Flashback Friday: How to Make Your Own Fruit & Vegetable Wash

Flashback Friday: How to Make Your Own Fruit & Vegetable Wash
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Commercial fruit and vegetable washes fail to work better than tap water, but there is a cheap do-it-yourself solution that may completely eliminate certain pesticide residues.

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How might we reduce our exposure to pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables? What about staying away from imported produce? Turns out domestic produce may be even worse, dispelling this notion that imported fruits and vegetables pose greater potential health threats to consumers.

Buying organic dramatically reduces dietary exposure to pesticides, but does not eliminate the potential risk. Pesticide residues are detectable in about 1 in 10 organic crop samples, due to cross-contamination from neighboring fields, the continued presence of very persistent pesticides like DDT in the soil, or accidental or fraudulent use.

By choosing organic, one hopes to shift exposures from a range of uncertain risk to more of a range of negligible risk, but even if all we had to eat were the most pesticide-laden of conventional produce, there is a clear consensus in the scientific community that the health benefits from consuming fruits and vegetables outweigh any potential risks from pesticide residues. But we can easily reduce whatever risk there is by rinsing our fruits and vegetables under running water.

There are, however, a plethora of products alleged by advertisers to reduce fruit and produce pesticide residues more effectively than water, and touted to concerned consumers. For example, Procter & Gamble introduced a fruit and vegetable wash in the year 2000. As part of the introduction, T.G.I. Fridays jumped on board, bragging on their menus that the cheese and bacon puddles they call potato skins were first washed with the new product. After all, it was proclaimed proven to be 98% more effective than water in removing pesticides. So researchers put it to the test, and it did no better than plain tap water. Shortly thereafter, Procter & Gamble discontinued the product, but numerous others took its place, claiming their vegetable washes are three, four, five, or even ten times more effective than water–to which the researcher replied, “That’s mathematically impossible.” If water removes like 50%, you can’t take off ten times more than 50%. They actually found water removes up to 80% of pesticide residues, like the fungicide captan for example, so for other brands of veggie washes to brag three, four, five, or ten times better than water is mathematically impossible indeed.

Other fruit and vegetable washes have since been put to the test. They compared Fruit & Vegetable Wash to FIT, to two I’ve never heard of, OrganiClean, and Vegi-Clean, compared to using dishwashing soap, all compared to just rinsing in plain tap water. 196 samples of lettuce, strawberries, and tomatoes were tested, and they found little or no difference between just rinsing with tap water compared to any of the veggie washes, or the dishsoap. They all just seemed like a waste of money. The researchers concluded that just the mechanical action of rubbing the produce under tap water seemed to do it, and that using detergents or fruit and vegetable washes do not enhance the removal of pesticide residues from produce above that of just rinsing with tap water alone.

That may not be saying much though. Captan appears to be the exception. When rinsing with plain water was tried against a half dozen other pesticides, less than half the residues were removed. Fingernail polish remover works better, but the goal is to end up with a less toxic, not more toxic, tomato. We need a straightforward, plausible, and safe method for enhanced pesticide removal, although the efficacy of pesticide removal from fruits and vegetables has been rarely reported in the medical literature. Anything we can add to the tap water to boost its pesticide-stripping abilities?

If you soak potatoes in water, between about 2% to 13% of the pesticides are removed, but a 5% acetic acid solution removes up to 100%. What’s that? Plain white vinegar. But 5% is full strength. What about diluted vinegar? Diluted vinegar seemed only marginally better than tap water for removing pesticide residues. Using full-strength vinegar would get expensive, though. Thankfully, there’s something cheaper that works even better: salt water. A 10% salt water solution appears to work as good or better than full-strength vinegar. To make a 10% salt solution you just have to mix up 1 part salt and 9 parts water, though make sure to rinse all the salt off before eating.

There’s not much you can do for the pesticides in animal products, though. The top sources of some pesticides are fruits and vegetables; but for others, it’s dairy, eggs, and meat, because the chemicals build up in the fat. So what to do about pesticides in meat, egg yolks, or egg whites? Hard boiling appears to destroy more pesticides than scrambling, but for the pesticides that build up in the fat in fish or chicken, cooking can sometimes increase pesticide levels that you can’t just wash off. In fact washing meat, poultry, or eggs is considered one of the top ten dangerous food safety mistakes.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures via Flickr.

How might we reduce our exposure to pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables? What about staying away from imported produce? Turns out domestic produce may be even worse, dispelling this notion that imported fruits and vegetables pose greater potential health threats to consumers.

Buying organic dramatically reduces dietary exposure to pesticides, but does not eliminate the potential risk. Pesticide residues are detectable in about 1 in 10 organic crop samples, due to cross-contamination from neighboring fields, the continued presence of very persistent pesticides like DDT in the soil, or accidental or fraudulent use.

By choosing organic, one hopes to shift exposures from a range of uncertain risk to more of a range of negligible risk, but even if all we had to eat were the most pesticide-laden of conventional produce, there is a clear consensus in the scientific community that the health benefits from consuming fruits and vegetables outweigh any potential risks from pesticide residues. But we can easily reduce whatever risk there is by rinsing our fruits and vegetables under running water.

There are, however, a plethora of products alleged by advertisers to reduce fruit and produce pesticide residues more effectively than water, and touted to concerned consumers. For example, Procter & Gamble introduced a fruit and vegetable wash in the year 2000. As part of the introduction, T.G.I. Fridays jumped on board, bragging on their menus that the cheese and bacon puddles they call potato skins were first washed with the new product. After all, it was proclaimed proven to be 98% more effective than water in removing pesticides. So researchers put it to the test, and it did no better than plain tap water. Shortly thereafter, Procter & Gamble discontinued the product, but numerous others took its place, claiming their vegetable washes are three, four, five, or even ten times more effective than water–to which the researcher replied, “That’s mathematically impossible.” If water removes like 50%, you can’t take off ten times more than 50%. They actually found water removes up to 80% of pesticide residues, like the fungicide captan for example, so for other brands of veggie washes to brag three, four, five, or ten times better than water is mathematically impossible indeed.

