Flashback Friday: Alzheimer’s Disease – Grain Brain or Meathead?

Flashback Friday: Alzheimer’s Disease – Grain Brain or Meathead?
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Grain consumption appears strongly protective against Alzheimer’s disease, whereas animal fat intake has been linked to dementia risk.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The rates of dementia differ greatly around the world, from the lowest rates in Africa and India, South Asia, to the highest rates in Western Europe, and especially North America. Is it all just genetics?

Well, the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is “significantly lower” for Africans in Nigeria “than for African Americans…in Indianapolis,” for example—up to five times lower.

Alzheimer’s rates for Japanese-Americans living in the U.S. are closer to that of Americans than to Japanese. So, “when people of one ethnic group move…from their homeland to the United States,…Alzheimer’s rates [can increase] dramatically.”

“Therefore, when Africans or [Asians] live in the [U.S.] and adopt a Western diet, their [increase in] Alzheimer’s [risk suggests] that [it’s] not the genetics.”

Unfortunately, one doesn’t have to move to the West to adopt a Western diet. The prevalence of dementia in Japan has shot up over the last few decades. “Mechanisms to explain [this in Japan] include increases in cholesterol, saturated fat, and iron from increases in [the consumption of] animal products. Traditional diets generally…are weighted toward vegetable products such as grains and away from animal products.” But, “[s]ince 1960, the diet in Japan has changed from [a more] traditional [rice-based] diet…to one with a preponderance of meat.”

“From 1961 to 2008, meat and animal fat increased considerably, whereas [the] rice supply [dropped].”

The dietary factor most strongly associated with the rise in Alzheimer’s disease in Japan was the increased consumption of animal fat. A similar analysis in China arrived at the same conclusion.

“On the basis of [these] findings…, the rate of [Alzheimer’s disease] and dementia will continue to rise…unless dietary patterns change to those with less reliance on animal products.”

This is consistent with data showing those who eat vegetarian appear two to three times less likely to become demented. And, the longer one eats meat-free, the lower the associated risk of dementia.

Globally, the lowest validated rates of Alzheimer’s in the world are rural India, where they eat low-meat, high-grain, high-bean, high-carb diets. Now, it’s possible the apparent protective association between rice and Alzheimer’s “is more likely due” to the fact that the drop of rice consumption associated with increasing Alzheimer’s was accompanied by a rise in meat consumption.

But, other population studies have found that dietary grains appear strongly protective in relation to Alzheimer’s disease. In other words, perhaps, don’t pass on the grain; pass the grain, to spare the brain.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to kresbicky via deviant art.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The rates of dementia differ greatly around the world, from the lowest rates in Africa and India, South Asia, to the highest rates in Western Europe, and especially North America. Is it all just genetics?

Well, the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is “significantly lower” for Africans in Nigeria “than for African Americans…in Indianapolis,” for example—up to five times lower.

Alzheimer’s rates for Japanese-Americans living in the U.S. are closer to that of Americans than to Japanese. So, “when people of one ethnic group move…from their homeland to the United States,…Alzheimer’s rates [can increase] dramatically.”

“Therefore, when Africans or [Asians] live in the [U.S.] and adopt a Western diet, their [increase in] Alzheimer’s [risk suggests] that [it’s] not the genetics.”

Unfortunately, one doesn’t have to move to the West to adopt a Western diet. The prevalence of dementia in Japan has shot up over the last few decades. “Mechanisms to explain [this in Japan] include increases in cholesterol, saturated fat, and iron from increases in [the consumption of] animal products. Traditional diets generally…are weighted toward vegetable products such as grains and away from animal products.” But, “[s]ince 1960, the diet in Japan has changed from [a more] traditional [rice-based] diet…to one with a preponderance of meat.”

“From 1961 to 2008, meat and animal fat increased considerably, whereas [the] rice supply [dropped].”

The dietary factor most strongly associated with the rise in Alzheimer’s disease in Japan was the increased consumption of animal fat. A similar analysis in China arrived at the same conclusion.

