Low Carb Diets Found to Feed Heart Disease

Low Carb Diets and Coronary Blood Flow
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People going on low carb diets may not see a rise in their cholesterol levels. How is that possible? Because weight loss by any means can drop our cholesterol. We could go on an all-Twinkie diet and lower our cholesterol as long as we didn’t eat too many. A good cocaine habit could do it. Anything that drops our weight can drop our cholesterol, but the goal isn’t to fit into a skinnier casket; the reason we care about cardiovascular risk factors like cholesterol is because we care about cardiovascular risk, the health of our arteries.

Now we have studies that measure the impact of low carb diets on arteries directly, and a review of all the best studies to date found that low-carb diets impair arterial function, as evidenced by a decrease in flow-mediated dilation, meaning low-carb diets effectively stiffen people’s arteries. And since that meta-analysis was published, a new study found the same thing: “A dietary pattern characterized by high protein and fat, but low carbohydrate was associated with poorer peripheral small artery function,” again measuring blood flow into people’s limbs. But peripheral circulation is not as important as the circulation in the coronary arteries that feed our heart.

There has only been one study ever done measuring actual blood flow to the heart muscles of people eating low-carb diets. Dr. Richard Fleming, an accomplished nuclear cardiologist, enrolled 26 people into a comprehensive study of the effects of diet on cardiac function using the latest in nuclear imaging technology–so-called SPECT scans, enabling him to actually directly measure the blood flow within the coronary arteries.

He then put them all on a healthy vegetarian diet, and a year later the scans were repeated. By that time, however, ten of the patients had jumped ship onto the low carb bandwagon. At first I bet he was disappointed, but surely soon realized he had an unparalleled research opportunity dropped into his lap. Here he had extensive imaging of ten people before and after following a low carb diet and 16 following a high carb diet. What would their hearts look like at the end of the year? We can talk about risk factors all we want, but compared to the veg group, did the coronary heart disease of the patients following the Atkins-like diets improve, worsen, or stay the same?

Those sticking to the vegetarian diet showed a reversal of their heart disease as expected. Their partially clogged arteries literally got cleaned out. They had 20% less atherosclerotic plaque in their arteries at the end of the year than at the beginning. What happened to those who abandoned the treatment diet, and switched over to the low-carb diet? Their condition significantly worsened. 40% to 50% more artery clogging at the end of the year.  In heart scans of the patients, as seen in my video, Low Carb Diets and Coronary Blood Flow, the yellow and particularly red areas represent blood flow through the coronary arteries to the heart muscle. The scan of one of the patients who went on a plant-based diet, shows how their arteries opened right up increasing the blood flow. Another person, however, started out with good flow, but after a year on a low-carb diet, they significantly clogged down their arterial blood flow.

So this is the best science we have, demonstrating the threat of low-carb diets, not just measuring risk factors, but actual blood flow in people’s hearts on different diets. Of course the reason we care about cardiac blood flow, is we don’t want to die. Another meta-analysis was recently published that finally went ahead and measured the ultimate end-point, death, and low-carb diets were associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality, meaning living a significantly shorter lifespan.

The reason I have so few videos about low-carb diets is that I already wrote a book about it. Carbophobia is now available free online full-text at AtkinsFacts.org. Atkins’ lawyers threatened to sue, leading to a heated exchange you’re sure to enjoy that I reprint in the book. I did touch on it Atkins Diet: Trouble Keeping it Up, though low carb diets don’t necessarily have to be that unhealthy (see my video Plant-Based Atkins Diet).

Here are some videos I’ve done on conquering our #1 killer:

-Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and watch my full 2012 – 2015 presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More than an Apple a Day, From Table to Able, and Food as Medicine.

Image Credit: ryan.dowd / Flickr

  • https://plus.google.com/116857107012516866291 Aneta Kaproń

    Dr Greger, I just wanted to thank you for all your hard work, yours is the best website in the universe

    • v stew

      I second that Aneta. This has to be the most revolutionary site on health ever created!! It is my #1 go-to source… my Health Bible! I refer videos to friends and acquaintances with tumors and cancer. Humanity deserves this knowledge. .. After that it’s up to each individual whether they will follow it or not!!!

  • Julie

    I’m curious if there are any studies comparing vegetarian/ vegan diets to low carb/normal protein/high fat, as this is the diet currently touted by the Paleo crowd. It seems that the high fat diets in the study were Atkins diets, high in both animal protein and fat. What about moderate animal protein/high fat?

    • baggman744

      No no no, Paleo does not mean “high fat”. Paleo and Atkins, or at least the old Atkins, are not the same at all. Most Plaeo advocates define their diet as high in low starch veggies, small amount of low fat protein, small “healthy” fats (avocado, olive oil, monounsaturated fats) some seeds & nuts, no processed foods, no added sugars, legumes or processed wheat, and a small amount of fruit.

      • chloeholly

        Sounds pretty healthy, but why would a Paleo diet have extracted oils? I was at Whole Foods the other day and saw the ingredient list for a Paleo item and it also had olive oil.

        • baggman744

          Well, I guess there are no hard & stringent rules to what “Paleo” actually is. But you’re correct, any extracted oil shouldn’t be Paleo, nor should any processed foods/meats such as bacon, jerky, etc., but some say it is. The term Paleo used by many to define a diet is pretty much a misnomer, and admittingly, I’m not an expert.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Dr. David Jenkins helped invent the glycemic index. He developed a portfolio diet for lowering cholesterol. One study he was part of looked at the difference between a vegan and omnivorous low-carb diet, as seen in this video. I do not necessarily recommend it because I have seen excellent clinical results from a strict plant based diet higher in carbohydrates and lower in fat, but still this ‘eco-atkins’ type of diet shows that perhaps animal fat is very different from plant fat.

    • Coolcat

      Use coconut oil for most of your fats. It is true, my cholesterol has gone up from eating too much processed meat.

    • Ron Evans

      There is not just one “paleo diet.” There are many interpretations.

    • Joe Doro

      There is – sort of.

      http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0708681

      While not a true veg diet, it was close in that is was a low fat calorie restricted with fat being only 30% of calories and saturated fat 10%. That arm of the trial had women and men eating 1500 or 1800 calories, respectively. So that means for a man only 180 calories would come from sat fat which would be only 20 grams. So that would have precluded eating very much meat or dairy. the other arms were the Mediterranean and low carb diets.

      In all measures the low carb beat the mediterrranean which beat the low fat.

      There are other studies as well but not as rigourous, but pretty much every diet tested against a low fat diet wins.

      The best part of this study is that food was provided to the participants at noon (the main meal of the day in Isreal), it lasted 2 years and there was a very high complaince rate (95 % year 1 and 84% year 2).

