Flashback Friday: Benefits of Blueberries for the Brain

Flashback Friday: Benefits of Blueberries for the Brain
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Blueberries can significantly improve cognitive performance within hours of consumption.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When you search the medical literature for studies on berries, papers like this pop up: A “‘Blueberry Muffin’ Rash”, ahh… Or, pictures of “strawberry tongue[s],” or as a way to describe “stool appearance,” though “stools truly resembling currant jelly” are not very common. What is it with pathologists’ love affair with food terminology? —the grossest of which may be the way amoeba chest infections are described, where you spit up pus that looks like “anchovy sauce,” which sounds gross—even without the pus.

There are actual studies on berry supplementation, like on how they can mitigate the negative effects of a “high [saturated-] fat diet on the brain and behavior,” but that was in mice. Maybe a better way to mitigate would be to not feed your pet mouse a stick of butter in the first place.

Then, there are studies of proprietary berry-based nutraceutical supplements, purported to improve cognitive performance. See how there’s a steeper rise in the supplement group?

Old hats will instantly recognize this as the timeless trick featured in the 1950s classic, How to Lie with Statistics. See how they don’t start the Y axis at zero? That’s to inflate the appearance. Correct the graph, and you can see the effect doesn’t look quite so impressive.

There are studies of actual berries on actual humans, but when they’re funded by berry industry trade groups, you get studies like this: “An afternoon snack of berries reduces subsequent energy intake.” Great! But that’s compared to candy. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries—fantastic, compared, to a handful of “Jelly Babies,” which are just like coated gummy bears. Do berries offer so little that you have to compare them to candy to make them look good?

There was that famous Harvard study I did a video about, where berry-eating appeared to delay brain aging by up to two-and-a-half years. But, you don’t know if it’s cause and effect until you put it to the test. And, “[b]lueberry supplementation [was able to] improve…memory in older adults” in just 12 weeks’ time. But, that was feeding them up to six cups of wild blueberries a day. Now, this was a proof-of-concept pilot study just to see if they could get any effect. We just didn’t have any studies using more realistic doses…until, now.

How about just a cup a day of blueberries? They found that “the addition of easily achievable quantities of blueberries to the diets of older adults can improve some aspects of cognition,” like long-term memory. In terms of the number of errors, the placebo group got worse; the blueberry group got better.

You can even correlate the cognitive improvements with enhanced brain activation using fancy brain scan technology to actually visualize the improved blood flow to those same regions of the brain caused by the blueberry consumption.

Does it work in kids, too? “[B]lueberry treatments have shown positive effects on cognition in both” rats and adult humans. But, do those these “benefits transfer to children”—human children? How about a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study comparing about one cup of blueberries, to two cups, to zero cups. What did they find? “[C]ognitive performance improve[ments] across all measures,” and the more berries, the better. And, this wasn’t after twelve weeks of eating berries, but within hours of just a single blueberry meal. Sounds like a good breakfast any day our kids are having their exams.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Joanna Kosinska via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When you search the medical literature for studies on berries, papers like this pop up: A “‘Blueberry Muffin’ Rash”, ahh… Or, pictures of “strawberry tongue[s],” or as a way to describe “stool appearance,” though “stools truly resembling currant jelly” are not very common. What is it with pathologists’ love affair with food terminology? —the grossest of which may be the way amoeba chest infections are described, where you spit up pus that looks like “anchovy sauce,” which sounds gross—even without the pus.

There are actual studies on berry supplementation, like on how they can mitigate the negative effects of a “high [saturated-] fat diet on the brain and behavior,” but that was in mice. Maybe a better way to mitigate would be to not feed your pet mouse a stick of butter in the first place.

Then, there are studies of proprietary berry-based nutraceutical supplements, purported to improve cognitive performance. See how there’s a steeper rise in the supplement group?

Old hats will instantly recognize this as the timeless trick featured in the 1950s classic, How to Lie with Statistics. See how they don’t start the Y axis at zero? That’s to inflate the appearance. Correct the graph, and you can see the effect doesn’t look quite so impressive.

There are studies of actual berries on actual humans, but when they’re funded by berry industry trade groups, you get studies like this: “An afternoon snack of berries reduces subsequent energy intake.” Great! But that’s compared to candy. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries—fantastic, compared, to a handful of “Jelly Babies,” which are just like coated gummy bears. Do berries offer so little that you have to compare them to candy to make them look good?

There was that famous Harvard study I did a video about, where berry-eating appeared to delay brain aging by up to two-and-a-half years. But, you don’t know if it’s cause and effect until you put it to the test. And, “[b]lueberry supplementation [was able to] improve…memory in older adults” in just 12 weeks’ time. But, that was feeding them up to six cups of wild blueberries a day. Now, this was a proof-of-concept pilot study just to see if they could get any effect. We just didn’t have any studies using more realistic doses…until, now.

How about just a cup a day of blueberries? They found that “the addition of easily achievable quantities of blueberries to the diets of older adults can improve some aspects of cognition,” like long-term memory. In terms of the number of errors, the placebo group got worse; the blueberry group got better.

You can even correlate the cognitive improvements with enhanced brain activation using fancy brain scan technology to actually visualize the improved blood flow to those same regions of the brain caused by the blueberry consumption.

