if anyone tries it, start slow, like 1 tsp per day.

      1. Barb,

        That has to be frustrating.

        I haven’t been eating that many grains or starchy vegetables this whole time, but lowering beans on top of those would be so difficult for me.

        What do you eat instead?

        1. What do I eat now? After all these years (decades) I don’t care much anymore. Nothing I can do about it re the cholesterol, but I do eat wfpb with some exceptions. I will use soy milk, bouilion cubes on occasion, a whole grain bread that meets Dr Greger’s rule of 5 and then fruit, veg, oatmeal & flax, small bit of beans, spices. Eating just fruit and veg is ok but don’t eat it all raw. Veg soup or roasted
          veggies makes it tolerable.

          You probably don’t have to worry about it Deb. Wait to see what your cholesterol values are first before making big changes.

          1. Thanks, Barb!

            Yes, I already have been making so many changes.

            I have lost a lot of my superfoods, but I ate them every day for well over a year and I can always bring them back in next year.

            I wanted to clean up my diet as much as possible before getting these tests.

            With my weight not dropping, I was afraid that the labs might be bad and if they were, I would be trying dietary changes and that is what I am doing ahead of time.

            I honestly don’t know if they will be good or bad or mixed.

            I do intend to find out, but I feel like I want to see if I can make the scale budge first.

          2. Not wanting to sound facetious but I suspect the diet of poor people when i was growing up is one that might work.for both weight loss and LDL lowering.

            That is boiled potatoes and cabbage as the staples – very filling – eked out by fruits and vegetables in season, plus some herbs and spices. Or perhaps substitute brown rice for spuds for some variety although total calories would be higher. However, Dr G isn’t a big fan of white potatoes so perhaps it should be sweet potatoes and cabbage

            Here is a list of vegetables by calories per 100 grammes – note that dehydrated potato flakes and flour top the list but whole unprocessed potatoes and cabbage are very low in calories content. That just illustrates that processing foods and turning them into flours can dramatically change the characteristics of food..
            https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/nutrients/reportnutrient1=208&nutrient2=&nutrient3=&fg=11&max=25&subset=0&offset=0&sort=c&totCount=767&measureby=g

            People like McDougall and others suggest that we fill up on low calorie foods such as these (and plain salad) as the start of all meals. That’s why they say you can eat as much as you want on a a WFPB diet – they just don’t say you can eat what you want at any time on a WFPB diet. Doing it that way would pretty much guarnatee weight loss and cholesterol lowering I think ….. although some people like Barb may be genetically predisposed to higher cholesterol than average. But I suspect that even she would see some real changes on a steamed/boiled potato and cabbage diet.

            1. What does it mean to only eat fruits and vegetables “that are in season?” There are fruits and vegetables that are imported into the USA from other countries or grown in the USA, with a drastically different climate from where I live. They are in season there, but not here. Is everything in the produce aisle always “in season” (Northern NJ for me) all year round?

              1. Jack McEwan,

                Here’a an example of fruits and veggies in season in the northeast USA: https://www.thespruceeats.com/seasonal-fruits-and-vegetables-of-the-northeast-4165314

                Otherwise, you could eat frozen, canned, or staples, like carrots and potatoes and onions etc. that can be stored for long periods of time, I guess. Limit the produce that is imported, or moved long distances. The nutrients tend to decrease with time after harvest anyway, even when the produce is sold as “fresh.”

                We tend to eat fresh what we harvest in our backyard and buy from famers market here in CT. Then we switch to my suggested steps above.

              2. I was really just suggesting that we eat the cheapest available fruits and vegetables which, at least where I live, tend to be local fruits and vegetables in season. It would improve both our health and wealth at the same time.

                Mung beans here are very cheap and very low in calories for example. So are bananas.

                But really the general principle is to eat the low calorie high volume foods first. They are very filling and we won’t want to eat much of the higher calories stuff later as a consequence.

      2. I lowered my LDL in half by adding two tbsp each of psyllium & oat bran two times per day, eating almonds, and adding dry oatmeal to smoothie.
        If HDL is high, and triglycerides are low, high LDL is not always necessarily a bad thing.. people with high OR low cholesterol both can have heart attacks….and peoples’ cholesterol naturally increases with age as it is shuttled around assisting where needed in an aging body.

        it all depends ‘how’ high I suppose.