      BTW, low carb diets, such as Atkins, are not high protein.The are high fat (60-80%) with very low carb and modearte protein.

      The paleo diet that was origianlly developed to mimic what our ancestors ate for millions of years has sort of morphed into a low fat no wheat or sugar type of diet.

      They tend to be higher in protein with the suggestion being to eat only lean meats, I suspect because of the lingering fear of fat. So the claim that his diet is what out ancestors ate for million of years calearly is not correct. For as we know from indigenous peoples such as the Inuit and others, who routinley eat meat that had the most fat first and then the rest and then feed to leanest meats to the dogs. Also if we look at all carnivorous animals, we find that after the kill the first thing they go for are the viscera often leaving the the muscular parts to the vultures.

      Also with the current paleo idea as to what we ate, it’s hard to imagine how our ancestors survived on tubers and plants, etc for example in the norther hemispher fot the 6 months or so when you couldn’t grow anything. And as for olive oil and other oils, they are realtively recent inclusions to our diet. For example, read about the myth of olive oil having been consume for centuries.

  • Leslie

    Dr. Greger, I’d be thrilled to see some data and suggestions on increasing blood flow to the brain for those who have had TBI/concussions, especially for young adults with history of concussions from sports. Apparently the increased blood flow to brain helps damaged brain tissue heal. Sure, one could cut back on fat and add berries. But your data is fun!

  • DairyMaid

    Does low carb necessarily mean high meat-based protein and high fat? What I’m asking is what did these people on the low carb diet actually eat? If they ate veggies and fruits instead of starches, then this study would be astonishing. But if they ate lots of meat-based protein and fat, then this study doesn’t tell us anything new at all.

    • baggman744

      Exactly. How is “low carb” defined in reference to this study?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Good points. It is hard to say what the low-carb diet consisted of. I’ll look deeper into this. You can too by checking out the actual study. Dr. mentions how the diet was supposed to be a healthy vegetarian diet, but then 10 folks went on a low-carb diet. From the methods: “Each patient was advised to consume a diet consisting of 10 kCal/pound/day. On the basis of
      caloric calculations, patients were instructed to consume 15% of their daily calories in protein, 70% in carbohydrate (principally complex carbohydrates), and 15% in fat with a 2:1 ratio of nonsaturated (polyunsaturated, monosaturated) to saturated fat intake. For example, a 170-pound person would be instructed to eat 1,700 calories per day, including 255 calories from protein (64 grams), 1,190 calories from carbohydrates (297 grams) from a variety of (mostly complex) carbohydrates, and 255 calories fat (28 grams), of which no more than 9 grams could be saturated.” At any rate, this dietary pattern seemed to trump the low-carb diet.

    • suepy

      Here’s a link to the new study which found an association between low carb and poorer peripheral small artery function. http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FBJN%2FBJN109_07%2FS0007114512003091a.pdf&code=3b0134193b14a1741e3a1a9fe14560df The study was conducted in Spain, but the study authors noted that “the diet consumed by the present study population was similar to the diet of a corresponding American population with equally high CV risk”. It was based on a 3-day food intake evaluation and reduced to a low-carbohydrate score. Guess they weren’t following the Mediterranean diet, but instead the good’ol American SAD.

      A newer review http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418418/ questioned whether low-carb diets have a favorable or detrimental impact on endothelial function, or is it the quality of the carbs which matters. They commented that high carbohydrate diets which cause hyperglycemia have been demonstrated to worsen the efficacy of the endothelial system and are associated with an increased CVD risk. A limitation to the studies analyzing low carb diets is that the carbs must be replaced by fats and protein, and it can be “challenging to differentiate the effect of carbohydrate restriction from the effects due to alterations in other macronutrients”. They observed that low-carb diets are associated with decreased intake of fiber, fruit or root vegetables, and increased consumption of meat and dairy, which may contribute to the adverse vascular outcomes. This review concluded that emphasizing the quality and GI index of foods may be a more promising approach to preserving vascular function than low-carb.

      However, the Eco-Atkins diet, which is low-carb vegan, has been shown to be associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality rates. David Jenkins published this study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418418/ which used nuts as a replacement for carbs. The full-nut dose of 73 g/day (2.6 oz) reduced A1c, LDL, and ApoB with good compliance among the participants with the diet. This is the diet I follow which has helped me drop my A1c to 5.0, total cholesterol to 145, LDL particles down to 668, inflammation markers low, and BMI fine. I think my success with this low-carb plan is from using high quality, whole plant foods and low GI carbs.

  • Russell

    What about those of us vegans who eat a lot of nuts, avocados, seeds, and tofu, but virtually no carbs and zero animal products? My diet is about 40% fat, but only the veggie kind. So far, no heart or vascular disease, low homocysteine and CRP. The reason for low-carbs? Unfortunately, I’m pre-diabetic and even whole grains raise my glucose excessively (even though I’m quite thin).

    • Steve Bozic

      Hey Russell, a high carb plant diet does not cause diabetes, in fact Dr. Neal Barnard’s patients managed to reverse their Type-2 diabetes by eating as much as they cared for of fruits, veggies, grains, legumes etc. Diabetes is a disease of fat toxicity as Dr. Gregor has taught us in previous videos. I would recommend cutting your fat intake WAY down to no more than 10% of your calories. Try to aim for 80-10-10 for optimal health. (carbs-protein-fat). Use Cronometer.com for an excellent look into your diets macro/micro nutrient breakdown. Raw till 4 high-carb, low fat for the win!!

      • Steven

        People who do not have this problem are always quick to recommend this sort of thing. I also note that the doctors pushing this approach do not have such problems themselves — if I am wrong here please direct me to one who does. Unfortunately, I also suffer from carb sensitivity due to a medical mistake and the fact is that, like others with blood sugar regulation issues, too many carbs dangerously elevates my post-prandial glucose levels. Intelligent use of supplements, exercise, and a moderately low carb diet have kept me from slipping into any diagnosed disease — in fact, most doctors would now laugh at my concerns based simply on fasting blood sugars — but I work hard. I would love to reduce fat content and eat more carbs but given my observations based upon extensive blood monitoring I do not see how it could possibly work.

        One problem with these studies is the confounding of animal products with “low carb” and, as the doctor points out, at least one study showed that a vegan low carb diet (Eco Atkins) can be healthy (though it was a bit high in processed soy for my taste). And BTW, I do support a vegan diet approach so I am on his side in that respect.

