Does Pressure Cooking Preserve Nutrients?

Does Pressure Cooking Preserve Nutrients?
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How Dr. Greger pressure steams his greens.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In a review of more than a hundred articles about the effects of cooking on vegetables, they tried to find the sweet spot. On the one hand, heat can destroy certain nutrients; on the other hand, by softening the tissues, they can become more bioavailable. Researchers settled upon steaming as the best cooking method to preserve the most nutrition. You’re not dunking it in water or oil where the nutrients can leach out, and you’re not reaching excessive dry heat temperatures. But they acknowledge that of all the common cooking methods, we know the least about pressure cooking.

There are all these fancy new electric pressure cookers on the market, including the Instant Pot, with more five-star ratings than even How Not to Die—I’m jealous! These pressure cookers are great for cooking dried beans with just a touch of a button. But what happens to the nutrition? Here’s the antioxidant content of presoaked black beans boiled for an hour normally. Compare that to pressure cooking for 15 minutes…. Even more. In fact, six times more! Wow. Here I was pressure cooking just because I liked the texture better (the canned ones can be a bit mushy), and I was spending lots of money on cases of canned beans, whereas dried beans are just so dirt cheap. So wait, cheaper, tastier, and healthier? That’s quite a combo. Okay, but what about pressure-cooking vegetables?

Vitamin C is one of the more heat-sensitive nutrients. Sauté spinach or amaranth leaves in a pan for 30 minutes, and about 95 percent of the vitamin C is destroyed, whereas 10 minutes in a pressure cooker wiped out only about 90 percent. But who pressure cooks spinach for 10 minutes? And sautéing for half an hour? And even then, not much effect on beta carotene levels either way.

Vitamin C is but one of many antioxidants. What about the effects of pressure cooking on overall antioxidant capacity? Here’s the cooking methods they compared. So, for the carrots, for example: 12 minutes of boiling, compared to five minutes of pressure cooking, compared to six minutes of microwaving. Here’s what they found. Cooking carrots increased their antioxidant potential. In fact, pressure cooking nearly doubled their antioxidant value, whereas peas took a hit no matter how they were cooked.

I’m particularly interested in the greens. The chard wasn’t affected much across the board, but microwaving beat out pressure cooking and boiling for the spinach. Note that pressure cooking beat out boiling too, though, and pressure cooking is boiling (just at a shorter time at a higher temperature.) But the time appeared to trump the temperature. Significantly less nutrient loss pressure-cooking spinach for three and a half minutes, compared to boiling for eight.

Same for those magical cancer-fighting glucosinolate compounds in cruciferous greens—the healthiest greens like kale, collards, and turnip greens. Here’s where levels started out raw, with three-quarters wiped out by boiling—but less than half with pressure cooking. Now, both got beat by steaming, but that’s because you weren’t dunking the greens in water, which can leach out the nutrients. But even though the pressure-cooked greens were immersed just as much as the boiled greens, only half the nutrient losses, presumably because it was only half the time—seven minutes pressure-cooked compared to 15 minutes boiled.

Okay, so here’s my idea. This was after 10 minutes of steaming. What if you cut down that time by pressure steaming, like put a layer of water down at the bottom of an electric pressure cooker, drop in a metal steaming basket on top, and then put the greens in and steam under pressure? That’s how I cook the greens I eat every day. I’ve always loved collards in like Southern cooking, or Ethiopian cuisine, and I found I could get that same melt-in-your-mouth texture just steaming under pressure for zero minutes. What you do is set it for zero, so it shuts off as soon as it reaches the cooking pressure, and then quick release valve it immediately to release the steam. The greens turn out perfect—bright emerald green, cooked tender. Give it a try, and let me know what you think.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Your Best Digs via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In a review of more than a hundred articles about the effects of cooking on vegetables, they tried to find the sweet spot. On the one hand, heat can destroy certain nutrients; on the other hand, by softening the tissues, they can become more bioavailable. Researchers settled upon steaming as the best cooking method to preserve the most nutrition. You’re not dunking it in water or oil where the nutrients can leach out, and you’re not reaching excessive dry heat temperatures. But they acknowledge that of all the common cooking methods, we know the least about pressure cooking.

There are all these fancy new electric pressure cookers on the market, including the Instant Pot, with more five-star ratings than even How Not to Die—I’m jealous! These pressure cookers are great for cooking dried beans with just a touch of a button. But what happens to the nutrition? Here’s the antioxidant content of presoaked black beans boiled for an hour normally. Compare that to pressure cooking for 15 minutes…. Even more. In fact, six times more! Wow. Here I was pressure cooking just because I liked the texture better (the canned ones can be a bit mushy), and I was spending lots of money on cases of canned beans, whereas dried beans are just so dirt cheap. So wait, cheaper, tastier, and healthier? That’s quite a combo. Okay, but what about pressure-cooking vegetables?

Vitamin C is one of the more heat-sensitive nutrients. Sauté spinach or amaranth leaves in a pan for 30 minutes, and about 95 percent of the vitamin C is destroyed, whereas 10 minutes in a pressure cooker wiped out only about 90 percent. But who pressure cooks spinach for 10 minutes? And sautéing for half an hour? And even then, not much effect on beta carotene levels either way.

Vitamin C is but one of many antioxidants. What about the effects of pressure cooking on overall antioxidant capacity? Here’s the cooking methods they compared. So, for the carrots, for example: 12 minutes of boiling, compared to five minutes of pressure cooking, compared to six minutes of microwaving. Here’s what they found. Cooking carrots increased their antioxidant potential. In fact, pressure cooking nearly doubled their antioxidant value, whereas peas took a hit no matter how they were cooked.

I’m particularly interested in the greens. The chard wasn’t affected much across the board, but microwaving beat out pressure cooking and boiling for the spinach. Note that pressure cooking beat out boiling too, though, and pressure cooking is boiling (just at a shorter time at a higher temperature.) But the time appeared to trump the temperature. Significantly less nutrient loss pressure-cooking spinach for three and a half minutes, compared to boiling for eight.

Same for those magical cancer-fighting glucosinolate compounds in cruciferous greens—the healthiest greens like kale, collards, and turnip greens. Here’s where levels started out raw, with three-quarters wiped out by boiling—but less than half with pressure cooking. Now, both got beat by steaming, but that’s because you weren’t dunking the greens in water, which can leach out the nutrients. But even though the pressure-cooked greens were immersed just as much as the boiled greens, only half the nutrient losses, presumably because it was only half the time—seven minutes pressure-cooked compared to 15 minutes boiled.

