Flashback Friday: Can Saunas Detoxify Lead from the Body?

Flashback Friday: Can Saunas Detoxify Lead from the Body?
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How much does sweating via sauna or exercise get rid of lead and mercury?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my video on henna, I talked about the study that proved lead could be absorbed through skin and into the body. Researchers applied lead to someone’s left arm, and then they measured the level of lead in the sweat coming off their right arm over the next few days. There was a big spike, proving that lead can go into your body, but also proving that lead can go out of your body. If we can lose lead through sweat, how about using sweating for detoxification?

Look: “No person is without some level of” toxic heavy metals in their blood, “circulating and accumulating,” and hey, cultures around the world have viewed sweating as health-promoting, from Roman and Turkish baths, to sweat lodges and saunas. But what does the science say?

When I looked up saunas, I was surprised to see this: a study on the detoxification of 9/11 rescue workers, with a regimen of exercise, sauna bathing, and supplements. They reported on seven individuals, and evidently during the month before the treatment, PCB levels in their blood stayed about the same. “In contrast, all rescue workers had measurable decreases in these PCBs following treatment.” And, they reportedly felt better too. They had all sorts of symptoms—respiratory, neurological, musculoskeletal—but felt better after the treatment. Improvements “consistent with” nearly 400 others they treated with the same protocol.

Wait a second. If they treated 400, why are they only reporting the results from seven? That’s a bit of a red flag, but not as red as this: the “detoxification regimen [was] developed by Hubbard.” As in, L.R. Hubbard—L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the infamous Church of Scientology. And the lead author of the detoxification paper also appears to have failed to disclose his financial conflict of interest for presumably profiting off the treatments.

Sweating does, however, represent a “time-honored treatment” in the field of medicine for mercury poisoning going back centuries. But, time-honored medical treatments include drilling people’s skulls open to release evil spirits, or even giving people mercury itself. Remember mercurochrome? What do you think the mercuro- stood for? In fact, some believe Mozart died of mercury poisoning trying to cure his syphilis—though, of course, all the bloodletting he got probably didn’t help either— another time-honored medical treatment that makes scientology saunas look pretty mild in comparison. But, a case report was described of a person who apparently recovered from mercury poisoning after six months of sweats and physical therapy. But maybe he would have gotten better anyway? You don’t know…until you put it to the test.

Mercury wasn’t formally studied, but lead was. Put people in a 200-degree dry sauna for 15 minutes, and based on sweating rates, those 15 minutes in the sauna would force out about 40 micrograms of lead from the body, with some people getting rid of 100 or more per session. So, you could drink like a gallon of chicken broth, and even if you absorbed all the lead, you could be back to baseline after just one sauna session, even after drinking bone broth.

Is it safe for children? Based on what we know now, ‘sauna bathing poses no risks” to healthy folks throughout the life cycle, though medical supervision couldn’t hurt. Now, this doesn’t mean it would be as effective in children, as adults sweat a lot more than kids. And, of course, kids are the ones who need lead detoxing the most. “There is a clear need for robust clinical trials” to test all this.

But even if it works, it’s not like some poor kid in Flint is going to have access to a sauna. That’s why I was so excited to find this paper: “The change in blood

levels of basketball players after strenuous exercise.” Saunas aren’t the only way to sweat; what about strenuous physical activity? Evidently, there was a study that found that “aerobic endurance training” lead to a drop in lead levels, with rowing better than cycling. But for how long? How intense? I don’t know; I don’t read German. But I did find the study, and it looks like they ramped up the stationary bike 50 watts every two minutes until exhaustion; so, probably just a few minutes, with no significant before-and-after difference in blood or urine lead levels, whereas an hour-long endurance exercise row did seem to drop lead levels about 12%.

This one I can read, though. A single intense training session on the court, and college basketball players blood levels dropped down to… Wait a second, they went up? A significant increase in blood levels, in fact by nearly 300%. They suspect it’s because where they were playing was so contaminated. The study was done in Turkey, where the lead levels in the air are evidently so high that all that extra breathing evidently made things worse, which I think underscores an important point.

All the dietary tweaks I’ve talked about for lead poisoning, and sweating it out, could be thought of as more expedient and cost less than primary prevention—getting at the root cause. This, however, represents “a retreat of sorts” from a commitment to cleaning up the environment and getting rid of these hazardous pollutants in the first place. Lifestyle interventions “should only be thought of as temporary solutions, and continued emphasis must be placed on eliminating lead in children’s environments” in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: KSchlott via Pixabay and MPCA Photos via flickr. Images have been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my video on henna, I talked about the study that proved lead could be absorbed through skin and into the body. Researchers applied lead to someone’s left arm, and then they measured the level of lead in the sweat coming off their right arm over the next few days. There was a big spike, proving that lead can go into your body, but also proving that lead can go out of your body. If we can lose lead through sweat, how about using sweating for detoxification?

Look: “No person is without some level of” toxic heavy metals in their blood, “circulating and accumulating,” and hey, cultures around the world have viewed sweating as health-promoting, from Roman and Turkish baths, to sweat lodges and saunas. But what does the science say?

When I looked up saunas, I was surprised to see this: a study on the detoxification of 9/11 rescue workers, with a regimen of exercise, sauna bathing, and supplements. They reported on seven individuals, and evidently during the month before the treatment, PCB levels in their blood stayed about the same. “In contrast, all rescue workers had measurable decreases in these PCBs following treatment.” And, they reportedly felt better too. They had all sorts of symptoms—respiratory, neurological, musculoskeletal—but felt better after the treatment. Improvements “consistent with” nearly 400 others they treated with the same protocol.

Wait a second. If they treated 400, why are they only reporting the results from seven? That’s a bit of a red flag, but not as red as this: the “detoxification regimen [was] developed by Hubbard.” As in, L.R. Hubbard—L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the infamous Church of Scientology. And the lead author of the detoxification paper also appears to have failed to disclose his financial conflict of interest for presumably profiting off the treatments.

Sweating does, however, represent a “time-honored treatment” in the field of medicine for mercury poisoning going back centuries. But, time-honored medical treatments include drilling people’s skulls open to release evil spirits, or even giving people mercury itself. Remember mercurochrome? What do you think the mercuro- stood for? In fact, some believe Mozart died of mercury poisoning trying to cure his syphilis—though, of course, all the bloodletting he got probably didn’t help either— another time-honored medical treatment that makes scientology saunas look pretty mild in comparison. But, a case report was described of a person who apparently recovered from mercury poisoning after six months of sweats and physical therapy. But maybe he would have gotten better anyway? You don’t know…until you put it to the test.

Mercury wasn’t formally studied, but lead was. Put people in a 200-degree dry sauna for 15 minutes, and based on sweating rates, those 15 minutes in the sauna would force out about 40 micrograms of lead from the body, with some people getting rid of 100 or more per session. So, you could drink like a gallon of chicken broth, and even if you absorbed all the lead, you could be back to baseline after just one sauna session, even after drinking bone broth.