Does it work in kids, too? “[B]lueberry treatments have shown positive effects on cognition in both” rats and adult humans. But, do those these “benefits transfer to children”—human children? How about a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study comparing about one cup of blueberries, to two cups, to zero cups. What did they find? “[C]ognitive performance improve[ments] across all measures,” and the more berries, the better. And, this wasn’t after twelve weeks of eating berries, but within hours of just a single blueberry meal. Sounds like a good breakfast any day our kids are having their exams.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Joanna Kosinska via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Wait a second, healthy and delicious? That’s what plant-based eating is all about!

For more on berries, check out:

For all our videos on the latest research on berries, visit our Berries topic page.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

The original video aired on August 13th 2018.

90 responses to “Flashback Friday: Benefits of Blueberries for the Brain

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  1. Dr. Geiger:

    I would like to compliment you on how much improved your presentation is today, compared to the last two presentations.

    Night and day!

    Two issues come to mind:

    (1) On the current presentation, I did not have to place my hand over the monitor to block out your distracting video presence. The presentation wasn’t so busy and distracting, such that I could now actually pay full attention to the informational content.

    The first page of each publication popped up long enough that I could pause the presentation and read that page in full and decide whether or not to proceed to the “sources cited” or no. That capability was largely lost when you put all sorts of material over those pages in the last two videos. This format is greatly superior. Great to see it returning!

    Bravo!

    (2) The information on this week’s presentation – though including a humorous introduction, which certainly brightened it up – was carefully edited, limited, disciplined and coherent. A tremendous improvement over the apparently unedited avalanche of information overpowering the viewer over the prior two presentations.

    Overall, one gets the impression that you are listening to the thoughtful guidance that so many of your readers have been giving about improving the presentations.

    Keep up the wonderful work!

    All the best –

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus

      You’re commenting on an “old style” presentation. There have been several variations over the six years I’ve been watching them. The videos were a little bit quiet and slow in the beginning. Then they got better for some time, but then they got OVER busy with graphical enhancements and many of us complained. It was far too distracting. Like you mentioned now, I would pull up another screen and just listen, rather try to watch the visual gymnastics event that the videos had become.

      Many complained and they settled the videos down for a while. You’re commenting on “settled down” video of recent past. Unfortunately the busy-ness has come back with our fine doctor appearing in practically all the new videos which I, like you find to be a bit much, but it’s not as bad as before with all the super-busy graphical craziness. (which some others thought snazzy and great)

      Unfortunately they shoot these shorts in batches of several, and with them released now only two per week as opposed to three per week, One bath of videos lasts for months. The result is that whether we recoil in horror or explode with joy over any changes in the presentations, there cannot be any “speedy” resolution. It may be one or two or three months before any new videos can/will be recorded with any fixing or adjusting of any parameters.

      One of the problems I often had was the graphic images of medical record, used for shock value and “being real”, aren’t really suitable to my breakfast meal, which is when I look at Dr. G’s products. This hasn’t been a problem for some time, but be aware of it if you search and watch old videos here, as I often do.

      You want something 10X more distracting that the good doctor standing in the frame? Some videos he does on his treadmill which drives me nuts. I simply cannot watch those, but can listen to the audio or read the transcripts. Dig around and you can find some. He also does his “live” YT stuff that way. He likes it and normals can tune out anything I suppose. I’ve never been that way. Once something trips my annoyance nerve, there is no ignoring it. So I understand your frustration, but also know we’re a minority and that the interests of the majority will likely supersede our sensitivities, which makes sense. But also that even if changes are promised, that it will likely be months before we see such results. Cheers.

      1. I used to listen to the video while reading the transcript but found the videos too slow then fast then slow then fast. Any charts, best just to go to the ‘sources cited’ tab.

        If I were this doctor I would hire a better speaker and just write the topic.

        1. Reality bites,

          Nope.

          Replacing Dr Greger would be the biggest mistake ever.

          I still don’t understand you that you come here almost every day but you still call him “this doctor” rather than having a sense of him as a real person by now.

            1. Toni,

              Yes, Dr Greger is a personality.

              He is also inspiring as a person.

              Irreplaceable.

              Other people give the same information and I watch him and them and his versions are more entertaining.

              But even if he got rid of all of his humor, he has high value as a human being to me.

          1. Reality bites,

            I couldn’t even imagine one human being replacing Dr Greger’s voice.

            Not one.

            If I wanted somebody else’s voice, I would go to their website in the first place.

            The concept reminds me of when I was younger, one of my relatives talked about how unattractive they thought Mother Teresa was and thought she should have a stand-in for photos.

            And Gandhi might have been a little thin. I think that was another comment that I heard.

            “You have got to be kidding me” is the only sentence that I can think of at the moment.

            1. Reality bites,

              I want to be respectful toward you about it.

              I just feel like there is something going on inside of you where you are reluctant to be respectful to Dr Greger.

              I will stand up for him every time.

              But I honestly also would genuinely hate it if he replaced himself.

              1. There is a Stephen Hawking show on.

                Reality bites,

                Should Stephen Hawkkng have replaced himself?

                Or did he become as popular as he was because of his funny sounding voice?

                Or did it matter?

                Were there not other passionate people in his industry?

