Flashback Friday: Never Too Late to Start Eating Healthier

Flashback Friday: Never Too Late to Start Eating Healthier
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Since many tumors take decades to grow it’s remarkable that cancer risk can so dramatically be reduced– even late in life.

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A hundred years ago, The New York Times reported on a rather sophisticated study for the time: 4,600 cases of cancer studied over seven years, suggesting that the increased consumption of animal foods was to blame. A century later, the latest review on the subject concluded that mortality from all causes put together, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular disease (such as stroke) was significantly lower in those eating meat-free diets, in addition to less cancer and diabetes.

I’m surprised they found such significant results given that people in these studies typically didn’t stop eating meat until late in life. For example, in the largest study done up until that time, up to a third ate vegetarian for less than five years, yet they still ended up with lower rates of heart disease whether they were young or old—under 60, or over 60. Whether they were normal weight or overweight, whether they used to smoke or never smoked, regardless–those who had stopped eating meat had lower risk, suggesting that decades of higher risk dietary behavior could be reversed within just years of eating healthier.

If you look at countries that switched from eating traditional, more plant-based diets to more Westernized diets, it may take 20 years for cancer rates to shoot up. It takes decades for most tumors to grow. For example, if you look in Asia, their dietary shift was accompanied by a remarkable increase in mortality rates of breast, colon, and prostate cancers. For example death from breast cancer in Japan or from prostate cancer: the line just goes straight up, but again, it can take years of a cancer-promoting diet and lifestyle. Same thing shown with migration studies. Men moving from rural China to the U.S. experience a dramatic increase in cancer risk, but tumors take time to grow.

So it’s remarkable to me that after most of a lifetime eating the standard Western diet, one can turn it around, reverse chronic disease risk with a healthier diet, even late in the game.

So, should we all start eating vegetarian? This was the editorial that accompanied the results from the largest study ever published on Americans eating plant-based diets, which found vegetarian diets associated with lower all-cause mortality, meaning those who started eating vegetarian live, on average, longer lives. Now this analysis included so-called semi-vegetarians, who ate meat at least once a month (but no more than once a week), so it’s not yet clear how bad eating meat a few times a month is for our longevity. What we can all agree on, though, is that we should limit our intake of junk food and animal fat, and eat more fruits and vegetables. Most authorities will also agree that diets should include whole grains, beans, and nuts. Instead of fighting over whose diet’s the best, it’s time to acknowledge these common features of diets associated with less disease, and instead focus our attention on helping patients avoid the intense commercial pressures to eat otherwise.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

A hundred years ago, The New York Times reported on a rather sophisticated study for the time: 4,600 cases of cancer studied over seven years, suggesting that the increased consumption of animal foods was to blame. A century later, the latest review on the subject concluded that mortality from all causes put together, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular disease (such as stroke) was significantly lower in those eating meat-free diets, in addition to less cancer and diabetes.

I’m surprised they found such significant results given that people in these studies typically didn’t stop eating meat until late in life. For example, in the largest study done up until that time, up to a third ate vegetarian for less than five years, yet they still ended up with lower rates of heart disease whether they were young or old—under 60, or over 60. Whether they were normal weight or overweight, whether they used to smoke or never smoked, regardless–those who had stopped eating meat had lower risk, suggesting that decades of higher risk dietary behavior could be reversed within just years of eating healthier.

If you look at countries that switched from eating traditional, more plant-based diets to more Westernized diets, it may take 20 years for cancer rates to shoot up. It takes decades for most tumors to grow. For example, if you look in Asia, their dietary shift was accompanied by a remarkable increase in mortality rates of breast, colon, and prostate cancers. For example death from breast cancer in Japan or from prostate cancer: the line just goes straight up, but again, it can take years of a cancer-promoting diet and lifestyle. Same thing shown with migration studies. Men moving from rural China to the U.S. experience a dramatic increase in cancer risk, but tumors take time to grow.

So it’s remarkable to me that after most of a lifetime eating the standard Western diet, one can turn it around, reverse chronic disease risk with a healthier diet, even late in the game.