Okay, so here’s my idea. This was after 10 minutes of steaming. What if you cut down that time by pressure steaming, like put a layer of water down at the bottom of an electric pressure cooker, drop in a metal steaming basket on top, and then put the greens in and steam under pressure? That’s how I cook the greens I eat every day. I’ve always loved collards in like Southern cooking, or Ethiopian cuisine, and I found I could get that same melt-in-your-mouth texture just steaming under pressure for zero minutes. What you do is set it for zero, so it shuts off as soon as it reaches the cooking pressure, and then quick release valve it immediately to release the steam. The greens turn out perfect—bright emerald green, cooked tender. Give it a try, and let me know what you think.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Your Best Digs via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I love practical day-to-day decision-type videos.  What’s the Best Way to Cook Vegetables? What about How to Cook Greens? What’s The Best Way to Cook Sweet Potatoes? Watch the videos!

I also have some actual cooking videos up:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

165 responses to “Does Pressure Cooking Preserve Nutrients?

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  1. Well i thought pressure cooking always mean steam cooking in a pressure cooker because i cook most of the végétables and potatoes like this but apparently not, i dont think there is much difference between regular lower temp steaming and steaming foods under pressure but i think you cant cook legumes and grains with steam only, you need to put them into water and cook them in a pot or a pressure cooker, right?

      1. I’ve never read anywhere that legumes and grains MUST be pressure cooked. They must be cooked well I agree, and certainly some need pre soaking too, but the way of cooking them has never been to specifically pressure cook them.

        1. I think they meant that if you put the beans in the pressure cooker, you cannot use the steam function. As far as I know, you can use the crockpot function for most beans….except kidney beans, which must be boiled or pressure cooked.

      2. Huh? Millions of people around the world cook legumes and grains on a regular stove.

        Lots of people do not own a pressure cooker.

        1. I live in California and we have prop 65 which warns consumers of cancer causing chemicals and instant pot is one of them. I went to look online to purchase an instant pot and when you read description it includes a warning of cancer causing chemicals, I decided not to buy it, not worth it to me.

          1. The question is: What part of the unit contains cancer causing chemicals.

            Many circuit boards (like the one inside the unit) trigger the CA law.  You won’t be cooking your food on the circuit board or even touching it …

          2. I have a lead testing kit (you can get in any hardware store) and routinely test all cooking or eating surfaces for lead before I use them. It might be, as Richard has said, that the chemicals in question are not part of the cooking/eating surfaces.

            It might be something other than lead too…

            In my farmer’s market, Sprouts, I found a B-complex vitamin that says right on the back label, “This product contains lead.” I’ve never seen that kind of a direct warning on any consumable before, so I called headquarters and asked about it. They told me that the label warning was in response to the CA Prop 65 mandate and may have nothing to do with the vitamins themselves. It might be in the glass bottle that holds them. Go figure.

            Here’s something you might be interested in, especially the top ¶ of the answer:

            https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/why-does-my-supplement-have-a-warning-label-from-the-state-of-california/cancer_warning_on_labels/

        2. You can bake, roast, or steam anything in a pressure cooker. to steam any thing at all just put in a small amount of water and use a Trivet refer to your pressure cooker manual, so many these days come with preset one touch settings that allow you to over ride the preset times either plus or minus fully user selectable. secondly there is no need to presoak hard beans or anything for that matter over night,

          1. I dont think you can cook dry grains, beans or others dry foods with steam only because they need to absorb water…
            There are two method of cooking in a pressure cooker, in water and with steam only.

      1. Engleg: Me too! I found a smaller pot that would fit inside the InstantPot’s pot and sit on top of a trivet, using only a few cups of water in the outer pot, so that the soy beans are “presure-steamed”. I soak the beans for 18 hours, and pressure-steam them for 4 hours. The beans turn out “soft as butter”, and this I have found to be one of the secrets of great natto.

        Glad to know that someone else is making their own natto.

    1. Pressure cook steaming gets much hotter and no steam escapes (until you vent it). It’s not under pressure for long although it takes minutes to start up the pressure. Heat destroys some vitamins he just said so it must be the pressure holding the steam down that leaves it with more nutrients. Still high oxalates though?

    2. For greens and other vegetables just plain good old steaming, maybe three types in one basket, no complications, just skill and some time while busy cooking washing etc preparing the meal, and take out when perfectly cooked for different times for different vegetables, adding to the sauce at the end etc. Pressure cooking beans sounds like an option though particularly in advance, thanks

      1. I thought the whole point of this topic is that pressure cooking is the optimal way to retain the majority of nutrients in Veges. It’s also the only way to kill lectins in veges. Steaming I don’t believe will. Where are Dr. Gregors comments on here about all these questions? The forum is helpful but
        Convoluted somewhat.

  2. Do you know those “what I eat in a day” videos on youtube from mostly vegan fitness folks where you can follow them around for a day to see what they eat morning, lunch, dinner, etc…?

    Wouldn’t it be kinda cool to see what Dr. Greger eats in a day? For example, I’ve recently found out he adds lentils to his morning oatmeal. What a great idea.

    There’s probably more of this crazy stuff. Not a bad idea for a video me thinks.

    1. NETGOGATE:
      I add canned black beans to my cooked rolled oats. I call my oatmeal breakfast Asian oats. In addition to the oats and beans I add greens, either mixed, or singular such as baby kale or spinach (from those plastic containers, such as Earthbound, or Organic Girl), and soy sauce (prefer Nama Shoyu). As soon as I take the oats cooked in water out of the microwave (3 minute cook time) I add the greens, stir a bit, then add beans and soy sauce. The greens wilt quickly. No need to actually cook them. If you eat nuts/seeds you can try sprinkling with sesame seeds, or ground flaxseed. Chopped green onion, or cilantro are good but that’s getting a bit too involved for my morning routine. Don’t limit Asian oats to the morning. The legumes in the oatmeal keeps me satiated a lot longer than typical oatmeal with berries/bananas. I have tried adding beans to sweet style oatmeal but I wasn’t crazy about that. The savory style of oats is a nice change from the typical sweet way of eating oatmeal.

      I give credit of my Asian oats to Dr. Esselsyn’s book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. In it, one of his patients, Anthony Yen, provided a recipe for oats, greens, and low-sodium tamari. It only took me about ten years to try it because it seemed so weird compared to our typical way of eating them. I am so glad I did.

      I second your suggestion of a What Dr. Gregor Eats In A Day video.

      1. I also eat black beans and oatmeal for breakfast and add 1/2 cup of canned pumpkin. My greens are freshly chopped lemon balm and spearmint. Top with some raw buckwheat groats, cacao nibs, flax meal, and raisins. A splash of unsweetened soy milk. Fresh orange, lemon and lime for citrus. Cranberries and water in the blender for juice. Breakfast of champions.

