Flashback Friday: How Much Fruit Is Too Much?

Flashback Friday: How Much Fruit Is Too Much?
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Does the threshold for toxicity of fructose apply to fruit or just to added industrial sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Previously, I explored how adding blueberries to our meals can actually blunt the detrimental effects of high glycemic foods; but how many berries? The purpose was to determine the minimum level of blueberry consumption at which a consumer may realistically expect to receive antioxidant benefits after eating blueberries with a sugary breakfast cereal. If we eat a bowl of corn flakes with no berries, within two hours, so many free radicals are created it puts us into oxidative debt. The antioxidant power of our bloodstream drops below where we started from before breakfast as the antioxidants in our bodies get used up. And a quarter cup of blueberries didn’t seem to help much. But a half cup of blueberries did.

What about fruit for diabetics? Most guidelines recommend eating a diet with a high intake of fiber-rich food including fruits, because they’re so healthy—antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, improve artery function and reduce cancer risk. However, some health professionals have concerns about the sugar content of fruit, and therefore recommend restricting the fruit intake. OK, let’s put it to the test. Diabetics were randomized into two groups–one told to eat at least two pieces of fruit a day, and the other told at most, two fruits a day. The reduce fruit group reduced their fruit. It had, however, no effect on the control of their diabetes or weight–”and so the intake of fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes.”

An emerging literature has shown that low-dose fructose may actually benefit blood sugar control. So having a piece of fruit with each meal would be expected to lower, not raise, the blood sugar response. The threshold for toxicity of fructose may be around 50 grams. The problem is that’s the current average adult fructose consumption. So the levels of half of all adults are likely above the threshold for fructose toxicity, thanks to industrial sugars like table sugar and high fructose corn syrup, and adolescents currently average 75.

Is that limit for added sugars or for all fructose? If we don’t want more than 50, and there’s about 10 in a piece of fruit, should we not eat more than five fruits a day? Quoting from the Harvard Health Letter, “The nutritional problems of fructose and sugar come when they are added to foods. Fruit, on the other hand, is beneficial in almost any amount.” What do they mean almost? Can we eat ten fruits a day? How about twenty fruits a day? It’s actually been put to the test.

Seventeen people were made to eat twenty servings a day of fruit. Despite the extraordinarily high fructose content of this diet, presumably about 200 grams a day—8 cans of soda worth—the investigators reported no adverse effects (and possible benefit actually) for body weight, blood pressure, and insulin and lipid levels (fats in the blood) after three to six months. More recently, Jenkins and colleagues put people on about a twenty-servings-of-fruit-a-day diet for a few weeks, and no adverse effects on weight or blood pressure or triglycerides, and an astounding 38-point drop in LDL cholesterol.

There was one side effect, though. Given the 44 servings of vegetables they had on top of all that fruit, they recorded the largest bowel movements apparently ever documented in a dietary intervention.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to vic xia via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Previously, I explored how adding blueberries to our meals can actually blunt the detrimental effects of high glycemic foods; but how many berries? The purpose was to determine the minimum level of blueberry consumption at which a consumer may realistically expect to receive antioxidant benefits after eating blueberries with a sugary breakfast cereal. If we eat a bowl of corn flakes with no berries, within two hours, so many free radicals are created it puts us into oxidative debt. The antioxidant power of our bloodstream drops below where we started from before breakfast as the antioxidants in our bodies get used up. And a quarter cup of blueberries didn’t seem to help much. But a half cup of blueberries did.

What about fruit for diabetics? Most guidelines recommend eating a diet with a high intake of fiber-rich food including fruits, because they’re so healthy—antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, improve artery function and reduce cancer risk. However, some health professionals have concerns about the sugar content of fruit, and therefore recommend restricting the fruit intake. OK, let’s put it to the test. Diabetics were randomized into two groups–one told to eat at least two pieces of fruit a day, and the other told at most, two fruits a day. The reduce fruit group reduced their fruit. It had, however, no effect on the control of their diabetes or weight–”and so the intake of fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes.”