        1. Thanks, Lucia!

          That is useful information.

          And, yes, I listened to one of the doctors, Esselstyn, I think, and he said that for most people if they are a little high, but are truly eating WFPB, that he doesn’t worry about it.

          But so many people are high and I am trying to do this as a way to prevent medical costs, on top of other things, so I want to try to have the proper numbers.

          I haven’t had any numbers checked since going WFPB.

          Partly, I just read that it would probably take 7 months to improve the numbers, so I didn’t want to spend extra on labs and end up worried about things.

          1. Ruth, we cook oat bran every morning. I use 1/3 cup oatbran, 1 cup water and 1 tbsp ground flax, and 1/4 tsp cinnamon for each serving. Bring to a boil and cook a couple of minutes, that’s it. I put it in a bowl , add some soy milk, and some berries. In the past I tried psyllium in oatmeal and oatbran but I found it brought my gut to a standstill . If I was to try it again I would start with a tsp in a full glass of water.

    3. Also, as far as the nuts go, Dr. Greger’s position is based on the mortality studies.

      Adventists vegans who eat nuts outlive the ones who don’t.

      Global Burden of Disease dietary risk factors, not eating nuts is a risk factor for diseases.

      It is 4th on the list below not eating fruit, vegetables, and legumes.

      It is a bigger risk factor than drinking soda, eating meat and eating processed meat.

      In the Adventist studies, not eating nuts was one of the top risk factors for dying younger.

      Plus, the Mediterranean study, switching from oil to nuts improved the deaths from strokes. I haven’t read that study in a long time, but strokes is the one I remember.

      I am saying all of it because there is a logic to eat the nuts.

      1. Deb

        I don’t think that your statement about the Adventist studies, nut consumption and mortality is correct. There was reduced mortality for CVD I believe but they were silent on the association with all-cause mortality.

        Also reducing death from stroke is fine but what if 100 fewer stroke deaths is accompanied by 500 more deaths from heart attacks?

        It’s like th fish oil studies, they tell you in what categories adverse events might go down but don’t point out where they might have increase

        1. Mr. Fumblefingers,

          Your last statement sounds like how results for cancer treatments are reported: specific decreases in mortality caused by the particular cancer under study, but no mention of any other increases in mortality. (Not to mention other adverse effects.) That’s why I always prefer to look at “all cause mortality:” if that number doesn’t decrease, then why undergo the treatment?

    4. Interesting! I cut way down on nuts and my total cholesterol dropped from 207 to 189 and my LDl from 143 to 123. I was already totally plant-based and following Dr. Greger except that I don’t eat many whole grains.

  8. Reza,

    If you are going to debate with Dr. Greger about nuts, you need to bring studies.

    He gives studies for why to eat them.

    If you have opposing studies, bring them and post them.

  9. I too have looked around for followup research information on this old 2013 study. Can’t find anything. Not even from the original research group. If this is correct, why the repeated messaging of the possible beneficial impact of ingesting 4 nuts per month? We’re still following your recommendation, but beginning to wonder why. Aren’t the original conclusions becoming a tad soft, perhaps even rancid?

    1. Why?

      Scientific studies don’t have a shelf life after which they become invalid. This study hasn’t been repeated and found to be in error or contradicted by other sthers so I’m at a loss to understand your concern.

      In any case, there have been subsequent studies, including one by the original research team ,which are consistent with the findings from that study. At least two of them are referenced elsewhere in this comment thread.

      As for why the ‘repeated messaging’, Greger tells why in the video:

      ‘…. when the intervention is cheap, easy, harmless, and healthy—eating four Brazil nuts a month—then in my opinion, the burden of proof is kind of reversed. I think the reasonable default position is to do it until proven otherwise…’

      1. Thanks for the response. Do you know if the authors of that original 2013 paper have published further results confirming their initial conclusions? Has anyone else repeated the experiments and confirmed the results during the last six years? I’m merely somewhat surprised the video has nothing to say about more recent work. Is there any? If there is, why no mention of it? And if the 2013 study hasn’t been repeated, that’s surprising in view of the initial dramatic findings. Just asking.

