Top 10 Most Popular Videos of 2018

Thanks to the collective enthusiasm for sharing NutritionFacts.org by our subscribers, Twitter and Instagram followers, and over 1.5 million Facebook and G+ fans, we averaged millions of video views a month this year. But it’s not about the numbers; it’s about the people whose lives we’ve touched, changed, or even saved. That is why I’ve dedicated my life to this work. A heartfelt thank you to everyone who has made this public service possible.

NutritionFacts.org arises from my annual review of the medical literature. With the help of a team of hundreds of volunteers, we churned through tens of thousands of papers published in the peer-reviewed scientific nutrition literature and are ramping up to break new records in 2019. How do I choose which studies to highlight? In general, I strive to focus on the most groundbreaking, interesting, and useful findings; but which topics resonate the most? Is it the practical ones, offering cooking or shopping tips? Or those that dissect the studies behind the headlines? Maybe it’s the geeky science ones exploring the wonderfully weird world of human biology? As you can see from the below list, the answer seems to be a bit of all of the above:

#10 Benefits of Lentils and Chickpeas

Too many people know beans about beans…until now! In this video, lentils and garbanzo beans were put to the test. Benefits of Beans for Peripheral Vascular Disease was another popular one, exploring the question: Do legumes just work to prevent disease or can they help treat and reverse it as well?

 

#9 Does Adding Milk Block the Benefits of Coffee?

Coffee videos are perpetual favorites. A similar effect was found for fruit and tea: Benefits of Blueberries for Blood Pressure May Be Blocked by Yogurt. And you don’t want to mess around with berry benefits. See two other faves from this year Benefits of Blueberries for the Brain and Benefits of Blueberries for Artery Function.

 

#8 Benefits of a Macrobiotic Diet for Diabetes

I’m glad I finally got around to macrobiotic diets, and seems folks agreed. This is a good one to share with your low carb friends. I also did one on the Pros and Cons of Macrobiotic Diets

 

 

#7 Is It Better to Drink a Little Alcohol than None at All? 

The best available balance of evidence is taking a decided shift on alcohol. Check out the video to see why. Others in this video series included Can Alcohol Cause Cancer?, The Best Source of Resveratrol, and Do Any Benefits of Alcohol Outweigh the Risks? 

 

#6 Is Organic Meat Less Carcinogenic? 

Organic and conventional meat were put to the test for 33 different carcinogens. It’s a question I get a lot, and I’m glad there’s finally data to share.

 

 

#5 The Weight Loss Program that Got Better with Time 

The most well-published community-based lifestyle intervention in the medical literature is also one of the most effective. You know I’m definitely going to be talking about it in my upcoming new book on weight control. Others in this series are What Is the Optimal Diet?, CHIP: The Complete Health Improvement Program, and A Workplace Wellness Program that Works.

 

#4 The Effects of Avocados on Inflammation

Guac this way? Find out, as the impact of high-fat plant foods—avocados, peanuts, walnuts—and olive oil are put to the test. The other one I did this year was also popular: Are Avocados Good for You? 

 

 

#3 The First Studies on Vegetarian Athletes

Meat-eating athletes are put to the test against veg athletes and even sedentary plant-eaters in feats of endurance at Yale. The other two in the series were The Gladiator Diet – How Vegetarian Athletes Stack Up and Vegetarian Muscle Power, Strength, and Endurance.

 

#2 Dining by Traffic Light: Green Is for Go, Red Is for Stop

The most popular video of 2017 was Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen Checklist explaining one of the tools I unveiled in How Not to Die. Here’s the other one, my traffic light system for ranking the relative healthfulness of Green Light vs. Yellow Light vs. Red Light foods.

 

#1 The Best Advice on Diet and Cancer 

The most popular this year was a video I built around one of T. Colin Campbell’s new papers. I also did How to Win the War on Cancer, which details the tragic ineffectiveness of many chemotherapy treatments. But the good news is that the vast majority of premature death and disability is preventable with an evidence-based diet and other healthy lifestyle behaviors. So make 2019 your year to wrestle control back over your health destiny.