Is it safe for children? Based on what we know now, ‘sauna bathing poses no risks” to healthy folks throughout the life cycle, though medical supervision couldn’t hurt. Now, this doesn’t mean it would be as effective in children, as adults sweat a lot more than kids. And, of course, kids are the ones who need lead detoxing the most. “There is a clear need for robust clinical trials” to test all this.

But even if it works, it’s not like some poor kid in Flint is going to have access to a sauna. That’s why I was so excited to find this paper: “The change in blood

levels of basketball players after strenuous exercise.” Saunas aren’t the only way to sweat; what about strenuous physical activity? Evidently, there was a study that found that “aerobic endurance training” lead to a drop in lead levels, with rowing better than cycling. But for how long? How intense? I don’t know; I don’t read German. But I did find the study, and it looks like they ramped up the stationary bike 50 watts every two minutes until exhaustion; so, probably just a few minutes, with no significant before-and-after difference in blood or urine lead levels, whereas an hour-long endurance exercise row did seem to drop lead levels about 12%.

This one I can read, though. A single intense training session on the court, and college basketball players blood levels dropped down to… Wait a second, they went up? A significant increase in blood levels, in fact by nearly 300%. They suspect it’s because where they were playing was so contaminated. The study was done in Turkey, where the lead levels in the air are evidently so high that all that extra breathing evidently made things worse, which I think underscores an important point.

All the dietary tweaks I’ve talked about for lead poisoning, and sweating it out, could be thought of as more expedient and cost less than primary prevention—getting at the root cause. This, however, represents “a retreat of sorts” from a commitment to cleaning up the environment and getting rid of these hazardous pollutants in the first place. Lifestyle interventions “should only be thought of as temporary solutions, and continued emphasis must be placed on eliminating lead in children’s environments” in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: KSchlott via Pixabay and MPCA Photos via flickr. Images have been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

105 responses to “Flashback Friday: Can Saunas Detoxify Lead from the Body?

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  1. Excellent point about environmental contamination.

    We can eat whole plant foods, avoiding animal products as well as processed and prepared foods, and even added oil, sugar, and salt, and improve our health, on our own, by our individual actions and behavior.

    But we can’t avoid the air we breathe, and to a large extend, the water we drink. Or the contaminants on and in articles that we come into contact daily, or the products we apply to ourselves, our clothes, our homes, etc. Or really, even in the foods we eat: organic products are also contaminated by various herbicides, pesticides, heavy metals, and more. So reducing environmental toxins in these requires concerted political will and action.

    (And after writing that, I’m beginning to consider processed and prepared foods as grocery store and restaurant and institutional pollutants and contaminants.)

    1. Somebody give me some guidance here for the record: Is Dr. J our “brother”?

      As the Monk theme song says, “I could be wrong now… but I don’t think so!”

      1. @ Dr, Cobalt:
        Good point. As I pressed send, I realized oh snap! Doc J could be a she. Too late though.

        Monk! Great show! Here are the complete lyrics, of which you are spot on, and yes indeed they are quite relevant to our health as well.

        Randy Newman – It’s a Jungle Out There Lyrics

        It’s a jungle out there
        Disorder and confusion everywhere
        No one seems to care
        Well I do
        Hey, who’s in charge here?
        It’s a jungle out there
        Poison in the very air we breathe
        Do you know what’s in the water that you drink?
        Well I do, and it’s amazing
        People think I’m crazy, ’cause I worry all the time
        If you paid attention, you’d be worried too
        You better pay attention
        Or this world we love so much might just kill you
        I could be wrong now, but I don’t think so!
        ‘Cause there’s a jungle out there.
        It’s a jungle out there.

        source: https://www.lyricsondemand.com/tvthemes/monklyrics.html

        *****************************************

        $$$$$$$$$$ Now, regarding where did they get the idea for naming a quirky genius with a traumatic past, who ends up in isolation unable to cope with his inner demons and his own pure spectral intelligence?

        I did a small bit of research to match my hypothesis but so far, it hasnt been born out.

        There is a character, a real life absolutely magical guy, who actually exhibited these same traits, in my beloved field of music.

        His Name? Monk

        Thelonious Sphere Monk

        The tune, is appropriately called “Evidence”: https://youtu.be/XjJYeCYO-hA

        If you go and listen, and like, then let it roll in autoplay. You will be glad you did. :)

        Happy weekend

        1. Thanks for your post, jazzBass.

          I think you might be fairly new to NF.org, maybe (?). I’ve been here for a couple of years and have interacted with Dr. J on a few occasions. Somehow I got the impression that she’s a she (I could be wrong now…) Anyway, once you get an impression like that you always think of that person as a him/her from that point on. Mental image, so to speak.

          I’m waiting for Dr. J to chime in and set one of us straight. =]

          Monk provenance? Hmmm. I’m not sure if the character is based on a real person or not. Interesting speculation re TSM though. My thoughts: I think Adrian Monk was just a reincarnation of the popular Columbo character. Lieutenant Columbo was quirky (though not as quirky as Monk to be sure), quite humble, and always the consummate crime solver by the end of each episode. I suspect that viewers just like that combination of traits.

          I am familiar with TSM. I will give the YouTube video collection a listen.

          1. Yes, the Newman lyrics fit this Lead theme quite appropriately. Maybe there’s a little bit of Monk in all of us NF.org aficionados.

          1. Deb, yes i checked it only breifly. We dont usually get to know the inspiration for the creation though, in IMDB lol

            What Ive noticed is that there are multitudes of “art homage signaling” in a lot of our film and TV because the writers just have lives and interests and live in circles where they know what quality is, so they work it into there craft. Usually unnoticed, but its there, a lot.

            I imagine its somewhat like product placement, unpaid, without profit, but instead less obvious reminders meant to connect on another level with open minds – in the know, often as homage, and with the intent of an un-witnessed wink from the receiver. (like the IMDB reference above)

            I think the arts borrow from one another constantly. (including writers here) I suppose it also happens on health websites too.

            In jazz we take solos and often quote parts of riffs from the masters, or well known melodies, or even memorable sounds, and sometimes even band-mates who are listening intently, miss them because they are transposed into alternative harmonies “a’ la minute”. They come out at unscheduled times, are meant to pleasingly jar or surprise softly, and are almost a test to learn who is truly engaged and present, right now, and it becomes a collective gift for that group of few “insiders”, all completely unnoticed by most at the time. Its about time, and the moment. Each, precious. There’s a connection formed between the “quoter” and the “quotee” that is interesting, acknowledged and unspoken – except for the occasional almost involuntary “yeah!” when the recognition occurs, which then directly connects the whooper, to another listener who did in fact hear, and catch the quote, in that moment. When this happens, or even during the more typical silent recognition, the quote is immediately appreciated for its inclusion in such an incongruous place (meaning almost impossible placement against a tangential harmony, compared to the original, such that the quote has new meaning over this new set of chords, yet has brought familiarity to the uniqueness of the improv. – this quote has now been restated, but somehow is reinvented.)