        1. Not sure why anyone would repeat this study since it is only 6 years old. In any case, all nuts appear to reduce cholesterol and this has been known for a long time so there is, in principle, nothing especially surprising about this particular study except perhaps the magnitude of the response

          ‘With a mean daily consumption of 67 g of nuts, the following estimated mean reductions were achieved: total cholesterol concentration (10.9 mg/dL [5.1% change]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (LDL-C) (10.2 mg/dL [7.4% change]), ratio of LDL-C to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HDL-C) (0.22 [8.3% change]), and ratio of total cholesterol concentration to HDL-C (0.24 [5.6% change]) (P < .001 for all) (to convert all cholesterol concentrations to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0259). Triglyceride levels were reduced by 20.6 mg/dL (10.2%) in subjects with blood triglyceride levels of at least 150 mg/dL (P < .05) but not in those with lower levels (to convert triglyceride level to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0113). The effects of nut consumption were dose related, and different types of nuts had similar effects on blood lipid levels. The effects of nut consumption were significantly modified by LDL-C, body mass index, and diet type: the lipid-lowering effects of nut consumption were greatest among subjects with high baseline LDL-C and with low body mass index and among those consuming Western diets.'
          CONCLUSION:
          Nut consumption improves blood lipid levels in a dose-related manner, particularly among subjects with higher LDL-C or with lower BMI'
          https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/415912

          Other studies have found a reduction of markers of inflammation with Brazil nut consumption eg
          https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0899900713004504?via%3Dihub

          And reductions in cholesterol with selenium supplements
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260986/

          These are all broadly consistent with the study in question. However, things like genes, BMI and existing cholesterol status do appear to affect individual responses to Brazil nut and selenium consumption eg

          https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00394-017-1470-7
          https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/ars.2015.6248?rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&journalCode=ars

  10. Off-topic (searched around and can’t find an answer):

    I started eating based on this website 2 weeks ago, but I screwed up and was consuming way too much spinach (6 cups each day). I recently learned about the risk of oxalates potentially building up and possibly damaging my kidneys or causing kidney stones. To be safe I switched to kale instead, but would like to resume spinach.

    If I eat raw spinach every single day, then what is the safe maximum limit (in cups/grams)?

    Thank you for your time.

    1. Hi, Chuck Norris! You can find everything on this site related to oxalates here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/oxalates/ I think this may be the video you were seeking: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/kidney-stones-and-spinach-chard-and-beet-greens-dont-eat-too-much/ For most people, a serving (1 cup) of spinach daily should be safe. Avoid high-dose vitamin C supplementation, as well. I hope that helps!

    1. Chuck Norris – Dr. Greger is the best expert on this site on this issue. He has three videos on spinach and oxalates I’ve listed below. So be sure to use the search function on this site and look around when you’ve got a question. Lots of good, accurate information from Dr. Greger.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/oxalates-in-spinach-and-kidney-stones-should-we-be-concerned/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/kidney-stones-and-spinach-chard-and-beet-greens-dont-eat-too-much/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/questions/what-are-the-hazards-of-oxalates/

      Basically he states that the oxalates in spinach aren’t the issue as much as whether or not you happen to absorb them.
      I can tell you that I’ve eaten a spinach salad – 1-2 cups – daily for years on a vegan diet and have had no problems.
      Best –

      1. Ruth,

        The final video is the one where people start having their kidneys shut down and they die in 10 days. Yes, they mostly have things like they take a lot of Vitamin C or used antibiotics recently or had bariatric surgery, but there was one person who died without those risk factors.

        The people died so quickly that if people are going to eat raw spinach, they do need to be careful.

        That is Dr Greger’s recommendation.

        They can drink water with lemon juice to prevent kidney stone formation, but people have died from it, in less than 2 weeks.

        There is an ex-vegan who hates vegan ISN so much on YouTube who talked about spinach as almost killing her and was talking about her organs shutting down.

        I saw that before I saw Dr Gregers series.

        Organs shutting down is a hard way to find out that you have the risk factors.