And for some New Year, New You inspiration read through the responses on Instagram when I asked everyone what they learned from reading How Not to Die

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Discuss

Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.


21 responses to “Top 10 Most Popular Videos of 2018

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  1. Hi Doc., I haven’t found the talk discussing whether freeze dried reduces nutritive value substantially. I recently started getting freeze dried vegetables in powdered form. The advantages for me are great to have a powder of vegetables and herbs that last in the closet and may be easily added to water. Thank you, would you please address the freeze dried powder form of veggies and herbs.

  2. Dr G, you don’t mention what form of vitamin D you take..,,D3 or D2?

    Also, if you do take D3, is it vegan or from sheep wool? Thank you.

      1. Interesting to me that he recommends animal source vitamin D as well.

        Makes me wonder if he’s all vegan…as I wonder if he personally takes the sheep’s wool derived D3. You know his choice?

        1. Laughing.

          I am going to take an educated guess from what I have learned about Dr. Greger.

          He will be someone who loves the vegan community and would choose vegan D3, but he is also someone who is practical and who is running a site where very, very, very few vegans show up and I suspect he is more concerned about peoples’ health-oriented than political about some issues.

          I say it because he used to be a burger guy when he was young and he is not quite so “all vegan” that he is worried about whether insects die in organic farming and that is on the record with his logic that organic is better than Roundup.

          Okay, that is my take on him. He is a sweetheart, people-pleasing, happy, vegan-loving, WFPB type of guy.

          To me, he hasn’t dumped all of the non-vegans off of the bus and he keeps being happy and wonderful, so that is my hunch.

          1. He will be someone who takes vegan D3 because it exists.

            And, he is not so legalistic about it that he is worried about organic farming.

            1. Dr Greger,

              I could be wrong, but I think you would choose vegan if it is an option.

              Plus, I don’t think you would want to offend vegans.

              But you are strong enough to be a voice about why vegans can support organic farming.

              Bravo for that.

        2. Let’s remember that the site’s name is nutritionfacts.org – not veganadvocacy.org.

          I think that Dr Greger is principled enough to base his recomjmmendations on what the science shows rather than on his personal preferences. There is no evidence to my knowledge that either plant or animal sourced D3 is superior to the other.

  3. Looking at this amazing list, you must feel great pride and satisfaction Dr Greger. At least, I would hope you do! Your ability to compile healthful, helpful information and deliver it with clear explanations is really remarkable. I thank you so much for all that you do.

    1. Barb, I whole-heartedly second your statements about this website! I have been a regular visitor here for about 5 years now and have learned so much. It’s the primary website that convinced me to adopt the human diet (WFPB). (That is, the diet for which humans are physiologically adapted to.)

      And thinking back to a post I believe you made a few days ago, many of us who have been visiting this website for many years, do fondly miss Thea!

  4. Wow, that is a fascinating list.

    Perhaps a little “Can I still get away with my vices?” topic-heavy.
    Followed by diets and specific foods.
    Very few “special topics” on the list. Cancer, Inflammation, and Diabetes.
    But Cancer tops the list. That one doesn’t surprise me at all.

    I went to about 50 YouTube videos on Cancer yesterday and posted the logic for water fasting. I will go back and do WFPB next, but I want people to not need surgery and now that I have tried both with my dog, fasting does things quicker. I am going to post on every video I can find over and over and over again because they cut and poison and burn people rather than starting with immunotherapy – and because they raised the price of immunotherapy from $5000 to upward of $500,000 for the top-line immunotherapy and insurance won’t pay it. My dog looks so good now, but my brother won’t get offered immunotherapy until he removes his kidney and gets it back. That motivates me to spread the logic of a free way to deal with it wide and far. Also, when I started going through the Cancer videos, there are a whole lot of videos where people weren’t trying anything. They were just announcing that doctors told them that there was nothing they could do and they would just die and those people weren’t in bed. Those people were walking around and still could have been trying things. I gotta give them things to try.