            Its all about tension and release, and takes years to master, then giving the listener something to hang onto while you go to another place of discomfort…. and the cycle continues…

            Ok, well that’s probably more than anyone wanted to know about whats going on inside the unlimited the layers of jazz expression, aside from recapitulating the tune itself – in the moment, and communicating harmonically, and executing difficult technical passages, but there it is. One of thousands of things that is going on when a musician plays jazz, and what a veteran jazz fan experiences while listening ( albeit, if a listener is picking up on this, that listener is usually another musician, but too, could be a script writer who wrote for the Monk TV show. lol)

            Hows your dad doing?

    1. Re. sweating more at the equator there’s a lot packed in there. You might be right but you’d have to establish that, on average, people sweat more at the equator – maybe they don’t go out much, have developed efficient ways of staying cool,…

        1. I just found a PubMed article and lead exposure is more linked to poverty. Things like old houses, exposure through job and housing, and living nearer to environmental pollution, eating animals which were hunted with the lead in the animals and lead in the waters.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6266944/

          They had an interesting sentence that struck me.

          “…the affected community engaged in “othering”

          Othering is such a powerful concept.

          Opposite of identifying with and getting involved to change things.

          1. Deb,
            The painting industry has a caution about lead on every container of paint. This pertains mostly to sanding lead based paint, which would be paints made before the mid seventies. There is still lead in some paint, like traffic paint. There’s lead batteries, lead shot; roof flashings, sinkers and on and on. Leaded gasoline was a big baddy and may still be used in places. Kids can get poisoned by eating lead paint chips in old housing. Some toys and furnishings, like window blinds have had lead in them. I painted a house next door to me last summer that was a toxic waste dump full of lead scrap. An owner who had lived there made fishing lures. I felt sick just thinking about it.

            1. Is lead paint still allowed in the US?

              It was banned many years ago in Europe. .In Australia the maximum amount of lead in paint is 0.1%, which is pretty much the same thing . Even in the Philippines where I live now, lead paint is banned.

              1. Fumbles,
                You might check the label on traffic paint, like the stuff used for parking stripes. I think lead soldering may still be used in plumbing. Lead sinkers, lead bullets, lead keels on sailboats, lead core batteries. Yup, still lots of lead around.

              2. You can buy lead oil paint for fine art painting. Artists helped keep it from being banned as they know that paintings without lead used in their construction are not as archival. Titaniun white for example is weaker and less flexible than lead white. One reason old master paintings in museums still exist is because they were painted with lots of lead white. When bound in oil the lead isn’t very dangerous to handle if you’re careful and dont eat it and wash any off your hands.

            2. Dan,

              Yes, the list goes on and on, doesn’t it?

              Maybe a year ago, on this site, we were talking about how much lead ended up in the water just from a shooting range.

              The othering part is the fact that wealthy enough people move away from the toxic environment and may keep shooting.

              They just mentioned lead paint on a sitcom house inspection.

              I can’t sleep.

              I think I feel down. I haven’t felt depressed for a decade or more but somehow my fathers surgery and feeling vulnerable about the electric bill going up so high and taxes might go up, too, and I have been feeling the COVID isolation and relatives approaching the end of live vulnerability.

              I have just been eating rice and beans. Maybe need some vegetables but I have been going from work to hospital to my step-mother.

              I honestly say all that and I think it was the stupid solar installation costs that depressed me.

              1. I watched Dr Greger talking about moving to Hawaii and it was so nice to see images of people getting together during COVID rather than being isolated by it.

                1. Jen Howk talked about studies that will come out about how personalities handle COVID, Black Lives Matter, politics, etc.

                  Up until now COVID has been easy-breezy to me. But the economy affects me more.

                  I watched Datelines episode on people in prison and there are people who have only left a cell the size of a parking space for one hour per day and there are thousands of very elderly people who committed crimes when they were teenagers and now are dying in prison 50 or 60 years later.

                  I am not going to let myself be depressed.

                  There are thousands of homeless people, thousands of prisoners, thousands who live in inner cities, thousands in mental institutions.

                  When they talked about the prisoners, they thrive when they have hope and something to do.

                  I need to recognize that I have been socially isolating since January and probably need to acknowledge that it is starting to temp me to think poorly.

                2. I hear Hawaii has endless fruit and veggies bars. Also a Polynesian friendly culture. Nice weather. Why would anyone want to move there?

              2. Deb,

                You wrote: “I have just been eating rice and beans. Maybe need some vegetables but I have been going from work to hospital to my step-mother.”

                Deb – you know better than that.

                Gotta keep your own health up if you are going to be able to keep helping other people.

                Let’s see – what’s been going down here today?

                Seven vegetables, four fruit (including avocado – ~70 fat calories), whole grains, lentil soup (more vegetables), garlic, one ounce mixed nuts lightly baked with cinnamon. Small amount of extra virgin olive oil (two tsp). Small amount of 100% cooking chocolate (~70 fat calories). Didn’t get everything in (no mushrooms, no orange, no oysters – and I am out of Alaskan salmon!) – but there is no need. If I tried to get everything in every day, people would begin asking me whether or not I’m havin’ twins.

                No added sugar; low fat; ~800mg Na (high!) plus whatever is in the fruits and veggies. 50 mcg B12, taken in the midst of a meal to reduce absorption – I need to get smaller tablets, or at least find some 50 mcg ones (or smaller) that I can cut in half. No solar noon Vitamin D today – I had just eaten and was I was in the lazy satisfied post-prandial high – ahhhh . .

                My bad.

                Can’t be perfect every day. It’s fine.

                This is a short day, anyway – gotta hit the sac early – long hard day tomorrow.

                Deb.

                You – of all people – know what you need to be eating.

                You can’t help anyone if you can’t help yourself.

                Not over the long term, anyway.

                If you have time to write on this bulletin board – your have time to feed yourself properly.

                Your physical health – appropriate daily nutrition – takes precedence over any Internet activities.

                No excuses.

                If you are going to post on health topics – you need to set a good to the rest of us.

                You take care of yourself –

                Vivamus

              3. Deb,

                Lots of things hapnin.’
                Stick with the stichk.
                The basics: good food, friends, sleep
                Keep the head and feet moving
                It’s okay, it’s alright
                Weebles wobble
                But they don’t fall down

            3. Lead in piston engine aviation fuel is still a thing. It was supposed to be phased out by now but it was too “green” for current fashion. The low lead variant has LOTS of lead in it. The areas in the US with unacceptable lead levels in the air are skewed towards areas with small airports.

    2. Lead is reabsorbed. So removal of the sweat is required to keep from just reabsorbing lead. Also some climates associated with heat are not really that hot. They are just mild throughout the year. It is inland away from large bodies of water where the hottest weather happens. So that’s parts of South America, Africa, and India. Not exactly areas that fill us with confidence in their environmental cleanliness.

  2. Last time I went to the equator, I did not sweat like a college basketball player, soaking my garments through, even in an air-conditioned gymnasium.

    Your experiences, may vary.

  3. Nice topic, but the video would be a lot better if did not start off focusing on unreliable sources. Personally I don’t think they deserve the time in a science, facts based site, unless there is a valid reason to point out a general misunderstanding with the public.