Other fruit and vegetable washes have since been put to the test. They compared Fruit & Vegetable Wash to FIT, to two I’ve never heard of, OrganiClean, and Vegi-Clean, compared to using dishwashing soap, all compared to just rinsing in plain tap water. 196 samples of lettuce, strawberries, and tomatoes were tested, and they found little or no difference between just rinsing with tap water compared to any of the veggie washes, or the dishsoap. They all just seemed like a waste of money. The researchers concluded that just the mechanical action of rubbing the produce under tap water seemed to do it, and that using detergents or fruit and vegetable washes do not enhance the removal of pesticide residues from produce above that of just rinsing with tap water alone.

That may not be saying much though. Captan appears to be the exception. When rinsing with plain water was tried against a half dozen other pesticides, less than half the residues were removed. Fingernail polish remover works better, but the goal is to end up with a less toxic, not more toxic, tomato. We need a straightforward, plausible, and safe method for enhanced pesticide removal, although the efficacy of pesticide removal from fruits and vegetables has been rarely reported in the medical literature. Anything we can add to the tap water to boost its pesticide-stripping abilities?

If you soak potatoes in water, between about 2% to 13% of the pesticides are removed, but a 5% acetic acid solution removes up to 100%. What’s that? Plain white vinegar. But 5% is full strength. What about diluted vinegar? Diluted vinegar seemed only marginally better than tap water for removing pesticide residues. Using full-strength vinegar would get expensive, though. Thankfully, there’s something cheaper that works even better: salt water. A 10% salt water solution appears to work as good or better than full-strength vinegar. To make a 10% salt solution you just have to mix up 1 part salt and 9 parts water, though make sure to rinse all the salt off before eating.

There’s not much you can do for the pesticides in animal products, though. The top sources of some pesticides are fruits and vegetables; but for others, it’s dairy, eggs, and meat, because the chemicals build up in the fat. So what to do about pesticides in meat, egg yolks, or egg whites? Hard boiling appears to destroy more pesticides than scrambling, but for the pesticides that build up in the fat in fish or chicken, cooking can sometimes increase pesticide levels that you can’t just wash off. In fact washing meat, poultry, or eggs is considered one of the top ten dangerous food safety mistakes.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

This is part of my five-part series on organic foods:

The most important reason to wash produce is to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Ironically, the food poisoning viruses may be found in the pesticides themselves. Check out my video Norovirus Food Poisoning from Pesticides.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

127 responses to “Flashback Friday: How to Make Your Own Fruit & Vegetable Wash

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  1. How long do you soak produce in the salt solution? And I’ve recently read that baking soda will remove pesticides as well?

    1. I don’t know, but the chart at t = 4:48 shows a “Time” scalar of 5 minutes for both columns.

      Would it work just as well if you sprayed the salt solution on the veggies and waited 5 minutes?

      (Only The Shadow knows!)

    2. In several studies I’ve looked at 2-3 minutes was mentioned for soaking, although this study looking at soaking in salt water used a 10 minute interval to show significant pesticide removal:
      How effective are common household preparations on removing pesticide residues from fruit and vegetables? A review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jsfa.8821 This article also references use of baking soda for pesticide removal as well.

  2. Wouldn’t washing fruits having soft skins, like berries, with salt water make them taste salty and also increase the eaters salt consumption?

      1. I have been washing produce in 10% salt water for some time now…….DO NOT SOAK, it is a wash. All produce washes work better with agitation. Put the produce in the solution, swish around until you get the gunk off, then rinse. This REALLY improves the flavor of grapes.

        Most sweet foods actually taste a bit sweeter with a tiny amount of salt. This is why many people put salt on watermelon and such.

    1. Cakes? You mean like take the chocolate frosting off? I like pie better than cake….especially fruit pies….and rarely eat cake.

  3. I thought that baking soda (still has sodium, I know) was the best? I’d love it if good old table salt would work because it’s cheaper.

  4. I noticed that there was no mention of using a dilute solution of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)… i.e., 1-3 %… Thoughts, comments, concerns… ???

    1. Oops! (Thanks, Merc. Retro). My reply to you got stuck up the hill somewhere.

      I had posted: “So do I. Sometimes I’ll add a little white vinegar to it.”

  5. Does anyone else notice the NF pages are slow to load this week? They load normally until it gets to the video rating stars, the comment section and the green support button. The delay is annoying when you are flipping through NF pages to get links for responses etc.

  6. Unfortunate that the illustration for “Fruit and Vegetable Wash” is an orange! Surely removal of the peel would obviate any need for wash (think: all citrus, squash and melons, bananas, avocado, papaya, etc.)

    Unfortunate also that the actual *amounts* of residual pesticide are not considered – has this been covered elsewhere? It seems that a “zero tolerance” attitude prevails here which is not entirely realistic. Of course people are free to choose their level of concern.

  7. Can you please point me to an article that discusses the health risks of pesticide residue in and on foods? How concerned should we be about pesticide residues? They sound icky, but are they really harmful?

    1. “If just half the U.S. population were to increase fruit and vegetable consumption by a single serving a day, an estimated 20,000 cancer cases might be avoided each year. That’s how powerful produce may be. But because the model was using conventional fruits and veggies the pesticide residues on those extra fruits and vegetables might result in ten additional cancer cases. So overall, if half of us ate one more serving, we’d just prevent 19,990 cases of cancer a year. Now this was a paper written by scientists-for-hire paid for by the Alliance for Food and Farming, which is a bunch of conventional produce growers, so they probably exaggerated the benefits and minimized the risks, but I think the bottom-line is sound. We get a tremendous benefit from eating conventional fruits and vegetables that far outweighs whatever tiny bump in risk from the pesticides, but hey, why accept any risk at all when you can choose organic? I agree, but we should never let concern about pesticides stop us from stuffing our face with as many fruits and vegetables as possible.” https://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-the-benefits-of-organic-food-underrated-or-overrated/

      You can do a search on this website; I searched “cancer risk conventional produce.” There are several more videos about this on this site.

      1. Richard Buckberg, if you read the “Doctor’s Notes’ under the video you will see links to the other videos in this series about pesticides.