                Replacing what he looked like grounded like would have made his messages less effective.

                People followed his personality even more in his imperfections.

                1. I can guarantee you that the professionals wanted to have an attractive, polished-speaking stand-in to replace Stephen Hawking.

                  Nope, passion can not be moved out of one human being and be packaged neatly in another.

                  There might be 100,000 other teachers who teach what these people tried to teach but passion and compassion can not be bottled.

                  Ask the processed food industry what happens.

                    1. Lisa,

                      What amazes me is that people like you can say one sentence and I see those qualities in you, too.

                      But, yes, Dr. Greger has so much passion and energy that somebody could have made a WFPB generator out of him.

        2. I love hearing hearing Dr. Greger speak so your opinion is just that; YOURS. If you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say it at all. Maybe he should do a study on how jealousy and negativity impact health. I’m sure it’s not good. Thank goodness you are not “this doctor”. Maybe spend your time doing something as beneficial to your fellow man as Dr. Greger does instead of spending your time critiquing the efforts of an exceptional person.

    2. Vivamus,

      He is listening to the feedback.

      But the webinar videos from the past several months still have to be shown.

      He does videos all in one year and then spends a year writing a book and then a year doing talks.

      He already has asked for feedback and the pandemic videos show that he already has listened, but there are months worth of webinar videos that haven’t been posted yet.

      1. Deb – REality Bites was expressing an opinion. Something you do here MULTIPLE, MULTIPLE, MULTIPLE times per day. Why don’t you give RB the same respect you reserve for yourself and let RB express his/her opinion s/he sees fit. Get of his/her back and stop thinking that you somehow personally monitor this site. you don’t.

        1. What a ridiculous comment.

          Get off RB’s back? The point is that RB continually posts comments that could fairly be categorised as rude and insulting to Dr Greger. I’m no slouch in that department myself but RB could give me lessons and is continually on Dr Greger’s back. What’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.

          1. Well, I do agree with RR in that Dr Greger and his team are professionals hoping to reach a global audience, and as such, need no defending from Deb or anyone else for that matter.
            A professional team, sponsored by the public, can stand on it’s own to receive praise or criticism.. it goes with the territory, and needs no one to plaster the comment section in excessive defense.

            1. Sure but there’s no reason why Deb shouldn’t post her opinions There’s also.a world of difference between polite criticism and rude criticism.

              In any case, if RB is free to criticise others, others should be free to criticise him.

              I.found it faintly absurd that RR should object to Deb’s posts objecting to RB’s posts. especially when Deb’s posts were polite and respectful (and RB’s posts never have been). It’s OK for RB and RR to criticise others but not for Deb to do so?

              1. Fumbles, the way I have perceived it here and over the past few years is, when Deb reads something that she doesn’t like, she reacts by posting in great excess. Here it was 6 or 7 posts reacting to RB. Rudeness and bullying are in the eye of the beholder I guess. She is entitled to her opinions, but so are others.

                1. Barb, regarding your comment, ” Rudeness and bullying are in the eye of the beholder”.

                  Totally agree … what seems rude to some, doesn’t seem rude to others. It’s just human nature and the culture from which one comes.

                2. Yes but Deb overposts on everything. I don’t get the impression that Deb is singling out RB for special treatment here – it’s just Deb being Deb.

                  It just seemed to me that the argument was that RB should be free to criticise Dr G whenever he wants but no-one should be allowed to criticise RB for doing so. That’s how it appeared to me anyway …. but then I am so used to seeing Deb post 7 or 8 times on the same topic that it doesn’t seem at all unusual to me. I can understand that others might see it differently.though.

                  1. Tom,

                    You are a nice person.

                    I don’t mind RB sharing his opinions about topics at all.

                    I just don’t understand why he still regularly shows contempt for Dr Greger.

                    Other than that, I have no problem at all with RB.

                    I don’t understand what he has against Dr Greger.

                    1. Am I the only one who thinks that RB almost always puts Dr Greger down as if he feels Dr Greger shouldn’t be respected as a doctor?

                      It is different than criticizing specifics.

                      It is as if he doesn’t want anyone to respect the man behind this site and that doesn’t even make sense to me at all.

                      There wouldn’t even be a WFPB movement at all without 2 hands full of doctors and it is rare to see someone care about the movement and look down on one of those key doctors.

                    2. I guess I have wanted RB to see that there are reasons to respect Dr Greger and that if had his way of getting other people to join him in looking down on Dr Greger it would hurt the WFPB movement and it feels like RB cares about the way of eating.

                      This movement could go away, like Keto is again.

                      I don’t take that for granted.

                      I care more about the movement saving lives around the world and it rests on the shoulders of these doctors who stand up daily against billionaires who want things that will kill people all around the world.

                    3. The health of the world rests on the reputation of a few doctors.

                      Where I live, not one person I have ever met believes in the principles of WFPB.

                      It is because I watched Dr Greger’s hardest video and respected him that I heard this message at all.

                      My friends and family members pressure me to respect Dr Fung and Dr Berg more. There was a man at the PEMF community who contacted me every day to try to get me to not respect the doctors of this movement.

                      Respect is the currency they have and the lives of the whole world depend upon that voice winning.

                      Our environment depends on it.

