The Effects of Avocados on Inflammation

The Effects of Avocados on Inflammation
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The impact of high-fat plant foods—avocados, peanuts, walnuts—and olive oil put to the test.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In the preface of How Not to Die, after bemoaning the fact that I never got taken out to dinner by “Big Broccoli,” I wrote that you’ll never probably see an ad on TV for whole natural foods, because there’s just not much of a markup. They’re not shelf-stable, you can’t brand them, patent them, trademark them. Real food just isn’t as profitable as junk. But, I may have to eat those words: there was evidently a TV ad for avocados, and, during the Super Bowl, no less. Not like avocado-flavored Doritos or something, but an ad for the actual fruit—thanks to billions of avocados sold every year, giving the Avocado Board $50 million, not only for ads, but for research.

I previously touched on their burger study, in which adding avocado blunted the spike in inflammation one gets within hours of eating meat. They added more fat, more calories, but got less inflammation—perhaps because they were adding that fat and calories in the form of a whole plant food, which tends to be packed with antioxidants, which can inhibit the formation of oxidized fats that are formed when meat is cooked and when it hits your stomach acid.

Do other high-fat, high-calorie, whole plant foods have the same protective effect? What about peanuts, for example? We didn’t know… until, now. Not to be outdone by Big Guac, the Peanut Institute funded this study with the understanding that most of us spend most of our waking hours “in a postprandial state”—in other words, an after-meal state. And, the fat coursing through our systems from those meals “is a well-recognized risk factor for atherosclerosis,” the #1 killer of men and women, and manifests as “impaired endothelial function”—meaning crippled artery function, within hours of a crappy meal, like a milkshake: 1,200 calories of mostly sugar and heavy cream. Okay, but what if you drank that same milkshake with three ounces of peanuts added? Now, to match up the added fat and protein, they had to add some oil and egg whites, and even threw in a fiber supplement to try to match the nutritional profile of the added peanuts as closely as possible. So, here you have two milkshakes, pretty much same calories, same amount of sugar, same amount of protein, same amount of fat—same amount of saturated fat, same fiber. So, on paper, they should cause the same reaction in the body. But peanuts are whole plant foods, and so, what you don’t see listed here are the thousands of phytonutrients in the peanut milkshake, missing from the non-peanut milkshake. Would it make any difference? That’s what the study aimed to find out.

This is showing artery function before either milkshake is ingested: the ability of our arteries to relax and dilate normally. Within hours of consuming the non-peanut milkshake, all that saturated fat and sugar clamps artery function down about 20%—one milkshake! Okay, but what if you ate the same amount of sugar and saturated fat but with a little real food floating in there? No significant drop. So, the peanuts helped preserve artery function in response to the endothelial insult, a “cardioprotective effect” presumably due to the active phytonutrients in peanuts.

Now, walnuts may work even better. Eat a salami-and-cheese sandwich with some olive oil, and artery function plummets like a third. But, replace that olive oil with the same amount of plant fat in the form of whole walnuts, and you don’t just blunt the effect of the salami-and-cheese, but reverse it—ending up actually better than you started out.

What about avocados? “Research indicates that [calorie]-dense foods increase inflammation and oxida[tion], thereby contributing to the development of [artery] disease. However, it is not clear whether the high [calorie] load alone, irrespective of the nutritional content of the ingested food, produces [that] postprandial [after-the-meal] oxidative and inflammatory activity.” So, what this study did was compare the impact of high-calorie junk, high-fat, high-sugar ice cream, a “phytonutrient-reduced food”—that’s an understatement­—compared to the effects of the exact same number of calories from a calorie-dense, phytonutrient-rich, whole plant food: avocado. If it’s just the concentration of calories, the concentration of fat, they should have the same effect. They tested reactions to four different meals: ice cream versus avocado, versus just the fat and protein from the ice cream to separate out the sugar, and then just the amount of sugar in the ice cream, to separate out the effects of the saturated butterfat.

So, two pints of ice cream, versus just the cream, versus just the sugar—no fat, versus about four avocados, which ends up having about three times the fat as ice cream, and the same amount of saturated fat, and the same whopping load of calories. Okay, so what happened? Eat the ice cream, or just the sugar-free components, or just the sugar, and the level of oxidative stress in people’s bloodstreams goes up. But “this is not observed after ingestion of a [calorie]-equivalent [whole plant] food.”

“Unlike [the] ice cream, ingestion of the whole-food avocado,” even though it’s packed with calories and fat, “did not produce a rise in oxidative or inflammatory activity,…suggest[ing] that the [after-meal] oxidative stress observed after eating foods such as ice cream may be due to their isolation from [nutrients like] antioxidants.”

Sugar is okay in fruit form, because it comes naturally prepackaged with phytonutrients. Similarly, the fat in whole plant foods, like nuts and avocados, comes prepackaged “with a rich matrix of phytochemicals [and] therefore does not demonstrate the same potential for oxidative damage.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: tookapic via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In the preface of How Not to Die, after bemoaning the fact that I never got taken out to dinner by “Big Broccoli,” I wrote that you’ll never probably see an ad on TV for whole natural foods, because there’s just not much of a markup. They’re not shelf-stable, you can’t brand them, patent them, trademark them. Real food just isn’t as profitable as junk. But, I may have to eat those words: there was evidently a TV ad for avocados, and, during the Super Bowl, no less. Not like avocado-flavored Doritos or something, but an ad for the actual fruit—thanks to billions of avocados sold every year, giving the Avocado Board $50 million, not only for ads, but for research.