      2. Dr. J.,

        I remember watching the pesticide video, and also remembered the concept, but forgot the exact numbers.

        It is interesting to read them again.

        I am trying to only eat organic, but it is so challenging sometimes.

        The other day, I ended up not having broccoli sprouts or broccoli slaw or broccoli microgreens. All of the broccoli at Whole Foods was conventional. I just posted that the other day and this is one of those timing things.

        I have been wanting to try Jicama sticks from Trader Joes, but again that is another conventional only food.

        Artichoke is another thing, which I particularly like and it is so hard to find it organic.

        Sometimes they are even out of organic blueberries.

        The inner guideline I am doing is: If I have been eating a lot of broccoli products, skip a few days and see if they order some in.

        But, I have been trying to do the brain healing with broccoli sprouts and blueberries and kale and turmeric and it is making sure I don’t miss too many days.

        I suddenly had the thought that I am so grateful that this Flashback Friday was chosen this week when I went through organic food scarcity at Whole Foods.

        Every organic salad and microgreen and sprout was gone from those sections.

        It saved me money, but the inner math of the brain healing equation is one which I don’t always understand how to deal with.

        If one of you sweet people at NutritionFacts.org chose this particular Flashback Friday because of my conversation, thank you.

        I know that it could also be that there was synchronicity that this would be the week you would post this.

        And I will thank you even if you had this particular one scheduled months ago.

        The timing was perfect.

          1. Lonie. Thanks for posting. If you are interested in the subject check out Dean and Ayesha Sherzai’s book or podcasts.
            Got their newest one recently from the local library. May be too elementary for you though.

            1. Thanks Marilyn Kaye,

              As for books, I can open one and be asleep a few minutes later. Don’t know why but that’s just how it works.

              But reading something on a large computer screen doesn’t have that effect.

              I doubt it is elementary to me, but I find that if I just wait, anything beneficial will present itself to me in time. Like learning that Naringinen can help dispose of tau and amyloid waste at night while we sleep, especially when sleeping on one side or the other which increases the action.

              As you can see I am open to just about anything if it passes the “hmmm… I wonder…” test. ‘-)

              But the conclusions drawn from the study I linked to make a lot of sense to me as previous studies show that mini strokes could have a dementia effect as well.

              I had already addressed this after reading years ago that drinking beet root juice can cause re-perfusion of the brain, to the point of re-invigorating dormant areas of the brain that have gone dormant due to lack of oxygen. Also, dark chocolate numerous times per day also have a plumping effect on blood vessels so I eat that a number of times. My oxygen levels are always in the 97 to 98 range.

              But this latest I’ve read (in the link) showed me how important the insides of our blood vessels are to guard against leakage in the blood/brain barrier.

              It just so happens I’ve recently started taking NMN and if David Sinclair is right, this molecule will repair the epithelial cells inside these vessels and even help new vessels to grow, so I’m hoping that protecting my blood vessels is being addressed… not only with the NMN but the nitric oxide producing beet root juice and dark chocolate that are causing elasticity in my blood vessels.

              As for whether or not I’m interested in the subject, of course the answer is yes but I’m also interested in about a hundred other subjects… just depends on what I come across that is interesting.

              Thank you for thinking of me and I’ll keep the authors’ names in mind in case I run across something from them.

    2. Hi these are the references Dr Greger refers to in this video.
      R I Krieger , P Brutsche-Keiper , H R Crosby , A D Krieger . Reduction of Pesticide Residues of Fruit Using Water Only or Plus Fit™ Fruit and Vegetable Wash.Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Feb;70(2):213-8.
      M Barański ,D Srednicka-Tober ,N Volakakis ,C Seal , R Sanderson , G B Stewart , C Benbrook , B Biavati ,E Markellou ,C Giotis , J Gromadzka-Ostrowska ,E Rembiałkowska , K Skwarło-Sońta , R Tahvonen , D Janovská , U Niggli , P Nicot , C Leifert . Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses.Br J Nutr. 2014 Sep 14;112(5):794-811. doi: 10.1017/S0007114514001366. Epub 2014 Jun 26.
      M C Benbrook., and B P Baker. Perspective on Dietary Risk Assessment of Pesticide Residues in Organic Food. Sustainability 6.6 (2014): 3552-3570.
      Z Wang , J Huang , J Chen , F Li . Effectiveness of dishwashing liquids in removing chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos residues from cherry tomatoes.Chemosphere. 2013 Aug;92(8):1022-8
      C K Winter . Pesticide residues in imported, organic, and “”suspect”” fruits and vegetables. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 May 9;60(18):4425-9.
      A Zohair . Behaviour of some organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides in potatoes during soaking in different solutions.Food Chem Toxicol. 2001 Jul;39(7):751-5.
      G Perelló , R Martí-Cid,V Castell ,J M Llobet , J LDomingo .Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, hexachlorobenzene and polycyclic aromatichydrocarbons in various foodstuffs before and after cooking. Food Chem Toxicol. 2009 Apr;47(4):709-15
      ZY Zhang, XJ Liu, XY Hong. Effects of home preparation on pesticide residues in cabbage. Food Control 18.12 (2007): 1484-1487.
      U Bajwa , K S Sandhu . Effect of handling and processing on pesticide residues in food- a review.J Food Sci Technol. 2014 Feb;51(2):201-20.
      W J Krol , T L Arsenault , H M Pylypiw , M J Incorvia Mattina . Reduction of pesticide residues on produce by rinsing.J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Oct;48(10):4666-70.
      C L Curl , R A Fenske , K Elgethun . Organophosphorus pesticide exposure of urban and suburban preschool children with organic and conventional diets. Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Mar;111(3):377-82.
      R Vogt , D Bennett , D Cassady ,J Frost , B Ritz , I Hertz-Picciotto . Cancer and non-cancer health effects from food contaminant exposures for children and adults in California: a risk assessment.Environ Health. 2012 Nov 9;11:83.

    1. I wonder about the removal of dirt and bacteria also? What would be most effective to remove those.
      ——————————————————————————————————————–
      How about one of those hand held steamers. I have one ordered that holds like 6 oz of water and heats up quickly.