        Finally, while I cannot claim to have read every study on fat metabolism and diabetes, every one I have read involves obese patients. So I always have the question about how this applies to fit folks who otherwise appear to have normal fat metabolism. I am pretty fit and can eat nearly 4,000 calories a day on a lower carb diet without gaining weight at a certain point. That is on a diet of approximately 60% fat.

        • Russell

          Steven, thanks for the comments. We have similar issues, and I’m up to 60% plant-based fats on some days as well. Like Steve Bozic above, who clearly means well, there is a lot of ignorance in the community about what thin vegan diabetics or pre-diabetics should do. It’s also frustraging to see so much conflation between low-carb animal diets and low-carb plant-based diets. There are extremely different!! (Yes, have seen Jenkins’ excellent work supporting plant-based fats, and higher fat levels in general).

          For that reason, three of us from Nutrition Facts have taken our conversations off-line and we compare notes and send around interesting studies and articles on a weekly basis. Feel free to join us if you want. I’m at russelllong@me.com. Yes, we are all basically Eco-Atkins.

          I’ve had a few emails with Caroline Trapp who runs the diabetes program for Dr. Neal Barnard, and she finally admitted that there is virtually no data on thin diabetics, and recognizes that it presents a different set of problems since we don’t have insulin resistance and instead appear to have insulin production problems, And you need a lot of insulin to metabolize carbs, whole grain or otherwise. (Not so much for veggie fats or protein.)

          Here’s the question regarding Eco-Atkins: at higher veggie fat intakes, I find my LDL can climb to 138. At the lowest fat intake that I can get to while still keeping A1c under 5.5, I get about 35% of calories from fat and my LDL drops to 95. But wow, at those lower levels, its hard to stay over 140 lbs,, and I’m 5’10”. Finding the middle ground between getting too skinny and having excessive LDL is very challenging.

        • Miroslav Kovar

          I am happy to find yours and Russels comments! I thought I was alone in this and maybe having some issue.

          I so agree. So many health professionals tend to universalise their recommendations based solely on observational studies and their own experience, but they forget that there are outliers and individuals with specific issues, needs and treatment. In other words, the treatment that works mostly does not necessarily work for everyone.

          I would love to make HCLF vegan diet, clinically “the optimal diet”, work for me, but I just can’t. Just a little bit of oatmeal or fruit sends my insulin through the roof and my blood sugars crash, I feel tired and crave sweets. I developed anemia, probably due to iron malabsorption. I have very low blood pressure, probably partially due to no salt intake.

          I increased my avocado, nuts and seeds intake, added a bit of salt and eliminated all sweet fruit. Now I finally feel human again! For a first time in a long time, I am able to go without food for more than 3 hours. I have more stable energy and no cravings. I know this is not optimal for health, but I was not able to make anything else work for me.

      • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

        Thanks, Steve! From Dr. Barnard’s research, study participants received either a low-fat vegan diet or a typical diet for diabetes and found significant changes in weight loss and insulin levels. Dr. Greger presents the study in this video.

      • Russell

        Steve, not sure if you saw my response below, and I appreciate the comments. I actually do use Cronometer. I briefly got my fat to 10%, while compensating for the lost calories with brown rice, whole oats, etc., but my glucose went crazy and the docs were threatening to put me on insulin. Unfortunately, Greger/Barnard’s approach just doesn’t work for thin people with diabetic-type issues. We’re clearly in the minority though, and heavier people should definitely go with the Greger program.

        Anyway, my A1c is happily under 5.5 now, and the docs are not concerned about my glucose so long as I keep it there.

        • Becky Hansen Carlin

          Well, heavy or thin, it just doesnt work for some. I cannot get weight down while concentrating on carbs. It doesnt matter if its mostly complex..the insulin resistance may play a part.
          contrary to popular belief..we can be very active people, but carbs of any kind wreak havoc

          • Steve Bozic

            Hey Becky. Have you tried a Raw Till 4pm high fruit diet yet? It will reverse Insulin Resistance. Here’s what I eat in a day – What I eat in a day –
            My smoothie recipe: Approx. 2500cal (gets me to approx 4pm daily). Macronutrient breakdown of roughly 80% Carbs / 10% Protein / 10% Fat. (Which is ideal for optimal health)

            250ml of soy/almond chocolate milk (almost all brands B12 fortified)
            20 Pitted dates
            Handful or two of Spinach (or kale)
            1 teaspoon of “Ceylon” Cinnamon (not the common kind found in most stores)
            1.5 tablespoons of Chia Powder
            1.5 tablespoons of Hemp seeds
            Optional 1 fresh Indian Gooseberry (left in the fridge to soak over night in water)
            1 Apple
            2 Kiwis (if available)
            1 Handful of Dried or fresh cranberries (if available) OR
            1 Handful of dried or fresh Figs (if available)
            1 tablespoon Coconut sugar (optional for taste)
            6-8 Bananas depending on size (super ripe with tons of brown spots if possible)
            Fill blender rest of the way with water

            (I’ll also sometimes sprout Broccoli seeds and throw a handful in)

            Then for dinner it’s a cooked carb rotation between Pasta/Potatoes/Rice/Quinoa with mixed Veggies (mainly Broccoli) and tomato sauce.

            This daily diet when checked on Cronometer.com meets all of the Vitamin/Mineral as well as Fat/Protein/Carb requirements for optimal health.

          • Becky Hansen Carlin

            Wow. No, thats way more than I eat. Any addition of fruit or veg, besides, besides s bit of ight salad fare, seem to count as sugar. Kale (strange) even gave me a couple lbs.
            when I review how those with insulin resistance seem to have all go to fat storage if not used right away, it sees accurate. I am active, eat clean for the most part, and rarely consume over 2000 kcal in a day. The oy way I have evet lost weight was by extreme exercise ( zumba-way fun!) And eliminating most carb.
            Because so many are as confused, as I am, I am now studying nutrition.
            lower carb rates can cause troble with memory and other issues with the brain. When I put more carbs back in my diet (mostly vegetable, but some fruit), I felt more awake, just as the RD tlod me. By no means am I a young pup, so a little brain fog (and with heart and muscle conditions as well…I’m complicated. Im only told to gind a way to lose weight. No direction gor me, except my new RD. I cant imagine all that fruit would help me.
            I do add chia and flax seed, alternating, fish oil and vit D (mine was a little low). Yes, the Ceylon cinnamon is used often, as is garlic and turmeric…yes, right in my greek yogurt! Savory, and quite tasty with some homemade balsamic vinegrette! I eat some berry every day too.
            somehow, my blood sugars have been low, but I still gain. Doesnt help that I needed a steroid treatment to get my legs going last fall.