An emerging literature has shown that low-dose fructose may actually benefit blood sugar control. So having a piece of fruit with each meal would be expected to lower, not raise, the blood sugar response. The threshold for toxicity of fructose may be around 50 grams. The problem is that’s the current average adult fructose consumption. So the levels of half of all adults are likely above the threshold for fructose toxicity, thanks to industrial sugars like table sugar and high fructose corn syrup, and adolescents currently average 75.

Is that limit for added sugars or for all fructose? If we don’t want more than 50, and there’s about 10 in a piece of fruit, should we not eat more than five fruits a day? Quoting from the Harvard Health Letter, “The nutritional problems of fructose and sugar come when they are added to foods. Fruit, on the other hand, is beneficial in almost any amount.” What do they mean almost? Can we eat ten fruits a day? How about twenty fruits a day? It’s actually been put to the test.

Seventeen people were made to eat twenty servings a day of fruit. Despite the extraordinarily high fructose content of this diet, presumably about 200 grams a day—8 cans of soda worth—the investigators reported no adverse effects (and possible benefit actually) for body weight, blood pressure, and insulin and lipid levels (fats in the blood) after three to six months. More recently, Jenkins and colleagues put people on about a twenty-servings-of-fruit-a-day diet for a few weeks, and no adverse effects on weight or blood pressure or triglycerides, and an astounding 38-point drop in LDL cholesterol.

There was one side effect, though. Given the 44 servings of vegetables they had on top of all that fruit, they recorded the largest bowel movements apparently ever documented in a dietary intervention.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to vic xia via flickr

Doctor's Note

This is the first video in our new Flashback Friday series. Over the last decade I have created more than 1,500 videos. How often have you seen me on my Live Q&A’s saying “I’ve got a video on that!”? There’s such a treasure trove of life-changing information now that I’ve decided to start digging into the video vault and bringing back one of the classics every week.


Cutting down on sugary foods may be easier said than done (see Are Sugary Foods Addictive?), but it’s worth it. This video is part of an intermittent series on the dangers of high levels of fructose in added sugars. See the first two installments in How Much Added Sugar Is Too Much? and If Fructose Is Bad, What About Fruit? That’s where I show the berry-blunting effects.

What’s this about being in oxidative debt? See my three-part series on how to pull yourself out of the red:

Ironically, fat may be more of a problem when it comes to diabetes than sugar; see:

Here’s some updated videos on fruit since this video first aired:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

89 responses to “Flashback Friday: How Much Fruit Is Too Much?

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  1. Just wanted to mention a couple of things in the first experiment that got my attention. First, they were measuring antioxidant values after people ate breakfast cereal (presumably with milk, but maybe someone can check?) and managed to get readings. I thought milk/plant milks blocked antioxidants in blueberries? Apparently not, at least not in the 1/2 cup group which is a ridiculous amount of blueberries. (would cost a king’s ransom to maintain that blueberry habit here).
    Also, in the abstract they said there was no significant difference in serum glucose between the groups ie, no, low, and high blueberry on sugary cereal groups. I thought berries were supposed to blunt the effect of a sweet breakfast?

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22935321

        1. Barb,

          Excellent points! Excellent!

          1/2 cup of berries neutralizes the effects of the milk? That might be something to work with.

          Maybe using less milk? (Instead of more berries?)

          Might keep you out of hock, because I agree with you about the King’s ransom.

          1. “Although there were studies that demonstrated a positive anti-diabetic effect of blueberries, this review also discussed studies with less pronounced effects. It is important to note that majority of the human studies that did not observe a positive outcome with whole blueberry supplementation used a less sensitive measurement to assess insulin sensitivity and also insulin sensitivity was a secondary measurement in the study.

            The varying types of berries, berry extract combinations, the methods of administering the treatments (whole berry vs berry extracts), population studied, and the specifics of each study design bring a substantial amount of variation amongst the results in the various blueberry studies. There is a great need for more well designed, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trials that further explore dose responses, whole blueberries versus bioactive compounds, longevity of any health benefits, and interactions between blueberry bioactives and other foods and drugs.”

    1. You should really discuss this with your doctor.

      There is not a lt of good research on this.

      There are also risks with high fruit diets – you are likely to get too littlr essential fatty acid, zinc, calcium, selenium etc in the diet. Wasn’t Ashton Kutcher hospitalised after a month on a fruitarian diet? On the other hand, there are people on the internet who cured their T2D on a fruitarian diet.