      1. Oh, and I suppose you could add some food grade Hydrogen Peroxide drops to your water (much stronger than regular Hydrogen Peroxide) and remove the pesticides too.

  8. Thanks — Another great use for white vinegar — or table salt too!
    Easiest way to avoid the pesticides in animal products is to not eat them….

  9. I like these Flashback Friday videos as reminders of what I read in Now Not To Die by Dr. Greger..

    I just returned from my weekly shopping at the one organic fair in the city. The vendor washes everything at the farm and then package most of the produce in clear bags, not plastic. I used to wash everything in salt water and then changed to baking soda when it was another option. (1 tsp per liter of water for 15 minutes and then rinse.)

    Pesticides are used in the production of fruits and vegetables in Argentina. I remember buying a strawberry that was the size of the palm of my hand — imagine the load of pesticides on the fruit.

    1. A week ago one of my friends brought me a bag of no-pesticide veggies from her wonderful garden. Later, when I rinsed some greens for a salad, I noticed a little green worm on one of the leaves. Awwwww, so cute! I gently put him/her in my garbage bag….where he/she was able to live out his/her life with apple cores, banana peelings, and such.

      Speaking of worms, I often see them on the sidewalks…..partly pink and writhing away, partly half dead. You can see the dark brown color creeping in around their edges. Such is life! To quote Einstein: “Energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only be changed from one form to another.”

      1. Worms.

        Last year, at my 8-year-old pal’s birthday, dressed in a gorgeous party dress. The games and contests and play switched to all of the girls searching for worms and putting them into a pail. The most worms were found under the trampoline.

    2. What kind of clear bags does your farmer have that aren’t plastic? There’s a big debate raging here on single use plastic (especially grocery bags) so I wonder what this farmer may be on to!

  10. What about insects? What is the most effective and safe way to remove tiny insects in produce? Most are full of insects, especially strawberries, lettuce, broccoli.

  11. I use straight white vinegar and spray it on my morning berries. I leave it on while I prepare my groats and cut other fruit. Then I rinse thoroughly with water.
    Spraying covers the fruit completely especially if you swish it all around. Best fruit wash without costing a lot!

  12. Regarding apples, I suppose you all know that you must gently scrape the fruit surface with a very sharp knife to remove the wax applied to stretch their shelf life. I have done this for some time now have yet to find an organic apple without wax. Sometimes, the amount of wax is astounding. If I had saved it, I could use it to polish my floor.

    I have also scraped pears but no wax comes off. I wonder if it has leached into the fruit…

      1. Orchard apples will ‘take a shine’ if you rub them on your clothing. It’s the natural waxes.
        —————————————————————————–
        So that’s where the “polishing an apple to give the teacher”… to score brownie points, came from. ‘-)

  13. I believe it was Jane Goodall said something to the affect of….”We’re going to look back on this time in history and ask why anyone thought that growing food in poison was a good idea”.

  14. I have heard that the best vegie wash is a diluted solution of Carb soda, and it did better than all the other things that they tried. I can’t remember if they tried it against salt water though. Would be interesting to see which was best.

    1. A solution of 1/100 baking soda and water for 12min. removes most of the pesticides from fruits and vegetables according to the latest research.

  15. Medical question here! Any treatment for endometriosis that does not require medication or surgery? PLEASE reply.
    Thank you

    1. The evidence on this is inconsistent although there are dozens of websites that will attempt to offer a solution. It is a very poorly understood disease

      https://medlineplus.gov/endometriosis.html

      However, some recent work idicates that inflammation may be an important driver of endo
      https://www.nibib.nih.gov/news-events/newsroom/researchers-realize-major-breakthrough-understanding-endometriosis

      Consequently, you might find it helpful to adopt an anti-inflammatory diet
      https://nutritionfacts.org/?s=anti-inflammatory+diet

  16. I am going to be going off my green tea latte, starting this week.

    The not losing weight eating salad and beans and lentils with a no oil dressing or hummus and veggies and berries in unsweetened almond yogurt with just a few Mary’s Gone Crackers is driving me crackers.

    What occurs to me is that my Soy Matcha Latte from Starbucks might have oil.

    I feel like I am still not losing weight even going off the nuts and avocado this week.

    That is the only idea I have left.

    Thyroid might be the next concept, but I have to stop the latte first.

  17. I have been watching all of these videos of people who lost over 100 pounds in a year and they are eating desserts and snacks and nut butters and I am not even eating potatoes or rice or pasta or bread or oil or animal products.

    I am confused now. Not discouraged, but confused.

    1. yeah well the Twinkie Diet guy ate a junk food diet too and lost oodles of weight. His secret? Strict calorie control.

      Or you can eat lots of potatoes (boiled or steamed not fried or roasted) to fill you up eg
      https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/diet/andrew-taylor-eats-nothing-but-potatoes-for-a-year-to-cure-his-food-addiction/news-story/41d8e6612679985fc9bf62e4b970ef15

      But these are all short term solutions but McDougall argues we need to eat a diet based on low calorie starches to make us feel full otherwise we start eating high claories foods and don’t lose weight.
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2002nl/nov/021100weight.htm

      1. Laughing.

        I never tried the Twinkie diet. Missed one.

        What I am going to say is that I have no food cravings and I am not hungry and I am getting a lot of nutrition.

        Those are the positives.

        In the Fall, I will try adding in the potatoes and sweet potatoes.

        I am not good at mixing the streams.

        I could do a lot of potato dishes for a few months, and go back to a lot of bean dishes for a few months and a lot of salads for a few months.

        I think that is what I have been doing. I am determined to keep eating fresh vegetables and berries through the Summer to see if I can get my seasonal appetite rhythms in order.

        For the past few years, I have been doing the opposite of the seasons. I ate tons of chili and 5 bean casseroles and beans and rice and hot, comfort food all Summer long and then, sometime in the middle of the Winter, I start thinking, all I eat are beans, I probably should have some fruits and vegetables at least once in a while. I am trying to turn that around.