So, should we all start eating vegetarian? This was the editorial that accompanied the results from the largest study ever published on Americans eating plant-based diets, which found vegetarian diets associated with lower all-cause mortality, meaning those who started eating vegetarian live, on average, longer lives. Now this analysis included so-called semi-vegetarians, who ate meat at least once a month (but no more than once a week), so it’s not yet clear how bad eating meat a few times a month is for our longevity. What we can all agree on, though, is that we should limit our intake of junk food and animal fat, and eat more fruits and vegetables. Most authorities will also agree that diets should include whole grains, beans, and nuts. Instead of fighting over whose diet’s the best, it’s time to acknowledge these common features of diets associated with less disease, and instead focus our attention on helping patients avoid the intense commercial pressures to eat otherwise.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

How amazing the human body is if we just treat it right! This reminds me of videos like Lifestyle Medicine: Treating the Causes of Disease or How Many Meet the Simple Seven? where simple changes can lead to tremendous differences in health outcomes. So please don’t allow the perfect to become the enemy of the good. Any movement we can make towards improving our diet can help. Though the earlier the better: See Heart Disease Starts in Childhood and Back in Circulation: Sciatica and Cholesterol.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

73 responses to “Flashback Friday: Never Too Late to Start Eating Healthier

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  1. I can’t help thinking that it should be ‘Never Too Late to Start Eating More Healthily’ but, on the other hand, adverbs do seem to be deeply unfashionable these days.

    1. Regarding the COVID-19 Prevention:
      There is plenty of research that shows that Zinc NEEDS QUERCITIN, which is the IONOPHORE needed to get ZINC into the CELL to STOP the virus from getting in!! Please mention this to people so they know how to take ZINC PLEASE!!
      Thanks
      Patricia

      1. RE: COVID-19
        The Virology Journal – the official publication of Dr. Fauci’s National Institutes of Health – published what is now a blockbuster article on August 22, 2005, under the heading – get ready for this – “Chloroquine is a potent inhibitor of SARS coronavirus infection and spread.
        Read:
        ”https://onenewsnow.com/perspectives/bryan-fischer/2020/04/27/fauci-knew-about-hcq-in-2005-nobody-needed-to-die

        1. Patricia, the referenced article in The Virology Journal talks about usage of Chloroquine as a potent inhibitor of SARS-CoV. What we’re dealing with now is SARS-CoV-2, a related but different virus. It may well work, but as Dr Greger likes to say “you don’t know…until you do the test.”

      2. Noted that pesco-vegetarians had the best outcome. That is basically the Valter Longo diet. He recommends low mercury seafood 2-3 servings a week. No other animal proteins allowed.

    2. https://onenewsnow.com/perspectives/bryan-fischer/2020/04/27/fauci-knew-about-hcq-in-2005-nobody-needed-to-die
      What about this!
      Dr. Fauci knew about HCQ in 2005!
      The Virology Journal – the official publication of Dr. Fauci’s National Institutes of Health – published what is now a blockbuster article on August 22, 2005, under the heading – get ready for this – “Chloroquine is a potent inhibitor of SARS coronavirus infection and spread.”

      1. Well, nobody has ever accused me of being fashionable. It’s just that when an argument is made using poor English, it’s hard not to wonder what else about it might be incorrect also.

    1. Yep. And here’s Fredie Blom, world oldest man who still smokes home-made “cigarettes” daily. Interesting he uses his own tobacco and paper, not commercial weed.
      https://www.newsweek.com/worlds-oldest-man-guinness-world-record-smoking-tobacco-fredie-blom-947687

      I think those are freak cases though. For the vast majority of us two Sunny Side Up eggs every morning or sucking in smoke from burning tobacco leaves every day is a huge risk to health.

      1. Smarty and dr cobalt,

        There’s a reason for the adage: “the exception that proves the rule.”

        And the risks never go to 0% or to 100%, as far as I know.

        It’s nuanced.

  2. I know way too many people who claim, “I eat healthy (vegan, WFPB, etc)”, but always are having a cheat day for some reason whenever they are seen by others. Then later the inevitable,”I tried that diet and it did nothing”.

    If you have a cheat day simply because it is a Tuesday or because you saw something you wanted to taste/eat…..that is not a cheat day. You are regular eater who just pretends to care what you put into yourself who uses any excuse not to care.

    On another note, EVERY THREE DAYS our country now sees more people die than on 9/11 due to covid-19. Please do not let our government NORMALIZE this.