“On the basis of [these] findings…, the rate of [Alzheimer’s disease] and dementia will continue to rise…unless dietary patterns change to those with less reliance on animal products.”

This is consistent with data showing those who eat vegetarian appear two to three times less likely to become demented. And, the longer one eats meat-free, the lower the associated risk of dementia.

Globally, the lowest validated rates of Alzheimer’s in the world are rural India, where they eat low-meat, high-grain, high-bean, high-carb diets. Now, it’s possible the apparent protective association between rice and Alzheimer’s “is more likely due” to the fact that the drop of rice consumption associated with increasing Alzheimer’s was accompanied by a rise in meat consumption.

But, other population studies have found that dietary grains appear strongly protective in relation to Alzheimer’s disease. In other words, perhaps, don’t pass on the grain; pass the grain, to spare the brain.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to kresbicky via deviant art.

61 responses to “Flashback Friday: Alzheimer’s Disease – Grain Brain or Meathead?

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  1. If you want good health go to the store and get the cheapest basic flip phone, the same one Warren Buffett the 3rd richest man in the world with no divorces, scandals or hospitalizations uses for himself and you will improve your health and wealth. Stay away from shoving earbuds in your ear, all apps and getting fat by sitting behind a computer ordering stuff you don’t need from Amazon. Don’t eat any food that was invented in the last 100 years.

    1. Agree with your advice but will point out that Warren Buffett is divorced and has had prostate cancer. He also eats a terrible SAD diet. IIRC, Berkshire owns dairy queen, a large amount of coke stock, and a candy store. Some other industrial food companies too.

      1. Blair,

        Yes, he has been treated for prostate cancer but I don’t think he got divorced. He was separated from his first wife for almost 30 years before she died, so it wasn’t exactly a happy marriage.

        Maybe billionaires figured out that staying married gave him control over the money?

        Either way, he may be low tech and a very intelligent businessman but he isn’t smart about everything.

  2. Hi.
    I love to read and listen do Dr Greeger since many years. Of course I read his book How not to die.
    I am a french speaking Canadian, but use french and English regularly, for instance I read a lot in
    both languages.
    I find that Dr Greeger speaks very fast and does not pronounce his words very well, therefore
    making it difficult for me to understand well.
    This is not a complaint but a constructive remark.
    Be sure that I will still continue to appreciate his wonderful work.
    Thank you.

    1. Hmmm. I wonder if NF.org could use you as a volunteer to translate the blogs/videos into French. If you could do that, you’d become an expert on the content of each video/blog and you’d be doing your French speaking compatriots a big favor.

      (I always try to employ Steven Covey’s ‘Habit’: “Think Win-Win” as a practical tool as often as I can.)

      1. By the way… Don’t forget there is a button below the video where you can read the actual transcript of the video. That plus the normal-speed delivery of the video would be an excellent way for you to firm up your “Doctor’s English” skills.

        I have a similar difficulty with German. I read German fairly well, but get in trouble when I listen to Der Spiegel broadcasts online… the spoken rate is too fast for me to grasp. I figure the best way to remedy this would be for me to move to Germany and dive into the culture. Ja? =]

    2. Hi Marcel, I understand! Have you seen that we have subtitles available? You can turn on captions for English, French, or other languages, using the settings wheel on the bottom right side of the video. You may use this function already, but I wanted to comment in case others are having the same experience.

    3. Marcel,
      You may be like me, I have a difficult time understanding accents; I had to drop a Chemistry lab class because I couldn’t follow the Chinese Professors’ accent. I even have some trouble with British accents. Doctor Greger though, no problem.
      Peace

    4. Marcel – I feel for you! I am American and I couldn’t agree with you more. I, too, have difficulty understanding Dr. G. As much as I love him, his work, and this site, the one thing I wish for is better enunciation. The good Dr. slurs his words and slides them together. I often have to turn on the subtitles and go back and replay to try to understand the verbiage. I’ve often wondered how non-English speaking individuals fared.
      You can try slowing down the presentation, but the slurring and slushing of words won’t clear up. Some challenges one simply must live with in life I guess. I’m there with you! :-)

      1. I have a lot of hearing loss at my age of 77 so I rely on the subtitles, don’t even turn the sound on. It’s fast and you have to be a fast reader but it works for me.