    When it comes to health, we can always look to nature for what is good. Summer comes and if we are out and about (as is natural) we sweat and get plenty of sunshine. Now days people often go from one air conditioned build to their air conditioned car and might not sweat all year long. For me sweating is a no-brainer , and it’s good for health… although it nice to see the science as well. Stagnation within the body brings stench and toxicity. If you’re ever in the company of fat, lazy couch potato types you can smell it.

    1. “When it comes to health, we can always look to nature for what is good. Summer comes and if we are out and about (as is natural) we sweat and get plenty of sunshine. Now days people often go from one air conditioned build to their air conditioned car and might not sweat all year long. For me sweating is a no-brainer , and it’s good for health… although it nice to see the science as well. Stagnation within the body brings stench and toxicity. If you’re ever in the company of fat, lazy couch potato types you can smell it.”

      Indeed this is solid common sense.

    2. “Nice topic, but the video would be a lot better if did not start off focusing on unreliable sources. Personally I don’t think they deserve the time in a science, facts based site, unless there is a valid reason to point out a general misunderstanding with the public.”

      I agree. The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. But with Dr. Greger there always seems to be an angle (or two).

  4. The video addresses lead levels in the blood, but not lead levels in bodily tissue. One might eliminate lead in blood and allow hidden lead in tissue to leach into blood possibly causing a higher blood lead level even though whole body lead level is lower. The omission of this criteria makes the study meaningless. Without lead levels of the whole body we get an incomplete picture, certainly not something that one can act upon.

        1. @Ed, I enclose this from the transcript:

          “In my video on henna, I talked about the study that proved lead could be absorbed through skin and into the body. Researchers applied lead to someone’s left arm, and then they measured the level of lead in the sweat coming off their right arm over the next few days. There was a big spike, proving that lead can go into your body, but also proving that lead can go out of your body. If we can lose lead through sweat, how about using sweating for detoxification?”

          I misspoke re: tissue sample, and in fact what I heard was regarding a measurement of lead from the sweat of the opposite arm. I’m not a doctor so I just assumed the lead in that sweat was not a blood sample, and rather the excretion from tissue.

          I will leave it to the doctors here to discuss if the study he referenced in the arm sweat scenario is regarding blood.

          1. As Mr Fumblefingers commented below, the greatest store of lead is in bones and teeth. It is simply not addressed in Dr. Gregor’s video. I am not a doctor either, but I have discussed it with one.

            1. Ed,

              You points are well taken.

              Serum Pb vs. body stores of Pb.

              Though intimately related – two different animals.

              The questions that arise over serum Pb vs. body stores of Pb – as with all the most important questioins in life – can be answered by the Tooth Fairy.

              Methodology: whenever a tooth comes out – place it under the pillow.

              Do you remember?

              Sleep well –

              Vivamus

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_Tooth_Survey

              https://www.mlive.com/news/flint/2020/03/dr-mona-tells-60-minutes-80-of-flint-kids-tested-need-special-services.html

              https://www.mlive.com/news/2016/10/baby_teeth_testing_gains_tract.html

                    1. jazzBass,

                      Rest assured – I know.

                      It’s a fireplace – bottle of wine – snacks kinda story.

                      Holiday gathering – different parties broken into smaller groups.

                      Some in the kitchen. Others in the fireplace room. Others lost in their electronics.

                      Poor sad things.

                      Tonight I am tired. Long day.

                      I’m not sure you would be interested.

                      Another day –

                      Vivamus

    1. It hardly makes the study meaningless while stating that it is ‘certainly not something that one can act upon’ is simply mistaken. It is a useful piece of inform that can inform clinical decision making. Physicians would need to consider a patient’s current and past history of lead exposure, and consider conditions that cause increased lead leaching from bones.

      Also, it is ‘criterion’ not criteria (criteria is the plural form).

      A blood test is the standard test for lead toxicity.

      Most of the body’s lead stores are in bones and teeth however and I am not sure whether in most circumstances soft tissue tests would tell us significantly more than blood tests already do. The medical and scientific communities seem to think that blood tests are the most efficient measure of current and/or recent lead exposure. Long term lead exposure requires a much more extensive regime of testing to determine.

      1. Your comment is helpful.
        “A blood test is the standard test for lead toxicity.”
        “Most of the body’s lead stores are in bones and teeth”

        When I said tissue I was not referring to soft tissue only.
        The 2 above statements can not be logically solved unless there is a direct correlation of blood toxicity and lead stores elsewhere in the body. I don’t believe there is any claim to make that correlation. Then it is possible to have low blood toxicity and high hidden storage toxicity or visa versa. There must be a connection to make blood toxicity a valid judgement or one may simply have a very misleading indicator.

    1. Blair, I think the answer is yes based on what he says.

      My take away is that he challenges us too, to think: if swearing on purpose is enough, or rather should we all work to challenge our politicians by demanding healthy environment, as Doctor J so eloquently put it above.

      Still, this vid is just part of his series on lead. (Check out the Doc notes section above if you haven’t already.)

    2. Ed,

      This leaves me wondering . . .

      Apparently one sweats out lead – but one can also absorb lead through the skin.

      OK. Suppose someone sweats out a bunch of lead – and some of that lead is absorbed by the porous wood bench of the sauna.

      Even through an intervening towel.

      Only to be partially reabsorbed by the occupant – or to be partially absorbed by the next occupant.

      As the lead in sweat solution sits on the porous wood – after the occupant leaves, the water evaporates.

      Concentrating the lead in the wood over time.

      Result – some of the lead gets transferred from the occupant to wooden bench – and this effect only increases with time.

      With many occupants over many years’ time – the effect could be substantial.

      If you have an occupant with high lead levels – followed by an occupant with low lead levels – the lead might be preferentially transferred from the first occupant to the latter.

      A result might be – people who start with high lead levels might benefit from sauna usage – while people with low lead levels may actually increase their exposure.

      Just an amusing hypothesis – the only way to know for certain, of course, would be to actually carry out the experiment.

      A good first step might be to test the oldest sauna benches one can find for lead (and numerous other pollutants) and see what one can see.

      I wonder if anyone has ever done it?

      Many things are not as simple as they seem –

      Vivamus

      1. @Viv! Yes, amusing hypothesis. I knew it! Saunas are dangerous and should be avoided since they are designed to take my lead, concentrate it, and then give it to others!

        Its like taking B12 to get healthy and getting cancer.

        Man, the more we know, the more we know. I think. Therefore..

        Time to meditate.