    1. Reality bites,

      I agree about COVID-19.

      The experts who have said that it isn’t much different than a mild flu year are doing a math that seems to be denying the actual numbers in my opinion.

      I have listened to their arguments but we have over 100,000 deaths even though society was closed down for months.

      I can’t conceive that we wouldn’t have had ridiculously high numbers if we had remained open.

      As far as the spikes go, I also agree that even without spikes we cared way more about the deaths when the enemy was human.

      Fear of the damage to the economy is winning right now. People are way more afraid of losing their jobs and of not having money than they are of dying from COVID-19 and that is driving the bus right now.

      That doesn’t surprise me, but the “fear of even temporarily losing freedoms” has also risen above the “fear of dying from COVID-19” and that does surprise me. People couldn’t make it through even one season of sacrifice.

      The effects on elderly, minorities and people with co-morbidities are low on the totem pole.

      What I will give them is that we couldn’t have closed the economy until this is solved, so right now it is more what type of spike we get.

      Some places are having spikes and some are having less of a spike than one might have expected. For instance, Florida hasn’t spiked since opening – though 2 weeks after Memorial Day weekend is when we will see closer to whether there will be a spike.

      I would say that if they don’t have a bigger spike within the next few weeks, they may have made the right decision in how and when to open.

      1. We are maybe 8 or 9 days from 400,000 global deaths and they are expecting us to reach 500,000 by Labor Day.

        Chances are, we will be going up to the next category with this.

        Even without a fall and winter spike.

      2. Here’s an interesting page from CDC about the flu pandemic in 1918-1919.
        https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1918-commemoration/three-waves.htm

        Millions died all around the world that year. Notice the chart about half way down the page that shows two waves in 1918, the second one bigger than the first. And even a third wave appears in 1919.

        Now… I’m reluctant to mention this for fear of offending some, but right now, even though I agree that corona virus is much nastier than influenza, still, according to the CDC

        * 47% of Americans get the flu shot
        * deaths from influenza range from tens of thousands to as high as 60k-95k per season (highest in 2017-18 season. See reference below).

        Though the statistics elsewhere on the CDC website didn’t bear this out, I suspect that the majority of the 47% of Americans who get the flu shot are older, maybe baby boomers on up. So…

        So, right now I think comparing influenza with covid19 is not realistic. The only way to do a meaningful comparison between the lethality of covid19 and influenza would be after an effective vaccine is made for covid19 and has a similar distribution to the flu shot (47% roughly).

        Imagine how many deaths we would have had from influenza in 2017 had there been no flu vaccine… It might have topped 100k too.

        As far as the “wave chart” from CDC is concerned, since our current behavior probably mirrors how people behaved in 1918-1919, we probably shouldn’t expect a different outcome.

        ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017%E2%80%932018_United_States_flu_season

      3. There has been so much guesswork regarding COVID-19. So many ‘experts’ and ‘models’ have been wrong so much of the time, including Dr. Fauci. The knowledge is still evolving. However we need better data to put COVID-19 into context, at which the media has failed. Sensationalism sells you see. For example: it is estimated that 30-40% of the deaths are the feeble elderly in nursing homes/elder care facilities. And what percentage of deaths involved comorbidity factors: compromised immune systems due to Chemo or organ transplants or heart/lung/kidney diseases, diabetes, obesity etc. Until this data is available on a consistent basis, the gross numbers are misleading at best. That is becoming all too clear by research showing the number of people for whom COVID-19 was a non-event. They didn’t even know they had it. All this is public information for those who want to find it, but unfortunately politics frequently is an obstruction.

  3. In this title I thought the word ‘food’ was implied. ‘Never too late to start eating healthier foods’
    https://www.thefreedictionary.com/healthier On that page they say ‘healthy’ is the adverb. ‘Never too late to start healthy eating’.

    Around this neighbourhood many people seem resigned to ill health at quite an early age and stubbornly cling to bad habits of smoking, drinking, and drugging. There are a few though that are avid walkers. They put on many miles per day, and though their diet may not be perfect, the exercise is tremendous benefit regardless in keeping them healthy and physically fit.