        What I noticed is that I am someone who doesn’t want to think about food, so, on top of being seasonally out-of-whack, I get overwhelmed by switching back and forth.

        I could eat chili every day for the whole Winter or beans and rice. I have trouble doing things like chili one day and salad the next.

        1. I haven’t done the counting calories, but I guess it wouldn’t be hard.

          Right now, because of cost, I buy two plastic containers, one with kale and spinach mix and one with arugula and I mix the two together and throw in a package of sliced mushrooms and a package of pomegranate seeds and a few more vegetables and 2 boxes of black beans and that becomes my dinner for 2 days. It is pretty filling.

          Then, I do a small package of blueberries in 8 ounces of unsweetened yogurt with a few tablespoons of golden milk and 2 teaspoons of manuka honey and a tablespoon of 100% cacao.

          Lunch is either a bag of steamed edamame or lentils or hummus and veggies or The Curry Tiger or Non-Dairy Amy’s burrito.

          I don’t do breakfast and I just gave up my green tea latte.

          What will be interesting will be to see if I don’t lose weight now and if I lose weight adding in sweet potatoes or grains.

          I haven’t eaten almost any grains at all most of this time. I just don’t have a concept of them. I haven’t had rice since March.

          1. Eat a green, grain, bean, and a fat lunch and dinner (all are whole foods) Lots of Veggies and fruits. You need a variety of foods for good nutrition.

            1. I eat a lot of vegetables in my salads generally, though I am paring it down because of how expensive it is.

              This weekend my salads are kale, spinach, arugula, mushrooms, pomegranate seeds, tomatoes, black beans and ginger miso no-oil dressing.

              Up until now, it was all of that, plus carrots, artichoke, tri-color peppers, onions, purple cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli sprouts, crunchy sprouts and avocado or guacamole or hummus, but that became half of my salary on groceries.

              I am down to 1/3 of my salary on groceries, which makes me happier.

              I know that you are recommending fats, but I have not lost weight and it has been so long without losing weight that I need to mix it up now and see what will help.

              I made it through a few days without my green tea latte, but I really want one. That will save me a few hundred dollars per month, but that was such a nice social gathering for me. They were always sweet to me, even when I was more broken in my brain.

              1. In the end, what I have been doing, trying to get mega-nutrition in isn’t something that could even possibly be sustainable for me.

                By the end, it is going to be beans and lentils and edamame and rice for my main meals and I still have to work out if there is a way to keep getting vegetables.

                I think I am going to hold onto the greens and berries and mushrooms.

                Everything else is on the fiscal chopping block.

                1. Deb, I am totally sympathetic to the stress of trying to eat on a limited budget. As far as organic goes, we buy only what we eat very often ie daily, as organic, and even then we hunt down the sales. So, soy milk , rolled oats /oat bran, coffee, green tea, veggie soup stock cubes, apples, bananas are routinely organic. Everything else has to be very competively priced with regular veggies for us to consider it. My neighbour, a red seal chef, says eating this way is too expensive, so I think we are doing well so far.

                    1. Barb, I never thought to buy organic bananas. Hmmm…..maybe I should from now on. I eat the little suckers (previously having been frozen — unpeeled, of course – every morning mixed with my hot cereal and (also previously frozen) blueberries.. And other stuff. (I’m such a pig in the morning!)

                  1. Thanks Barb!

                    Yes it is so expensive.

                    I will say that I ended up weighing myself after 4 days on a fewer veggies salad and after a week without avocado and several days without nuts and I gained 8 ounces.

                    That is genuinely frustrating.

                    It has to be the no-oil ginger miso dressing.

                    1. 8 oz? That’s just a glass of water.

                      Minor differences like that are irrelevant. They can be driven by when you last went to the toilet, or wearing a heavier sweater.

                      Perhaps you are overthinking this?

                    2. Tom,

                      I haven’t been overthinking it up until now.

                      I have been eating and drinking vegetables, some fruit and lots of beans, avocado, hummus and nuts, apple cider vinegar, spices and Nutritional yeast. I drink water, hibiscus tea, a few cups of coffee and 1 Green tea latte. That green tea latte is my guilty pleasure other than a slice pf birthday cake every 4 months or so and something sweet at Christmas. The green tea latte was my only social outing and it is expensive and it is in place of movies and cable and internet and outings of all kinds, except walking on the walking paths. I don’t have vacations or trips or any of the other things. I had green tea and liked it, and loved, loved, loved the people.

                      Mostly, I was disquieted that I didn’t lose weight this week after giving up nuts, avocado and the green tea latte and I had already given up the kale chips, popcorn and beet chips.

                      I have switched from a junk food, soda, heavy dairy and heavy refined carbs diet and switched all of that and much of it I got rid of a year or more before coming here and now I gave up dairy and refined carbs a year and a half ago and gave up oil and I did lose some weight. Just some and, honestly, I am not even sure that I lost as much as I say because there was variation between the scale I started with and the one I have and I may have lost 10 pounds or 7 pounds if that one was just not accurate. More if it was.

                      I just am maybe disappointed. I do not eat meat, dairy, I don’t eat vegan cheeses or faux meats anymore. I don’t eat oil and, yes, I occasionally, accidentally had things like plant-milk with oil and when I was eating the vegan faux cheeses, I accidentally ate dairy, but I switched to plain nutritional yeast. I am not even making the nut cream sauces or any version of fake cheese. Just some nutritional yeast. I don’t eat potatoes or sweet potatoes or grains and that is mostly because I don’t really know how to cook them and actually enjoy them and I found I like salad and vegetables, but I have spent a fortune on organic vegetables and I am not losing weight.

                      I try to not eat salt.

                      I know that I was eating the Curry Tiger burrito or a non-dairy bean burrito and I guess that could be the answer. I just am thinking that it has been long enough that I have to over think it for a while. If I don’t over think it for a few weeks, I don’t know if things will accidentally change somehow or not.

          2. Deb, just keep doing what you are doing… you are eating healthy and no matter your weight, should be very healthy.

            And who knows… you could end up like some famous comedienne or another who said she gave up trying to lose weight and to her surprise, the weight just fell off. ‘-)

            1. Laughing, that is sweet. Thanks for the encouragement.

              I agree that I am eating all healthy foods. 7 days a week.