    If I were doing a personal top 10 list, mine would be more the geeky science videos. I love those so much.

  5. Instagram is a fun audience. They are a little more talkative than Care2. A lot less conversational than here, but they read the questions and participate. That is pretty cool.

  6. Fear is a powerful emotion. It can be good or it can be bad. It makes everything look subjective and makes you feel alive as you feel it. Some people learn in hospitals. Others become bad diet entrepreneurs and make others die. But if you learn from here your chances improve. You have the aspiring centenarians, the people diagnosed with a disease, the world helpers, the diet metricians, the ones looking for the extra competitive edge, etc. It is about for the same thing.

  7. I am cooking lunches for my brother and I am so grateful that I have spent the past year learning here because I don’t even understand how people who start at a diagnoses process the information.

    I am handing him the Prolon fasting soups tomorrow, even though I will also make a vegan no oil dish. Hoping he chooses Prolon or Gerson.

    And if Tom reads this, I am not saying instead of medical care. I am saying that mimicking fasting and calorie restriction do a similar mechanism to immunotherapy and they aren’t going to offer it to him.

    I know that anecdotal evidence doesn’t count, but if he does this and his tumor shrinks I am going to be just like Chris, except not writing books or putting up websites or recommending a whole range of things. I will be the annoying “Try it for 48 hours” person at such a high level. My dog looks so good now. I can’t even handle that all the symptoms went away. I am supposed to contact the vet again soon and he has obviously figured out that I am not giving him steroids and that he isn’t dead, but I feel almost like I need to call after hours because if he does another put down as if I didn’t accomplish anything, I will be so upset, but I know him getting well is anecdotal evidence.

    I am more afraid of him not trying it at all because of trusting doctors so much and I don’t even know how he and I came from the same family, except maybe that I came from abuse and learned that you can’t always trust authority figures and maybe he never learned that. I think he didn’t.

    1. I have honestly already crossed over.

      They priced Cancer patients out.

      I watch the sweet St. Jude’s ad and they give free care to the families and I watch the Shriner’s hospital ad and those two just became my go-to charities. I think I have given to American Cancer Society in lieu of flowers and maybe even designated to them. Nope.

      A half million dollars for one dose of immunotherapy just turned me into Rambo. Somehow I have to get past rebelliousness, God help me.

      But I watched the videos of the people who already have their RIP videos up, them sobbing and struggling to say the sentences and them not being offered immunotherapy because it is only for wealthy people…..

      I might not be able to talk my brother into Mimicking fasting or Water fasting, but everybody in my life is going to hear about it and I will put copies of How Not To Die in hospital waiting rooms, but there is going to be a water and mimicking fasting paper in it.

      1. And I am going to add that I don’t mind that Mimicking Fasting ProLon diet charges $250 for a week’s worth of soup but, everybody getting wealthy off of truly sick people and those people going homeless is the current system.

        1. Deb, not sure if you have seen this interview with Dr Longo or not, https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iE__akaI6iI but I was surprised by some things he talked about. Around the 30 min mark and onwards he starts taking about intermittant fasting, and some effects that are not good, like higher incidence of gallstones when people fast longer than 14 hrs regularly. Also, some people shouldn’t fast, like those with heart disease where missing breakfast increases the disease. Presumably this will be discussed in a new book or whatever. It’s worth watching.

          Anyway, just saying, I feel I have to be very cautious in suggesting any health related idea to people. I do feel confident in recommending this website to them for further research, and try to focus on what I am eating instead ie whole fruits, veggies, beans, grains.

  8. Hello everyone

    I love nutrionfacts.org, I think it’s an incredible idea and I love the fact that it has the Wikipedia scheme of being supported by donations. That been said I think that we sponsors shouldn’t be able to appear on a list or even worse have a link like some of them do. This might not sound as much but for example Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD has a link to his webpage where he sales products. That’s in direct contradiction with the idea of no sponsorship.

    If we truly want to be independent the sponsors don’t need to be shown

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