    1. ‘Healthy’ is an adjective ……………. in the example you use, ‘eating’ is a gerund not a present participle. Gerunds basically function as nouns so they are modified by adjectives. However when ‘eating’ functions as a present participle it is a verb and therefore needs to be modified by an adverb.

      Therefore ‘healthy eating’ and ‘eating healthily’ are both correct but ‘eating healthy’ is incorrect. Ditto for when the comparative forms of the adjective and adverb are used ie ‘healthier’ and ‘more healthily’

      1. Thanks Fumbles! In my first example it looks like ‘healthier’ is actually modifying ‘foods’. I haven’t heard of gerunds before. I will check it out!

  4. What is Greger’s game? I thought his story was that he had a life long devotion to THE heart healthy diet after miraculously transforming his old gran? But in his pandemic video he has reconstructed his back story to that of someone really interested in controlling pandemics. It was just that no one else was at that time, so he filled his days with pushing this diet until the world caught up with him.

    That is what he is saying now, folks, to his new audience. You are all past your sale by date. He has moved on.

    This is not my spin. Seriously, listen to the video, the one he kindly referenced in his email to us all flogging his book.

    Looks like we have been had.

    1. Gillian,

      You seem to think that Dr. Greger is a one-trick pony. So strange.

      Pandemics and nutrition are related. Eating meat and other animal products is the major source of pandemics past, present, and future; there are several potential ones circulating in animal herds right now. And avoiding animal products, as well as processed and prepared foods, and eating whole plant foods, is much healthier — both for us, and the planet.

      So eating a healthier diet will greatly decrease the risk of many lifestyle conditions/diseases and greatly reduce the risk of future pandemics — if enough of us stop eating meat, and the way we raise our food animals changes. That is the conclusion from the vast weight of the evidence.

      I have no idea what you mean by “Looks like we have been had.” Perhaps you can explain that.

    2. Gillian, I think you have some details mixed up. Dr Greger had nothing to do with his grandma’s recovery as he was still a young boy at the time. She was one of the first clients to visit the Pritikin center, and she followed their diet and lifestyle recommendations successfully.

      Here is a short overview if Dr Greger’s career though I notice it certainly doesn’t list all of his many achievements. https://drgreger.org/pages/about-us

    3. Gillean, rarely does one have a single backstory. I suspect I could point to hundreds of things that have affected my life, and they would all be true.

          1. Still kickin’ ‘-)… but in slow motion. I now have an oximeter and 95 to 97 prcntge in my fingers but especially pleased with 99% in my toes. Guess that rules out Peripheral Arterial Disease, which I had been wondering about, with all the pain in my legs.

            I’m gonna quit fretting about whatever I have and just let time have its way. ‘-)

    4. What is your game Gillian?

      Another meat eater who can’t refute the scientific evidence so who instead tries to smear the character of the people who present that evidence?

  5. In Dr. Greger’s podcast with Rich Roll he mentioned special properties of millet and sorghum but I have not been able to find the reference. Does anyone know what he was referencing?

    1. Hi Billy,
      thanks for your question. Millet is gluten-free and boasts high protein, fiber, and antioxidant contents. Pearl millet is the most widely produced variety intended for human consumption. Still, all types are renowned for their high nutritional value and health benefits.

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26566827/
      Sorghum is also gluten-free grain contains beneficial plant compounds that act as antioxidants to reduce oxidative stress and lower your risk of chronic disease.

      Additionally, sorghum is rich in fiber and can help slow the absorption of sugar to keep your blood sugar levels steady.
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15184005/
      I hope these explanations are useful to you.

  6. I have a friend who has out of control diabetes who plans on trying Whole Food Plant-Based.

    She asked me how to do it today.

      1. Good idea, Joe. Thanks!

        I gave her recipes.

        I prayed about it and felt that the most important part is for her to not have any thinking involved because she has been Paleo, Gundry, Keto oriented, and is raw milk, and loves fats.

        Mentally, she has so many hurdles if she tries to understand it.

        She would also have hurdles at the concept of giving up milk and cheese and oil and meat and fish and anything else.

        Recipes magically jump people over the concept of giving things up.

        I know that her brain will split in half if she starts with trying to understand the logic.

        Better to try to understand the results.

        I gave her Forks Over Knives recipe and food planner, plus specific recipes.