      2. WW❣️TY for all that! I wonder if u have to cook the lentils or will they absorb the liquid as I prepare mine overnight in small mason jars. It was on Pinterest and I make a variety. One with blueberries and lemon, sometimes use only water if out of almond milk, other times non dairy yogurt and add walnuts and banana always w/ground flax seed and cinnamon. I think if I did this one with beans and spinach I would add some turmeric, mustard seed powder and cumin since it’s more like a lunch m. I am also trying to watch all the carb intake As well as lectins that I’m just now discovering about in veges.

        1. Sound like you really enjoy your sprouted lentils, although you should be aware that raw lentils, even sprouted are not for everyone.Consider this from a reputable source on sprouting: . https://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/sprouting/how-to-sprout-lentils/ “Unlike most legumes, lentil sprouts may be eaten raw. However, some may experience discomfort from consuming too many raw lentil sprouts. We recommend cooking sprouted lentils before consuming.”
          Besides the potential for GI upset, it seems cooked lentils have a slight advantage over sprouted healthwise. Check out this video please:
          https://nutritionfacts.org/2016/05/03/sprouted-lentils-healthier-canned-lentils/
          “…we can compare the overall antioxidant power of boiled versus sprouted beans. In that case, boiled appears to have a marginal edge….
          Boiled beans do about 40 times better than raw beans—the same cancer growth inhibition at just a fraction of the concentration. Sprouted beans do about the same.” As Dr. Greger says later in this same video ” As far as I’m concerned, we should eat beans in whichever way will get us to eat the most of them” Still you might consider at least cooking some of your sprouted lentils for that health edge. Hope this helps.

      1. I have worked with you for 3 years online.
        Thank so much for the opportunity to apply as a volunteer job with your N.G.O.
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    2. Simnett nutrition has many great what I eat in a day videos. He is a plant based certified holistic nutritionist from Parksville BC Canada

  3. Perhaps a little off-topic, but one of my favorite uses for my Instant Pot is preparing several days worth of a grain mix I use in my breakfast.

    2/3 cup each of quinoa, buckwheat groats, steel cut oats.
    3 cups water

    Pressure cook High for 4 minutes, wait for natural release. Comes out with a nice texture similar to sticky rice. Keeps well for up to a week refrigerated in a covered dish.

  4. Ethiopian greens at most every Ethiopian restaurant get there ‘melt in your mouth’ texture from niter kibbeh, spiced butter. They are also, unlike southern cooking, chopped fine before cooking which dramatically changes the texture when cooked. People who eat vegan Ethiopian cuisine use spiced oil instead.

    Southern cooking greens get their ‘melt in your mouth’ texture from very long cooking times and pork fat.

    To ignore that fats are a part of the dishes most of the time is a bit misleading. Greens cooked without fats just turn into the texture of canned spinach.

    1. Wow Dr. Greger, great information! I am going to try your method of cooking greens in my Instant Pot. It is very helpful to know that I am saving many nutrients by pressure cooking. It gives me great encouragement to know what I am doing correctly or incorrectly with so many things that involve health for myself and my family. Thank you. I love your videos. Keep up the great work you are doing!

    2. Jumbo,

      We get tender collards by rinsing them, chopping them, then adding about 1/8 t baking soda and 1/4 t brown sugar per serving (we eat fairly generous servings; the chopped raw greens fill the pan, about 2 qts); we cook them in a pan over medium heat, for about 6 min, stirring every 2 min, and adding a bit of water if needed. Fantastic!! And fast. I can’t imagine cooking them for as long as you describe.

      And we got the recipe from a co-worker of my husband (we got collards in a CSA delivery, and had no idea what to do), who also added ham hocks — which we skip, of course! But it is an example of how you never know where you can find wonderful recipes and cooking suggestion.

    3. Not true. “Greens cooked without fats just turn into the texture of canned spinach”

      lots of Mediterranean people do it well with spices too and without the fats

      Greens are surprisingly easy to make delicious. You may be ham fisted with your greens jimbo

    4. Wow! Thanks for that texture tip on Ethiopian-style greens…an interesting must-try-tonight variation for my usual steamed greens w/ a bit of EVOO and lemon juice.

  5. What about the cheaper non-electric pressure cookers? Are they just as effective in terms of nutrition & the “zero minute ” setting?

    1. I have three non electric pressure cookers of various sizes I have been using for 20 years, and I steam greens like Dr Greger describes…but it requires more attention than an instapot with built in timer. Basically, you bring your cooker up to pressure, remove from heat and take to the sink and run cold water over the lid to quick release. nutritionally it shoudl be just the same.

      I soak dry beans overnight, rinse and drain, add fresh water, and those presoaked baneas only take 4-8 minutes instead of 15-20 for dry beans.

      I also adore savory oats for breakfast, while they are cooking I saute mushrooms, onions, brocolli stems, whatever needs using up. Then I top my oats with sauteed veggies, fermented veg, dollop of hummus, sprinkle of sesame seeds. And lots of fresh ground pepper! I learned this from an Italian friend who said savory oatmeal is a thing in Italy. (but they would add parmesan cheese, not hummus). I will try lentils instead of hummus next time. Sounds delish.

      1. Mims this is where Dr Greger was unclear (non specific).. previously I’ve read that it’s the throwing out of the water from the beans that wastes the nutrition. An advantage of the extra high heat under pressure cooking us supposedly no need for pre-soaking beans or you can soak in same cooking water

  6. Love the video. Such great useful info, taking the guess work out. And I love my insta-pot even more than my pressure cooker.

  7. Dr. Greger’s “melt-in-your-mouth” is my “slimy,” so I have been eating all of my cruciferous greens raw, or chopped and stirred into already cooked hot soup. I blend collards and kale in my smoothies and shred cabbage, broccoli and kale into my salads. I do steam-fry bok choy and broccoli sometimes. Is there any advantage to cooking these cruciferous greens instead of eating them raw?

    I use my InstantPot often, just not for greens – mostly bean/mushroom/vegetable stews.

    1. Anne, About your comment, “I use my InstantPot often, just not for greens – mostly bean/mushroom/vegetable stews.”

      I was just about to post a similar comment. I make green smoothies with a variety of greens, to preserve all the nutrients and then add some of the smoothie mix to my previously cooked bean-grains and other veggies, into a soup mix.

    2. Yes, there is an advantage to gently cooking most crucifers. You destroy the capacity to produce nitriles, which compete with those healthy isothiocyanates for production. The catch is: Cooking also destroys myrosinase enzymes, which convert the sulfurs, so add back the enzymes by eating some spicy crucifers in the same meal.

      As with everything, there are exceptions. Watercress is the main one. Always eat it raw. It produces nitriles when cooked.