          • Becky Hansen Carlin

            Sorry about the spelling. Its on my phone today, a bit harder for me sometimes

          • Steve Bozic

            If your issue is that you have insulin resistance the only real cure is to cut out all animal foods as the saturated fat and cholesterol in them is causing your disease. Yours is a disease of “Fat Toxicity” as Dr. Gregor has done a few videos on in the past few months. Once you cut out all animal foods (meat, dairy and eggs) as well as oils, and other overtly fatty foods and replace them with an abundance of fruits daily then and only then will you cure yourself of the insulin resistance issues you are troubled with. You should use Chronometer.com to make sure you are meeting all of your micronutrient requirements as well. Potassium is the key to weight loss. Not sure if you know this but 98% of Americans do NOT get enough Potassium daily.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Glad you found something that works, that is the what’s important!

        • Steve Bozic

          Hey Russell. Here’s the key. Long term results. I know you’ve got your issues under control now eating that much plant based fat but have you tried to go “fruit-based” “Raw till 4pm” Freelee the Banana girl style yet? It’s been super successful for most even slim, active people that are at risk for type-2 diabetes. I say give it a shot for a few weeks at least. Smash in the bananas brah. Peace and love.

          • Russell

            I can eat about two bites or banana before my glucose exceeds the speed limit. Or about a quarter of an apple. I wish it could work… I love fruit but other than a strawberry or two sometimes, they’re off my list.

          • Steven

            I second Russell’s comments. For instance, you frequently see recommendations to eat berries as a “low glycemic” fruit but my experience as been that even small amounts (like picking blackberries as you walk through the woods here in the PNW) elevate my glucose, and it sounds like Russell has much bigger problems than I do. I’ll stick with emphasizing the vegetables.

            Russell. I saw your earlier response and am interested – I will contact you soon.

            Interesting conversation, at any rate!

          • vegank

            I have similar reactions but could probably manage 1 banana and an apple and no more.
            I also find coffee has a negative effect , after about 30mins-1hr. When I used to eat biscuits before going Plant based Whole food, anything containing golden syrup or corn syrup also gave me problems, similar to the effects of MSG in some processed food.

          • Really

            Steve, your advice would kill Russell. Freelee and Durian Rider are fraudsters.

    • Steve Bozic

      Hey Russell, a high carb plant diet does not cause diabetes, in fact Dr. Neal Barnard’s patients managed to reverse their Type-2 diabetes by eating as much as they cared for of fruits, veggies, grains, legumes etc. Diabetes is a disease of fat toxicity as Dr. Gregor has taught us in previous videos. I would recommend cutting your fat intake WAY down to no more than 10% of your calories. Try to aim for 80-10-10 for optimal health. (carbs-protein-fat). Use Cronometer.com for an excellent look into your diets macro/micro nutrient breakdown. Raw till 4 high-carb, low fat for the win!!

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Good question. You may want to check out some of Dr. Jenkins’s work. Dr. David Jenkins helped invent the glycemic index. He developed a portfolio diet for lowering cholesterol. Here are 38 citations about diet and disease with this one showing tree nuts help improve glycemic control. Nuts and seeds appear helpful for those with diabetes. Vegans on a low-carb diet ate nuts/seeds and seemed to do okay, as seen in this video on a low-carb plant-based diet. Click “source cited” to find the actual study, if interested. I do not necessarily recommend it because I have seen excellent clinical results from a strict plant based diet higher in carbohydrates and lower in fat, but still this ‘eco-atkins’ type of diet shows that perhaps animal fat is very different from plant fat.

      • Steven

        Thanks Dr. Gonzales. I am aware of some of the research on nuts but not all and will follow up these links. It is clear from many sources, including Dr. Gregor’s videos, that walnuts may be the best attested “super food” out there. In any event, I eat a fairly large amount of nuts and seeds and they have been key to making it work for me.

      • Leslie

        Please see Russell’s response to me above. I always thought that blood sugar spikes were fine and of no threat to the organs as long as the levels were brought down to a safe level within a few hours. Mine can spike up 175 after a bowl of fruit, but as long as I move around and exercise it comes down 2 or 3 hours later. I always was told this was safe, but the studies Russel posted claim otherwise. Your thoughts?

    • Leslie

      When you say “whole grains raise my glucose excessively” what are you considering a high glucose reading? How long does it stay that high? Does it eventually come down a few hours later? Thank you for clarity, this might help me.

      • Russell

        Studies show that above 140, organ damage can begin to occur. I try always to stay below 140. Unfortunately that means that if I have a half cup of oatmeal, I exceed that number by quite a bit and will stay above 140 for 2-3 hours unless I go for a walk right away. Instead I substantially reduce my oatmeal amount and add flaxseed, almond butter, hemp seeds. These reduce the peak considerably and also taste great!

        • Leslie

          Thanks for the studies. But I am confused and now curious about something…as you claim that if you go for a walk after eating the oatmeal then the blood sugar issue is no longer an issue, as this obviously keeps your blood reading at a safe level, of no harm, but you instead you add nuts and seeds in place of the oatmeal, and this, I am to assume, allows you not to have to go for the walk. Why not just eat the oatmeal and exercise? It seems so natural, like the “human” thing to do, to be on our feet, active before and after exercise. Am I understanding this correctly?

          • Russell

            It would take a one hour walk to hold glucose down to sub 140. I just don’t have the time and need to get to work. But you are on the right track; if one has time for extended walks after each meal every day, some carbs can definitely be added.

  • meat good for brains

    I eat meat so can distinguish between low cabo and high protean.

    the experiment does not mean low carbo no good.. It just means high protean no good.

    • Amanda

      I believe Dr. Greger has reviewed studies comparing animal protein to plant protein and plant protein doesn’t have the same negative effects as animal.

      • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

        You are correct. Dr. Greger has a blog about the ratio of animal vs. plant protein and cancer. You can view his video in that blog, too. Thanks, Amanda.

  • Susanna

    I couldn’t find the free download of Carbophobia at atkinsfacts.org

    • MikeOnRaw

      download gives 404 but you can get the html one and then print to pdf.
      http://atkinsfacts.org/printer_friendly.html

      • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

        Thanks, Mike!

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi Susanna. You can read for free from the printer friendly version (the link Mike gave below). We’re working on fixing the PDF link. Thanks!

  • Coolcat

    Lies. Big Vegetable Oil Companies producing “research”. Dr. Atkins Diet has helped scores of patients, to lose weight and reduce cholesterol, and triglycerides. Low fat and high carb diets have proven to increase weight, and to promote diabetes.

    • kylemeister

      You remind me of Nina Teicholz. I’m guessing you consider a diet getting about a third of its calories from fat and about half from carbohydrate to be “low-fat” and “high-carb.”