  11. GOING NUTS OVER BRAZILS?

    Wade asked, “So this has never been replicated? This video goes way back, have any anecdotal reports from individuals who saw this video years ago?”
    ———————————————-
    As a nefarious former president liked to comment, “I’m glad you asked that question…” Because Brazils contain a rich supply of methionine, which more than one study notes is associated with tumor promotion. Tumors not only crave glucose and iron, but are very partial to anybody who supplies them with their methionine dose.

    Better to cut down on methionine, altogether, and reduce cholesterol by the best means known– not ingesting the stuff, in the first instance.

    1. Thanks for pointing out the information on methionine in Brazil nuts, Alphaa0010. I appreciate that, being an ex-cancer patient (from 2001.)

      1. alphaa0010,

        I just re-read your comment, not on my cell phone and I understand now that you didn’t say what I thought you said.

        Okay, Methionine.

        Dr. Greger is recommending 4 nuts per month.

        Nutritionally, according to the World Health Organization, adults require approximately 13 mg per kilogram of body weight per day of methionine and cystine combined.

        13 mg per kilogram, so a person weighing 100 pounds needs about 589.67 mg of cystine plus Methionine. A person 150 pounds needs about 884.51 mg. A person weighing closer to 200 pounds needs about 1179.34 mg.

        Brazil nuts have approximately 286 mg of methionine per ounce or 6 nuts. That is 47.66 mg per nut.

        If you take 4, that is 190.66 mg and you are only taking it one time per month.

        1. If you want a comparison, one cup of cooked oats contains about 108 mg of methionine.

          Versus 47.66 for a Brazil nut and one a day is plenty for selenium.

    2. I doubt whether 4 Brazil nuts once per month has any significant effect on our methionine intake – either daily or monthly.

      1. Yes, Dr Greger is not recommending snacking on Brazil nuts, he is saying that some people have eaten 4 of them and had a significant drop in their cholesterol levels.

        The fact that people from this community have high cholesterol just eating fruits and vegetables with a little bit of lentils, we already know that post-menopausal women, for one, often go high in cholesterol.

        The fact that Dr Esselstyn had to cover the topic with a different group, and the fact that I have seen comments about it on other web-sites, women particularly go WFPB for years and are often still facing meds.

        Also, above, there are a few people who had successes on this site.

        Finally, I have used Brazil nuts and I was a former glucose addict with serious diabetes symptoms and Brazil nuts didn’t cause cravings for candy or cookies or ice cream or soda or any of it. Sugar and artificial sweeteners are what do cause cravings for glucose.

          1. I am not even sure that sugar causes it. Artificial sweetener does increase glucose cravings.

            I think the milk in milk chocolate was the real craving.

            Switching to dark chocolate, I forget to eat it.

            That never happened.

          1. Lida

            This site used to use WordPress to run the comments section and it apparently carried over my WordPress ID (and photo) to the new system.

            You could try creating a WordPress account and see if that works.

            Otherwise, ask the Support people via the pop-up box at the bottom of the page.

  12. Sorry this is off topic but need some feedback on getting the new shingles vaccine pro and con.
    My doctor wants me to get it but wonder if that is advisable. I am over 70 and I think it is especially considered relevant at that age. Would really appreciate some information from others who had it or chose not to. Don’t see anything from Dr. Greger on this. Thanks

    1. Lisa,

      My mother had an attack of shingles in her late 60s (perhaps caused by stress; my newborn daughter was hospitalized and nearly died at a week old), and she told me that the pain was excruciating. I’ve read that from other sufferers as well.

      I think I would do whatever I could to avoid that. Even if the vaccine is only about 50% effective, I’ve read that it reduces the severity of the symptoms of those who do come down with shingles. I plan to ask my doctor about the vaccine; I just hope I’m not too late.

      But I haven’t read about the vaccine yet, it’s pros and cons. I don’t know what it’s risks are.

      1. The CDC recomends it for older adults.

        The independent Cochrane Review orgnanisation also looked at the matter and concluded that it is likely safe and effective. Unfortunately, the link won’t post here (but you can Google it).