        Soups – with beans and lentils – because soups are easy and she thinks she can’t eat them and I didn’t want her to be overwhelmed by them.

        Grain bowls – even though I still don’t really understand them myself, but they are flexible and are a way to do whole grains rather than ending up refined grains.

        Salads and dressings

        Some heartier comfort foods

        And some breakfast ideas.

        1. I think that if she doesn’t notice that the recipes don’t have milk, cheese or oil, she won’t feel threatened.

          I also think that if she gets her blood sugar lower than the highest her doctor has ever seen, she will end up researching things herself.

        2. Deb, switching to foods made by companies like Foods for Life can help. Their Ezekiel 4:9 cereals, breads, tortillas etc. are high in fiber and fairly low carb. Can switch to soy or almond milk. Oat milk is too high simple carb for diabetics.
          You are right, beans, soups are good. This is a good time of year for salads and fresh vegetables.
          It is hard to make a big diet switch.

    1. Deb, you might want to refer your friend to the Mastering Diabetes program. They promote a very low-fat WFPB diet. To get diabetes under control while still eating lots of carbohydrates requires low-fat. So other WFPB approaches may not work for her. There is an online Mastering Diabetes program and they also recently published a book.

      1. Patricia,

        Yes, I have mentioned them to her and gave her a link. I had given her How Not To Die and the cookbook the Christmas before last. She didn’t read it though. I also just remembered that I had recommended Dr. Barnard’s book back then, and she bought it but didn’t read that either. Dr. Fuhrman and Dr. Greger do too many beans.

        It is going to be interesting to see how quickly it will work and I do think it will work. She has lost a lot of weight, and now just needs to eat healthy foods.

        1. What I have learned about the superfoods is that they lose their superpowers entirely if they cause people to go Gundry.

          Meaning that the whole greens and beans and onions and mushrooms thing, for example, doesn’t work as well when people get digestive issues with beans and onions and have only ever eaten iceberg lettuce and didn’t like it and hate broccoli.

          It becomes a diet people cross off their lists.

          By God’s grace, I have a mind that sits between the diets and already got confused, but it has made me flexible.

          We can erase the beans or add a few handfuls to some soup or disguise them as hummus.

          Or she can not eat them at all, but still get the benefit of Plant-Based.

          I am going to work with her and it will be good for me because it will get me away from transition foods.

      1. Lonie,

        Thank you for the video link. I am familiar with Dr. Fung.

        This coming month, I don’t want her to think about science even one time.

        I want her to choose recipes and test her blood sugar.

        If it doesn’t work for some reason, then we can move on to dissecting concepts.

        It is going to sound backward for this place, but I don’t even want her to watch even one Dr. Greger video because she has too much information running through her mind and no success with the Diabetes part.

        Yes, I could do the pot calling the kettle stainless steel.

        Some people here might be aware that I try to understand every single thing, but she has health problems and what I would like her to understand is that eating fruits and vegetables might help.

        I feel like she thought losing weight and going low carb and high fat would help, but her doctor isn’t bearing witness to that.

        She is honestly probably close to her ideal weight now, which is probably a lie because doctors slid those numbers around years ago, but she looks good except every lab report in the universe. I worry about her health and she has worried about mine, too. Yes, we have been around the block a few times.

        This time, I am NOT emphasizing any foods that will cause her to disqualify the Plant-Based lifestyle. I am just showing recipes.

        1. I wonder if How Not To Diet Cookbook will have tips for beginners.

          Meaning lots of people don’t have the gut microbiome for it.

          Others don’t have the taste buds particularly to start off.

      2. The problem with low carbers like Fung is that they promote low carb diets. These are more likely to kill diabetics early not least because fibre is a type of carbohydrate

        ‘One study, a review published in Plos Medicine, used data collected from 8300 adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes to show that those with a higher fibre intake faced a significant reduction in premature mortality compared to those eating the least fibre.

        Lead author Dr Andrew Reynolds, National Heart Foundation Fellow of the Department of Medicine, says compared with the New Zealand average of 19 grams of fibre per day, those consuming 35g per day have a 35 per cent reduced risk of dying early.’
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/05/200522113826.htm

        https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1003053

    1. Thanks, Barb!

      I might check it out.

      I did use a food journal for a few years but it was time-consuming and I am still thinking it will help me more to keep looking at recipes and maybe find the nutrition weekly instead of daily.