                      Animals lives depend on it.

                    4. Keto just lost so much audience that it will affect what businesses and grocery stores and restaurants do.

                      It will affect what the Press communicates.

                      Atkins nearly disappeared as a concept.

                      WFPB could go either way.

                      The Press has already asked if it is a fad.

                    5. Country after country have been leaving Plant-Based eating for SAD.

                      To me, nearly every business and government is in an army of Goliaths and we have maybe 10 or 12 forerunners carrying this message.

                      I don’t understand how it doesn’t make people so passionate to save the world and save the animals and save the environment and protect the quarterbacks blind side is clearly why I write too much.

                      I want Dr Greger to succeed more than I care about the rest of what happens on this site.

                    6. I have heard Colin talk about people not respecting Colin and I have heard Dr MacDougall say that nobody listened to him anyway. I have heard so many people talk about not respecting Dr Fuhrman.

                      I go to Dr Barnards YouTube site and he has about 200 people listening to his message and yet when he lists what these doctors have accomplished even with animal abuse I am amazed that so few people accomplish so much every single year.

                      I have never met one person who had even heard the message. Not once.

                      I know how fragile this whole coalition is.

                      And how wealthy, powerful, and addiction-creating the people who hate this movement.

                      God help us all if this fails.

                    7. Dr MacDougall has retired.

                      Dr Greger at one point left his work about pandemics because he felt it was a waste of time because nobody respected the message enough to listen.

                      I do not take this man for granted.

                      I never will.

                      If I could jump over the rest of you and just keep encouraging him in what a remnant can accomplish, he is the one who I would encourage every day.

                    8. Colin is an old man.

                      Dr. MacDougall has already stated that he has moved on from saying the same message over and over again and that he is more interested in the environment than diet now.

                      Right now, these next few years are probably the most important years because information is no longer consolidated and unless enough streams of the internet pick this message up, it could lose its voice.

                      None of you will understand that bigger picture.

                    9. Dr Greger had already said in an interview that he would consider going back to his focus on things like pandemics if that becomes more important in saving lives.

                      I guess it is me who has to post fewer comments do that Dr Greger can see how many people in this snarky, selfish audience actually care about this part of his message.

                      RB, if you could stop threatening this Whole Food Plant Based movement, I will go work on my brain problems on another site.

                      But if you are going to destroy him, I will end up coming right back.

                      Because this doctor has a life’s desire to save lives and so do I.

                      I could go back and focus on the missionaries in Africa who are feeding 10,000 orphansevery day, plus are trying to feed another. 216,000 refugees while insurgents try to kill them and that will be someplace I could put my passion and money and time towards.

                      But, Dr. Greater, don’t you dare ever listen to RB when he puts you down.

                      You stay focused on saving lives.

                      I genuinely love you.

                      God bless you in your life saving mission.

    3. Vivamus,

      Your comment was probably the most important comment for feedback.

      It means that it isn’t just that the audience was used to something and liked that better.

      You hadn’t been exposed to the old style.

  2. Vivamus, I enjoyed this video also… It’s an older video which origionally aired on Aug 13 2018. Every friday is “flashback friday” whereas monday and wednesdays are ‘new’ material we haven’t seen previously.

  3. Almost every day now for over 5 years, I have berries at breakfast. Mostly blueberries, but sometimes strawberries, and the best of all-wild raspberries and blackberries in season.

    In thirty years I’ll be 84 and expect I’ll still be eating berries daily. Thanks doc.

    1. Way to go, Wade!

      I have backed up on blueberries.

      I am hoping blackberries and black grapes do some of the same things.

      Once we get the power back, maybe I will try again.

      They had said Saturday but today they said Tuesday.

    1. With the power out, one gets a whole new appreciation for the utility of home-canned, pickled, and dried food items. And being the middle of growing/harvest season in the Northern Hemisphere. I must say, it could be worse with far less fresh options around. I shop lightly and frequently in order to keep fresh fruits, greens, and veggies in my diet as possible. Good luck with that. Berries have been cheap enough for even me to buy fresh lately-but the bulk of my berries are frozen.

    2. Hi, Deb. I love your defense of Dr. Greger and couldn’t agree more. I think maybe there’s a touch of Dr. Greger envy going on here…we are so lucky to have him. I also wanted to mention that you might want to consider a small portable power station like a Jackery (no affiliation here) and a 12 volt fridge to save your food in a power outage. Just a thought and keep up the good work.

      1. Kathy,

        Thank you so much.

        I have been looking at the solar power stations for months.

        The thing is, right now, I have my brother who fixed my generator and drove every 4 hours and bought gas for it.

        He has 4-wheel drive and did it even one winter storm.

        Around here, people either get the Generac that I have which does power the whole house for 4 hours or they get one that just turns on automatically when the power goes off and I think those run on propane. Or they have cheap one’s they roll from fridge to ac and back.

        A lot of the elderly people move closer to having the automatic one and they don’t want to drive to gas stations 4 or 5 times a day.

        I live in a place where solar can be iffy but I have found a young man on YouTube who has put every brand of solar to the test.

        There are some that run a full-sized house fridge and small ac’s.

        I try to do everything as a once and done toward the day that I might not have my brother or when he might not want to do this process.