    5. Marcel, quick FYI/tip, in case you didn’t know:

      On YouTube, if you click the “gear” icon, you set the Playback Speed. Perhaps slowing the speed to .75 or even .5 will make Dr. Greger easier to follow.

      Cheers!

    1. Dr Cobalt,

      I love your comments.

      Yes, whenever I see Alzheimer’s videos, my first thought is “Don’t forget to take my B-12!”

      Homocysteine is a factor.

      Also, being low enough in saturated fats and sugar to not have blood sugar issues and that probably includes not eating white rice more than 4 days per week, which was associated with an increased risk of Diabetes in Asia, would be a few things I add in.

      Plus, get rid of all of the sources of aluminum in your food, cooking, and personal care products and do a 12 week Fiji water cleanse if you ate a lot of cheese or baked goods or cooked for years in aluminum or used aluminum deodorants.

      I look at the grains sentences listed above and the other day I was reading about the Blue Zones again and what I noticed was that one of them ate a lot of grains and only 11% vegetables and fruit wasn’t even listed where others had something like 70% vegetables and almost no grains listed. I found that interesting. It seems like you can do it either way.

      1. I have not been so sure about how grains fit in and I haven’t been eating them almost at all this year and had stopped eating them a few years ago. I had brought rice back in when I started WFPB and will be bringing it back in again, but it always seemed like I had to choose between fruits and vegetables and grains and it is clear that I don’t have any calorie margin, so I just wasn’t sure what to do, but having one Blue Zone have most of their calories from grains and only 11% from vegetables and no fruit, means that I can maybe go back to rice and beans and not worry as much if my vegetable intake drops significantly.

        I am not losing weight on fruits and vegetables, but think I was losing weight on oatmeal and rice and beans. I haven’t eaten those in a long time, but they are so much cheaper and easier for me.

        I got my Mama Sezz meals today and I will be doing that for the next 2 weeks. I did lose a few pounds increasing my watery fruits and adding in a brothy soup, but I am still not happy with the cost of my food and the prep time and how packed my refrigerator gets with all of the produce or how much I throw out at the end. I watched the tv ad of the food truck which sells meals from wilted food, but I tried to eat a less crisp apple and I will stop eating apples entirely if I do it that way and already didn’t buy apples this past shopping trip because I had tasted an apple that way, so that will not work for me.

        1. Thinking about the fact that I was losing weight on grains, the fact that I was eating oatmeal, it might just be that I was able to get up early enough to have breakfast and maybe my calories were earlier.

          After Mama Sezz, I am going to try oatmeal and rice and beans even if it is lunch and dinner.

        2. Deb,
          You mentioned broth soup and I immediately thought of barley soup,yum. Your unhappiness with prep time reminded me a video on the VSH website by Carl Seff, PhD, titled “Confessions of a Low Class Vegan” from Sept. 2015. He doesn’t have time to prep food. I’m off to the store to get some barley; it’s a cold wet Oregon day and I’m going to have vegetable barley soup for lunch. Thanks for starting the idea for my lunch.

            1. Very interesting Marilyn, though not entirely a surprise lol. We eat well by planning and shopping sales so coffee beans, citrus, all fresh produce are mainstays. But so are the prescription drugs… the ones mentioned and a few more! We count our blessings since in this region the soup du jour might easily be swapped by most for BK burgers, fries, pizza, and serious recreational drugs.

            2. If you watched PlantPure Nation, they went into places where there were no farmer’s markets, no fresh produce at all and the fast food places had no healthy options.

              When I lived in Los Angeles, some of those poorer areas did not have grocery stores. It might have changed by now, but there isn’t a lot of money to gain from selling produce in poor areas. They don’t have cars and the streets often aren’t safe. They have a few convenience stores and package stores and fast food, generally.