      Most conventional medical advice focuses on the sugar content of high fruit diet and advises against it. That however ignores the high vitamin C content of fruits which lowers fasting blood sugar levels etc. That said, the conventional wisdom is that a vegetarian diet is a healthy option for diabetics. They can eat competely vegetarian diets that include fruit. Balanced vegetarian diets are likely to be more nutritionally complete than very high fruit vegetarian diets (Of course, not just any old vegetarian diet will do it – for good health, it has to be a whole food plant-based diet. Otherwise the completely vegetarian booze and baccy diet would be even more popular than it already is)
      http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/meal-planning-for-vegetarians/

      Again, you should really discuss this with your doctor.

    2. Hi Lauren Comisar,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks so much for your question!

      Unfortunately, there is not a single study testing the effects of a high-fruit diet in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, as a PhD student, my research mentor and I are beginning a study soon to test the effects of a high-fruit diet on blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. The study would not be published for another 1.5-2 years or so, though.

      Until then, for those with type 2 diabetes, I think it might be best to slowly increase the amount of fruit, checking blood sugar levels over time, to see if it has a positive, neutral, or negative effect on their blood sugar. It is entirely possible that some people respond differently than others, so trying it out on an individual level might be safest, until evidence comes out.

      I hope this helps answer your question!

    1. Because the serving sizes are minuscule. One 14 1/2 oz can of vegetables listed as 3 1/2 servings. Typically 25-45 calories per serving. On a WFPB diet you’d have to eat at least that much to get your daily calories in. 2500 calories divided by 64 servings is about 40 calories per serving. Which is about right for fruits and vegetables. Nuts. seeds, avocados, other high fat plants, beans, grains and other starches would be more I would think.

      1. Dule

        Sorry but you are wrong on this.

        It is scientifically documented that the study participants did eat 44 servings of vegetables per day. In fact, the researchers detailed eactly what the test subjects ate at each meal and how much. I’m pretty sure that each of them was eating over 5 kilos of fruit and vegetables a day (we can calculate the exact amount from the data in the study report). This has been done before of course. The BBC did a programme years ago where the study participants were fed a diet of 5 kilos of fruit and raw vegetables a day.
        https://www.academia.edu/13109821/Effect_of_a_very-high-fiber_vegetable_fruit_and_nut_diet_on_serum_lipids_and_colonic_function
        http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/humanbody/truthaboutfood/healthy/evodiet2.shtml

        You would probably need to eat these amounts to get sufficient calories in the diet if you are eating a diet primarily of green/leafy vegetables and excluding cereals, tubers and other starchy foods. I don’t eat this way but I probably should.

    2. Hi Tree of Life,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks so much for your question!

      This is not a misprint. They even list out the amount of food the participants were given each day, in grams. The total amount of calories ended up being about 2,706 per day, which is quite a lot. If you subtract the 322 calories from avocado (which they had on one day) for example, you’re left with 2,384 calories, which divided by 64 servings, is 37.25 calories per serving, which seems right, given that 2/3 of the servings were from vegetables. For example, a 1/2 cup of Brussels sprouts is only about 20 calories, and a 1/2 cup of red bell pepper is about 30 calories. Obviously, the fruit servings would be higher in calories.

      I hope this helps to answer your question!

  2. I have an unrelated question – something that didn’t match any documents or videos when I used the search box:

    I’m seeing more and more cookware being made today with “titanium infused” ceramic materials. Oster waffle irons, Bella, usw. No PTFE, no PFOA, no cosmic debris (they say).

    So, my question is: is this cooking material safe for human consumption? Or are we still getting toxic metals in our waffles?

    1. From what I have read, many of them aren’t pure titanium and you have to find out what metal it is mixed with and also some of them have Teflon coating, so the answer will be based on those answers first.

  3. I started wondering about a year ago when Dr. Greger was going to start running out of material- quality research can only be produced so fast. I’m really glad the team found a productive way use the time until more material comes out!

    1. LOL! With 100,000 studies published each year, I doubt he is running out of materials. Writing books and translating them into every language, and becoming a global celebrity of sorts, I could see him running out of time.