        I have specifically looked at the jackery and the titan and patriot and goalzero and others where you can just swap batteries in and out.

        But I am not as confident about the sun here.

        First off, I have a super shade-filled yard.

        These decisions are always so complex.

        The Generac has served me well.

        But it needed repair this year.

        If it ever ends up being me driving to the gas station, I will end up with 8 gas cans because I am not driving around during an ice storm.

    3. Deb,

      Here in CT, we are now in day 3 of our power outage, and utility company has warned us to expect to be without power for 5 to 10 days total. So we are eating items out of our fridge first, then onto the freezer. Luckily, I think our food will last a bit longer than what animal products would. We’ll find out. Knock wood. But so much for “stocking up“ for a pandemic. Bah!

      The good news is, we have a gas stove, so we can cook. Luckily, I saved an old tea kettle, and I had previously bought a hand coffee bean grinder, so we can make coffee! I have a little Aeropress coffee maker, but any pour over coffee maker would work. And grinding coffee beans is a good workout for my arms!

      1. Dr J,

        You sound so resilient. Nothing is going to keep you down.

        We don’t have gas on my street. Not offered.

        I did look at some solar ovens.

        But my brother fixed the generator and I just used the microwave and ate cold foods.

        1. We have been out for 10 days before.

          Cell phones connecting to the internet sometimes helps with information.

          But I will tell you that I used my Halo power charger almost up before the generator was up and running.

          I do want a power source that I can just plug in an electric blanket and a television for the hours that the generator is off.

          I like being able to watch the news.

  4. Yeah, I suppose we all have different reactions to speaking style. But I suspect I am very much not alone in finding Dr. Greger a fantastic speaker. He is unique, one-of-a-kind, funny, and brilliant, and I am thankful for him. And I’m a bit distractible myself so sometimes stop or reverse the video to digest. I do prefer somewhat the shorter videos (3-7 minutes) that stick to a few points. At the same time, I appreciate that even those focusing on one sub-population usually have material relevant to all.

  5. Hold off on raiding the frig until you’re finished reading:

    Blueberries
    Berry good for the eyes
    Great in pies
    A favorite of Harry, Mary, Larry, Jerry, Kerry, Barry, Perry & others
    Easy to chew and reduces the flu
    Not red like a cherry; It’s blue but can vary
    Improves memory, easy on your history, speeds recovery
    Antioxidant, anthocyanin, anticancer, antisocial to all antipaths
    Good for the heart till life do you part
    Berry popular; not contrary; great for the urinary
    Plenty of fiber; leaves you purring like a tiger
    Voids constipation; a good revelation
    Reduces belly fat & not just in rats
    Makes you happy and blue
    Brought to you by the Blueberry Council
    No conflict of interest; not found in a pill
    Find your thrill on Blueberry Hill

  6. I am so troubled by reading all these comments on “appearance” and “format”. We are SO blessed to have Dr Greger to lighten us on the healty path. We benefit from so many ways to listen to his wisdom: audio, transcripts, books, even precious culinary books, the Daily Dozen, etc.
    The most important element for me is the great value of the content, and Dr. Greger’s ability to summarize complex notions and made them practical and understandable.
    Remember also that Nutrition facts is a non profit organization and Dr. Greger and his team and supporters are doing their professional best to give us precious information TOTALLY FREE to us and TOTALLY FREE from advertisors’pressure.
    That in himself makes me so grateful towards Nutritionfacts and his leader.
    The sense of humor of Dr Greger and his passion are a great plus for me. Bless you Dr Greger. I cannot thank you enough for your videos, books, and web site that changed my life for the better.

    1. Louiselle, I totally agree with your gratitude to Dr Greger. I have been watching these videos for several years now and do prefer the older format, but I’m much more interested in the content. Dr Greger is the primary nutritional doctor that convinced me to change to a WPF way of eating, and I am so much more healthy than I was before. I have purchased his How Not to Die book and donated to the website to help keep it going so others can benefit, too. I guess I’m old enough to not be in any of the “entitlement” generations ;-)

  7. I just realized that I don’t have any idea what day or week or month we are in.

    That is normal for me but having the power out for 3 or 4 days or however many days near the end of the fiscal year just made it worse.

    I was just thinking about the 80% of ICU patients who have hallucinations and my fear that they are putting them on Morphine and I remembered that they wanted to put my grandmother on Morphine because they believed that elevated heart rate means pain even if the patient communicates that they aren’t in pain over and over again.

    They told me that they wouldn’t listen to my grandmother or to me because it is normal for them to not know they are in pain.

    I was like, ”Okay but her not knowing that she is in pain is like the dentist meds and she isn’t on meds at all and that is good enough.”

    Anyway, the smart watch app people think elevated heart rate is linked to infection which is what I had brought her in for and something tells me that Morphine doesn’t improve survival from infections.

    I will have to look it up but it came to me as a thought because they forced Morphine on my mother when she begged them not to give it and she said that she wasn’t in pain either. Same with my uncle.

    They each did have infections and each said that they were not in any pain.

  8. I know that because I have brain problems they would force it on me and would do the starve me to death and don’t give drinks when I ask process.

    I am a Christian and don’t even want a kill them faster process in the first place but if I get COVID they might force Morphine on me and that terrifies me more than anything.