  7. I am looking at the flames of these candles and I watched the news earlier and started crying.

    I watched the city burning and I didn’t even know that I had PTSD from the city rioting and burning around me in Los Angeles during Rodney King until I saw the video of those flames.

    But this one is worse. It wasn’t adrenaline of a fast car police chase with a drug addict behind the wheel. This was 8-1/2 minutes of someone kneeling on a man’s neck while the man pleaded, “I can’t breathe” and him staying there even after people were pointing out that the man was no longer responsive.

    I watched the news online and there were locusts and starving people are pandemic and riots and pandemic, but that police officer kneeling on someone’s neck for so long even after they had called an ambulance for him brought tears to my eyes.

    These flames above have a false headline. There is a point where it is too late and I am afraid that COVID-19 will end up harming the black protestors next.

    We can’t figure out how to care and I can’t understand that at all.

  8. Eat fruits and vegetables. The NYT reported 100 years ago that people would benefit from doing this. Today, weight loss is a 15 billion a year industry. What’s still a good message? Eat fruits and vegetables, you know, those things with fiber in them.

    1. Dan, in the 10 yrs+ that I have watched Dr Greger’s videos and read the studies, 2 studies stand out (for me) above all others in the results they got.

      One was the macrobiotic study with diabetics eating mostly vegetables, grains, and beans. Wow, what results!
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/pros-and-cons-of-a-macrobiotic-diet/

      And the other was a study done by Jenkins (of Portfolio diet fame) who had people ingesting massive amounts of fruits and veg. The number of servings was huge, but the size of servings was small so it was not much more than average for many of us. Again, stellar results!
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11288049/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-fruit-is-too-much/
      The only other study that I saw tremendous results for was the Adventist 2 study, re pescatarian women specifically. Men attained the best results by sticking to the vegan foods in that study.

      I don’t know how people can spend 15 billion… on what?

      1. Barb,

        “on what?” That’s books, programs, treatments, yada yada. If I remember correctly, the 15 B is just in America. Those are interesting studies you cited.

    2. Dan,

      Dr Greger has had CHIP and BROAD studies, plus all of the doctors.

      People are spending money on all sorts of things. My Keto friends do things like collagen. My sister-in-law is doing doctor assisted Keto and spending a fortune on it.

      I have known people who did doctor assisted shakes.

      And people who did gastric bypass.

      Etc.

      Not to mention every exercise machine in the universe.

      Plus the pills.

      Most people don’t have the Whole Food Plant Based concept even as a concept.

      But this year, it is the hottest trending diet and meat prices are going up.

      Unfortunately, most people will go Plant-Based processed foods and won’t know that they didn’t try Plant Based eating.

      1. Deb,
        A few years ago I was having winter pains and tightness in my shoulders. So, I got four hours of PT. The bill was $1200. And, you guessed it, my data was then in the mill. I soon got a call from a bariatric group saying I was scheduled for surgery. I replied, “Do you have the right person; I’m trying to gain weight?” Then I got a follow up email. I had never talked to those people.

        1. :-D This might have taken place during a Mercury retrograde transit. Annoying but often funny time(s) of year.

          (Unfortunately) we have another one coming up in a coupla weeks. :-(

  9. Time to start a discussion on the mTOR pathway and how it’s upregulated by a carnivorous diet. As a concomitant thought, maybe it’s also time to examine the role autophagy plays in simply overindulging, Doctor.

      1. Barb, Dr. Longo has nothing against animal products, does he!

        “Over age 65, you should slightly increase protein intake but also increase consumption of fish, eggs, white meat, and products derived from goats and sheep to preserve muscle mass. Consume beans, chickpeas, green peas, and other legumes as your main source of protein.”

        https://valterlongo.com/daily-longevity-diet-for-adults/

        Products made from goats and sheep? Yuck.

        1. Well YR, i have watched many of his videos and interviews posted on youtube. He himself prefers a wfpb diet with fish/seafood a couple of times per week. He generally eats twice per day. Even the link you says to obtain most of your protein from peas and legumes. He’s really big on legumes. I also think it speaks volumes that his 5 day fasting mimicking diet is vegan. (all that being said, if the elderly around my neighbourhood ate wfpb with lamb, fish, whatever on the side, they would be a hundred times better off than they are now) I haven’t read his book yet, but I believe Marilyn has. It’s on my list.