    2. I wanted the shingles vaccine but when I went to the drugstore in my 50s they said I was too young, and I didn’t think to ask a doctor. I then got shingles twice. The first time was really painful. Shingles can cause neurological problems, so it’s something to be avoided at all costs. I didn’t have any, thank goodness. Afterward, I switched to a plant-based diet. I’m now 63 and never even get a cold, or only every three years or so at most. Good luck to you!

    3. Lida,

      I know a whole lot of people who got shingles around your age and it really, really sucks.

      I haven’t gotten the vaccine myself, but my brother got his.

      They do it at CVS and some grocery stores.

  13. I eat about 2 Brazil Nuts a day, no more because of the high Selenium content. But I do eat them for the Selenium. Is two a day too many?

    1. Daniel, for toxicity, you are fine. 400 is the cut off. For the insulin resistance study, you want to stay under 200 and each nut runs 60 to 80, so you are under 200 for that, too. You could get away with 1 per day.

  14. hello Ive been reading studies and i am EXTREMELY concerned about not receiving these nutrients (b12 zinc sodium selenium iodine) how do us vegans get these? i take a b12 supplement and im not too happy about needing to do that, but now im panicking as this isn’t looking good for being vegan, and especially not looking good for being raw vegan and fruit based, argh! help! :(

    1. Jaden,

      I just bought my supplements.

      I have been doing A few Brazil nuts for selenium.

      I take a B12.

      I take a D3, which has iodine in it.

      Occasionally, I take zinc.

      If I remember right, Dr Greger said that we probably don’t need to take zinc, but I am overcoming brain problems and that process is going so well that I am happy with it.

      I also take Omega 3.

      I am not someone who supplements anything daily.

      The Cyano B12, you only need one pill per week.

      Iodine, you can use seaweed, which I do in the Winter in my miso soup.

      The D3 you probably can get through the sun. I can’t.

      It is heatwave all Summer. Dark when I go to work and when I get home in the Fall. Too cold in the Winter and it rained or was total sky overcast long sleeves weather literally until June 21st and the next day it turned 90 and humid.

      The only thing you really do need non-negotiable is the B12.

      Seaweed, Brazil nuts, sunshine and I can’t remember Dr Greger’s zinc answer, except to not worry too much about it.

      Can you handle 1 pill per week?

      1. I just upped my Vitamin D3.

        Mostly, do to the weight loss study and because Dr Greger talked about taking 5000 and I still get zero sun and I am overweight so I am going to try a higher dose this month.

        1. I am still amazed by kale.

          I have been trying to only eat when I am hungry thinking that maybe I am not, but I can just eat half a box is salad or even 1/3 a box of salad and as long as it is kale and arugula and watercress, with mushrooms and beans, I am not hungry again.

          I feel like I don’t understand why.

      1. Do you like his supplements?

        Are they expensive is my main question?

        The thing about my local Vitamin Shoppe is that they will match Amazon’s price and will ship to my house for free if they don’t have them in stock.

        Tonight, I also had a “personal sale” 20% off my order card, plus a $15 off the order from their rewards points, so I feel like I am interested in what he is doing, but I feel like I have a pretty good deal going already.

        It is still expensive, but I add in a few like PS100 and NeuroMag.

        I think all of my vitamins together come in about $100, but it is partly because I am doing things like upping my D3.

        I switched to DHA from Omega 3 tonight, after reading that DHA converted easily to EPA and that it is DHA that our brains really need the most.

        I am going to say it again, my brain is healing.

        My brain is healing.

        My brain is healing!!!

        I am so happy about that.

        I am afraid that as I move away from the nuts and seeds, that I might stop improving in my brain, but I can always go back if I need to. This is only a test.

          1. That is interesting.

            Hm, I will look it up.

            So far, the first link I clicked on doesn’t agree with her about there not being a risk.

            Scroll down for the risk factors for it.

            They wrote about how when fat intake, digestion, absorption, and/or metabolism are impaired, there is risk of EFAD

            Anyone with GI problems has a high risk. I know so many people with Crohn’s or Colitis and malabsorption issues.

            https://med.virginia.edu/ginutrition/wp-content/uploads/sites/199/2014/06/Parrish-June-17.pdf

          2. Barb,

            I am doing a trial period of no nuts, but all of the studies, the people who eat nuts have the lowest BMI. Lower than those who don’t eat them.