      One thing is, I’ve never seen a paper indicating an Atkins-type diet having the kind of effect seen here.
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4338379/

      • Coolcat

        Read Dr. Atkin’s Diet Revolution.

        • 2tsaybow

          Read Carbophobia.

          Here is a excerpt:

          There is nothing new or revolutionary about Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution. Various high-fat diet fads like Atkins have been masquerading under different names for over a hundred years, starting in 1864 when an English undertaker and coffin maker by the name of William Banting wrote a book called Letter on Corpulence.[24] Based on what we know now about these diets, Banting’s book may very well have added to Banting’s business.

          • Jen Drost, PA-C, NF Volunteer

            2tsaybow, it really is a great read, isn’t it? :) Who else but our Dr. G. could find the humor in death and diet?

    • Charzie

      LOL. Atkins died from heart disease he kept hidden from his public, you have got to be joking! I got rid of my diabetes and tons of other health issues after switching to that low fat, high complex carb, whole food diet…where do you get this antiquated nonsense from?

      • Coolcat

        Dr. Atkins feel on a slick icy sidewalk and hit his head, and died from it. He didn’t die from heart disease. That’s why your brain isn’t fully working. Saturated fat is needed for brain functioning. And carbs t shoot up your blood sugar. Low fat diets cause heart disease, and cancer. You never had diabetes to begin with.

      • Ryan Taylor

        He didn’t die of heart disease. This is a common inaccuracy. This whole site is such nonsense. Lmao.

  • Peggy Bean

    I love you Doc! You really help get me on the right path! Thanks, P

  • Really

    Basing this on ONE study?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi, Really. I don’t think so. Dr. Greger has multiple hyperlinks in this blog post with all the research available in “sources cited” – check it out! Also, he mentions at the end of the article why he doesn’t have tons of information on low-carb diets because he wrote an entire book about it called “Carbophobia.”

      For ease. These citations are from the video low-carb diets and coronary blood flow. Hope this helps.

      H. Noto, A. Goto, T. Tsujimoto, M. Noda. Low-carbohydrate diets and all-cause mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. PLoS ONE 2013 8(1):e55030.

      J. Merino, R. Kones, R. Ferré, N. Plana, J. Girona, G. Aragonés, D. Ibarretxe, M. Heras, L. Masana. Negative effect of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diet on small peripheral artery reactivity in patients with increased cardiovascular risk. Br. J. Nutr. 2013 109(7):1241-1247.

      R. M. Fleming, K. Ketchum, D. M. Fleming, R. Gaede. Treating hyperlipidemia in the elderly. Angiology 1995 46(12):1075-1083.

      R. M. Fleming, L. B. Boyd. The effect of high-protein diets on coronary blood flow. Angiology 2000 51(10):817-826.

      F. L. Santos, S. S. Esteves, A. da Costa Pereira, W. S. Yancy Jr, J. P. L. Nunes. Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials of the effects of low carbohydrate diets on cardiovascular risk factors. Obes Rev 2012 13(11):1048-1066.

      L. Schwingshackl, G. Hoffmann. Low-carbohydrate diets impair flow-mediated dilatation: Evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br. J. Nutr. 2013 110(5):969-970.

      R. M. Fleming. Reversing heart disease in the new millennium–the Fleming unified theory. Angiology 2000 51(8):617-629.

      • Really

        Another misleading title. And what is most outrageous is referencing a felon…..

        http://www.fbi.gov/omaha/press-releases/2009/om082009.htm

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Thanks for your comments and opinions.

          • Really

            It’s safe to say Dr. Fleming and his research has been discredited based on his felonies.

        • 2tsaybow

          Oh this is so exciting! It reminds me of my first philosophy class, Logic. I had to go back to my old book to determine whether of not the fallacy in your argument is Argumentum ad hominem or if its a Moralistic fallacy.
          I love it – “outrageous referencing a felon..”
          He didn’t make money off people eating plants.
          There is no money in having people eat a whole food plant based diet, just the opportunity for good health.

          There is a lot of money to be made if Americans eat a Standard American Diet. Who makes the money? The beef industry, the dairy industry, big poultry, big pharma, big agriculture (corn fructose, yum!), and all those medical professionals making all that money by performing surgeries that would not be needed if their patients just ate beans and veggies instead of meat.

          • Really

            “He didn’t make money off people eating plants.” —-http://cnsnews.com/news/article/doctor-who-got-atkins-death-report-selling-his-own-diet-book

            “There is no money in having people eat a whole food plant based diet….” LOL

  • Liam Rees

    Only in the known universe Aneta kapron !

  • lesleycp

    This comment is a bit off topic : )
    Below is a paragraph from an email sent by the owners of PEERtrainer about the benefits of Nicotinamide Riboside(NR), and a product they are promoting called NiaCel, made by Thorne Research.The PEERtrainer owners claim “When cell fuel increases, so does your energy, and nearly every aspect of your health improves. There isn’t an advanced MD we have come across recently who a) does not recommend this and b) take it themselves every day.”

    I’m very curious to know what Dr. Greger has to say about it. He’s one of the few people I trust for honest, unbiased nutrition information. Here’s the paragraph:

    “Nicotinamide Riboside (NR): Sometimes referred to as the “Miracle Molecule” or “Hidden Vitamin,” NR is found naturally in trace amounts in milk and other foods and is a more potent, no flush vitamin B3 (Niacin)derivative.

    Published research has shown that NR is perhaps the most effective NAD+ booster, an essential metabolite found in all cells. NAD+ is arguably the most important cellular cofactor for improvement of mitochondrial performance and energy metabolism.

    Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell where macronutrients are converted to energy the cell can use. Mitochondria also play an important part in the aging process. It is hoped that by stimulating mitochondrial function with the NR molecule scientists will see increased longevity as well as other health improvements.

    Researchers worldwide continue seminal discoveries characterizing the unique properties of NR in a wide range of health benefits. These include increasing mitochondrial health, increasing muscle endurance, neuroprotection, sirtuin activation, protection against weight gain on a high fat diet, protection against oxidative stress, improvement of blood glucose, and insulin sensitivity to maintain blood sugar levels within the normal range

    Findings from a recent study by Weill Cornell Medical College and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland researchers showed that mice on a high fat diet that were fed NR gained 60 percent less weight than mice eating the same high fat diet without NR.

    Moreover, unlike the mice that were not fed NR, none of the NR treated mice had indications they were developing diabetes and they had improved energy and lower cholesterol levels, all without side effects. The Swiss researchers were quoted as saying the effects of NR on metabolism “are nothing short of astonishing.”

    A study by researchers from Harvard Medical School in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging, published in December 2013 in CELL, demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction (a hallmark of aging) in aging mice is due to a disruption in sirtuin1 dependent nuclear mitochondrial communication.