        1. Tha claim that B 12 supplementation increases cancer risk doesn’t seem to have much evidence behind it

          ‘Increased intake of B12, folate and B6 may lower the risk of breast (20) (21) (22) and cervical (23) cancers, but not lung cancer (24). In fact, long-term use of vitamin B12 supplement is associated with increased risk of lung cancer, especially in male smokers (53). Another large study did not find an effect with this combination on overall risk of invasive cancer or breast cancer (25). However, data from a Norwegian study suggest higher cancer incidence and mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease following B12 and folic acid supplementation (26), although these effects appear to be mediated by folic acid. ‘
          https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/vitamin-b12

          According to the US National Institutes of Health

          ‘The IOM did not establish a UL for vitamin B12 because of its low potential for toxicity. In Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline, the IOM states that “no adverse effects have been associated with excess vitamin B12 intake from food and supplements in healthy individuals” [5]’
          https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/

          Given the proven dangers of B12 deficiency, and apparent widespread deficiency among vegetarians, older people and those taking certain common medication, B12 supplementation seems prudent. The cancer worry seems confined to male smokers and increased lung cancer risk. The apparent reduction in breast and cervical cancer risk in women also needs to be considered.

      2. It took a while to absorb your comment. I would bet the the wood would only absorb a trace if anything
        , but the safest bet is use a fresh towel to sit on for yourself.

  5. I dream of putting a Finnish steam sauna in my basement for winter use. When I’ve had access to one, it made my sinuses and skin much happier in the winter dryness. I like steam saunas. I have reservations about the long-term effects of infrared saunas. Oh, well, all public saunas are closed for the duration of Covid-19 anyway.

    1. Anne,

      Infrared, there is near and far-infrared.

      Near-infrared can have the danger of cataracts and aging skin.

      Far infrared: A study in Finland found that more frequent sauna use was associated with a decreased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and stroke. Another study found a benefit for atherosclerosis. There have also been other studies where they found Far infrared useful for reducing risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumonia. Plus, it can improve insulin resistance, help with weight loss, and improve blood pressure.

      1. Most of the well reputed studies on Sauna are done with traditional saunas (not infrared) and are done out of Finland. I have a traditional sauna and do it about 3 times a week. I would do it in more instances, but I am also running and lifting and periodically doing ice bath. My body can’t really take additional sauna sessions, as I have the Sauna cranked up on the highest setting (it’s 190 -200 degrees at the top of the sauna)

        Some sauna studies sound too good to be true, including the one published in JAMA

        “The risk of fatal CHD events was 23 percent lower for 2 to 3 bathing sessions per week and 48 percent lower for 4 to 7 sauna sessions per week compared to once a week. CVD death also was 27 percent lower for men who took saunas 2 to 3 times a week and 50 percent lower for men who were in the sauna 4 to 7 times a week compared with men who indulged just once per week. For all-cause mortality, sauna bathing 2 to 3 times per week was associated with a 24 percent lower risk and 4 to 7 times per week with a 40 percent reduction in risk compared to only one sauna session per week.”

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150223122602.htm

        In a 20-year study published in the journal Age and Ageing, a team of researchers from the University of Eastern Finland have found a link between frequency of visiting the sauna to the risk of being diagnosed with dementia. What they found is that men who visited the sauna between four and seven times a week were 66 per cent less likely to show any form of dementia, and were also at 65 per cent less risk contracting Alzheimer’s disease compared to those who went just once a week.

        https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/sauna-use-linked-to-lower-dementia-risk/

        It could be that Sauna users have more money (and better access to medical care), more leisure time, and are more social and those factors could be responsible for the study results. Or the results could be due to the activation of heat shock proteins and the creation of hormetic stress. A hot steam sauna will get your heart pumping, so Sauna does have a cardiovascular like exercise effect. Subjectively, Imy body feels more stress when I am running compared to Sauna.

        1. Brad,

          Yup.

          I do wander about cause and effect on these kinds of studies – and with exercise studies in general.

          Not a lot of nursing home patients taking saunas three times a week – or running up hills – or pumping iron – etc.

          So you can always show that saunas or strenuous exercise are associated with better health by age cohort.

          ‘Cause the people who have worse health can’t do them.

          Cause and effect on such studies are typically reversed.

          It’s called “Marketing.”

          Brad.

          All the best –

          Vivamus

          1. Hi Vivamus:

            Though I do question the dramatic findings of the Sauna studies, I think there is some benefit to moderate amounts of weight lifting, running and sauna and that it’s not just marketing.

            To be clear, I don’t think these specific activities are necessary for good health. For example, we do know that the longest living cultures do not tend to go running or lift weights or do sauna. Instead, they seem to engage in several hours of low level exercise throughout the day such as walking and gardening. Walking and gardening are not my style, so maybe I will die earlier than necessary.

            In any event. I think sauna is actually a great activity for seniors that get the okay from their doctor. It allows one to get a cardiovascular workout even if they lack mobility.

            1. Brad Hirshon, I remember looking at the studies for saunas when the lead toxity videos were airing. I was pleased since I was enjoying the steam room 3 times weekly after my lap swimming.

              I would go through 2 to 3 cycles of working up a good sweat, then out to stand under a cold shower. I have missed this rejuvinating ritual since the facilities closed for the coronavirus thing. I wish I had one at home.

              Most of the people in there also came from finishing similar workouts in the pool or the gym. I noticed that people who did not work out regularly could not take the heat for long either, (with rare exception of course) but not sure if there is a connection.

        2. Brad,

          As far as the “more money” goes, that might be true, but there are several real benefits which sound to me like they would help.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4935255/

          For instance

          Far infrared on cardiovascular disease:

          Evidence has indicated that FIR rays exert protective effects on CVD. Several weeks of sauna therapy markedly enhanced flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery (P < 0.001),16–18 which was associated with an increase in cardiopulmonary exercise tolerance.17,18 Because endothelial dysfunction is typically observed in patients with hypertension,19 hypercholesterolemia,20 diabetes mellitus (DM),21 and obesity and patients who smoke,22 sauna treatments probably play a therapeutic role for patients with coronary risk factors, suggesting that sauna treatments improve vascular endothelial function.

          Compelling evidence has indicated that vascular endothelial function is closely associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which catalyzes the amino acid L-arginine into L-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelium. NO is a crucial vasodilator substance, which prevents the progression of atherosclerosis by dilating blood vessels and inhibiting some arterial disorders such as platelet aggregation and the migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells.23 Ikeda et al. reported that one month of FIR sauna therapy significantly upregulated eNOS mRNA and protein expression (0.73 ± 0.04 vs. 1.02 ± 0.02, P < 0.01; 3250 ± 70 vs. 4090 ± 60, P < 0.01, respectively) as well as serum NO production (3.98 ± 0.43 mmol/L vs. 4.66 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P < 0.05) in cardiomyopathic hamsters with chronic heart failure (CHF).24 In addition to enhancing eNOS expression, FIR increases NO production probably by promoting the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 to increase eNOS activity.25

          For Diabetes patients:

          …four weeks of FIR radiation administered to the feet of type 2 DM patients significantly reduced cortisol levels and blood glucose levels.47 Therefore, assuming that FIR therapy normalizes blood glucose levels by reducing serum levels of cortisol (adrenal glucocorticoid hormones) and thereby improves the ability to respond to insulin action in patients with type 2 DM is reasonable.

