Doctor's Note

There are also potentially toxic compounds in certain types of cinnamon. See my last video Update on Cinnamon for Blood Sugar Control.

You can also overdo other healthful plant foods if you consume too much of the yellow curry spice turmeric, drink too much tea, eat too much soy, too much seaweed, too many broccoli sprouts, and even too many raw cruciferous vegetables

One more video in this three part series on the safety of spices in The Safety of Tarragon next.

For more context, check out my associated blog posts:  Cinnamon for Diabetes and Tarragon Toxicity?

 If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

  • Kc

    A long time ago, I accidentally used about 2 tablespoons of freshly ground mace in a swedish meatball recipe. My boyfriend and I ate it for dinner, and also for lunch the next day. We couldn’t figure out why we felt so…stoned. I called my older brother, who had given me the (verbal) recipe, and he said, “Are you crazy? I said 2 pinches! Mace is part nutmeg. You could kill yourself with too much!”
    You wonder how the couple ate the food, but honestly ours was quite good like that. :)

  • b00mer

    I knew it! I swear my dreams get funny if I’ve eaten nutmeg that day.

  • Thea

    Wow. Yet: Interesting on more of an intellectual level than anything else, since as you said, it seems unlikely that someone would really eat such a dosage unless by accident. Thus, I have some disagreement with the video’s description that nutmeg has a narrow safety of margin. That sounds like sensational headline-ism (which I hope this site will avoid!) – since that safety of margin seems pretty big to me given how much nutmeg one is normally likely to eat. The examples of someone getting hurt by nutmeg seem akin to me to be like the example of people hurting themselves with too much soy. They have to eat extreme amounts to get there. That’s just my opinion of course.

    That said, this is a good reminder that no matter how good something is for us, it should be taken in moderation. Since I had never heard anything bad said about nutmeg and I had assumed that the more, the better, I’m really glad to have viewed this video.

    One bit I would have liked this video to include what a little sentence on whether Dr. Greger still thinks that nutmeg in moderation is a good part of a healthy diet. It seems in past videos, (perhaps I am remembering incorrectly) that Dr. Greger highly endorsed nutmeg – especially given all of its antioxidants. Just some feedback on the video.

    Thanks.

  • Mark

    Um,
    FYI… That video is only 6 seconds long (including the intro tune). :-

    • Thea

      Mark: I am able to see all 1:57 minutes. Perhaps there is something wrong with your browser? I can’t help you trouble-shoot, but I thought you would want to know that it is working for some people.

    • http://www.facebook.com/drew.corrigan61 Drew Corrigan

      The same happens for me using Safari on a Mac, and also on my iPad. However, if I go to the YouTube website I can view the entire video on my Mac and iPad. Can’t imagine why this should be the case … maybe something to do with the embedding code.

      • http://nutritionfacts.org/ Michael Greger M.D.

        Thank you everyone for helping us get to the bottom of this–hopefully it will never happen again!

  • Mark

    Um,
    FYI… That video is only 6 seconds long (including the intro tune). :-

  • http://www.facebook.com/lizanddan.lonetti Elizabeth Lonetti

    One of my older friends recalled that as a child when he and his friends
    were getting too rambunctious at his grandma’s house, she used to take out her
    nutmeg and slice off slivers and feed it to them until they mellowed out. He said they usually all fell asleep on the
    sofas when she did that… hmmm.

  • Anne

    Nutmeg oil is used to make a cola flavor in at least one natural diet soda. Given the diet soda intake of some people, I could see them getting up to the higher doses of nutmeg.

  • frnkbnhm

    Way to break news that the effects of nutmeg have been known since the 1500′s… Exciting stuff.

    Breaking News: Too much of any one thing is bad for you.

  • www.foodandloathing.com

    I heard this NPR story about nutmeg, and here’s the related article (you can also listen to the story if you like): http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/11/26/165657050/no-innocent-spice-the-secret-story-of-nutmeg-life-and-death. The article is called “No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death” — it’s about how nutmeg has a bloody history of imperialist powers competing to control its trade because it was popular among the rich for its hallucinogenic properties. If you listen to the audio, the Dutch actually wholesale slaughtered all the people who were native to the so-called “spice islands” (modern Indonesia) to control nutmeg. Also, the Dutch traded Manhattan to the British for the last of the nutmeg-growing islands they controlled.

  • MaryJS

    What happened? I recently posted how much I enjoyed the longer video and now can’t see any…Disappointing

  • http://www.facebook.com/rusti.hauge Rusti T Hauge

    Erowid has several articles discussing nutmeg’s intoxicant properties. http://www.erowid.org/plants/nutmeg/

  • http://www.facebook.com/ryanseaton Ryan 船 Seaton

    what exactly are the nutritional properties of Nutmeg and why does it make you high and become toxic past three teaspoons ?

  • extraears

    I’m going to die.

  • funny

    I’ve seen people purposefully get stoned on nutmeg. as an observer it was funny watching people retch while trying to drink ground nutmeg that had been simmered in milk.

  • JBdisqusblip

    By definition, ‘too much’ of anything is bad for you. Without a quantity, each ‘too’ statement is meaningless.