      More here. https://eatandbeatcancer.com/2013/11/30/anti-cancer-recipes-groundbreaking-news-about-crucifers-another-bombshell/

  8. I always soak my beans for at least 8 hours before putting them in the pressure cooker. I add all vegetables and enough liquid to cover the bottom 2 inches and usually cook for about 30 minutes as I was always concerned that less time might not cook the beans enough to prevent food poisoning. Is 15 minutes in an Instapot for beans suffice?

    Thank you, oh wise group!

  9. You keep talking about the nutrients leaching out into the water. Don’t folk consume the liquid much of the time, especially with beans, legumes, etc?

    1. Jabrou, that was my question, too. I eat greens raw or swirled into soups, stews and beans right before serving. Are we not consuming the leached out into the broth nutrients when we eat the meal?

      I do not own a pressure cooker though I help a friend do her pressure canning of salmon. Greens are so fragile I wouldn’t even blanche them never mind pressure cooking. The slow cooker does beans ok.

      1. Barb, I agree that it’s better to eat the greens raw and eat the bean-grain water that they were cooked in. As I commented earlier, I make green smoothies with a variety of greens, to preserve all the nutrients and then add some of the smoothie mix to my previously cooked bean-grains and other veggies, into a soup mix.

      2. It depends on how much greens you want to eat. Take a plastic WalMart shopping bag, jam it full of chopped greens and pack as tightly as you can. That makes 3 quarts of canned greens. So if you want to eat a lot of greens, you have to either cook them down or else spend a long time eating them.

        1. But you don’t have to eat as many greens if you don’t cook them, because you haven’t lost as many nutrients. Right? I hope? I really don’t like eating cooked greens!

          1. Heat makes some nutrients bioavailable and kills bugs. Greens are hard to wash thoroughly under and between evey leaf. Snails and slugs (and even just their slime can contain eggs from) tiny parasites.that can burrow through your stomach or brain. You’ve heard the occasional reports of boys who eat bugs on a dare then die

  10. Just what I’ve been waiting for to get me to steam veggies in the pressure cooker.
    Does anyone have a good recommendation for the metal steamer you’d insert?

    1. June,

      I just use the steamers I’ve used on the stovetop for decades. Eg: a stainless steel steamer, with legs, where the basket sides fold inward over a flat circular bottom, and outward to fit different sized cooking pots, and a central stem with a wire loop I use to remove the basket from the IP.

      There are all kinds of steamers available.

  11. So – microwaving beat both pressure cooking and boiling in terms of nutrition preserved. Interesting. I’m looking forward to a video about microwaves!

  12. I’ve been pressure steaming my greens for about a year now and I just LOVE the way they turn out! Kale is bright, fluffy and tender! Good to know I’m not losing crucial nutrients! Thanks doc!!!

  13. I never pressure cook my veggies submerged in water, but instead pressure steam them: about 1/2 – 1 cup of water, with the veggies in a steamer basket, under pressure, High or Low, for about 0-2 min, then quickly release the pressure. (0-2 min HP or LP, QPR), depending on the veggie. Then I save the water used to steam them (in the fridge), and use it later to cook beans or grains, or to make soups and stews.

    And when I add greens to soups and stews, I add them to the top of the soup or stew after it’s cooked, put the lid on, and let it sit, or add a bit of pressure cooking for a short time. Then I stir the wilted/slightly cooked greens in. Same thing for delicate veggies, such as summer squash, or even tomatoes. Depending on the recipe.

    I also cook some veggies in the microwave: acorn squash cooks particularly well there, halved, seeds removed, cook for 2 min, turn, cook 2 more minutes, then remove and let them sit for about 5 min before serving with the skin (which we usually don’t eat; we scoop the flesh out from it).

    I find two cookbooks very helpful, “The New Fast Food” and “Vegan Under Pressure,” by Jill Nussinow; an R.D., she’s been teaching vegan eating and cooking — and pressure cooking — for 3 decades. The books have cooking charts for beans, whole grains, rice, and veggies, with amounts of water, pressure, and time recommended. I use them all the time, especially when adapting other recipes to cook in the IP. And the books also have wonderful recipes, for those, like me, who are not intuitive cooks.

    1. I thought consuming water from certain cooked vegetables, such as mushrooms, sweet potatoes, spinach, can be unhealthy due to a release of high content of oxalates into the cooking water…

      1. Fawn,

        Well, I don’t steam mushrooms or spinach separately; they are usually part of a dish. And in that case, I eat the entire original veggie, so I don’t understand how any oxalates in liquid left over from steaming them (if there is any) is worse than eating them in the intact veggie in a soup or stew.

        As for sweet potatoes, I’ve eaten them roasted, oxalates (are there any?) and all. I also add them directly to soups and stews, skins and all.

        So, I don’t really understand your concerns.

        Plus, I steam my veggies in 1/2 – 1 cup of liquid, so I almost always need to add more when cooking beans and grains, or making soups and stews. Because I use my IP at least once a day, and frequently more often.

        1. I think Dr Greger recently suggested eating less spinach or chard and more kale instead because of the oxalic acids if that’s a concern for you? If you blanch spinach in hot water you lose other nutrients of course

      2. Fawn – I think your oxalate question/issue can be addressed by (who but?) Dr. Greger. If you do a search on this site for oxalates, spinach, etc. you will find a number of videos addressing the oxalate “worry”. As Dr. G states, the issue of oxalates may be more an issue of whether or not you are a person that reacts poorly to them, as many people have no oxalate problem.
        For myself, I’ve been eating gobs of spinach and high oxalate vegg for over a decade both raw, steamed, baked (not smoothied because I just don’t do smoothies) and have never had a problem.
        Have fun researching! cheers!

    2. I also like the electric pressure cooker (mine is an Instant Pot, or IP) because it keeps my house much cooler (important during the hot summer months in a house with no AC), it’s much quicker than my stove top, slow cooker, and rice cooker (the last 2 types of appliances are now gone), and it is more energy efficient. All very important considerations.

      Plus, the food tastes good!

      By the way: when I cook beans, I eat them with the broth. There isn’t much left-over cooking liquid (or broth) when I cook them in accordance with the guidance provided in the cooking charts in Jill Nussinow’s pressure cooking cookbooks. And, of course, there is no left-over liquid from cooking grains. Quinoa: perfect! Polenta: not at all lumpy, much less burned. Amaranth, millet, etc: lovely!

    3. The trick must be to pressure steam veg in sizes with similar cooking times. I’ve always hesitated as I steam mountains of multiple types of veg with different cooking times. I’d still need the stovetop steamer for soft fast veg like tomatoes and broccoli?