  9. Then they will go ”the poor people are paranoid that we are trying to kill them.”

    And would give something that shuts down the CNS to people when such a high percentage of people still die in the ICU.

  10. I feel like there is a paradox in care because doctors assume people are in pain and would be better off dead, like the handicapped person who they didn’t try to save even though the family wanted them to.

    My father believes that handicapped people would all rather be dead and he would rather be dead than in a wheelchair and I have had relatives in wheelchairs who disagree about that.

  11. Thanks, all! It is great relief to learn that Dr. Greger apparently will be returning to much more effective video teaching format when the current group of experimental videos reaches the end of their queue.

    With that in mind, I just reviewed some of Dr. Greger’s Novel Coronavirus videos to see how the renewed format is going.

    I choose to analyze the July 15th, 2020 “The Best Mask or DIY Face Covering for COVID-19” video as it encompasses material of which I am knowledgeable independent of Dr. Greger’s work.

    Assessment: this is an excellent teaching presentation. The information is presented very effectively.

    One remembers the material – unencumbered by distractions of presentation.

    Vocalization is measured – you can sense Dr. Greger carefully slowing himself down for us mere mortals – poor fellow – from the Gatling gun delivery of which he is so eminently capable – never enter into a verbal race with Dr. Greger, you would never stand a chance. This measured pace gives the listener time to assimilate the information as one goes along, without having to pause to let one’s mind catch up to the material. Verbal tone is at the lower end of Dr. Greger’s register – which works very, very well indeed.

    Publications are presented at a pace where one can pause the presentation and read the first page if so inclined – with labels as to the specific publication if one wishes to go further and explore the “sources.” There are none of the vertiginous motion graphics which made this so difficult in the past. There are no overlays to prevent the reading of the publication pages.

    Less is more.

    Editing is fine. Tighter and we would lose information. Looser and we would go on forever. I would give editing a “just right.”

    Length: 9 minutes, 40 seconds. That is what the material actually needed. I know that some prefer shorter presentations – but to accomplish that, Dr. Greger would have had to sacrifice material or would have had to race through the presentation full tilt, sacrificing audience comprehension. I think it best to simply give the material the time that it needs – whether it is three minutes or ten minutes. Reasonable people may disagree.

    All in all – a fine comeback.

    Dr. Greger is back!

    Everything is fixed and is now better than ever.

    Thank you, Dr. Greger. And my thanks to the NutritionFacts support team.

    All the best,

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus, Regarding your comment: “Length: 9 minutes, 40 seconds. That is what the material actually needed. I know that some prefer shorter presentations – but to accomplish that, Dr. Greger would have had to sacrifice material or would have had to race through the presentation full tilt, sacrificing audience comprehension. I think it best to simply give the material the time that it needs – whether it is three minutes or ten minutes.”

      This reminds me of the scene in the biographical movie of Mozart, Amadeus, where the Emperor tells Mozart his opera has too many notes!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6_eqxh-Qok

      Just as ever entity has it’s inherent resonant frequency, every complex temporal composition has it’s proper duration. :-)

  12. Off topic.

    New scientific statement from the AHA:

    ‘ In this scientific statement from the American Heart Association, we provide rationale for the widespread adoption of rapid diet screener tools in primary care and relevant specialty care prevention settings, discuss the theory- and practice-based criteria of a rapid diet screener tool that supports valid and feasible diet assessment and counseling in clinical settings, review existing tools, and discuss opportunities and challenges for integrating a rapid diet screener tool into clinician workflows through the electronic health record.’
    https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/HCQ.0000000000000094

    1. Thanks for posting this study, it was interesting and the first thing I thought of was “wonder if they looked at the daily dozen” :-) It will be interesting to see what they end up with as the list of questions to use. I can just see the Dr telling me I need to eat more olive oil and fish depending on which of the questionnaires they use.

      1. Following 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and other available guidelines (some by memory).

        Corrections are welcome:

        (1) Gotta get your Dairy!

        After all – you have to get your calcium! ;-)

        (2) Up to 30% of daily calories should come via fats and oils. Up to 10% of daily calories should be saturated fat:

        “The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting calories from saturated fats to less than 10% of the total calories you eat and drink each day. That’s about 200 calories for a 2,000 calorie diet.”

        (3) Up to 2300 mg Sodium daily:

        “The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that Americans consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day as part of a healthy eating pattern.”

        (4) Added sugar: up to 10% of total calories each day:

        “The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting calories from added sugars to no more than 10% each day. That’s 200 calories, or about 12 teaspoons, for a 2,000 calorie diet.”

        (5) Gotta get your daily protein ration: beef, veal, pork, fowl, venison, lamb, fish . . .

        And, of course: eggs are “the perfect protein.”

        (6) Dietary cholesterol is no longer of any concern.

        (7) Industrial agriculture is on equal footing to organic agriculture. No difference.

        (8) Alcohol as follows (2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans):

        “If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation – up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men – and only by adults of legal drinking age.”

        This is gonna be great!