              I have zero food cravings. I don’t need sweets. I don’t crave junk food or chocolate or soda or anything other than my soy Matcha tea latte.

              That is already amazing.

              I did watch some videos tonight from the Nutritarian side and I think I am figuring out that I am falling halfway between the logic for Starch Solution and Nutritarian.

              I like the beans and greens and mushrooms and onions and berries focus better, and I like nuts and I really like avocado, so it is easier for me to imagine Nutritarian, but a woman who did a video of “Why you might not be losing weight on Nutritarian” almost just pushed me toward Starch Solution and that is fascinating because I have been watching what the Krocks in the Kitchen couple are doing and I thought I might end up there, but I listened to the “You might need to eat fewer nuts if you are doing dressing and you might need to eat 1/3 of an avocado and the you might need to list got longer and longer and longer and it became keep a food journal and count your nuts and the dressing has to be a tablespoon of it and I know that I am putting way more than a tablespoon on my giant salad and I am only eating an ounce and a half of nuts, but I probably am eating too much avocado and too much oil free dressing.

              Mostly, she is doing so much calculation and she is still having food cravings and I haven’t had any food cravings in a year and a half and she is eating food she isn’t thrilled with and I am liking my food, and she is waiting until she is hungry to eat and I can’t do that, unless I want to end up eating at 10 pm.

              I still like Nutritarian as a program but I don’t want to have to think so much about it. I would rather limit nuts and avocado to once a week or something and not have to do keeping a food journal and portioning sizes and I watched a video of a woman who lost 200 pounds with Nutritarian and I know that is possible. I can’t afford it and I am not able to just eat.

              I watched High Carb Hannah’s 10 Staple meals and I think I am going to go back and forth between the 2 and see how to do this.

              1. I also watched, “What I eat in a day” from her and I think I am watching her do things like be so hungry that she scarfs down her baby’s food and can’t eat her dinner.

                It is fascinating that I eat so close to Nutritarian that I probably only have a little bit to adjust, but got so turned off by that woman’s videos and I can’t even explain why except that Dr. Lisle simplifies and High Carb Hannah simplifies and the Krocks who are doing Nutritarian probably do simplify and I think she complicated things. Plus, she just spoke about things like she wasn’t satisfied or hungry. The Starch Solution people sold me on the simplicity and fullness and how comparatively inexpensive the food is.

                I haven’t moved to that because I like the beans and greens and mushrooms and onions and all the vegetables, plus, I can do it without cooking.

                If I have to only eat a tablespoon of dressing, I am not sure what will happen. Will I still really love the salads? I might not. And High Carb Hannah put her greens in a hashbrown dish which looked fascinating.

                1. You always like to have some sort of a project going, doncha Deb! :-) A lot of females beyond menopause gain, and have a hard time, losing weight. What do you think you want to lose, 20 pounds or more?

                  I find it amazing that some people eat more than a tablespoon or so of avocado a day. Why so much? All I need is a little bit in my raw veggie salad in lieu of oil. A few drops of ACV and lemon juice and, salad-wise, I’m good to go.

                  It’s very important to keep up the walking and other physical exercises if you want to lose weight — as I’m sure you know. More to it than just angsting over what to eat every day.

                  1. Also (and I’m just the “messenger” here!), humans are said to be going through huge changes, DNA-wise. If you google “Ascension Symptoms” you’ll find more than 1,000,000 search results. From: https://ascensionsymptoms.com/

                    “Changes in diet, appetite and eating habits; Sudden cravings for or aversions to certain foods; Unexplainable weight gain or loss.”

                    1. YR, Interesting explanation… sort of an all-encompassing theory.

                      In my younger years I would have explored it further… looked under the hood. But at my current stage of existence, I’m more interested in the hood itself. ‘-) That is, what is known rather than what is surmised.

                      I do agree we as humans are changing and as suggested, if I read that right, is caused by changes in our diet and maybe our interactions.

                      In my mind at least, the biggest change of all will be when the majority come to believe in longer, healthier lives. Just think how that will affect people in what used to be “old age.” Take an older couple for example. At present they are content to grow old together.

                      But if we prove the interventions that are being discovered to give not only a longer life but a healthy one, perhaps one member of that aging couple will be re-invigorated to live life more like when they were younger. If only one member of the couple feels this way, some sort of break-up may occur. Eventually a marriage may simply be a contract with an out clause for either party… no need for messy divorce.

                      Agreed we are different people than we were a few generations ago. Having grown up in a time when something like landing on the moon could hold the attention of the entire world, I wonder now if an event, even one like 911, could keep the world’s attention very long.

                      I suppose Ascension is as good a name for it as any, but I think the dynamics are too varied to be placed under one umbrella.

                      Not pointing my comments at you, the messenger… just some Sunday Morning ramblings.

                    2. “Not pointing my comments at you, the messenger… just some Sunday Morning ramblings.”
                      – – – – –

                      Beats sitting in a pew listening (enduring, more like it) blatherings from a preacher-man up thar’ in the pulpit. *_^

                    3. Also better than Kris Kristofferson’s:

                      Well I woke up Sunday mornin’, with no way to hold my head that didn’t hurt
                      And the beer I had for breakfast wasn’t bad, so I had one more, for dessert

                      ‘-)

                    4. Just realized I could have changed one word in that first line (head for hand.)

                      Well I woke up Sunday mornin’, with no way to hold my hand that didn’t hurt

                      Reason is I was filling a small stew pot with water from my water boiler and got it right up to the rim before a misstep that caused the water to fall back onto my hand on the handle.

                      I first poured room temp water over it. Next, remembering how taking a Niacin took the pain away from a rolled ankle, I sprayed some Niacin water on the hand, then went and took a Niacin tablet. Then I rubbed some hemp oil on the hand and took some other things for inflammation and just waited for the pain to subside.

                      That all helped some but still did not take away the pain. So I found a small bottled drink in the fridge and wrapped my hand around that. That offered some relief for the palm but had to roll it around on the back to get temp relief there.