        1. YR… Fierce Feline… if you’re referring to the potatoes & rice vs. almonds thing in the last blog, Dr. G briefly summarized it in the last sentence. Neither rice nor potatoes had the protective effect that almonds did. It’s one measly little sentence, but it’s there. If you blink, you miss it.

          1. I know, Nancy…..Fumbles said the same thing. Heck, we could substitute rice/potatoes for…let’s see…..cucumbers/rye bread and it would tell us pretty much the same thing: not a heck of a lot.

            So I was wondering why rice & potatoes even deserved to be in the title. Hmmm…..click bait much? :-)

            1. No collar or flea powder yet, but lately I’ve had a hankering for some Meow Mix. I’ve also become buddies with a little mouse that happened to move in recently. We have SUCH fun together, scampering here ‘n there! *Puurrrrrr*

              (BTW, inquiring minds wish to make a correction, preposition-wise. Should be substitute “with,” not “for.”)

          2. Nancy, did you check out the Jenkins study that Dr Greger refers to in today’s video? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288049 He had 3 test groups, wth the most successful one eating just fruit, vegies, and nuts. It beat out the group with starchy veg and grains added (sounds like wfpb to me), and the low fat group.Eatong just fruit vegies and nuts got the best test values, including the lowest LDL. This matters to me since I still have way too high cholesterol eating wfpb.

        2. I have seen no evidence of ‘senior moments’ – just people complaining that the title aroused expectations on their part which weren’t met. Not the same thing ………….

          Now, someone who thinks she’s cat, that might raise questions about whether she has senior problems ;)?

          Have you started wearing a collar? And how often do you apply the flea powder? Inquiring minds want to know.

  4. Congratulations on the new opening audio signature for today’s video– much better than the simulated boom. Hope this signature is applied for every video from now on.

    1. I am not under the impression that this is replacing the boom. I think this is flashback Friday’s sound.

      I am not sure I like it yet.

      I like the audio podcast prelude but I am not sure this represents retro or flashback. It is functional. It hangs there a little bit.

      I will let you know in a few weeks.

        1. I just went up to the audio podcast and yes there are not any monkeys up there. He has changed that one too over time

          He might be getting a little too entertaining with them.

          I don’t mind though.

          It makes me laugh.

          YR, don’t go up there!

            1. Does it sound jungle sound to you?

              I ended up listening to people doing sound effects with their voices and there is one young person who could do such a good intro.

              1. Actually, The Vegetable Orchestra choosing their instruments really sounds like a jungle.

                They would be perfect for the intro here.

                Have you heard them?

                    1. But the Friday Flash Back does not.

                      I like the Friday intro & the regular video intro. I’ve always liked the regular video intro. It’s short. It gets my attention.

              2. I just watched it again with the visuals and I think it is too fast for my aging brain.

                I had to watch the video image of the intro 4 or 5 times to almost get what happened there.

                Then I suddenly got that it was unlocking a vault.

                I thought it was an old film footage or something.

                I don’t mind it, but I genuinely didn’t get it the first several times I watched it and I think the intros could be simpler.

                I wonder if that is hard for you, Dr. Greger? You are an entertaining guy and the video itself is entertaining. I feel like the intro is over-stimulating, in a way. And complicated enough that it doesn’t disappear.

                I will say that I actually enjoy the boom with the cute sounds at the end you have. I don’t even need that much because I bought into the process of coming here and watching, but having a sound for your logo makes it professional. This one needs a Brain Games question to see what age people are who got what was going on and liked being over-stimulated at that point of the process.

  5. I decided tonight that when I start re-feeding my dog, I am going to make baby food first.

    He may reject it, and if he does, I will be fasting him longer.

    Then, I will try making vegan dog food again and maybe a lentil loaf or tempeh.

    If he doesn’t eat those, it will be burgers but I will know that we are heading toward the end.

    1. I think the tumor right next to his eye is gone or small enough that I can’t see it.

      When I put him on animal products Tumors became more visible all over the place and now the ones which were visible are pretty much gone after less than two weeks fasting.

      He is so needy now though. So vulnerable that I have gone this long without feeding him.