              Dollar menu at McDonald’s generally has a double cheeseburger and they eat at soup kitchens or get a bag of groceries from churches of Salvation Army, but it is usually once a month.

              Food stamps don’t give enough for healthier foods and if you work your butt off to have enough money to pay the rent and insurance, food stamps go down. People who have low-income housing, do okay, but there is a 10-year waiting list to get it and they don’t let anybody put their names on the list anymore. They do have a lotto once every few years where a few people get low-income housing, but you have to be computer literate and check every week to see if there is a lotto for it and it is only a few people who get the housing. Without the housing, you have to make so much to pay rent that you don’t get enough food stamps to eat properly.

              Schools feed the kids 2 meals per day and are part of the equation.

              If you live in the inner city, you are way more likely to get Diabetes than if you live in the suburbs.

              Medicines are often free. Dr’s hand out samples to their poorest patients. The newer better medicines are not free or cheap and poor people can’t get them, but there are usually some medicines available for free if you have someone who helps you with the process because they don’t have cable and may not be able to speak English or read or use computers.

              If they came out of prison, they might have something like being registered as a sex offender and can’t even go to the churches. There is a ministry for them, but unless they are online, they are likely unemployable and homeless.

              My friend’s schizophrenic son has done incredibly well with his little job at the institution, but when they put him out in an apartment, there weren’t sidewalks to walk anywhere and it was impossible for him to get a job because he bit the person he had attacked and his police record says that he is a cannibal attempted murderer. He is actually a sweet young man, but obviously he is an attempted murderer and if you think someone is a cannibal, you don’t put them in foodservice and the only place he could walk to was a fast-food burger joint.

              Mostly, wealthy people have no real concept at all and think that the poor people are lazy, but they are trying to succeed with both hands tied behind their backs.

              1. I think, conceptually, we think of them as going to a grocery store and choosing junk food with their food stamps and that can happen, but still, I watched an inner-city mother of 3, who had already had 1 child murdered and she couldn’t make it on food stamps even with having low-income housing and what I will tell you is that she had health problems and ended up dying by the end and her kids are scattered to the winds, but there are a few people like her who taught me how little money poor people actually get for food. Her kids did well in school and were very polite and went to church, but they lost everything and each and every poor person has a story or a mental illness or a physical illness, which took their money or an addiction or a deficit like not being properly educated. The test scores of the poorest cities around me are so low that those young people aren’t ready for anything. I have friends who are teachers there and what I remember was that my friend showed up at a grade school her first day of work and a 5th grader was holding a 3rd grader up by the neck.

                I recommend the movie, “Freedom Writers” even though there is a lot of swearing near the beginning. Somewhere halfway through, the teacher asks the kids how many of them had a friend or family member who had been murdered and it was every single one of them. Then, she asked how many knew 2 people and it was still almost all of them. I can’t remember how many murdered friends the kids with the most murdered friends had, maybe 5 or something.

                If you hang around with the poor, you hear about robbings and muggings and lice and having the power shut off and not owning clothing and not having food for the end of the month.

                As I wrote that today, I had someone who came to see me, who I gave groceries to. It is something I do probably once a month.

            3. Marilyn,

              I just had another thought.

              For my friends, people who take more meds become poorer very fast. They re-mortgage their houses to get better medical care and often can’t work.

          1. Thanks, Joe.

            I bought some barley and soup is a good idea for me.

            I laugh because at first, I thought you were sending me to a website named barleysoup.yum

  3. Dr Greger I have a g6pd deficiency making it contraindicated to eat beans. Additionally since carbohydrates are often broken down in th pentose phosphate pathway I’ve found it hard to digest grains like oats… what would you suggest for someone like me who wants to eat plant based but has so many restrictions?

    1. Theodore,

      What are you eating? Can you eat things like rice or potatoes? How about the rest of the vegetables and fruit?