          For Kidney patients

          …In addition, they demonstrated that FIR stimulation provided substantial benefits of increasing Qa and the rates of AVF unassisted patency and clinical maturation as well as lowering AVF malfunction within one year compared with controls.61 These results were identical to those of their previous study.55 Endothelial dysfunction associated with AVF stenosis may lead to AVF maturation failure in HD patients.58 In summary, FIR benefitted HD patients by promoting endothelial function in both animal3,7,24 and clinical studies.

          I will add the amazing wound healing results for Near Infrared.

          My cousin still hasn't needed his toes or foot cut off and he still hasn't gotten another infection. He has a port for draining his lungs and that was constantly getting infected until I sent over my gadgets.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AsoRWHhhVQ&list=WL&index=15&t=75s

  6. So, during the writing of the script for this video was there a discussion of whether to use

    lead to a drop in lead levels

    or

    led to a drop in lead levels

    Rare to have to choose between looks alike versus sounds alike.

  7. Bold move, imo, to start out with the truly fake technology and science of l. ron hubbard.
    Maybe even more amazing that some anonymous doc actually wrote a paper to promote such crap.

  8. I have been reading about COVID and airplanes and there was one woman who got COVID who wore an N95 mask and only took it off in the bathroom and it was the same bathroom the person with COVID had used and she got it.

    Let down your guard for two minutes and look what happens.

    She had been quarantined before the trip, so it was that one bathroom exposure that got her.

    1. Deb,

      You might find this reassuring:

      https://time.com/5815492/flight-attendants-coronavirus/

      Favorite lines:

      “‘It’s awful, because we know we’re definitely spreading it, seat to seat, city to city, person to person, hotel to hotel,’ one Atlanta-based flight attendant who has been in the job for 15 years tells TIME.”

      “‘I have cried every time I am on my way to the airport to start my trip,’ one flight attendant for a major U.S. airline told TIME, saying her biggest fear is contracting the virus from her fellow flight attendants.”

      Have a good trip!

      Vivamus

      1. Vivamus,

        Their hiding information isn’t exactly comforting.

        Though, the fact that almost 200,000 U.S. passengers a day still got planes the last weekend of March and very few people tested positive tracing back to planes is a bit comforting.

        Apparently, you had better not get too close to the flight attendants, since they are exempt from quarantine.

        The pilots being exempt may concern me more than the risk of me getting COVID.

        I watched part of the older movie, “Fearless” the other night where after a plane crash Jeff Bridges starts doing risky behavior and Rosie Perez gets suicidal and he helps her by driving full speed into a wall. I don’t remember much about it except that it turns out that I get vertigo watching people stand on the edge of tall buildings.

        https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106881/

        Anyway, I was monitoring myself to see if I was getting depressed and I am pretty sure Jeff Bridges cured her character’s depression by scaring the heebie-jeebies out of her.

    2. True that. Keep your guard I suppose, its good thinking, but we must still try to live life I think. Its a fine line right?

      Still, the flu kills up to 60k a year, and that is WITH a vaccine. When we have a Covid vaccine, I suspect the numbers will be similar. (this depends on how many lives we feel flu vaccine saves each year)

      The reason I mention this time and time again here is that we simply ignore the burden of influenza because we are tranquilized by the comforting thought there is a vaccine.

      It not easy for me to forgo one fact while latching onto another related one. As much as anyone tries to suggest this is an apples to oranges comparison, I disagree, and apparently so does Johns Hopkins, and the CDC, and I am supposing the WHO – in the following sense:

      Airborne transmission, upper respiratory issues, asymptomatic early-on, ventilators at late stage, mostly affecting over 65, and deadly, requiring a vaccine to keep in “check”.

      Whatever differences one cares to cite, the above are known similarities of these deadly viruses (and others) we must learn to live with, and will kill hundreds of thousands every year in the united states, going forward.

      My take away? The both of them are never going away.

      In this larger picture then, and thinking beyond our lost year of 2020, Covid to me is merely an extended news cycle, like so many others, from Fox’s Obama’s birther assertions to MSNBC’s Trump Russiagate.

      The main difference in this news cycle is that Covid is true – but news cycle it is, and was used to create the largest upward redistribution of wealth in the history of the planet, and BOTH sides of the corporate beholden aisle voted unanimously for it.

      Obviously, and to that, another solution is required in the name of a viable and powerful working class third party. Thankfully, there is a centralized organization starting a movement in this direction.

      I hope there can be a paradigm shift to better ourselves, our health, our thinking.

      I will be at the virtual convention tomorrow Sunday 30th, 2020. 4pm EST.

      1. jazzBass,

        It may well be a paradigm shift required.

        There have now been people recorded getting it a second time and they know that it really is a second time because it had a 24-character different RNA sequence from the first diagnosis to the second diagnosis, so it wasn’t that the person just kept testing positive.

        jazzBass,

        COVID is the third leading cause of death in the USA this year already and even with MUCH better care than when we started and even with convalescent plasma and us being in the summer months so people have had more vitamin D, and even with there being drugs which cause some improvements, we are still having over 1,000 deaths per day.

        We could easily have another 124,000 deaths before the end of the year, particularly when we get the flu on top of COVID and people can have both at the same time.

        I honestly expected this to be more like 1918 or Swine Flu where deaths took the Summer off but we didn’t have that and now Europe has as many cases as they did at the height of the pandemic again. It is mostly young people so far but if Florida is any indication, eventually, it will spread back to the parents and grandparents and this time there will not be a shut-down.

        I don’t know what the Winter will bring but it will be way more than 60,000 deaths this year and so far we are at 186,727 per the Worldometer.

        Globally, 845,361 and still rising by close to 6,000 deaths per day. Sometimes more, sometimes a little less, but if any of the other countries suddenly have people over 50 get this again there are times when it has gone over 7.000 deaths and that is what some people are expecting over the winter.

        I expect the convalescent plasma to help but if people start getting it again already, we have no choice but hang on for the ride.

        To me, 1918 and Swine Flu didn’t do their major killing until the second winter and we haven’t reached that yet so I feel like COVID still deserves respect as a killer.

        1. As far as media attention goes, it is the third leading cause of death in the USA and the most preventable.

          It is good that we had the time with the attention because back at the beginning it was so much more deadly and we didn’t have PPE publically, nor in the hospitals and we didn’t have meds, nor concepts about how to treat it.

          If we had not closed down, way more of our cities would have been like NY and NJ and parts of Italy.

          But we will not close down again, so we should be even more cognizant that it is still around.

          I skipped watching for a few days because of my father’s health problems and when I came back, I was surprised of how close to where I live the new outbreaks were. Easy to mentally block it out and make mistakes.

          1. Plus, we don’t know what the school year is going to bring.

            We will find out over the next month or two.

            What I do know is that opening society has caused a marked increase in the deaths of Latinos.

            https://www.newswise.com/pdf_docs/15984776396042_EMBARGOED-Report-8-COVID-19_Associated_Deaths_in_Working_Age_Latino_Adults.pdf

            In the 18 to 34-year-old Latinos, in the three months from May 11 to August 11, the death rate for this group increased by 473%.
            In the 35 to 49-year-old Latinos, in those same three months, the death rate increased by 386%
            In the 50 to 69-year-old Latinos, the death rate increased by 471%.