  6. Is there information on the postprandial blood sugar curve after a food or meal for the first 15 minutes? With measurements taken every minute? If that’s possible that should reveal the immediate effect of foods on blood sugar. I remember Ryan from Mic. The vegan tried that and got a spike from a banana I think.

  7. Hi I’m a health support volunteer. That’s a great question. I’m pretty sure this has been studied and they find that fruit does not cause a blood sugar spike because of the fiber. I couldn’t find any of those studies off hand. There is definitely research that shows fruit decreases risk of type 2 diabetes and helps control blood sugars in the long run. I think Dr. Neal Barnard has done the most research on this.
    Here is some more information for you
    https://www.pcrm.org/news/blog/does-sugar-cause-diabetes
    https://www.bmj.com/content/347/bmj.f5001

    1. NurseKelly, this is anecdote, but my brother, who years ago was overweight and out-of-shape, started exercising and switched to vegetarian and then plant based whole food eating, lost about 70 pounds, and eventually went off all his meds (high BP, high cholesterol, etc) including for type 2 diabetes. He told me that he always eats fresh fruit daily – apples, grapes, peaches, watermelon, bananas, blueberries, kiwis, tangerines, etc.  And he rarely eats dried fruits, but if so, then in smaller amounts. As far as I know, he’s still off his type 2 diabetes med. (And all the rest.)

    1. Hi Adrian,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks so much for your question!

      We do not know specifically how the consumption of fruit affects the blood sugar of individuals with type 2 diabetes. We also do not know the effect of fruits in the form of smoothies on blood sugar either. However, there are a couple factors that influence blood sugar levels from consuming smoothies: 1) how fast one drinks the smoothie–the faster you drink it, the higher the rise in blood sugar levels, generally and 2) certain fruits, like berries, blunt (or reduce) the rise in blood sugar levels. Therefore, it would be beneficial for all people, and perhaps especially individuals with type 2 diabetes, to include berries in every smoothie and to drink the smoothie relatively slowly. This is discussed in Dr. Greger’s video here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/green-smoothies-what-does-the-science-say/

      Even though we do not yet know the answer to your specific question, I hope this helps!

  8. For at least 20 years, no matter what time of the day, every time I eat only fruit, I wake up hot at 3am, and have to get up and move around to cool-off. This reaction is the worst with fruits like banana, mango, pineapple, or apple, it is somewhat less bad with berries or an orange and it’s hard to judge dates because I never eat them by themselves or with other fruit.

    I’ve compared the total sugar content of each of the different fruits I eat, but suspect this issue might be more specific, such as the quantity or combination of the different kinds of sugars like sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, etc… in each fruit.

    But this doesn’t happen when my food combination is mostly vegetables and small amount of fruit, such as using a sliver of an apple in a V-12 Vegetable Blast (in How Not to Die Cookbook).

    I’m over a decade past menopause, so it’s not that kind of hot flash, and I have a lot of whole plant food experience because I’ve been vegan for a decade and was Macrobiotic before that. This 3am heat issue is difficult to figure out and I would like to know if anyone else experiences this reaction.

    1. Bette,

      I’d not be surprised if you find some of your reaction is due to hyperglycemia or an allergenic reaction. Some suggestions: Try a single serving of one fruit and start to note both the severity of the reaction, if any, and note the amount of the fruit used. Over a period of a week or two it should be more obvious which and how much you can tolerate. Separate the experiments with at least a day or two between each trial and get a good night’s sleep.

      You might also invest in a glucometer and measure your blood sugar levels both pre and one hour after the fruit intake as well as your 3am levels.

      Changing the subject significantly, you might refer to Chinese medicine, as the 3 am wake up is the time where the liver is more active energetically (not the whole story but….) Remember it’s intimately involved in your sugar metabolism.

      Also you did not indicate if the fruit was organic. Please try this for the experiment.

      I will be curious to hear your response to the trial with different fruits and your blood sugars.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

      1. Thank You Dr. Kadish for your suggestions and I will work on that experiment as soon as I sort out the source of my dog’s allergy that is causing his chronic ear infections. Not sure I can cope with another experiment presently, as I’m so focused on his and his drugs and ointment ministrations …been working on it for several months without success. His future seems grim, but at least he’s had a wonderful life for 11 years.