      I am asking because there have been people who eat just fruit and others who eat just potatoes. The Okinawans got almost 70% of their calories from sweet potatoes. I am not sure if you could eat things like Seitan and Jackfruit or rice. Can you eat pasta? Or things like vegan pizza? I know you can’t eat peanuts, but can you eat other nuts and seeds? If so, those can become plant-milk and yogurt and flour and cheeze, etc. Soups and salads are what a lot of people eat.

      I found this site: It might be helpful to you.

      https://www.pinterest.com/VegMama3/g6pd-deficient-vegan/

      I also found a baker who had the condition who made his own bread. He said to watch vegan junk food because the gluten-free ones in particular may be made from fava beans.

      1. Here is a site which gives a list of antioxidant foods, which are suggested to prevent hemolysis

        https://g6pddeficiency.org/wp/living-with-g6pd-deficiency/g6pd-deficiency-diet-suggestions/list-of-antioxidants/#.XaqPFuhKjME

        They say things like barley and millet and corn.

        Can you eat mushrooms? I eat a lot of salads with artichoke hearts and mushrooms and find them filling. I was trying to understand their sentence about mushrooms and tyrosine, but I am not a science person yet.

        Page 224 of a book you can Google called Plants in Indigenous Medicine & Diet: Biobehavioral Approaches
        edited by Nina Lilian Etkin

        1. Can you do eggplant?

          That is another food, similar to portabello mushrooms, which can hold its own as a main dish.

          Stuffed peppers? Stuffed cabbage? Tahini? Polenta? I have been eating a lot of cheezy cauliflower and they sell riced vegetables of all sorts both in the produce and the rice section of Whole Foods. Zoodles are still popular.

          Do you know for sure that you cannot eat any of the other beans? Some people with the condition can eat chickpeas, for instance. There is a variation in the severity of the condition. One site said to ask the doctor about your own case.

          1. Avocado is a good one.

            Plus, almost any vegetable can be mixed with Tahini to make hummus.

            There are recipes online with carrot hummus and beet hummus and zucchini hummus. Some of the recipes have oil, but I just leave it out.

            https://detoxinista.com/raw-hummus/

            https://www.tastingpage.com/cooking/beanless-carrot-turmeric-hummus-paleo-whole30

            https://blog.paleohacks.com/avocado-hummus/

            I have done a lot of veggie wraps.

            There are low carb wraps and having a wrap can make vegetables feel more like a meal.

              1. Jackfruit is something vegans use to make a mock tuna and a mock pulled pork.

                Cauliflower is what a lot of people use for rice, for mashed potatoes, etc.

    2. Hi Theodore Abrahams, Thanks for your question. As you know G6PD deficiency is also called favism; particularly the most severe forms of G6PD deficiency. This is because the ingestion of fava beans (also known as broad beans) can trigger hemolytic attacks in patients with G6PD deficiency. Some suggest that all legumes (such as peas, lentils, or peanuts) be avoided. As well as the use of naphthalene and aniline dyes cause an issue. The food that have not caused issues are Fruits and vegetables, mushrooms, seeds, nuts, nut based milks unless you have tried any of these food and you showed reaction. Also making sure vitamins and minerals and essential fatty acids are taken daily. Some medications such as certain sulfa based antibiotics or quinolone based, Aspirin. Mothballs that contain naphthaline and henna based products need to be aware of as it can cause an issue. Please consult with your doctor as far as medications are concerned.

  4. From looking at Youtube, specifically an EONutrition video about vitamin b1 and neurological problems, I’m going to say that Alzheimer’s disease is due to a functional B-vitamin deficiency. What causes that? Who knows, but i’m going to guess it’s a complication of diabetes (maybe GI or cell related), drugs or drug interactions, accumulating toxins, sleep issues, being sedentary or a combination of these things. Google vitamin b1 and dementia and you’ll find a study in 2006 about it. If you look at the symptoms of beri-beri they’re likely related to Alzheimer’s disease. That’s why that Souvenaid product in Australia seems to help because it’s a nutritional supplement. Doctors are looking at the tangles and plaques etc and really the same stuff happens when someone is severely deficient in thiamine.