            They didn’t tell what happened to the elderly Latinos.

            Either way, the Black, Hispanic, Latino, Mixed Race, and other non-white people’s may get hit hard when school opens and then, after that, is the flu season.

          2. Deb,

            One of our crew has young children.

            Signed up for remote school.

            Anticipating possible exponential spread with school opening.

            He and his family remain sheltered in place. Well stocked. Well water. Way ahead of you on electricity – solar panels, propane generator. No big batteries, though – that seems to be a next consideration – no hurry – all in good time.

            Over-reacting?

            Maybe.

            We all consider it at times.

            We will be happy for the rest of society to figure that out for us, first.

            No hurry to be right – no shame in being wrong – when it comes to the unknown.

            Remain cool and collected – low profile – prepare for the worst – hope for the best –

            Vivamus

            1. Vivamus,

              I was thinking again about the solar panels and I realized that I don’t trust authority figures very much.

              My father was a salesman and I think the minute the “experts” go into salesperson mode, I don’t trust them.

              His doctor did that with me the other night. The phone was handed to me to ask the questions and talk to him because nobody else wanted to know anything and I wanted to know what he thought about the non-surgical methods and he immediately got sketchy and cagey and said, “If I had other methods, I would be a millionaire right now.” and I let it go because my father was willing to declare the physical therapy methods hokum because he seriously trusts authority figures no matter what and doesn’t question them out of a sign of respect.

              I found 2 non-surgical ways and he wouldn’t talk about them and I did let it go, but either he wasn’t up-to-date in his field or the studies for the non-surgical methods were lies and I can’t tell who to trust, but him go into salesman mode when an elderly man was going to have non-laproscopic surgery was frustrating to me.

              The solar companies do the same thing.

              But I could just believe them that they pay themselves off and ignore the horror story videos and maybe it would work out.

              Or I can keep looking and find wholesale panels and find a person who would install them for me without costing that much.

              Or something else and what came to me is that sometimes I will make mistakes.

              With my whole house, I haven’t made mistakes yet.

              Not any.

              I just stubbornly keep going and keep going and keep going and find something that works.

              The other night, after talking to the doctor, I came to the place where I know that my father doesn’t worry about making mistakes.

              Cut him open. No big deal.

              I am Forks Over Knives person who does not want to be tricked.

              Sometimes I will probably be tricked.

              Not often.

              And I have to accept that margin of error and accept not being smart enough or perfect enough.

              1. My recent quandary with it has been: One site said that “it pays for itself in 20 years” and another “It pays for itself in 8 years”

                They also say that the “tax benefit” is a partial scam where you only get it if you have had that much taken out of your payroll and if not, the amount they say you will be able to deduct will be put back on your loan at the end, if you do a loan. So, suddenly, it will cost an extra $5000 that they deducted to show you how easy it is to afford it.

                I haven’t figured out why people in California are saying that the power company just steals the solar and doubled their prices and all sorts of things like that.

                I did cancel the conversation that was scheduled about it.

                If I can find an honest source of how long it takes to pay for itself where I live, I may still do it.

                But I might save money and wait – even though the Federal tax break is on the bubble.

                If I can save most of the money for the panels, and then I just found out that Home Depot has a list of installers.

                I could afford the wholesale kits.

                So maybe I can just buy a wholesale kit and then just hire Home Depot installers and save most of the cost.

                Hmmm.

                Preppers are often DIY and that has profound benefits.

                1. I just watched a woman who went with Tesla roof and a powerwall and after a year of generating power she did the math for how long it would take to pay for the system and hers was 43 years. With the tax break, it brought it down into the 30’s.
                  Either way, the answer is “It won’t pay for itself” that way.

                  I am wondering if I can just buy Home Depot brand and it won’t be as efficient but I can get $3000 worth of panels and pay it off over 24 months and pay their installer and not have a loan.

                  It would get me something and I love zero-interest payment plans now, even if I have the money.

                  43 years to pay off SOLAR!!!! That is crazy!

                  I have the feeling that installation prices will drop precipitously after the tax breaks end.

                  I feel like I could buy the panels now, get the tax break, then wait to install them until after the tax credit ends.

                  The tax credit might come back, is my other thought, but if it doesn’t, it is highly likely that the cost of solar will drop because they will lose so many residential people.

                  1. I just went back to Tesla and they switched how they do solar.

                    They chose 4 sizes to standardize to drop the price by 30%.

                    I can get a small solar panel system with 1 power walls for $56 per month before tax incentives. That would change it to $35 per month.

                    I can get something double that size with 2 power walls (6 days of back up) for $112 per month $70 per month after incentives.

                    That is much better than what they used to be.

                    They don’t even do salesmen.

                    You just click and order a system.

                    I just have to make sure that monthly loan price includes installation.

                    Wow, Tesla changed it this year. What timing.

                    1. I will say that I don’t understand electricity in the first place. Particularly my bill.

                      For one, one of my electric bills was $14.00 and one was $30 the last one was $168.00 and this month was $205.00 and most of my bills were $50 to $70.

                      I think a small system would get rid of all of the power I use but I am not understanding if a medium system would get rid of the fees and give me a monthly credit.

        2. Deb,
          That is some good perspective. I’ve been thinking about the 2nd round, what with many dropping their guard and pretending business as usual. At least we’ve done the learning curve, a care routine is in place, the virus may weaken and vaccines may help.

            1. jazzBass,

              Yes. If we get a vaccine…

              But before then, come therapeutics and those are fabulous, but they will run short and so will the vaccines.

              They have already announced that we will be short of vaccines

  9. I like to review the flashback videos. There is plenty on this one I don’t recall seeing before. I think I do remember that eating WFPB allows our body to detoxify in the waste stream. I suspect this is one of the best ways to get rid of toxins.

  10. The question I have had for awhile is: if you sweat out the (whatever) toxins when exercising (I live in Florida), do they reabsorb if you don’t shower right away afterwards?

    1. Char,

      Perhaps that is why one sauna tradition is to jump out of the sauna au naturel and run out and roll in the snow.

      I guess you will have to wait on this for the Florida winter. ;-)

      This illustrates one of the many pifalls of taking things from one culture and transposing them to another.

      Keep thinkin’ –

      Vivamus

  11. Our environment is full of toxins. The oxygen we breath oxidizes. The food we eat is toxic. It had to grow that way to fend off predators. Our bodies detox the toxins several ways to include several pathways of physiology, food, sleep, exercise and more.

    1. (See recent NOVA with Scott Kelly): Astronauts are up against new environmental challenges, like, low gravity and cosmic rays. Low G makes bones weak and cosmic rays cut DNA. More exercise is needed to counter low gravity. Research is working on a way for the DNA to reassemble.

  12. The mammary gland – the gland that produces milk – is often said to be a “modified sweat gland” or “evolved from sweat glands.” Apparently there is structural similarity.

    A debatable area, true.

    But it leaves me wondering – if lead is preferentially discharged via sweat glands, might this also be true of mammary glands?