          1. “if the elderly around my neighbourhood ate wfpb with lamb, fish, whatever on the side,”
            – – – – – – –

            That’s sounds pretty much like me. :-) From the spelling of your “neighbourhood,” I’m taking a guess you’re from somewhere in Canada.

            One thing I couldn’t do (maybe I should say “refuse” to do) is a 5-day fast. No way Jose’.

          2. Dr Greger talked about How Not To Age And said that book concept came from principles of aging Longo and a few other researchers set forward where Dr Greger said that there were principles like lowering IGF-1 that already have dietary ways of accomplishing things.

  10. Just from my humble observations, the older folks who exercise daily and eat decently, do best. They rarely, if ever, get sick, retain a good fitness level and muscles.
    The ones who sleep in, use alcohol, tobacco or drugs, eat fast food, complain about the weather and refuse to use the stairs do much worse on average.

    As for fasting, it would probably do me good right about now, but I can barely hold off til breakfast these days lol.
    13 or 14 hours overnight without eating is fine for me.

    1. “…13 or 14 hours overnight without eating is fine for me.”
      – – – – – –

      14 hours overnight has always been my norm. So is no snacking…or the desire to….between (3) meals. For me it got habit-forming very quickly.

    2. Barb,

      I am finally re-setting after COVID-induced stress eating.

      It took a while.

      I think most of the people around me being safe and getting a few gallons of hand sanitizers and having my make-believe pantry stocked with real food and supplies like toilet paper and society starting to open have all helped.

      There is still so much turmoil in America right now and that is so painful.

      The Walgreens near me is closing and a Stop & Shop and so many chain stores and mom & pop stores.

      I think part of what helped me was looking at the problem-solving people’s web sites.

      Watching people playfully take a dare to plant 2 million trees and figure out how to succeed at planting over 2,100,000.

      Dr John Campbell said that he was disappointed with the science community because they said that there will be spikes from opening but didn’t even try to come up with solutions.

      The playful scientific community is the one I am trying to get to think of things because they succeed.

      No politics or red tape in that community.

      Just brainstorming and implementing solutions.

      1. I also figured out that I can use a closet and turn it into a real pantry.

        Then I can just fill my Ball jars and have a revolving short and long-term storage solution.

        I might still be a year or two away from succeeding at this but each thing I figure out gets permanently solved.

    3. Barb,
      I used to hang out on the basketball court a lot, at the gym. The walking track above is more of a hang out now. Some people have been walking there for years and I like to walk with some of them. They are so fast though that they move on. My walking is improving since the weather is warmer and my stretching exercises loosen me up. I repaired my bike and have been riding it some. The gym will open again this week. Some walkers have been walking in city parks. I’ve been in cemeterys walking.

  11. Great Deb! I know it must have been terribly stressful for you there… it’s stressful here too but our situation pales by comparison. I admire your ingenuity through it all though, and think you might enjoy having the pantry back-up.
    I have a thing about food wasting so I am eating to almost the bottom of my food supplies before replenishing.
    I have been listening to Dr Campbell too, and it occurred to me that people have to really assess their own risks/needs in all of this and act accordingly. I don’t care what the gov says is open etc, I may well prefer to stay the course a while longer. I hope you take care too Deb, take whatever precautions you feel are necessary!

    I have been indulgent too over past months but lost 5 lbs recently. Lately I have enjoyed a salad with some chopped cooked and raw veg as my supper….seems to be enough. I narrowly escaped homelessness in the last couple of months, so sitting down to any kind of a meal in the comfort of our own space is a real treat.

  12. Food wasting. Half of all food is wasted. I do not understand this. I prepare my own food. I throw away some of the broccoli stalks, apple cores, orange and grapefruit peels and coffee grounds. That’s about it.

    Latest food try: raw broccoli crowns dipped in mustard and minced garlic. Super food combo and tasty.

    Cheep eating: 50 cent can of pinto beans. 50 cent can of sour crout. Mix the two together. Makes four servings, two if you are a pig like me. That’s 25 cents to 50 cents a meal. Splurge a bit and add a slice of whole bread.

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