    They further showed that a reduction in NAD+ levels is responsible for this disruption. They also showed this mitochondrial dysfunction was readily reversible by administration of a NAD+ precursor. The authors found that “one week of treatment with a compound that boosts NAD+ levels is sufficient to restore the mitochondrial homeostasis and key biochemical markers of muscle health in a 22 month old mouse to levels similar to a 6 month old mouse.

    NiaCel, from Thorne is a single ingredient product that is designed to boost NAD+ levels. Essentially this product produces “cell fuel” or ATP. When you make more cell fuel you help to support:

    Weight Managment by promoting THERMOGENESIS
    Greater Endurance for both athletes and tired people
    Fat Metabolism
    Nerve Function
    Insulin Sensitivity
    Brain Function
    Healthy Aging.”
    Thanks,
    Lesley

    • 2tsaybow

      I am not sure this is a good place for advertising. Consumption of supplements in not encouraged here unless it is B-12 of Vitamin D.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Thanks for sharing, Leslie. I don’t see any links to your comments so not sure exactly what the study is, at any rate looks like animal data so it is hard to based day-to-day choices off animal studies. I agree with 2tsaybow’s comment that the only main supplement needed are B12 and Vitamin D. B12 is super important. Check out Dr. Greger’s Optimal Nutrition Recommendations for more information, if interested.

      Thanks again,
      Joseph

  • broken1

    Dr Greger, I would be willing to be a test subject of a vegan diet. I have been vegan 3 yrs. I am 60.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hey, broken1. We do not conduct clinical trials but you can always share your stories, what works for you, what didn’t, what foods you feel give you the best boost of energy, etc, etc! That would be great and super helpful for others who may be trying to eat more plant-based.

      Thanks,
      Joseph

      • broken1

        Hey thanks Joseph for your reply and time. I do relate to others I talk with at my grocery store about eating a plant base diet. And many people respond positively. My produce friend call me the organic vegan guy. They know my name, but I like the nickname. I guess I should keep a journal. Maybe one day my kids will benefit from it. Namaste.

  • selma al-abbas

    Sure is confusing when you have people like Dr. Permultter and Dr. Wahls advocating paelo/grain free and even ketogenic disease for those with autoimmune, neurological, and other serious diseases based on their own experience or treating patients.

    • Jen Drost, PA-C, NF Volunteer

      Selma, Agree, there are a lot of conflicting opinions out there, which is why for me, as a sciencey-person, I always come back to not opinions, but the evidence (here’s a fave video about that). Who’s published their results? Who’s citing evidence rather than their opinions? One thing I love about NutritionFacts.org (and why I volunteer for the site) is that it’s not-for-profit and all references are listed (under “Sources Cited” tab).

      I failed to find any clinical studies published by Dr. Perlmutter but found one published study by Dr. Wahls-to the contrary of what I thought I knew about her work, her study showed the positive effects of veggies on the fatigue associated with MS. Also, the effect of a diet that is helpful is usually evident to the person eating it within 1-3 weeks. That’s pretty quick. So we should not be afraid to do our own experiments and find what makes us feel best :)

      • Charzie

        Exactly what I planned on doing…for just a month, trying out a WFPB diet over 5 years ago. In 3 weeks no more diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, arthritis, on and on. Needless to say, I never looked back. There would be NO controversy if people would just give the diet in question a fair trial. I also eventually lost half my body weight too, but the original goal was to nix another round of pharmaceuticals and stop disease progression, I was already taking 12 meds and hadn’t even reached 60 yet. Needless to say, they are all history now, including narcotics for severe arthritis, fibromyalgia. and back issues. I never did have to get the knee or hip replacement they were scheduling me for either. I am soooo thankful I finally learned the truth and the ADA should be ashamed of themselves, seriously. Their “healthy diet” is a sham for diabetics…it may maintain the disease in a “better” way, but it didn’t come close to eliminating or reversing it like a WFPB diet did!

        • Jen Drost, PA-C, NF Volunteer

          Great to hear about your healthy choices, Charzie! So glad you’re feeling better :)

  • mouth

    People are having a hard time with round up poisoned wheat that is GMO garbage. It is ruinous. So many people on paleo (not atkins or soth beach) are much healthier with no allergies and no diabetic problems. Doctors besides the few like DR OZ, now being harassed for his honesty, are concerned with the money they get from pharmas and not our health.

  • thorn324

    Having looked at the abstract for the source article, I am unclear about what seems to me to be a significant point. Dr. Greger wrote, “[Fleming] He then put them all on a healthy vegetarian diet”; later he (Dr. Greger) refers to “the veg group.” So what exactly was the diet of the Treatment Group? A ‘vegetarian diet”–even a “healthy” one–is usually defined as one that excludes flesh foods but not dairy &/or eggs. Is *that* what the treatment group ate? If so, that’s different than what Dr. Greger recommends and what many of us follow–specifically, a vegan diet. Could someone with access to the full article (hint, hint, Joseph!) clarify what the Treatment Group’s diet comprised? Thanks.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I may have spoke to this further down in the thread. If you cannot find please let me know. Thanks, throrn324

  • Justin Roy Olson

    So what do we do continue eating high fat and moderate carbohydrates?

  • Justin Roy Olson
    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hey Justin. It looks like there are no available citations so I am not sure. our site offers all citations and information free of charge. Let me know if you have other questions.

      Best regards,
      Joseph

      • Justin Roy Olson

        Thanks doctor! I follow the Weston A Price Foundation for nutritional and lifestyle advise for most things, everyone has their own hobbies and likes for things though. I eat lots of grass fed beef, organic chicken, and takes fermented cod liver oil and high vitamin butter oil everyday! Along with lots of butter from kerrygold. I also drink raw milk, eat raw cheese, raw pastured egg yolks and cooked egg whites. I have a total cholesterol of 241 HDL of 104 LDL of 128 VLDL of 9 and TRIGLYCERIDES of 43 which is outstanding ratios and numbers. I have recently wanted to go low carb but am scared to now but my HbA1C was 5.6 and my glucose was 83 all the tests listed above were from over a year and a half ago now. Haven’t wanted to go back to get tested!

        • 2tsaybow

          Hi Justin, you might want to look into the studies that are being done by nutritional scientists. This website is a good starting point. There is also the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine website. Its is PCRM.org.

          I am not a registered dietitian like Joseph but when I began having problems with my blood sugar I started to rethink my day to day diet and I’ve found that a whole food plant based diet really made be feel better. I hope you spend some time here and watch many of the videos that Dr. Greger has made. My favorite ones are his annual presentations. If you have a chance watch From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseased with Food. I think it is the best one.