    I wonder if – when a baby tests as being high for lead exposure, do they assume it is “environmental” – looking only at the lead in the house and such – or do they check out Mom, as well.

    And even if Mother’s blood is WNL – what about her milk?

    Could a high normal serum blood Pb level be more concentrated in her milk?

    I dunno.

    Curiously –

    Vivamus

  13. Sweat shirt and sweat pant ensembles. “Sweats.”

    Some people used to wear sweat s while exercising. They used to all be the same boring grey, with a fleece interior.

    Drawstring pants.

    “Warm up.”

    Common in high school gyms of an earlier era.

    This used to seem odd to me – an invitation to heatstroke.

    And I never have much been into sweating – it looks too much like work.

    But perhaps I have been wrong. It happens all the time . . .

    Maybe we should think of sweats as “portable saunas.” The toxin-infused sweat may be absorbed by the material, avoiding resorption.

    It might be best to get 100% cotton for optimal absorption. The 50% blends are not very absorbent.

    Maybe have several sets of sweats – perhaps each set should be washed between use to clear out the absorbed toxins, and prevent toxin resorption.

    Anybody have experience with sweats? Pros and/or cons?

    Contemporary experience?

    Thank you –

    Vivamus

    1. Contemporary sweating, need not be encumbered by dripping clothing anymore.

      Now we have breathable fabrics. Who knows what in them, but they actually “wick sweat” off of you such that you remain dry and cool even while competing at the French Open, which is the desired effect. (The dry and cool bit, not the competing at the French Open bit, but alas one can dream I suppose)

  14. Maybe we should think of sweats as “portable saunas.”

    I think that the portable sauna role is filled by ‘sauna suits’. I occasionally still see people exercising in them. My impression is that they are promoted more for (rapid) weight loss than they are for long term health benefits. They can be quite dangerous if used improperly I seem to recall.

    1. You may be on to something…I had a friend who used to smoke, was an alcoholic, and would go out in NYC 100 degrees, with sweats with plastic as a liner, (making sure cocktail party fitness was preserved, and a throwback from his highschool football days when coaches recommended this sort of thing), and then ride his bike only in top gear. Maybe 13 revolutions per minute at full exertion. I told him he was ridiculous.

      A loveable fantastic poet, and infomaniac, but freaking Quixotic.

      Poor john died of a stroke at 63. I miss that brilliant fool.

      1. A loveable fantastic poet, and infomaniac, but freaking Quixotic.

        Laughing.

        Some of us went to college when everybody was freaking Quixotic.

  15. jazzBass,

    One of the most important lessons about long life I learned when I hung out one sultry Southern summer with my Grandfather on his rural farm.

    Ghost town – the town had been based on the railroad, and everything is now highway.

    With everything you gain – you also lose.

    Wooden buildings were still all there. Paint long gone.

    I seem to remember wooden sidewalks – with wooden siderails – long in disrepair.

    “That was the hardware store. That was the doctor’s office. That was . . .”

    All preserved eerily in place.

    No kids around, even, to vandalize things.

    I was in my earliest 20s. He – in his 80s. 88?

    I’m too lazy to do the math.

    The issue – he had already outlived ‘most everyone.

    If you win the lottery – if you do everything right – if you are really, really lucky – if you live to be 100 –

    Everyone is gone.

    Hmmm . . .

    Mother told me she was not going to any more funerals.

    “Wazzupp?” says I.

    She had sone to six funerals in the last month.

    “Enough’s enough.”

    Hmmm . . .

    Make sure you connect with younger family and make new friends along the way.

    “Do you want to live forever?”

    Yup. Sure do.

    Considering the alternative.

    There are issues.

    jazzBass.

    All the best –

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus,

      “Make sure you connect with younger family and make new friends along the way.”

      That is wisdom.

      Though the caregivers in the family never tend to be able to do that, particularly during pandemics.

      My cousin and I talked about that because all of our lives, we were inches away from elderly people.

      Guiding the blind by the hand. Helping all the way through life and we both said that we got every last best drop of the older generation.

      Every amazing moment.

      But the elderly and the young often just can’t be near each other for practical reasons and suddenly, 20, 30, 50 years later, you don’t regret even one moment of it, except that you don’t have the same bond with the young people.

      My aunt and uncle went the opposite direction and they took care of all of the kids and are seriously bonded with that generation.

      And they will benefit from that for the rest of their lives.

  16. This question has to do with the Daily Dozen Digest app. I am unable to change the day from August 29 to August 30 in order to enter my daily checkmarks. I’ve gone to the chart, pushed the forward arrow, but nothing happens. The forward arrow is not “high-lighted” as it should be.

    Any suggestions?

  17. Back to school.

    The children (of one of our crew) are back in school.

    Only 11% of parents opted out of classroom study.

    100% of the Chinese American parents opted out of classroom study.

    I wonder if they know something?

    First child has already tested positive. School plans to isolate the child and keep on going.

    Feels to me like watching an anthill on fire.

    People are – interesting.

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus,

      That is interesting.

      I suspect it has to do with economic issues for Americans.

      Many people couldn’t work at home so they have been paying for childcare which is expensive.

      Americans also are leisure and free-time and “give me some space” oriented.

      If you watch YouTube videos with families, they LOVED having the kids home for the first 3 months.

      But now they want them to go to school.

      I think about that Staples commercial where the parents are celebrating as if it was parents’ Christmas vacation.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwcYbo7pjto

  18. Vivamus,

    I just read that most parents in urban areas in my area are keeping their children home.

    That is almost opposite of what I expected.

  19. I finished my solar process.

    Tesla lowered their prices 30%
    Plus bundled the power walls which deducted over $2000
    Plus, the Federal tax incentive is another 26% off.
    Plus there are state incentives
    Plus, my house value will go up but my taxes won’t go up.
    Plus, a man tested out his power walls and stopped his experiment after living off-grid for 33 days.

    Close enough to a win, win, win and I can pay the loan off early and not get penalized.

    And there is a 7-day total grace period where they will give me all my money back if I change my mind after they have installed them.

    1. Deb,

      I just checked with my crew member who has gone this sort of route:

      (1) There is concern that this may result in a lien on you property which may reduce the value of your home for resale – particularly as solar conversions decrease in price in the future, leaving you with a loan for a system that is seen in the future as being overpriced.

      (2) He stated that one simply does not put a battery system to save money. They do not save money.

      (3) I am concerned about Tesla. It’s leadership seems to me to have the attention span of a gnat – much more interested in immediate sales than in long term service.

      (4) My crew member was faced with repeat brownouts of several day’s duration. First priority was decreased demand prior to arranging a stable supply. He does have a wood stove as heating backup. Air conditioning has been minimized with the installation of a whole house fan. LED lighting. Insulation. Belt and suspenders. His solution has included solar panels with propane generator backup – automatic with systemic loss of power. Priorities are (1) refrigerator and freezer, (2) heating system.

      (5) He indicates that battery backup would be another $15,000 or so. No economic sense at this time. No need at this time.

      My own take: slow down. It’s a forest out there.

      Good luck –

      Vivamus

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