                      Finally, I remembered I had a quart-sized tub of yogurt in the fridge. I went there, opened it, and thrust my hand in up to my wrist. Boy did that feel good. Left it there as long as the yogurt felt cool… even had to move my hand around in the yogurt to find a cool place as the yogurt apparently was removing the heat from my hand.

                      Long story shortened, the pain subsided to the point I was able to sleep without pain. Being up and about and using the hand (to type this) I’m only feeling mild discomfort. I’ve just taken another Niacinimide tablet and will probably feel a flush that will cause me to totally forget about my hand discomfort. ‘-)

                      Only one blister in the form of a ring that only circles the top of my middle finger and one small one on my palm near the same finger. Yay!

                    5. “….before a misstep that caused the water to fall back onto my hand on the handle.”
                      – – – – –

                      Aren’t Mercury retrograde transits FUN?

                    6. Aren’t Mercury retrograde transits FUN?
                      ——————————————————-
                      Heh, well this is my first thing like this in all my 69 years and 65 months… so I guess I can tolerate one of these in that time span.

                      I was just thinking back… I once drove a Mercury Comet (loved that car) and later a Mercury Montego… does that qualify as a Mercury transit? ‘-)

                      (Uh oh… just noticed 3 more hard blisters on the palm side of two of my fingers. Is there a moon sign called Blister Rising?)

                    7. And I just remembered a 1955 Mercury with Overdrive. Loved to let overdrive kick in and then let off the gas and just let ‘er coast. ‘-)

                    8. “(Is there a moon sign called Blister Rising?)”
                      – – – – – –

                      No, but there’s a tune called “Don’t Pop That Blister Rag.” (You won’t find it by googling…..)

                2. Well, I still am a Christian. Though I will say that I watched a little bit of a movie with that old school preaching and sometimes I feel like the preachers are pretty monotone and sometimes they are seriously flamboyant and somewhere in between, you find one who spent his week out on the streets helping people get off drugs and helping the poor and visiting people at the hospitals or supporting missions in seriously dark parts of the world and those are ones that I used to sometimes go to church all week long to listen. We called that the Gospel with feet.

                  There are people like Richard Wurmbrand where he and his wife went through the Holocaust and all of her family was killed and after the war a NAZI who was afraid for his life because of how many people wanted to kill him. He hid in their house and bragged about killing Jewish people and what I remember is that Sabina was very ill and Richard said something like, “My wife’s family was in that concentration camp. You may have killed her family. But what I will tell you is that we can go wake my wife up right now and tell her about it and she will welcome you with open arms of love.” And he woke his wife up and even though she was very ill, she sweetly greeted the NAZI and spoke words of the love of Christ toward him.

                  Fast forward, and they end up in the Russian ruled side of the world and both of them end up in Russian versions of Concentration Camps and Richard got beaten every single day for 14 years, unless he would renounce his faith, but he would get beaten to a pulp and come in the other room and start singing worship songs.

                  I could do stories from Korea or China or Viet Nam or other World War II, people like Corrie ten Boom, who also reached out a loving hand to the man who may have killed some of the 6 relatives who died in the concentration camp they were in and she forgave him and I love church when it is like that.

                  Or David Wilkerson getting gang members off of drugs and one of the ones he got off of drugs was one of the pastors I went to church and listened to for years. He passed away, but you can’t beat a good church service.

                  1. One Sunday morning back when I was a fidgety little Catholic kid (maybe I was 3 years old or so) my family happened to sit near the front of the church, not far from where the priest was giving the sermon. He droned on and on and on and on. Finally, in a very loud voice so the whole church could hear, I yelled, “Mama! Make that man be quiet!”

                    (I can’t remember if this shut him up or what.)

                    1. Laughing.

                      That is a funny story.

                      That doesn’t surprise me at all.

                      I have felt that way at times.

                      I fell asleep during my great-aunt’s funeral, and really, really, really wanted to say, “Could you stop talking now, please?”

                      It was all the exact same monotone, long-winded, formal, not really saying anything at all ceremony.

                      It was so opposite of the funerals my family always had, where there was generally funny stories and slight tearing up and a lot of laughter.

                      I had never been to a boring funeral before, and some of us who don’t sleep at night tried valiantly to hold one eye open, but the man speaking was like white noise.

                    2. I was talking about the Holocaust and a psychiatrist was a guest of Pam Poppers and he wrote a paper that the Holocaust may not ever have happened without psychiatrists.

                      I do know that Hitler personally thanked Davenport from Harvard for the inspiration, but I didn’t know that there were psychiatrists wanting to kill people before Hitler was on the scene.

                      That does not surprise me at all.

                      http://breggin.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/psychiatrysrole.pbreggin.1993.pdf

                    3. Stalin corresponded with eugenics supporters, too, and invited one to come watch what he was doing in Russia.

                      I wonder if that was the psychiatry movement, too.

                      I know that Margaret Sanger also thanked Davenport and I wonder how many people Davenport inspired to do mass killings.

                      I guess if you count the people who read the books of people like Stalin, as the leader of North Korea did, he might be the instigator of a whole lot of killing.

                      I am not a history major. I just do know that he was thanked by some interesting people for giving a justification to kill people. I just didn’t know about the psychiatrists, but it was interesting reading other concepts by the man who wrote the article. I feel like modern psychiatry is often still almost as bad a One Flew Over the Cuckoos nest. Minus some of the lobotomies and electroshock therapies given without permission. But the drugs really do mess people up so much and so does being in the system.

                      I know a lot of people who were put on drugs, got so much worse that they end up in institutions, then, get off the drugs and they are better again and it was just that they were going through difficult situations and didn’t have proper coping skills.

                      The Sybil Exposed story is one of the most ridiculous multiple cases of abuse of power stories there is.

                      Anyway, I am not a history major, but I have seen so many people really messed up by psychiatry and psychology, when they might have gotten better if they ate enough vegetables.

                    4. I wonder why it was America which doesn’t want the real story of the German psychiatric death camps.

                      The fact that Germany owned up to them and America doesn’t want its people to know tells me that we may really have been behind all of it.