      I guess you could pressure cook steam potatoes with even larger chunks of sweet potato until 3/4 quarters cooked then if you add more veg on top it won’t take that long to recover it’s steam again? But manual pressure release could disturb (explode the edges of) some veg?

      There are tonnes of great instant pot recipes online now including tables for cooking beans soaked or unsoaked, depending on the texture you want

  14. This video seems totally from the perspective of the need to cook greens. Just throw kale, (spinach if you wish), celery, cucumbers, and some fruit in a vitamix with some water and make a green smoothie. You get all the nutrients of the raw food.

    1. Variety is good Brent. See his videos on this. More nutrients from blended but some nutrients released from cooking, and from intact whole foods you get more resistant starch and more .fibre makes it further down you for intestinal flora and colon health.

    2. Hi Brent – I appreciate your comment as smoothies are really quick. That can be useful for sure. But also, some vegg increase their nutritional “goodies” when they are cooked. Some increase their nutritional content with longer cooking times like tomatoes which produce lycopene – particularly useful for men and their prostrates. The longer you cook tomatoes the more the lycopene increases (interestingly enough). Tomato paste has the highest lycopene content and I saw some research, years ago now, that showed that lycopene has a protection effect in the skin from the sun. Since I work out doors, I spread tomato paste on my bread (or whatever) to make sure I’m getting enough.
      Other vegg that increase nutritionally with cooking are celery and carrot (as noted in this video). So cooking does have some positives . . .
      I found this information about lycopene/tomatoes in a very interesting book titled “Eating on the Wild Side” by Jo Robinson. This book is worth reading if one is interested in their nutrition.
      – have a great day!

  15. Okay, I just went to Insta-Pot’s site to verify that the type I have does not let you do zero.

    I watched the video on that type over and over again and it was so confusing even what they were doing to get it off the default time of 30 minutes and the time function and power function are together, so they were doing the time twice on their video and I still don’t understand it, but the time function will not go to zero was the clear part.

  16. I watched their instructional video over and over again and I will never be able to understand it because they didn’t give verbal instructions. Just the cheerful music with them adjusting the time, then the power, then the time again.

    1. Deb,

      try visiting other sites, with videos on how to use an IP. That’s what I did. I found this website, which is not vegan, helpful: https://www.hippressurecooking.com/learn-to-pressure-cook/

      There are many, many others. It’s fun watching the IP cooking videos.

      I also bought a few cookbooks, and read the introductory information at the front, about how to pressure cook.

      Then I did the water test with my IP, and made the smashed cauliflower/potato recipe from the website I suggested. Then I started cooking beans and grains, soups and stews, and finally veggies. Last night I cooked pasta for the first time: it worked like a charm!

      1. Dr. J.

        I have watched a lot of videos, but my Instapot, I have trouble getting it to a low time and watching then it just shuts off when I am making chili and just says, “Burn” after 5 minutes.

        Finding out that the power and time are on the same blinking setting and that if I adjust the power, it means that I have to adjust the time again maybe will help.

        Also, finding out that it has a 30 minute default time and it may reset to that when you adjust the power.

        People aren’t using the model I have.

        1. I think I have figured out that “burn” means that the liner bottom is having chili burnt onto it, but it is in pressure setting, so I have to shoot the steam all over the cabinets for a while to open it and stir it.

          1. I didn’t realize that it defaults back to a 30 minute time.

            I knew that in the process, I would often forget to turn off the “warmer” function because it is in the same scrolling thing and it is so confusing and I would come back out thinking it had turned itself off and find out that everything in the pot had broken down and most of my miso soup was on the cabinets and there was a small amount of soup left in the pot. Or it was all broken down as if I had used an immersion blender and I would microwave more vegetables and add them in later to have some texture left.

            1. You and me both, Deb! I have a pressure cooker with Chinese directions. I couldn’t figure out how to get it to close! I hate my pressure cooker. I guess I need to break down and get an IP.

      2. Dr. J – Can you share what size IP you use? I realize that’s ultimately a personal decision, but I’m just curious. I’d like to get one but am completely flamboozled about what size is useful for a single person. I tend to cook in large batches in order to have leftovers, but when I looked at the large IP I realized that I didn’t have room in my kitchen for it. So I’m just curious what size you use. I’m assuming, also, that yours lives on the countertop since you use it so often?
        And thanks for the book suggestion by Jill Nussinow!
        best! –

        1. Ruth,

          I live in a 2 person household, and have a 6 qt IP. Most of the time, the food I cook (beans, grains, soups, stews, etc) is enough for the two of us for 2-3 meals. Sometimes, I freeze left-overs; otherwise, we eat them the next day with different sides. But we do eat smaller portions now than when we were younger (we are 68 and 76 yo).

          I’ve had mine for 2 years, and find that I use it more and more. The other day I cooked pasta in in for the first time! I plan to try pot-in-pot soon, for cooking smaller amounts of food, and/or more than one type of food at a time. And some day, I may try “baking” a cake in it.

          I also bought an air fryer lid (CrispLid by Mealthy) that works on the IP; I want to be able to air fry without oil. Meanwhile, I’ve discovered that I can make small batches of air fried veggies — which are similar to oven roasted, but without the need to turn on my oven, thus heating up my kitchen. And it takes up less storage space than an entire air fryer would.

          And yes, I do keep it on a counter top, since I use mine daily at least once, usually more. I keep it under a relatively unusable corner under cupboards, and move it to where I want to use it. But I have already given away my rice cooker, and plan to donate my slow cookers, now in the basement. My mantra is: something new in, something old out.

  17. Not surprised at all that the nutrient content of cooked foods in contact with water (a solvent) depends more on time rather than temperature (within normal cooking limits). This is because most of the lost nutrition isn’t being destroyed through a chemical reaction, but rather leached out, which is more time dependent than temperature dependent. For further information on this I recommend looking up the Arrhenius Equation and Fick’s Laws of Diffusion.

    1. The food is in contact with steam, above the water (as I’m sure you realise). Temperature is relevant when the pressure cooker is building up pressure because it shortens the cooking time and that pressure suppresses the water from actively boiling ie minimises bouncing molecules in the pot around the food until you vent it

      1. Yes, the steam is what cooks the food and reduces the amount of nutrition lost to leaching through reduced contact with water (a solvent). The water that does condense and touch the food can accumulate enough to drip off back into the water, so with the reduced time cooking in the pressure cooker, there is less water that condenses and drips off of the food compared to regular steaming. Also the reason the pressure cooker builds up pressure is because of the temperature increase; the Ideal Gas Law tells us this, PV = nRT. The increases pressure reduces the amount of water molecules in the gas phase because of water’s vapor pressure, the Clausius-Clapeyron relation can provide more information related to that.