            That is interesting to me.

            I think many people though are eating nut butters and nut yogurts and nut cheeses and nut milks on top of nuts and that is not what anybody at all recommends.

            1. I am not at all against Chef AJ’s story.

              I just feel that people like Jeff Nelson are on a warpath against nuts when the studies involving nuts all seem to be good.

              I feel like it is similar to the “soy police” where people start attacking people like Dr. Greger as if his 20+ studies on his side are all worthless.

              I don’t like the way people do that.

              I hate the division and arrogance in these communities. I don’t at all mind people having their own opinions, but when it goes so contrary to the studies, and the superfoods become demonized, I hate it,

              I have been watching “Krocks in the Kitchen” losing over 100 pounds in a year and they do eat nuts. They have been mostly Eat to Live Nutritarian, with a little Mary McDougall for transitions, but both of them lost over 100 pounds in a year.

              My being post-menopausal is so different from their story that I have to try different things to see if anything at all works, but I do feel that nuts have been helping my brain and I would only go off of them as part of a weight loss experiment.

              I measured myself today as I was going through clothing to give to a poor friend and I also weighed myself and other than the 8 tenths of a pound, which was on a new number on the scale, I don’t seem to be losing even now without the nuts or avocado or green tea latte and I got rid of my blueberries and non-dairy yogurt and half of my superfoods. Plus, I have been exercising.

              I might lose part of a pound every once in a while, but it isn’t going to be easy is what I already know.

              For people like me, giving up nuts might make sense. It is at least something to try.

              But I have so much weight to lose and a few nuts a day were satisfying and I am getting rid of all of the satisfying things and that is usually when I fail and I have done this process all of my life and have failed every time, so I am sober about it.

              1. I think I just decided to keep my 4 Brazil nuts per month and a few walnuts.

                Mostly, I thought I had lost 8/10ths of a pound, but the past 2 days it has been back.

                I am going to try Vitamin D and I don’t want to be confused by which thing is giving me results.

                I didn’t really lose weight the few weeks of low fat.

                I will go back to it later, but I want to see if it is that I am low in Vitamin D, first.

                1. I am not doing it to be contrary to what other people are doing.

                  I am doing it because nuts increase metabolism and I feel like mine is totally shut down.

                  I am not going to actually lose a pound in a few weeks after going off the tea and the nuts and the avocado and the blueberries and yogurt and honey and cacao and half my vegetables. I dropped so many calories, plus have been exercising for at least an hour, plus I have been doing a lot of work around my house.

                  I feel like going down any further in calories or foods will just shut my system down further.

                  I might be wrong. It might be the fats, but this morning’s scale number didn’t reflect a drop and neither did yesterday’s.

                  I am back where I started and may never have budged. It all might have just been scale fluctuation.

              2. I hear you Deb, I really do! It’s like, ok , make a list of everything I have no interest in eating, and that is what I end up being ‘allowed’ or find out ‘works’. LOL

                I cook oatbran with a tbsp of flax, (takes 2 min) then dump it in a bowl, add a splash of soy milk, a few tbsp of berries and a walnut. Maybe you could throw some blueberries and a walnut or two on your salad, and eat a wasa flax bread ? If you have a cold roast potato wedge or two leftover, throw that on too. (the berries will make resistant starch from potatoes) I honestly do not think 2 or 3 nuts are holding up your weightloss program, but what do I know.

                The community at the coffee shop sounds wonderful. I go to a similar place to have coffee with soy milk I add myself. It’s a cheery break and well worth the price of the coffee. A herbal tea has zero calories if any interest you on the menu.

                When I first started wfpb, I did things simply. Porridge for breakfast, baked sweet potato and a spoonful of chili or beans on top and small salad for lunch, maybe the other half of the sweet potato and peas and small salad for dinner. Fruit here and there. I lost over 15 lbs the first month while I searched the net for recipe ideas that appealed to me. Think of the flavors or cuisines you enjoy and start there.