        Thank you so much for your help.

  9. Yeah that is pretty weird. :-(

    I know somebody who is unable to eat raw fruit, only if it’s cooked. She gets rashes on her arms, or wherever, otherwise. Do you get the same “hot flash at 3 a.m.” when you cook the fruit, or have you never tried it cooked? How long does the flash last, only a minute or two? Do you have trouble falling back to sleep again?

    I’m a light sleeper and get up during the night at various hours. Plus, I seem to get tired of being a captive of my comforter, especially when it feels like it weighs a ton and won’t let me stick my feet out from under it. If I had to get up only the one time, at 3 a.m. like you, I could deal with that! I don’t mind getting out of that hot bed for a while, anyway. I go take a leak, and then fall asleep again almost immediately. Such is life!

    1. Yes, for years I’ve noticed it happens with cooked fruit as well. An example in The How Not to Die Cookbook is Raspberry-Peach Crisp. It’s delicious and I thought the fruit combined with the nuts might work, but no.

      The hot episode might last as long as 5 minutes, but it will take at least 30 minutes for me to fall asleep again. I don’t wake up otherwise unless the dog wakes me up when he wants to go outside, but then I fall right back to sleep quickly.

      The bedding heat used to really bother me ….in my case the culprit was a new memory foam mattress that was hotter than hades to sleep on.

      I’m truly stumped over the fruit consumption and 3am heat.

          1. Wow YR, this is all news to me. There is a man in our neighbourhood who sleep walks according to his wife, and she has to turn off the breaker for the stove every night before bed… he will get up and start cooking apparently without waking up.
            Sometimes I wake up and feel chilled like I was calorie deficient that day or week, but an extra blanket will do to ward off the cold til breakfast.

        1. Thank You Barb for that link, it made me remember something incredible I had long forgotten.

          Near the bottom of the replies, the liver is mentioned. It’s something I learned from practicing Macrobiotics, although I had forgotten it, that each organ uses the greatest amount of energy at a certain time each day or night. A knowledgeable Macrobiotic counselor will customize a novice’s diet to address a problematic issue by adding or removing foods that affect that organ. As I understood it, it was a temporary dietary tweak, until your body was healed, at which time you could add those foods back to your diet if you desired them.

          At a friend’s suggestion, I consulted a Macrobiotic counselor, who diagnosed a liver problem by asking questions and having me draw a picture. It was the picture drawing that really seemed odd, and even though he told me what he saw in my drawing, I was skeptical. But I did what he suggested and it worked because I felt better than I had ever felt in my life. I stayed on that diet for several years, but eventually became bored with it and cheated, adding more foods to my diet than just those I had been advised to forgo.

          Thank You Barb for this gift.

          1. “…. and having me draw a picture. It was the picture drawing that really seemed odd”
            – – – – –

            Bette, sounds odd to me too. Maybe he was picking up psychic messages from it. *woo-woo* Do you remember what you drew? Landscape? A person? Or something like a table or chair?

            I used to do watercolor portraits — drawings of faces, in particular. There are so many different ones out there, aren’t there? I don’t always remember names, but never forget a face.

            1. He asked me to draw a picture that included a house, the sun and a dragon. I also put a mountain and water in the picture, but don’t recall if he asked for those things, because I remember thinking he didn’t give me enough time to draw a dragon so I needed to devise a way to eliminate the time I would normally have spent drawing the dragon.

              So I hid most of the sun behind the mountain and drew the house from the side because it didn’t require as much detail, and I put the dragon in a large body of water so that I only had to draw his head and tail sticking out of the water.

              His analysis was that I put the dragon in the water because my system was too hot …too yang.

              His response didn’t surprise me because I was also practicing Tai Chi at that time, and studying the works of great Tai Chi Masters, and my instructor was a 90 year old Chinese Master, and I had encountered this same idea of being too hot and too yang from all those sources, although my hopelessly Western mind wasn’t really capable of understanding the meaning.

              1. Thanks, Bette. If you had drawn ja cute little baby dragon (with a big smile on its face) peeking out from a corner of the house, that might have told him something too. :-)

                Very interesting!