  18. I cook kale in my Instant Pot with half a cup of water, filling the pot with kale to the 3/4 mark. Turns out great, as you say. I’ll try the steamer.

  19. I cook my greens in my instant pot with mushrooms and onions almost daily. I usually set the time to 1 minute and they are delicious.

  20. I used an electric pressure cooker for the first time yesterday! (FARBERWARE) I made carrots, potatoes, celery, onion, fresh sucked corn with curry powder and Worcestershire sauce. It was quick and omg it was perfectly cooked and so delicious!

      1. Barb,

        Look at the models and find one, which is easy to adjust the time.

        If you get an Instapot, get a kind with buttons. When I was buying them, all of them had the knobs, and now they are back to buttons.

        But most of the buttons are useless, you need to be able to adjust the time yourself, not have it choose pre-set times.

        My Instapot splatters. My old pressure cooker didn’t and I just watched a Power Quick Pot video and it showed it not splattering compared to the Instapot splattering. Power Quick Pot has a splatter guard and it won an award because it comes to pressure 50% faster.

        Not sure of its longevity, but it has a time button and a Sous Vide button.

        Barb, if you get the right types, it is as non-threatening as a Crockpot, but I genuinely have barely had any soup left in my model Instapot and I genuinely have had it shut off within 5 minutes for things, which needed 15 minutes, and that is so confusing.

        People love Instapot, so I am thinking theirs doesn’t work like mine.

      2. Barb,

        Did you have the kind where it would explode and the top piece would fly across the room?

        Sounds like you did.

        We had that.

        This is not like that.

            1. Barb,

              Most of them are safe.

              I was watching a video and the heater element isn’t hot enough to cause the same explosion as stovetop models.

              I only found that brand – the Power Pressure Cooker XL which has a defective locking mechanism and it is an “as seen on tv” brand and is sold at stores like Bed Bath and Beyond, so it is a popular brand.

              1. Your comments are very helpful, thank you Deb! I have not witnessed an explosion and would prefer not to really. That’s too bad about your soup, but did you watch Dr Greger make miso soup on the stove top. He just heated up some water, mixed spoonful of miso and tbsps of water in a dish and added that slowly back into the saucepan which he takes off the element.

                Anyway, I will look around… I am looking at scales too. Thanks again!

                1. Barb,

                  No, I don’t remember that. Is there a video?

                  I just read his Miso recipe and, YES, waiting until it is hot to add the Miso would probably already solve a lot of things.

                  Water spatter is so much nicer than sticky soup spatter.

                  Laughing. I watch so many Dr. Greger videos that I am surprised that I missed one.

                  I will have to look for it.

                  I am still laughing at his Summer Fest Q & A.

                  He is so fabulously playful and quirky and energetic and vivacious.

                  The camera didn’t show his wife so I didn’t get to see if he makes her laugh.

                  I have a friend from high school who was bookish and sweet and he is Jewish and funny, but he was so clumsy when we were growing up that all sorts of ridiculous things used to happen and I knew immediately when he met his wife because she told a story of how my friend went to pick up someone at a very powerful person’s home where her family was from and he was so focused on listening and talking that he walked straight into the man’s swimming pool and she started laughing and it was the first time I had met her. He had brought her to see me in California and the way she laughed, I approved the choice. She still laughs like that.

                    1. Thanks, Barb!

                      I have watched this one.

                      Interestingly enough, I remember the oatmeal and flax and all sorts of things, but he did so much teaching during the “cooking lessons” that I think I forgot the recipes entirely.

                      I think he moved from breakfast to science for quite a long time.

                      He is so much more polished nowadays, but he was still so on-point and passionate and still had the same message.

                    2. It was interesting when he was speaking about Chernobyl and Miso and it occurs to me that Japan has had a few tests of Miso’s power versus cancer from radiation. Those on top of Chernobyl would seem to be interesting points of reference.

                      There obviously would be no control group for Fat Man and Little Boy and nuclear power plant Cancer radiation, but some of these things are long enough ago that the data might possibly be there.

  21. I’ve used the same pressure cooker for as long as I can remember. The only occasional upkeep is to replace the sealing ring which is readily available at the local hardware store. I have several stainless steel steam baskets that have small legs and it keeps the food above the water. When I go on a trip, I take a 4 quart PC with along with a small one electric plate. Many a good meal on vacation and well fed children. Just stop in a grocery store, see what’s new, and cook/steam in the motel room. No mess. No greasy fry odor. Quick clean up. Throw paper plates away. It always tastes better away from home! I also have 6 quart for home. The pressure cooker, whether electric or not, is the best investment you can make. They both do the same thing. My kids wanted to buy me an electric one and my decision was an easy one—no I don’t want it as it takes up too much counter space. There are no problems with time or timing or zero time etc and it’s easy to lift and move and put away. Easy to clean too. Be well friends. Great topic Doctor G

    .

      1. In an older pressure cooker the sealing ring goes around the inside of the outer edge of the lid. It is some type of a rubberized gasket.

      2. Deb – I have an old pre-InstaPot stove-top pressure cooker that my Mother bought me decades ago. I cannot tell you how much I love this thing. Can’t set a timer and leave it like the InstaPots but it still saves a ton of time in the kitchen. I think of her every time I use it and thank her – and yes I told her that! Anyway, mine is a Swiss made Dura Pot by Kuhn Rikon. In 20 years I’ve never replaced the lid seal (around the top rim of the lid). I have had to replace the steam vent, on the lid, once as the rubberized (or siliconized, whatever) seal hardened over time and didn’t hold the pressure well any more. But that’s the only “repair”. The pot is stainless steel and I use it for other stove top cooking as well. You can google Kuhn Rikon for their website. Just be aware that they are an international company and their website is set up for english but also german, swiss, french, and others. So if the dollars don’t make sense just check at the top of the page to see which country website of theirs you have pulled up. You can switch at the top of the page.
        Another summer cooking tip to share is that when I use my slow cooker for beans, I set it outside to cook (and yes, I place in a safe place where animals, etc cannot get to it – all the usual safety stuff). I often let my slow cooker do it’s thing all night on the back deck.

  22. Maybe that is why research shows that Latin Americans have better health outcomes because of the consumption of beans/legumes…. because here we always use pressure cookers. Not as fancy as the ones in the US but pressure cookers regardless.

  23. I pressure cook beans because well you have to if you want them soft. I boil the rest but keep the water and thicken it with pea flour or equivalent so nothing lost that heat wont kill.

  24. Re: steaming vs. slow-juicing

    I would be very interested to know how pressure-steamed greens compares with slow-juiced greens from an augur-type juicer in terms of nutrient values. The purpose of steaming is to soften the cell walls in order to make nutrients more available. Slow-juicing in a high-quality juicer also breaks the cell walls, and perhaps has the advantage of not denaturing heat-sensitive nutrients with high temperatures.