                As far as internet personalities go, I don’t let the division bother me. There is more going on than meets the eye, and that’s their problem. Two more videos came out this weekend btw, so it continues… doesn’t matter. I am going to go re-read Fumbles post about cabbage and potatoes. He might have an idea there. Take heart Deb, AJ had to try different things, we all do!

                1. Barb,

                  I will try my first real potato dish in September.

                  I have done pretty much salad since March.

                  But, I agree with you. A walnut is 26 calories and I don’t eat them every day and I don’t eat more than 4 or 5 now and then.

                  I mentally did the math of how many days it would take to lose weight by subtracting “100-ish calories now and then”

                  I am neither gaining or losing and I dropped hundreds of calories per day and am exercising off a minimum of 200 calories per day.

                  I probably have dropped 700 calories per day and exercised to burn a few hundred calories and no matter how many calories I give up, I don’t lose weight and I wasn’t gaining with those extra calories either.

                  It feels like it has to be my metabolism and nuts are supposed to increase metabolism.

                  1. Back in March, I was choosing clothing ahead of time for a wedding, which was the beginning of June. The shower was in April.

                    I am at the bottom of a clothes size and thought maybe with the changes I made back then, moving toward greens and non-starchy veggies, that maybe I would finally get to the next lower clothes size. I am still eating those greens and I did not lose a quarter of an inch since then. Nothing.

                    1. I think that the reason people can go off of them and lose weight is because people are doing nut milk, nut yogurt, nut cheeses, etc.

                      If I gave up the nuts I eat, it might be the loss of a pound at the end of the year, but that might be totally 100% offset by the metabolism thing or the fact that we don’t tend to chew every single nut calorie in the first place.

                      I feel if they pushed against using nuts as sauces versus pushing against the whole food, which none of the doctors recommend snacking on, that could be the compromise between the two positions, but I know that they are against them more than that.

    2. Jaden

      I think that you are experiencing one of those ‘mote’ and ‘beam’ in the eye moments.

      First, only one in ten Americans gets enough fruit and vegetables in their diet. So you are very probably well ahead of the game overall.
      https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

      Second, the US National Institutes of Health advise that everybody aged over 50 should take a B12 supplement (or eat B12 fortified foods); Even in younger age groups it appears to be a widespread need:

      ‘Evidence from the Framingham Offspring Study suggests that the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in young adults might be greater than previously assumed [15]. This study found that the percentage of participants in three age groups (26–49 years, 50–64 years, and 65 years and older) with deficient blood levels of vitamin B12 was similar. The study also found that individuals who took a supplement containing vitamin B12 or consumed fortified cereal more than four times per week were much less likely to have a vitamin B12 deficiency’
      https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/

      … so this is clearly not an issue unique to people calling themselves vegan.

      That said, ‘raw vegan’ is probably not a good idea since for example grains are high in selenium (but you could eat Brazil nuts).

      Iodine is in seaweed. Tofu, oatmeal and lentils are good sources of zinc. So are peanuts.

      So if you are going to stick with ‘raw vegan’, you need to plan your diet to tick all the right boxes. Nothing unusual there though. Everybody needs to plan their diet to achieve optimal nutrition. As the CDC notes, vitually everbody in the US has nutritional deficiencies of some kind or other.

      Whatever diet people eat, there are going to be gaps unless we plan our diet accordingly. The US Department of Health for example advises that a ‘vegan’ dietary pattern is healthy as long as it achieves nutrient targets
      https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-5/

      Being ‘raw vegan’ though makes it so much more difficult to do. WFPB seems an easier approach (and probably more enjoyable).

      .

      1. Tom,

        I am going to agree with you and not push raw vegan on anyone.

        Jaden,

        If you are having second thoughts already about going raw vegan, then DO THINK TWICE about it.

        I am not trying to tell you what to do, but you are worried about it and there is no “superior raw” diet.

        Whole Food Plant-Based is enough.

        It leaves you a much wider dietary pattern and you can still be vegan if that is what you are trying to do.

        However, if it is that you secretly want to keep eating meat or fish and that is what is secretly going through your brain now, well, then, maybe a Dr. Fuhrman plan where you could eat 5% of your calories from animal products.