    1. Arthur,

      There are a few causes of Alzheimer’s, but blocked arteries decreasing blood flow to the brain is one of the biggest causes. They recently had a study in Finland, where getting rid of saturated fats and cholesterols improved the Alzheimer’s situation in the study by almost 90%.

      In the Adventist community, fewer than 5% of the people end up with Alzheimer’s, even though the neighboring communities have a lot of it. The Nun’s study, the nuns who are closer to vegan, plant-based have much lower levels of Alzheimer’s than their meat and fat eating peers.

      Yes, Homocysteine has to be low, but Dr. Greger has shown studies that where vegans supplemented with B12 and ate plant foods with Folate, they ended up with the lowest levels of Homocysteine.

      Yes, they need to not have an out of whack A1C but to lower the A1C, it is the same diet as the one to unblock the arteries – lowering animal products and saturated fats.

      Dr. Greger has videos on many of the subjects. He has one which showed the blocked arteries of Alzheimer’s patients versus normal patients at autopsy. He has one on copper in the brain, and the copper/zinc ratio would be another factor. So would aluminum in the brain, which you can get from sliced cheeses and baked goods and cookware and personal care products.

      1. Arthur,

        The fact that they can improve the risk by almost 90% just by dealing with the fats, that, to me, is the big one. Homocysteine and Aluminum and Copper and A1C would be next, but improving the risk by 90% is already the most important thing, to me, and I am overcoming brain problems and have seen such an improvement since I started this process about 2 years ago. My brain still has its moments, but it has improved so much.

      2. I wouldn’t dismiss functional (not necessarily dietary) b-vitamin deficiency as a cause. As an anecdote, looking back on my father, he had many symptoms like Reynaud’s, heart failure, oedema as well as confusion, troubled gait, speech etc, and they’re all signs of beri-beri. It’s easy to blame it on something like impaired blood flow and imagine that this would cause those symptoms. I can see how failing capillaries would stop blood flow to those brain regions. However if the vascular system has deteriorated to that point, wouldn’t strokes be happening by that time? The strokes would kill the afflicted before dementia. It’s possible drug companies want a drug to treat the symptoms and would like to avoid addressing the cause. Granted, it would be better if your arteries are healthy.

  5. Dear Dr Gregor,

    I have been following a diet high in antioxidants (implementing a number of your recommendations, Amla powder, hibiscus tea, turmeric, berries, cruciferous vegetables, etc). However, I have not been able to find a rebuttal in your videos or book to the “too many antioxidants can actually be bad for you”. In other words, we are quite certain that drinking orange juice is much better than sugar water in not “spiking oxidative stress”. However, is it necessarily better to drink a smoothy containing amla powder, tumeric powder, cranberries, hibiscus tea, other berries, spinach, etc? Could such a massive amount of antioxidants actually be counterproductive?
    Looking forward to the reply as I have been taking the latter approach for some time now!
    Many thanks,
    Nicholas

    1. Am pretty sure the busy-busy Dr. Greger is/will be too busy to answer your question, Nicholas. (Notice his name does not contain an “o.”)

      “There ain’t nobody here but us chickens.”

      1. YR,

        Nicholas is doing the process Dr. Greger asks people to do. His comment could become a video or a moderator could answer him.

        I am sure that you are right about him being busy-busy, but I have seen so much evidence that he receives the communications from this site and that he is very gracious about them.

        As far as the “Gregor” versus the “Greger” goes, a lot of people spell it that way. There are people who do spell their name with the or at the end. Some nationalities do it that way. It is often “Gregor” when it is a first name, so it is an honest mistake.

        I know that you are probably very good at spelling and writing but it is hard to keep track of things.

        I don’t think Grammarly corrects people’s names.

        1. “It is often “Gregor” when it is a first name, so it is an honest mistake.”
          – – – – –

          Deb, so what? IMO, anybody who follows this site can’t help but see the way Dr. G. spells his name. If you were he, wouldn’t you want to see your name spelled correctly?