                    5. I am really disturbed that information like that was blackballed from our press and our journals and still was being blackballed for decades after the war.

                      Are we going to have wanted people killed and meddled in elections and put people like Hitler and maybe Stalin and Mussolini in power? Was Harvard helping with more than inspiration?

                      Who has the power to silence the press and keep verified information out of journals?

                    6. And I know that I don’t have a strong enough memory to get every detail right, but how many Jewish people escaped the gas chambers and came to America and died from the same companies.

  18. For what it is worth, the Indian national Dietary Guidelines advise

    ‘Washing
    The first step in the removal of pesticide residues from the food products is
    washing. About 75-80% of pesticide residues are removed by cold water washing.
    Washing with 2% of salt water will remove most of the contact pesticide residues that
    normally appear on the surface of the vegetables and fruits.
    The pesticide residues that are on the surface of the grapes, apples, guava,
    plums, mangoes, peaches, pears etc, vegetables like tomatoes, brinjal, okra require
    2-3 washings. The green leafy vegetables must be washed with 2% salt water. The
    pesticide residues from green leafy vegetables is removed satisfactorily by normal
    processing such as washing, blanching and cooking.’
    http://ninindia.org/DietaryGuidelinesforNINwebsite.pdf

  19. A little off topic but this latest study on nut consumption.was published recently.

    “ADELAIDE, Australia — Nuts have always been viewed as a healthy snack and great source of protein, but new research suggests that a steady, hardy diet of nuts can also sustain mental sharpness and cognition as we age.

    Conducted at the University of South Australia, the study found that consuming more than 10 grams of nuts per day led to improved mental functioning and thinking, and better memory and reasoning. The study consisted of 4,822 Chinese adults aged 55 or older.”

    https://www.studyfinds.org/daily-dose-nuts-key-to-staying-sharp-in-old-age/

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12603-018-1122-5

    1. Hal, I thought it interesting, but the researchers raised a flag for me. They concluded peanuts especially were effective due to their anti inflammatory properties. While no doubt the do have all kinds of phyto nutrients Dr Greger also talking about damaging AGE’s … peants and nut butters were iff the charts. Also, I think it matters what population you test them on. In me, inflammation levels rise with peanuts or nut butters. any nuts actually. I am finding that so many studies have little relevance to us as long term wfpb eaters.

      1. Barb, you raise some good points. And I agree, as individuals, we all need to tailor the WPF diet to what works for each of us. I do eat a few nuts a day, mostly walnuts, pecans, a few cashews, and a few almonds, but no peanuts. And the 10 grams mentioned in the study is around 1/3 oz. which isn’t much.

        1. Agreed Hal, and it is amazing that such a modest amount can make a real difference! That would be something that most people can incorporate into their diet easily… tossing some nuts onto oatmeal or a salad for example. I do recall Dr Greger saying that he no longer toasts walnuts (which he loves!) and also uses raw nut butters to cut down the AGE’ s If a person is eating a whole food diet mostly, a few roasted nuts are not going to amount to a lot of AGE’ s . I keep a cup of walnuts in the freezer for the odd time I use them, but other varieties are too addictive for me to keep in the house!

    2. Hal,

      Yes and that is why I have been holding on to nuts and avocado.

      I think they really have helped my brain but I am not losing weight and it is a choice between risk factors and I don’t know how to process that.

  20. what about pesticides and whole wheat products? given the structure of the wheat kernel and assuming that almost all of the pesticide is on the covering of the kernel doesn’t that mean that white wheat flour will have almost no pesticide residue and whole wheat flour will have lots of it? (i mean non-organicly grown wheat.)

  21. How about rock salt? Could this be a cheaper alternative to table salt? 10% salt solution could run into significant money with the quantity of produce I need to wash!

  22. Also….

    Salt itself is hardly non-toxic–maybe as toxic as some of the pesticides. And the sodium intake coming from the salt residue on multiple pounds of washed produce could easily have negative health consequences.

  23. Consumer Reports says that soaking fruits and veggies 15 min in water plus baking soda is the most effective. is this wrong?

  24. Vanessa,

    First in the suggested use of baking soda study they used apples and found that post pesticide application of 24hr there was penetration of the chemicals within the skin, not affected by the use of baking soda. With that said we also need to recognize that the study: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03118?source=cen focused on only a few pesticides and did not use the salt approach as a comparison.

    In terms of timing, a 15 minute exposure for veggie/fruit preparing is a long time that most of us will not do. The use of the salt remains very cost effective, easy and one of the two methods to consider when addressing the residual concern.

    It would be interesting to see a chart of common pesticides per item and best method/s of removal….. What would be the result of using both approaches simultaneously ?

    Until that time the use of baking soda and salt washes should be our go to after….. buying organic.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    1. I struggle with this when I saw this video what popped out at me was 1 out of 10 times the organic produce had pesticide residue.( I have ate half an organic orange with my oatmeal the last few months) . Not knowing really how to approach it out of frustration today I finally added a tablesppon of salt to a 1\2 cup water in a bowl and drenched a washcloth in it and rubbed the outside of the orange with it a couple of times and then rinsed the orange under running water, What do you think?

    1. Can I use ozonated water from my laundry system?
      ———————————————————————–
      I don’t have an answer to your question… rather a question of you. Are you saying you have an ionizing system for your laundry or is ozonated something less expensive? Just curious.

  25. When this very practical video originally appeared, a friend tried it. Here are his questions and concerns:

    1. What type of salt, as there are many kinds and price varies?

    2. My friend used sea salt, but it didn’t dissolve well.

    3. What is the science behind how the salt removes the residues?

    4. What about oil-based pesticides? Does the salt water wash work on those?

    5. Does the wash also remove nutrients?

    6. To what extent do the toxins in pesticides penetrate through the outer surface of the fruit/veg, rendering it difficult to wash away?

  26. What type of salt is recommended/ used in these studies? Do you have to throw away salt rinse every time you use it or can you use it for several batches?

  27. With all the bacteria-laden food recalls lately, I want to use something that also kills bacteria. That’s why I use vinegar. Would love to know if there are studies on this issue.

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