          Good luck and good health

  • http://johnotvos.wordpress.com/ John Otvos

    I know of a person who religiously follows Dr. Mercola. Joe is very well known for what he does, but it now seems that he is at opposite ends of the spectrum that Michael is touting. I will stay with Dr. Greger and the science that he so generously gives us. But, what about Mercola and this article? It’s entitled: They Just Made This Stuff Up and Most of Us Believe It

    http://everlast.mercola.com/r/?id=h397b0daf%2c8eeab6d%2c9242368&et_cid=DM75661&et_rid=964365743

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi John. I am not sure about Mercola I do not know him if you have any questions related to the research we provide here (or have some of your own you’d found) let’s discuss! I could spend hours reading nutrition articles and giving you my “take” but I’d rather focus on the research :-) Sounds ok?

  • https://www.facebook.com/app_scoped_user_id/10206649255851816/ Jonathan Christie

    Dr Greger, I’m a 30-year Type I diabetic on Dr Bernstein’s lowcarb diet for glycemic control – my HbAic is 5.3%. However, my coronary artery calcium score is zero. My doc tries hard to persuade me I’m digging my grave with my teeth, just like you, but my experience suggests you are gravely misguided. Were I to embrace your advice, my HbA1c would return to near 8% as it was on the ADA low fat diet and I would once more be at extreme risk of diabetic complications.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hey Jonathan. Please eat what you feel is best. I will say that the ADA diet is useful, as well as a strict plant based diet for lowering A1c. From Dr. Barnard’s research, study participants received either a low-fat vegan diet or a typical diet for diabetes and found significant changes in weight loss and insulin levels. Dr. Greger presents the study in this video. Good luck with your diet I commend you for lowering your A1c.

  • sherlocke

    I am trying to find Carbophobia that is now available online full-text at AtkinsFacts.org. Unable to locate it. Help please.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      That link IS the book ;-) You can read page for page on the link you supplied, or check out this free PDF.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      That link IS the book ;-) You can read page for page on the link you supplied, or check out this free PDF.

  • Joe Doro

    Interesting –

    So you quote a single old study from 15 years ago on 26 patients using SPECT , the limitations of that era that we are all aware of. How is it that no one has have done a follow up to see if the results could be replicated? Or have they and just never published because they didn’t? One will never know since there is no way of checking. But with the popularity of low carb diets since 2000, one would clearly have expected this to have been done many times over since it would bypass all of those risk markers such as LDL,HDL,,LDL particle size, CRP, etc. and get right at the “heart” of the question.

    Then you point out more recent sutuidies that dramatically show a low carb diet causes heart disease to progress. From the alarm of them one would expect people on low carb diets to be dropping like flies due to their CAD.

    And then to further show how bad low carb diets really are you reference a study that shows overall mortality is increased (RR 1.3) in those on a low carb diet . Of course RR is a pretty slippery statisitic. For example, statins are advertised to reduce risk by 33% but if you look at the package insert of any of them and look at the data upon which that number is based you will find that the absolute risk reduction is just 1% over 3 years (i.e. in the treated group of people at high risk for vascular diasease only 2 out of 100 had an event while in the placebo group 3 out of a 100 had). So that means out of every 100 people taking a statin for 3 years, 99 of them will not have had any benefit.

    But the main concern I have is that you fail to point out that in that very large meta analysis (272,216 patients) that the mortality and incidence of CAD was not statistically different. And to me those are the real hard end points in any study.

    So on the one hand you are using data from various imaging studies to prove that low carb diets cause CAD to either devlop or progress, but ont the other the study that shows the real hard endpoint, ie. incidence or mortality from CAD does not.

  • alphakitty
    • alphakitty

      new science says cholesterol is not a bad thing at all. Our bodies NEED it, our brains NEED it, that is why our bodies make it. Giving up sugar is what helped me…and sugar is grains too.

      • Tom Goff

        ” that is why our bodies make it.” … that is why you don’t need to get cholesterol from the diet. We also need water but consuming too much can kill you. These simplistic arguments about cholesterol which you have found are half truths at best and seriously misleading at worst. Be very cautious about people claiming there is “new science” on nutrition and health which real scientists, researchers and physicians are unaware of … two and two still make four whatever the diet book infomercials and promoters may say.

  • Valerie Robbins

    I have had issues with carbohydrate addiction for a long time. I am morbidly overweight at this point. When I fast for a day or two…I detox from the carbs and I feel extremely better. I am also able to control my carb intake. In my experience now and in the past (I lost more that 50 pounds twice in my lifetime) I find reducing my starchy and sugary carbs helps me to take control of my weigh loss. I have other issues to deal with also…such as motivation, exercise, chronic health issues, etc..

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Good for you keep it up! if you want more information about how whole grains and other healthful carbohydrates let me know. Motivation is hard to find for everyone! We must find what we love doing in regards to physical activity and perhaps look for that “greater purpose in life” to help build our self esteem. Social support is also key. Best to you.

  • Trey
  • Tomorrow

    I agree some people may have carbophobina. But what about cholesterolophobia?

    Namely, cholesterol does not cause heart disease. Never did.

    And secondly, even if it did (but 50 % of people who get heart attack have normal or even low cholesterol levels which shows that it does not matter what your cholesterol level is), it is not ingesting (dietary) cholesterol that raises your (blood) cholesterol. It is ingesting sugar, too many carbs and inflammatory foods. So even if you go out of your way to stretch the truth and interpret it the way you set out to interpret it, i.e., distorted, LC diets do not cause heart disease, at least they didn’t cause it those 5-6 million years when humans were eating mostly meat and fats.

    Meanwhile, there hasn’t been one single vegan society in the whole human history. Not one, ever. And there isn’t one now. because without animal fats, you can’t procreate. This is what happens when you pretend to be smarter than Mother nature.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Is there a study showing that without animal fats you cannot procreate? Interesting! Please eat what you feel is best we do not promote one diet over another. Based on the research cholesterol does not appear to have a lower limit so I am not following that logic. Anyway, we many be in a bit of a disagreement about optimal cholesterol levels but that doesn’t mean we cannot have a civil conversation about the research. Thanks for you comments, Tomorrow.

  • lowcarbconvert

    “He then put them all on a healthy vegetarian diet” – biased much?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Did you see the research on plant-based Atkin’s diet? If interested, here is a video on a low-carb plant-based diet. I do not necessarily recommend it because I have seen excellent clinical results from a strict plant based diet higher in carbohydrates and lower in fat, but still this ‘eco-atkins’ type of diet shows that perhaps animal fat is very different from plant fat.