          As P.T. Barnum said, “I don’t care what the newspapers say about me as long as they spell my name right.”

          1. ” If you were he,”
            – – – –

            Is considered “old school.” Nowadays we’re more apt to hear “If you were him.” :-/

            1. You are right.

              I like that quote from such a great showman.

              When people come here, they may not know his name at all. I didn’t know his name when I first started watching him. I had never heard of him before and if I had commented the first time, I would have called him Dr. Berger or perhaps Dr. Burger and people would have thought I was making a joke, but I watch all sorts of people on the internet and rarely do I take the time to know their names.

              I have taken the time to learn Dr. Greger’s name and the names of many of the people in the WFPB movement, but I still watch new people every day and some of them are mentally still “that lady” or “the guy” in my mind.

              Dr. Greger was doing a process so important that I needed to learn his name so that I could Google him, but I didn’t necessarily know that at the time.

              So many people do call him Dr. Gregor out there on the internet that it has to be confusing. I just saw a woman I will call, “some lady” with a blog was critiquing something by Dr. Gregor and she has a very professional website with the wrong name posted. She might be a journalist of some sort, so it stood out, and yet, I didn’t even try to learn her name at all, so I will say that she was closer to getting his name right than I am to remembering her at all.

    2. Nicholas,

      Dr. Greger has commented on the too many antioxidants issue. When it is in a supplement form, it is a problem, but not in the food form.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/questions/might-too-many-antioxidants-cause-cancer/

      Though he generally recommends the whole foods versus the juices or smoothies because of the fiber.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2016/08/09/what-about-all-the-sugar-in-fruit/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/11/21/do-smoothies-cause-overly-rapid-sugar-absorption/

    3. Hi, Nicholas! While it is true that antioxidants in supplement form may be harmful, this is not likely to be the case with whole plant foods consumed in reasonable amounts. Too much hibiscus tea could be harmful, but not because of the antioxidant content. More on that here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-hibiscus-tea-is-too-much/
      When you drink smoothies, I would suggest that you sip them slowly over the course of a half hour or so, rather than chugging them, and rinse your mouth with water after you finish them. You can find everything on this site related to antioxidants here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/antioxidants/
      Everything on this site related to smoothies may be found here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/smoothies/ I hope that helps!

  6. I just got back from my birthday dinner and I went to a brand new place and had a fabulous black bean burger and sweet potato fries. It was so delicious. I am going to end up making Dr. Greger’s black bean burgers soon.

    Mama Sezz for 2 weeks first. I came away from the dinner wanting to cook again. I am so happy about that. I have not wanted to cook anything at all since March.

    1. Deb,

      Sadly, sweet potato fries are high in fat/oil, since they are deep fat fried. I consider any fried potatoes — french fries, chips, breakfast fries, etc — as a vehicle for oil. The larger the surface area, the greater the amount of oil that the fried potatoes can contain — because it’s sticking to their surfaces.

      For example: “One three-ounce serving of sweet potatoes, contains roughly 160 calories, 8 grams of fat [72 calories], and 23 grams of carbohydrate. Keep in mind, that a side order of sweet potato fries at a restaurant yields about 350-450 calories, 20 grams fat [180 calories], and 50 grams of carbohydrate.“ https://www.verywellfit.com/sweet-potato-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4117290

      Since sweet potatoes are naturally very low in fat (0.1 g per medium 130 g sweet potato), all that fat comes from the oil used to fry them.

      Much better to eat a steamed or baked potato, or mashed without any oil or dairy products (milk or butter). Sweet potatoes are delicious steamed (I steam mine in my Instant Pot, because it’s so quick and easy), and mash them with pumpkin pied spice (without the sugar). It’s like eating dessert with your meal.

      1. Dr. J.,

        Yes, I know. Luckily, it was a very small portion of them.

        But I know that it blew my no-oil.

        It was my birthday celebration and they tasted delicious and I had been looking at them in the grocery store tempted to air fry them, but a year later I am still looking.