    2. YR (Fierce Feline), there is a condition called oral allergy syndrome: people who have hay fever also have allergies to certain raw fruits or vegetables, depending on what they are allergic to. The same protein on the pollen causing the hay fever is also present in the fruits or vegetables. They get a rash in their mouth and throat, maybe on their lips; I haven’t heard of a rash other places, though that might be possible. Cooking denatures the protein, so it won’t cause an allergic reaction, and the cooked fruit or vegetable is safe to eat. (e.g.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_allergy_syndrome)

      1. Dr. J. (hey, you can call me YR for short; why do all that extra typing?), I might be wrong about the rash thing. Next time I talk with her, I’ll ask her All I remember is raw fruit causes some sort of reaction to her arms. Hives? ‘Tis a puzzlement, and I confess I wasn’t listening to her very well. She seems to have an intolerance to gluten, too. She can eat raw veggies, (lettuce), seems to me. Does NOT like avocados. Which surprised me, as they have hardly any taste!

        So many people have allergies these days!

        https://www.livestrong.com/article/501630-fruits-to-avoid-with-hives/

  10. Sounds like your body is talking to you; maybe you should listen! “No more fruit!” True, life would be miserable without it, IMO, but if you had your druthers, wouldn’t you rather be able to sleep at night?

    You might try not eating it for a while and just concentrate on getting your veggies. Some think they’re healthier for us than fruit, anyway.

    https://makeyourbodywork.com/fruits-vs-vegetables/

    1. Although….I just now took a look. The kind I have on my counter is California Olive Ranch, supposedly one of the “real” ones.

    1. These studies are consistent with current mainstream knowledge/opinion.

      ” With the exception of measures related to bone health, the health relationships examined were either not supported by adequate evidence to establish cause and effect, or the conflicting nature of the available evidence could not be used to link health benefits to particular levels of intake of vitamin D or serum measures of 25(OH)D with any level of confidence. This overall conclusion was confirmed by a more recent report on vitamin D and calcium from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which reviewed data from nearly 250 new studies published between 2009 and 2013 [41]. The report concluded that it is still not possible to specify a relationship between vitamin D and health outcomes other than bone health.”
      https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

      Ditto for omega 3 supplementation
      https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/

      Note that Dr grgere recommends omega 3 supplementation for brain health.

      1. “The most consistent cardiovascular benefits of supplemental omega-3 fatty acids were found in participants who reported low fish intake at baseline and in African Americans. In participants with low fish consumption (defined as less than 1½ servings per week; one serving is 3-4 ounces), omega-3 fatty acid supplementation led to a 19% reduction in major cardiovascular events, including a 40% reduction in heart attack, as well as a trend toward a reduction in death from any cause, and no indication of increased cancer risk.”
        http://vitalstudy.org/findings.html
        Dr Greger recommend vitamin D supplementation for health outcomes other than bone health.
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/will-you-live-longer-if-you-take-vitamin-d-supplements/

      1. Its natural to think this, but as the sugar content is so minimal compared to refined food products, and the fruit sugar is bound to dietary fiber, it appears you would not be able to induce fatty liver disease from eating a lot of fruit.

        Dr. Ben

      2. Following up on Dr Ben’s post, it seems that eating a lot of fruit may even be protective against fatty liver disease if this Spanish study is any guide (the study participants ate actual fruit as opposed to just the fibre from fruit)

        “Fruit Fiber Consumption Specifically Improves Liver Health Status in Obese Subjects under Energy Restriction”
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5537782/

  11. Did they take any tests on the liver, see how it was affected by the high consumption of fruit? Since fructose can only be metabolized by the liver, seems like it would put a lot of strain on the liver. I’ve read that too much fructose can cause build up of fat in the liver, would be interesting to know if high consumption of fruit would do the same.

  12. Hi, Maud! The research cited on the effects of fructose on the liver were based on sugar-sweetened beverages that included high-fructose corn syrup. Whole fruit is different, because the fructose comes packaged as it was intended to be consumed, with fiber and polyphenols. See the related video here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/if-fructose-is-bad-what-about-fruit/ for more on that. For more on NAFLD, or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, you might be interested in this video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/prevent-non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/ I hope that helps!

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