        1. Also, Jaden, there are some prominent vegans who left raw and there are a community of raw vegans who also left vegan altogether.

          High Carb Hannah and Happy Healthy Vegan both left raw for The Starch Solution.

      2. thankyou for the reply, i find no matter how much water i drink i just cant handle the grains or beans as i have fissures thats a big reason i try stick to fruit only, but yeah its a worry with the low amount of those nutrients! just gotta put my faith in the fruits i guess

    3. Hi, Jaden! What studies have you been reading? Lots of misinformation floats around the internet, and it is best to ignore it. There is no need to panic. I will address your concerns one at a time.
      Vitamin B-12 supplements are a good idea. More on that here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/vitamin-b12/ It is worth noting that most livestock are given vitamin B-12 supplements, which is why people can get it from eating meat. Why not just skip the meat and take the supplement yourself?
      You can find everything on this site related to zinc here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/zinc/
      As you have probably learned from the video above, 1 Brazil nut per week is enough to meet your selenium needs. You can find everything related to selenium on this site here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/selenium/
      There is no need to worry about getting enough sodium. Most people consume way too much, and too much can be very harmful. More on that here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/sodium/
      Iodine is important, and needs can be met through sea vegetables such as dulse, but too much may be as harmful as not consuming enough, and some sea vegetables should be avoided. More on that here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/iodine/ I hope that helps!

  15. I eat one a day for selenium. What do studies have to say about the effect of one a day on cholesterol? Are 4 a month enough to maintain a healthy level of selenium?
    Thank you

    1. Please read my post below for a particle answer to you question, or google NCBI CHOLESTEROL BRAZIL NUT to get the test details of this.

    2. Hi, Sue McDonald! It only takes one Brazil nut a week, or about 4 per month, to meet selenium needs. With regard to Brazil nuts and cholesterol, you might be interested in this study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21619692 It is theoretically possible to get too much selenium eating one Brazil nut per day, but I am not aware of any documented cases of selenium toxicity resulting from doing this. Because Brazil nuts are so high in selenium, I would suggest that you avoid eating them in high quantities daily. I hope that helps!

  16. Dave Feldman has “cracked the code” (for the non-physiologists of the world) of lypo-proteins and the role of cholestorol. Simple put, lypo-proteins are there to transport fat nutrients and fat-energy sources for the metabolism to use. Having “high cholesterol” on a test means that you previously depleted your body of nutritious fats. He did a test in which his “high cholesterol” went really low just by measuring his lypo-proteins right after eating a healthy fatty meal.
    Check his YouTube channel.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UComIr_SYmKrR6PbX2AezIJg

  17. This has worked for me. My LDL level dropped dramatically but the HDL only rose a small amount. Even with that results my total cholesterol level was normal. First time that has ever happen in my life(71 years old).
    Even statins didn’t do that. I quit taking any kind of cholesterol lowering drugs two years ago and on a have been on a vegan whole plant based diet.
    Please don’t go with the 4 nut rule. The lower level of consumption is accurate, but what everyone needs to know is that nuts vary in weight and the tested levels were from 20 grams – 50 grams. WEIGH the nuts to make sure you are getting the amount your looking for.

  18. I forgot to add….the nuts I buy are raw and organic. I don’t know if a roasted and seasoned nut would give the same results.

  19. I’ve got (3) 10 oz jars of Brazil nut butter being delivered tomorrow to do a 3 jar n-1 study of eating Brazil nut butter every day.

    Can anyone suggest what 4 nuts would translate to in tsps?

    1. Lonie, 20 grams of brazil nuts have approximately 2.5 to 3 grams of protein(depending on the food tracker you’re using. The high range of 50 grams have just under 8 grams of protein.Checking several brands of brazil nut butter, they all say 2 tbsp of brazil nut has 4 grams of protein. Using that as a guideline, it looks like 2-4 tbsp would be a monthly dose.I don’t know if this is the only way to answer your question, but its all I could learn.Marlin 

      1. Marlin, thanks for doing the math. As I’ve heard said before “Close enough for govt. work”… and just getting close is good enough for me.

        Thanks.

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