        I haven’t had sweet potatoes since March. I haven’t been having root vegetables or grains. Just salads and fruit and hummus with wasa crisps.

        The only real cooking I have done has been a broccoli potato soup, which I cooked on the stove so I didn’t get soup all over my cabinets, which is what happened the last time I made soup in my Instapot. The soup came out good, but it left me feeling hungry late at night and I ended up eating something sweet. I might still have blood sugar issues and try not to eat white rice or white potatoes.

        This was the first restaurant I have eaten at since my friend’s birthday, which was back in the Spring. The balancing almost good news is that I haven’t had cake or icecream at the past 3 birthdays. Going to a restaurant helps to avoid the non-vegan cake issue.

  7. Yes Dr J, oil and fat in general can really tally up the calorie count in a hurry. Like I mentioned above, I make hummus with no tahini and don’t miss it a bit. The hummus is just as satisfying imo, and fresher tasting.

    I rarely eat potatoes anymore, but the family likes them. I cut washed unpeeled sweet potatoes, purple potatoes or regular potatoes into thick wedges, and bake them til done.

      1. Deb, I have tried a couple of things. First I tried just 1 tbsp tahini (when recipes call for 1/4 cup or more) and it was fine. Then I came across this recipe https://happyherbivore.com/2009/06/hummus/ and thought I’d try it. I did not notice the lack of tahini for my purposes. I cooked some dried chickpeas, and took the time to take the skins off them as suggested in some books. I used roasted garlic, lemon juice, and some aquafaba, drizzled a bit at a time. You can use a soonful of vegan yogurt. I make it thick, not runny, and often add or sprinkle chili powder or smoked paprika on top.

        1. The recipes I have seen only used 1 tablespoon. The tahini that I have bought has no added olive oil and is 85 calories for the tablespoon. 8 grams of fat.

          I haven’t been making hummus lately.

          How do you get aquafaba if you are using dried chickpeas?

          1. In the recipe link I posted, she used aquafaba and tinned chickpeas. I found the cooking dried chickpeas worthwhile for the taste and you can save some of the cooking water to use along with lemon juice.

            I eat chickpeas often in chopped vegetable salads (with some greens folded in). I try to make things that will last 2 to 3 days so that I am never cooking when I am starving. It’s helpful to have 1 or 2 dishes in the fridge that can be reheated in minutes or eaten cold.

            1. That is interesting. Is aquafaba basically just cooking water?

              I have been using boxed beans so I can just throw them in the salads.

              I am determined to make some things over the next few months.

              It is hard though.

              Not sleeping and not getting up early and not getting out of work early and working on the weekends all add up and make anything extra harder to succeed at.

              I have started to spend more time with my 90-year old relatives and that feels healthier than all of the vegetables in the universe.

  8. Topic suggestion.

    I have been eating watercress because it is supposed to be a good source of iodine, but when I tried to find out how much iodine is in it, I found a sentence that said that it is high in goitrogens and may interfere with the uptake of iodine in the thyroid.

    “….cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, arugula, Brussels sprouts, watercress, and radishes, are high in goitrogens that may interfere with the uptake of iodine in the thyroid and thus perpetuate an iodine deficiency.2”

    That list of vegetables is basically what I eat all day.

    It causes me to think that my thyroid may be off from iodine. I thought the watercress was helping. Is it also hurting, particularly when it is combined with daily servings of kale, cauliflower, broccoli, arugula, cabbage, and radishes?

  9. The fat from 100% grass fed cows and lamb is quite DIFFERENT from the fat in standard cows and lamb, and different still is chicken fat. Yet todays report
    just says animal fat. I fail to see how repots that lump together such different fats can be valid.

    1. I would suggest you watch the documentary “The Game Changers,” which is available on Netflix. There is a segment where they test the blood after just one meal with organic, free-range/grass-fed meat, then test the blood after a meal with beans and avocado. Very enlightening. Basically, animal fat is animal fat, whether grass-fed/free-range and organic or conventional.

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