Diet Pills Do Fat a Lot of Good

Diet Pills Do Fat a Lot of Good
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Common slimming supplements are found to be ineffective, whereas a diet centered on whole plant foods is described as perhaps the safest approach to weight control.

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A billion people in the world are now overweight. And, that’s great news for the $13 billion weight loss supplement industry. Reported at the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm recently—a review of common “slimming supplements” versus placebo, and not one worked better than the sugar pills.

No evidence that any of these food supplements provide adequate treatment for weight loss, so looks like we’ll just have to stick with food.

That was the conclusion reached in a similar review out of the Weight Management Center at Johns Hopkins recently, which ended with this: “[I]t is fitting to highlight that perhaps the most general and safest alternative approach to weight control is to substitute low-energy density foods for high-energy density and processed foods, thereby reducing total energy intake. [In other words, more whole plant foods and fewer animals and junk.] By taking advantage of the low-energy density and health-promoting effects of plant-based foods, one may be able to achieve weight loss, or at least assist weight maintenance without cutting down on the volume of food consumed or compromising its nutrient value.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

A billion people in the world are now overweight. And, that’s great news for the $13 billion weight loss supplement industry. Reported at the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm recently—a review of common “slimming supplements” versus placebo, and not one worked better than the sugar pills.

No evidence that any of these food supplements provide adequate treatment for weight loss, so looks like we’ll just have to stick with food.

That was the conclusion reached in a similar review out of the Weight Management Center at Johns Hopkins recently, which ended with this: “[I]t is fitting to highlight that perhaps the most general and safest alternative approach to weight control is to substitute low-energy density foods for high-energy density and processed foods, thereby reducing total energy intake. [In other words, more whole plant foods and fewer animals and junk.] By taking advantage of the low-energy density and health-promoting effects of plant-based foods, one may be able to achieve weight loss, or at least assist weight maintenance without cutting down on the volume of food consumed or compromising its nutrient value.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to actoslawsuithelp.org

Nota del Doctor

So many supplements are useless (see my videos Dietary Supplement Snake Oil, and Some Dietary Supplements May Be More Than a Waste Of Money)—regardless of what one might be told in a natural food store (see my video series Health Food Store Supplement AdviceBad Advice From Health Food Store EmployeesDangerous Advice From Health Food Store Employees; and Pharmacists Versus Health Food Store Employees: Who Gives Better Advice?). You can also search for other videos on diet supplements, like Milk Protein vs. Soy Protein, and thousands of other topics!

For further context, check out my associated blog post, Plant-Based Workplace Intervention.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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