    I’m sure there are many strong “opinions” on this subject, but I would like to see some lab results, i.e., some numerical data.

        1. We stir fry our veggies in a little water.  We consume most of the sauce.  So we don’t throw away the juice.

          I wonder how that compares to the other techniques.

          It’s quick, easy and tastes great.  No special equipment required.

        2. plant_this_thought – That’s an interesting idea and I would be curious to see some number on that as well. We already know that tomatoes, celery, and carrots increase their phytonutrients with cooking (I posted above on this), but your question is still something to look at. As a gardener, I know that plants increase their phytonutrients with environmental stressing like sun, bruising, bug attacks, etc. We, then, use those phytonutrients for ourselves when we eat those plants. So the I can’t help but wonder if the severe bruising that a slow juicer imparts on plants might increase once juiced. We know that garlic makes its magic when its cells are mangled and crushed and let sit for 10 minutes. We also know that broccoli works the same way and Dr. G has a video on chopping your broccoli 40 minutes before cooking to potentiate the phytonutrients. So, to me, your hypothesis makes sense. It also makes me wonder if juicing and then letting the liquid sit for a few minutes might increase the “magic” in the liquid. We already know that mixing white tea with brown tea potentiate each other’s antioxidants beyond what either tea produces individually. So one can’t help but wonder if juicing mixed vegg and fruit might potentiate the mixture as well. Makes complete sense to me.

          1. Thanks for your thoughts, Ruth. It’s true that plants don’t form their helpful (to us) phytochemicals until they have been traumatized. It is their defense mechanism. Cruciferous vegetables form sulforaphane only after being injured. Onions and garlic form allicin when their cell membranes are damaged, and there are many other examples, I’m sure. Allicin, by the way, is toxic to dogs and cats, which reminds us of the toxic nature of some phytonutrients. In these cases, it is the response of our body to the presense of these toxins that is beneficial to us, not the phytochemical per se.

            Until I find science-based evidence to the contrary, I am of the opinion that juicing is as good an option as any other for extracting maximum nutrition. Every preparation method has its strengths and weaknesses. Blending preserves fiber but introduces huge amounts of oxidation, destroying phytonutrients. Cooking releases some nutrients but removes or destroys many others. Juicing extracts many nutrients intact but also removes most of the insoluble fiber. (Since beans and grains are much better sources for fiber than greens any, I don’t worry too much about the loss of this particular nutrient from juicing.)

            I would still like to see some lab comparisons of nutrient availability profile of each preparation method (cooking, blending, juicing, etc.)

  25. C’mon Doc, please fix your audio.

    It’s ‘boomy’ and a little hard to understand at times.

    Get a new mic or something …

    Please?

    Your message is too important to have poor audio.

      1. I’m comparing audio to many other Youtube videos.

        It’s not one of the worst, but it’s really not great.

        It’s ‘boomy’.  Kind of hard to listen to.  No volume setting fixes it.

        A better microphone would probably fix it.

  26. Is Dr Greger pressure cooking beans without pre-soaking? No soaking for even the hardest to digest (toxins) legumes and pulses? No open lid boiling and removing the scum?

    It was advised years that throwing out the soaking and boiling water loses most nutrients from the beans Little nutrition escapes with steam while boiling versus pressure cooking? I try to get it down to minimum water cooking beans

    How would it compare to higher nutrition he’s previously said you get from getting beans to start sprouting before cooking? Sprouting involves soaking 1st. Should we both start beans sprouting and then pressure cook them?

  27. Dr Greger please clarify if pressure cooking without throwing out bean soaking water is important to preserving nutrients (as has been said for years).

    The magic trick of pressure cooking being that the extra high heat the liquid reaches under pressure removes the need to pre-soak and throw away bean pre-soaking water with lots of the bean nutrients in it. Is this still accurate?

    1. I recently spoke with Dr. Sam Chang, the author of the study on black beans that Dr. Greger cites. Chang says that it’s best to soak beans overnight (because they cook faster that way), then to throw out the soaking water (because beans can be dirty) and pressure steam them, using a steamer inside the pressure cooker so that the beans don’t touch the cooking water (because that method preserves most nutrients.) He says that pressure-steaming destroys lectins and trypsin inhibitors.

    1. Cools for resistant starch? I eat it warm unless it’s leftovers. Yes to mustard unless you chopped it ahead of time. Yum

      1. Did everybody forget that Dr. Greger reported that it is necessary to sprinkle mustard seed powder after it has cooked and cooled in order to enhance its cancer fighting action

        1. Sydney,

          I don’t remember the cooled part with mustard seed powder.

          I went to the broccoli lesson and he did say that he put it on at the table, but I didn’t see any tags for videos which said to eat the mustard seed powder after it is cooled.

          Is it in the resistant starch video? Because that is where the cooked and cooled topic is.

    2. Yes! Myrosinase (the enzyme that converts glucoraphanin to sulforaphane) is completely destroyed at cooking temperatures (including pressure-steaming for short durations). Adding powdered mustard seed to your cooled (below 158 Fahrenheit) greens is a great way to restore the myrosinase.

  28. Love my instant pot. Worth every penny. I couldn’t convince my neighbor (who soaks/boils her beans) that pressure cooking is a better process because she thought it would lose too much nutrition. Thanks for the info and proof. I also ran to my garden for chard and beet greens and did a “O” pressure cook as suggested. Perfect. The texture and taste is so much better. No need for additional fats or spices.

    1. Yes, stainless steel and the good thing about the Instapot is that you can buy extra liners.

      They describe it as 3-ply stainless steel food grade 304 (18/8), with no chemical coating,

  29. This is very helpful information. I agree with what Mercola said about microwave ovens, possibly contributing to development of diabetes. My mother spent a lot of time in electro magnetic fields at home and at work. She used her microwave oven every day. She died of complications of diabetes. I think cooking on a stove top is safer than microwaving food.. To reheat food, I put it in a stainless steel bowl inside a larger pot with water in it. The bowl sits on a rack. This way, you can’t burn anything even if you don’t stir it.

    1. Sara,

      What was her diet like?

      It is interesting that you are saying this. Mostly, my friend who is the most anti-microwave person in the universe, who believed the video, which has been debunked by Snopes, where the so-called microwave water killed the plants. She just got her lab-work and her doctor said that she has the highest A1C that he has ever seen. She had recently lost 50 pounds doing Gundry, and I will say that she really did lose 50 pounds, but her blood sugar is through the roof.

      I am not saying it to counter what you are saying. I would like to see a study on it if you know of one.