        Of course – there do need to be some modifications reforms. All will be science-based:

        “Leading Scientists Agree: Current Limits on Saturated Fats No Longer Justified”
        February 25, 2020
        “The Nutrition Coalition, a non-profit group without any industry funding”
        https://www.nutritioncoalition.us/news/saturated-fat-limit-not-justified

        All accompanied by recommendations for new statin guidelines, blood pressure medication guidelines, diabetic screening, cardiac stress testing, kidney screening, bariatric surgery – and mental health evaluation for those who resist science-based dietary counseling.

        Dr. Greger has pointed out limited nutrition training in medical schools. John McDougall has pointed out the need for improvement in this regard.

        Isn’t it wonderful – Dr. McDougall’s wish may finally come true.

        To your health!

        Ever-Optimistic Vivamus

        1. Actually, I cannot seem to find any limitation on total fat in the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

          Can you?

          Just the limitation for saturated fat at 10%.

          So I guess that 60% total fat calories – or more – is just fine.

          Be interesting to see what the “rapid diet screener tool” will look like after the keto people get finished helping mold it.

          Vivamus

          1. They deliberately moved away from focussing on macronutrients (fat, carbohydrate.protein) to focus on dietary patterns instead. So no up-front recommendations re total fat or protein or carbohydrate consumption as such.

            1. Mr Fumblefingers,

              Thank you for the knowledge.

              What is your take on that?

              I have found numerical goals to be helpful.

              Best regards,

              Vivamus

              1. They apparently came to believe that focussing on individual nutrients was counterproductive. After all. previous guidelines advising low fat eating meant thousands of low fat products which contained high levels of sugars and refined carbs. And low sugar eating meant low sugar products that were high in fat or sodium or refined carbs or sugar substitutes. So they decided to concentrate on foods and in particular ‘dietary patterns’.

                They still did identify some nutrients of concern – trans fats, saturated fat, sugar, sodium etc.

                Not unreasonable in the circumstances I think. the dairy and meat industries are too big to call out but the guidelines did advise low fat dairy nand reducing red meat. Some progress then?

        2. ‘Dairy’ actually includes vegetarian dairy substitutes

          ‘protein’ includes legumes, tofu etc

          there is no limit of fats just as there is no limit on carbs or protein (and for the same reason)

          an upper limit is an upper limit. It is not a requirement or a target

          ‘The Key Recommendation from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day is not included in the 2015 edition, but this change does not suggest that dietary cholesterol is no longer important to consider when building healthy eating patterns. As recommended by the IOM,[24] individuals should eat as little dietary cholesterol as possible while consuming a healthy eating patter’
          https://health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines/guidelines/chapter-1/a-closer-look-inside-healthy-eating-patterns/

          There is no conclusive scientific evidence that eating organic is healthier than eating conventional foods.
          https://www.politico.com/story/2015/10/the-money-behind-the-fight-over-healthy-eating-214517
          The “Nutrition Coalition” is an obvious stalking horse for industry, Just look at its members. I think everybody recognises that.

          https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/257353-coalition-is-full-of-baloney-on-nutrition-guidelines

          1. Mr Fumblefingers,

            Thank you.

            Much to read. This will take time – and the ability to concentrate, which seems to have fled this evening.

            This sleep will likely restore.

            From the articles that I have gotten to, I am shocked! Shocked to learn that something as pristine as science can possiblly be politicized.

            O tempora, o mores!

            Vivamus

            1. Context is key. Even when it comes to the boiling point of water, it’s not always 100C.. It varies according to atmospheric pressure and eg salt content. How much more relevant is context when it comes to something as complicated as health and nutrition?

        3. That’s all industry driven garbage.

          Canada now has worthwhile dietary recommendations.

          America will likely never–despite all the wonderful statements made before the advisory meetings as seen here and on YT. I expect all those wonderful comments (and the health they embrace) to be swept under the rug and for our “new” recommendations to be a rehash of the old garbage from industrial influence on all things government. Money speaks and science is weak in the ears of the decision makers. THIS is where Captalism fails our society-it has undermined our safeguards to human health and freedoms that come with natural health.

          Thanks for your thoughts V.

      1. No. RDA is the recommended dietary allowance of a certain nutrient. It may be used in a dietary screening tool but it is not the same thing.

        Some online diet checkers may already calculate if your diet meets the RDAs for essential nutrients.

  13. In regards to criticism of DR Gregers style of delivery .
    As a person who has used the English language as a means of communication for over 55 years , even though it wasn’t my first language , I am in total awe as to how well Dr Greger communicates .difficult to pronounce words . I would wish I could do even half as well.
    Pretty sure this site would not have gotten this popular without him .

  14. The video is about blueberries. Yet 3 out of 4 comments are about Dr Gregers speaking style, and some of the others are ramblings about whatever. Give it a break. Come here for the content, the information.

    If you all are so good at public speaking then write your own books and start your own blog/site/YouTube. Or become a public speaking/speech teacher. This constant complaining and sniping has gotten old. You may find that putting together a concise, complete briefing is harder than you think.
    Nice to be wolf, you humans are, well….too dog eat dog….

    1. Smile.

      Yes, backseat running a nutritional website might make it look easier than it is.

      The fact that he has nailed it so many times.

      I know that it would be challenging to even do one video well.

  15. There is a man who has a show about how pizza affects his brain and his brain before pizza was OCD and anxious on the brain scan.