      • lowcarbconvert

        Yes, I’m in correspondence with many who have successfully followed this approach. I however question any diet that requires supplementation and/or requirement of specialized non-local foods to sustain health. Most animal species get along just fine without any specialized supplementation. If they were unable to do so, they would have long since become extinct.

  • Reason And Believing

    Total non-sense. Reduced blood flow ? Of course, the lowering of sugar, not the increase of protein or fat, causes a settling and leveling of your entire body.
    Eat some sugar its like adding gas to the BBQ
    Stop being a vegan activities , We can all see how sickly our vegan friends are .

  • Diana Michael

    My name is Diana, I am here to give my testimony about a doctor who helped me in my life. I was infected with CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE in 2010, i went to many hospitals for cure but there was no solution, so I was thinking how can I get a solution out so that my body can be okay. One day I was in the river side thinking where I can go to get solution. so a lady walked to me telling me why am I so sad and i open up all to her telling her my problem, she told me that she can help me out, she introduce me to a doctor who uses herbal medication to cure CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE and gave me his email, so i mail him. He told me all the things I need to do and also give me instructions to take, which I followed properly. Before I knew what is happening after four weeks the CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE that was in my body got cured . so if you are also heart broken and also need a help, you can also email him at ogboduherbalhivcure@gmail.com OR ogboduspellhome@gmail.com OR ogboduherbalhome@hotmail.com
    .

  • Billy Dee

    After seeing the article on plant based atkins, I did 6 days straight on it, using nuts and seeds and greens and 6 oz of berries, the results were spectacular. Lost 12 lbs. It had the added benefit of lowering my overnight blood sugar from 140 to 102 with in 3 days. The problem is it is boring and I had very little energy. However, my goal was to burn out the ceramides that had accumulated in the muscles by forcing my body to become a fat burner. Once the ceramides that blocked the absorption of sugar into them were cleaned out, it was possible to convert to a high carb low fat vegan diet. Ceramides are formed when you consume fats – mainly palmitic acid in a high insulin environment. Eating too much fructose even from fruit – usually more for women- can cause issues. If your liver’s glycogen stores are already full, then the fructose will be converted to fat which can then form ceramides in a high insulin environment. Banana girl suggesting women should be smashing in 1000 calories smoothies, have led many women including my daughter and daughter in law to gain weight. And when it happens, banana girl said it is from past metabolic damage. No it is just they are exceeding their liver’s storage and creating ceramides. My daughter and daughter in law continued to have issues after quitting the diet, but after putting them on the plant based atkins diet for six days to burn out the ceramides, they are now able to drop weight eating normally. In summation, before starting any hclf diet, I recommend that everyone do a plant based atkins to burn out the ceramides first and also only eat fruit on an empty stomach and limit fruit consumption at any one time to 500 calories for women and 800 for men.

  • Jonathan

    Having had a look at the studies, the carbohydrates were way to high to be called “Low carb”

  • Steve Francis

    You wrote this article in 2015. Your most compelling cite comes from “Dr. Richard Fleming, an accomplished nuclear cardiologist”. Yet you fail to note for your audience that he was convicted of fraud in 2009 and stripped of his license to practice by the Iowa Board of Medicine in 2012. (google his name in conjunction with “FBI” or “Iowa Board of Medicine”) Doesn’t that make the citation somewhat less credible? Even if you believe the science is good, doesn’t your audience deserve to know?

  • Jamie Hicks

    Interesting that you got no reply.

  • clembartels

    Gee, I wonder how humans survived on a low carb diet for hundreds of thousands of years. Who funded those studies? Because there are many studies that show the exact opposite. Not only that, but the Twinkie statement at the beginning of the article is ridiculous.

  • Mike

    Wow this study was amazing probably got the kid a b in his middle school science fair. If it was a legit study they would have had a control, they didnt, it would have had hard rules ,I didn’t. So to make any assumptions off this pathetic waste of space is to believe in aliens, big foot and every other mystical creature. In fact if you put stock in this study I have lots available on Mars for sale……. wish sites used intelligence when posting garbage studies

  • Jopo

    Here’s the latest study (featured on the landing page of the Atkins site) which claims that the Atkins diet is good for your heart. Please debunk this. It’s misleading so many. https://www.atkins.com/newsroom/2015/a-low-carb-diet-outperforms-a-low-fat-diet-when-it-comes-to-health-outcomes

  • William Driscoll

    The first study had carbs at 45% and 29% of diet, versus a truly low carb diet of 5%. There are several studies that clearly show ketogenic diets are beneficial for cardio vascular disease. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2716748/ When I did a high carb low fat diet, my fasting blood sugar kept rising, and when you consider that some people who have fewer copies of amylase genes, may actually do better on a high fat low carb diet. Your real argument against meat consumption is large amount of toxins in the animal products as well as bad bacteria, inflammation, . And yes, eating animal products without restricting carbs substantially at the same time, can lead to heart disease. After 2 years of watching your videos, I am hesitant to consume animal products, however, I am doing a cyclical ketogenic diet where I eat vegan 5 days a week and the other day I have some trout raised to spring water. Also on the trout days, I consume garlic (antibacterial), shredded red cabbage (sulforaphane), turmeric and black pepper(anti-imflammatory) nuts, (cholestrol remover), and over 80g of fiber (increase flow thru colon).

  • Goran Radojevich

    I had a heart surgery in 2009. Ever since 1998 I have been on cholesterol lowering drugs. I gained too much weight, so I am thinking of the low carb diet. How the bad side of this diet correlates with the statins?

  • HisEminence

    His bio belies his bias. There is no way this man came at his opinion objectively. There are now literally decades of studies and research to prove a proper low-carb lifestyle is far, far healthier than a carb-loaded, grain-fed diet.

  • Miroslav Kovar

    So many health professionals tend to universalise their
    recommendations based solely on observational studies and their own
    experience, but they forget that there are outliers and individuals with
    specific issues, needs and treatment. In other words, the treatment
    that works mostly does not necessarily work for everyone.

    I would love to make HCLF vegan diet, clinically “the optimal diet”, work for
    me, but I just can’t. Just a little bit of oatmeal or fruit sends my
    insulin through the roof and my blood sugars crash, I feel tired and
    crave sweets. I developed anemia, probably due to iron malabsorption. I
    have very low blood pressure, probably partially due to no salt intake.

    I increased my avocado, nuts and seeds intake, added a bit of salt and
    eliminated all sweet fruit. Now I finally feel human again! For a first
    time in a long time, I am able to go without food for more than 3 hours.
    I have more stable energy and no cravings. I know this is not optimal
    for health, but I was not able to make anything else work for me.