      Mostly, as of tonight, my Plant-Paradox, anti-microwave friend is going to be reading books by Dr. Fuhrman and Dr. Barnard and I am wondering if she will mentally be able to succeed at getting away from Gundry’s thinking.

      I am someone who uses microwaves every day and I also had an extremely SAD diet and I had so many symptoms of Diabetes and those symptoms are all gone. I haven’t gone to get my A1C checked yet and that is what she called me about. She wants me to have a physical.

      I already have been looking at the lab-places because I am not against getting checked, and I am not worried because the symptoms have reversed. Hers had gotten worse. We talked about her getting neuropathy and I got rid of it and that is partly why she is going to give it a try.

      Well, actually, it is more because she has to start taking meds and checking her blood and she has a doctor now, and she has neuropathy.

      Anyway, I think I have reversed it with diet and I won’t have any evidence of it ever having been there, but I had serious neuropathy and eye problems and brain problems and horizontal nail ridges and I was thirsty all the time and other things, so I think what I think and can’t prove a thing.

      1. I reversed my pre-diabetes by following a whole food, plant based, no oil diet. I get healthy oils from a reasonable amount of nuts and seeds (about 1 oz./day), but do not add olive or coconut oils to my food. If I deviate from this diet by eating oil or animal meats, my fasting glucose number jumps right up! My father has had the same experience.

  30. io ho sempre usato il cestello nella pentola a pressione per la cortura della verdure. anche per i cereali in chicco, appena arriva a temperatura, spengo la pentola a pressione e la apro dopo almeno 4 ore. la pentola a pressione è veramente un ottimo alleato in cucina

  31. I just tried this. In fact I’m still eating it. The greens are DELICIOUS this way! I throw a bit of Kirkland’s no salt seasoning on them when they come out. But I do have a question. Are there more oxalates in the greens this way vs. boiling? Is this a concern?

    1. Penny – do a “Search” on this site for oxalates and spinach and you will find your answers I think. Dr. G has done a number of videos on this topic.

  32. Hello Dr Greger

    It was wonderful to see your pressure cooker with a steamer inside idea … very creative

    I wanted to share with you how I cook tuscan whole kale leaves, spinach or silverbeet …

    I’m sure you would have heard of a Forman griller ( the one that angles down to a drip tray).

    I simply

    Turn the griller on
    Sink my leaves into water to wash them
    Grab all the leaves out of the water by hand
    And place them into the Foreman dripping with water
    And close the lid
    The water evapotares steadily steaming the leaves
    Within 4 to 5 minutes the leaves partially wilted
    Leaving the kale beautifully buttery in taste and texture..

    Let me know what you think

    Amir El Abbassy 56yrs
    Still under taking the transition into a wfpb diet , not just for myself but for my 83 yr old friend for whom I am the principle carer.. ( he’s been written off by the medical profession) .

    I live in Sydney Australia and am yet to find a wfpb diet friendly doctor … I’m sure they’re out there so I’ll,  of course persist.

    Thanx

    1. Amir – I have an old George Foreman grill too! Great idea for cooking the greens. I will try that. I use the grill to cook hash browns. I just throw them in frozen and let them do their thing. I haven’t done this yet, but another idea is to use the grill to make a hummous pannini using a corn tortilla and thick hummous and whatever vegg you want to put inside.

      Let us know how things go for you and your elder friend who you are caring for. A book suggestion is “The Longevity Diet” by Valter Longo, Ph.D., head of the gerontology dept at USC. He has studied aging and the diseases of aging for 30 years.
      All the best to you and your friend –

      1. Hi Ruth thank you for the response to the email

        I haven’t been able to find any GP in Sydney Australia who specialises in whole foods plant based diets and I need to because my elderly friend is on diabetes drugs cholesterol drugs and all sorts of other drugs for his chronic illnesses and I’m afraid of transitioning on the diet if I don’t have a welcoming GP to monitor his blood results any suggestions on how I can either find a GP in Sydney or how i can manage the transition from the diet he has at the moment to WFPB AND CORRECTLY the reduction of his drug taking if not can you possibly POINT me in the right direction as to where to find some wholefood plant-based substitutes for butter and sugar especially Sugar and what is a good milk to put in coffee because I drink coffee I need to put some milk in it I’m not sure which one to use that gives the same taste as cows milk thanks very much hope to hear from you soon and I’ll try those ideas with the foreman thank you

  33. Thanks, Dr. Greger! This is very useful information. I have an Instant-Pot and love it for beans, grains, soups and stews. But I haven’t cooked leafy greens in it, because I thought they would just get too mushy. I am going to the farmers market for greens,and will try this out today:) !!!

  34. What if you eat the juices the meal has been cooked in?

    I always add the spinach etc. once I’ve finished the cooking process so it wilts…

  35. In addition to the cooking methods described in this video/transcript, are there reliable studies that describe the possible benefits of sous vide preparation?

  36. Tali,

    Good question…. part of the answer is in the temperature and time considerations along with what plastic or enclosure is used. For a good discussion on these issues see: https://www.cooksillustrated.com/articles/1131-is-sous-vide-safe and then https://www.bonappetit.com/story/plastic-bag-safety-sous-vide.

    One of the cooking considerations is the need for a higher amount of energy to break the cells of certain foods, such as carrots to maximize their nutritional value. You can achieve this with steam quickly, but not with sous vide without significant exposure times. See this article for some thoughts on higher temp and veggies: https://www.cooksillustrated.com/articles/1141-science-why-sous-vide-is-perfect-for-cooking-vegetables

    On the other side of the coin what about the ecological aspects of using plastics. Sorry no easy pass here unless you use glass in your sous vide devices.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  37. Hi,

    If I do this method, steam/pressure cook, and then pack the vegetables to bring to work, will I lose nutrients if the veg are not eaten right away? I will be refrigerating them at work after a 1.5 hr commute.

  38. I went and bought one of those “instant pots” from Amazon, right after seeing this video, and got it in 2 days! (with free shipping/ non-prime)
    Then used it to pressure/steam cook a large basket of collards. Wow, they do come out great, mild flavored!
    Best steamed greens I ever had. Can’t wait to try it on other greens etc….

  39. I want to pressure steam both greens and about a quarter-pound of sliced sweet potato. Do you have to pressure steam the greens first and then the potato in order for the potato to be well-cooked, or can I do it all at once if I cut the potato into small enough pieces?

  40. I tried it and loved it. I didn’t have a basket but I do have one of those superpots! I tried it as described, otherwise, with just the water in the bottom, zero minutes for chard, 1 minute for mature kale and 2 minutes for mature broccoli leaves (the big tough actual leaves of the plant). Perfect!

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