    After the pizza his OCD and anxiety was gone.

    I found it fascinating because I think I would have had the same reading.

    I know pizza is the biggest food addiction in my family but seeing the anxiety and OCD go away and the man ended up in a meditative state after.

    Pizza coma.

    The calm before the death.

    Is vegan pizza okay or is it still bad.

    The faux cheese and oil and flour can’t be good.

    It was just interesting to see his brain scan.

    He eats pizza every single day and my family would do that.

  16. Both my wife and I get chest tightness immediately after drinking a smoothie if we add a half cup of frozen blueberries.

    We think it is salicylate sensitivity.

    What is the best way to consume the blueberries without this issue arising?

    1. TN,

      Not knowing the contents of your smoothies…. how about eliminating it from consideration and eat a few clean organic blueberries. If you continue to experience chest tightness, don’t consume this berry. One of the easiest ways to assess salicylate sensitivity is to typically question a patient and ask if they tolerate aspirin. For clarity I am not suggesting you do this test as the amount in a single aspirin is substantially more than the fruit. See your physician to be safe and properly tested.

      Forcing a reactive food into a diet can generally have negative consequences. Take a look at other foods with a limited salicylate content at: http://www.foodcanmakeyouill.co.uk/salicylate-in-food.html

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  17. Thank you Alan and Barb.

    The ‘test smoothie’ was simplified: a cup of almond milk, half a banana, half a cup of frozen blueberries. I know bananas cause no effects for us.

    I’m a bit reluctant to eliminate blueberries, given Dr Greger’s numerous videos on their benefits. Are there adequate substitutes that bring the benefits?

    regards

    1. TN Args, if it was me, I would be following Dr Kadish’ suggestion by making an appt with my doctor to investigate a possible allergy to salicylate. In the meantime I would be eating a low salicylate breakfast like oatmeal until I knew, one way or the other.

      As for blueberries, I rarely purchase them preferring black raspberries, blackberries, black currants instead. Years ago I did read source materials under Dr G’s videos and found that the berries I mentioned plus amla (indian gooseberry ) were the real power houses.

      Trouble is, they are also going to be as high or higher in salicylates. Even the greens/veg that commonly go into a smoothie have high levels salicylate.

      I don’t know how common salicylate sensitivity is, or how likely it would be for 2 people to both experience allergic symptoms, but your doctor would be the one to consult.

      The link provided by Dr Kadish lists foods according to levels of salicylate which would help in creating a menu.

      This smoothie recipe looks great but again, moderate to high in salicylates.
      https://plantbasednana.org/recipes/beverages/417-super-green-smoothie-from-dr-greger

      1. You could also consider trying divided doses over the course of the day rather than consuming them in one big hit.

        However, Dr Kadish’s advice is probably the one to go for

  18. Not medical advice – merely informational. For medical advice, please contact your wise and learned locally licensed physician – certainly prior to attempting to weave any solution from unproven thread.

    TN Args,

    Two thoughts – if not prudent, they may still be of interest:

    (1) Consider the words of Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim.

    AKA “Paracelsus” – Father of Toxicology:

    “Alle Dinge sind Gift, und nichts ist ohne Gift, allein die Dosis macht dass ein Ding kein Gift ist.”

    Or – in the vernacular:

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison, the dosage alone makes it so a thing is not a poison.”

    Often shortened to:

    “Sola dosis facit venenum.”

    “Only the dose makes the poison.”

    Which is to say – you might dilute your blueberry concoction to see if there is no ill effect with a lesser concentration.
    The only problem with this approach is – like all good ideas that do not necessarily work out – this doesn’t always work.

    Oops! Never mind . . .

    Oh, well – let’s consider another possible approach.

    (2) You might consider the Mithridates Principle – starting small and building up.

    No guarantees, of course.

    As so clearly expounded by Housman, Kennedy Professor of Latin at Cambridge University.

    From: A Shropshire Lad.

    1896

    https://www.bartleby.com/123/62.html

    ——————————————————–

    Two strikes?

    Hmmm . . . let’s try for one more:

    Diet substitution.

    As you may recollect, amongst other nutrients, blueberries contain the following:

    Anthocyanins
    malvidins
    delphinidins
    pelargonidins
    cyanidins
    peonidins
    petunidin

    Hydroxycinnamic acids and derivatives
    caffeic acids
    ferulic acids
    coumaric acids

    Hydroxybenzoic acids and derivatives
    gallic acids
    protocatechuic acids

    Flavonols
    kaempferol
    quercetin
    myricetin

    Flavan-3-ols
    catechin

    Stilbenoids (phytoalexins)
    pterostilbene
    resveratrol

    http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=8

    You may wish to cut out blueberry intake entirely and explore other foods that contain these blueberry nutrients separately from blueberries.

    Then again – this can be seen as reductionist – using flawed logic similar to that which supports the vitamin pill industry.

    Reductionist thought allows us to equate oranges with Vitamin C pills.\

    A convincing idea on first hearing – bot not one that survives well over time.

    All fun to think about – but ideas are not solutions.

    TN Args.

    Best of luck –

    Vivamus

  19. Hello… I am from India. Blueberries are not readily available in India. So what is the substitute of Blueberries available in this part of this World so enhance cognitive skill.

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