I previously touched on their burger study, in which adding avocado blunted the spike in inflammation one gets within hours of eating meat. They added more fat, more calories, but got less inflammation—perhaps because they were adding that fat and calories in the form of a whole plant food, which tends to be packed with antioxidants, which can inhibit the formation of oxidized fats that are formed when meat is cooked and when it hits your stomach acid.

Do other high-fat, high-calorie, whole plant foods have the same protective effect? What about peanuts, for example? We didn’t know… until, now. Not to be outdone by Big Guac, the Peanut Institute funded this study with the understanding that most of us spend most of our waking hours “in a postprandial state”—in other words, an after-meal state. And, the fat coursing through our systems from those meals “is a well-recognized risk factor for atherosclerosis,” the #1 killer of men and women, and manifests as “impaired endothelial function”—meaning crippled artery function, within hours of a crappy meal, like a milkshake: 1,200 calories of mostly sugar and heavy cream. Okay, but what if you drank that same milkshake with three ounces of peanuts added? Now, to match up the added fat and protein, they had to add some oil and egg whites, and even threw in a fiber supplement to try to match the nutritional profile of the added peanuts as closely as possible. So, here you have two milkshakes, pretty much same calories, same amount of sugar, same amount of protein, same amount of fat—same amount of saturated fat, same fiber. So, on paper, they should cause the same reaction in the body. But peanuts are whole plant foods, and so, what you don’t see listed here are the thousands of phytonutrients in the peanut milkshake, missing from the non-peanut milkshake. Would it make any difference? That’s what the study aimed to find out.

This is showing artery function before either milkshake is ingested: the ability of our arteries to relax and dilate normally. Within hours of consuming the non-peanut milkshake, all that saturated fat and sugar clamps artery function down about 20%—one milkshake! Okay, but what if you ate the same amount of sugar and saturated fat but with a little real food floating in there? No significant drop. So, the peanuts helped preserve artery function in response to the endothelial insult, a “cardioprotective effect” presumably due to the active phytonutrients in peanuts.

Now, walnuts may work even better. Eat a salami-and-cheese sandwich with some olive oil, and artery function plummets like a third. But, replace that olive oil with the same amount of plant fat in the form of whole walnuts, and you don’t just blunt the effect of the salami-and-cheese, but reverse it—ending up actually better than you started out.

What about avocados? “Research indicates that [calorie]-dense foods increase inflammation and oxida[tion], thereby contributing to the development of [artery] disease. However, it is not clear whether the high [calorie] load alone, irrespective of the nutritional content of the ingested food, produces [that] postprandial [after-the-meal] oxidative and inflammatory activity.” So, what this study did was compare the impact of high-calorie junk, high-fat, high-sugar ice cream, a “phytonutrient-reduced food”—that’s an understatement­—compared to the effects of the exact same number of calories from a calorie-dense, phytonutrient-rich, whole plant food: avocado. If it’s just the concentration of calories, the concentration of fat, they should have the same effect. They tested reactions to four different meals: ice cream versus avocado, versus just the fat and protein from the ice cream to separate out the sugar, and then just the amount of sugar in the ice cream, to separate out the effects of the saturated butterfat.

So, two pints of ice cream, versus just the cream, versus just the sugar—no fat, versus about four avocados, which ends up having about three times the fat as ice cream, and the same amount of saturated fat, and the same whopping load of calories. Okay, so what happened? Eat the ice cream, or just the sugar-free components, or just the sugar, and the level of oxidative stress in people’s bloodstreams goes up. But “this is not observed after ingestion of a [calorie]-equivalent [whole plant] food.”

“Unlike [the] ice cream, ingestion of the whole-food avocado,” even though it’s packed with calories and fat, “did not produce a rise in oxidative or inflammatory activity,…suggest[ing] that the [after-meal] oxidative stress observed after eating foods such as ice cream may be due to their isolation from [nutrients like] antioxidants.”

Sugar is okay in fruit form, because it comes naturally prepackaged with phytonutrients. Similarly, the fat in whole plant foods, like nuts and avocados, comes prepackaged “with a rich matrix of phytochemicals [and] therefore does not demonstrate the same potential for oxidative damage.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: tookapic via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Recent videos on apples, autism, and now avocados? You can tell I’m back to the beginning of the alphabet. That’s how I cycle through my research to ensure broad coverage. So, for those interested in berry research, your dreams will soon come true. Those for whom zucchini is their favorite veggie, though, are in for a long wait. If there’s ever any topic that you’d like me to cover, just leave a comment below.

Want to read more from How Not to Die? Please do! All proceeds I receive from my books are donated to charity. My next book should be out in late 2019.

I also mentioned this video: The Effects of Avocados and Red Wine on Meal-Induced Inflammation. More on guac here:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

142 responses to “The Effects of Avocados on Inflammation

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  1. I recently got my copy of How Not To Die Cookbook (Amazon). I’ve only had time to try two recipes; but just surveying, this looks like an exceptionally good resource – for three reasons:

    1. The recipes are recognizable favorites – not the culinary esoterica that you can find in other WFPB cookbooks. Sometimes I find it’s hard to try something new that is completely unfamiliar. Everything in this cookbook seems to be within my willingness to try.
    2. The ingredients are recognizable; everything you need is available in a farmers’ market or grocery. The only unfamiliar ingredient I saw as I surveyed the recipes was white miso paste; but I found it in the refrigerated section at Sprouts.
    3. The photographs of the finished dishes are good quality and captivating. That’s an important attribute for a cookbook.

    The two I made so far are Red Quinoi Loaf (p. 156) and Champion Vegetable Chili (p. 66). Those went over very well here.

    100 + recipes to help prevent and reverse disease… now that feels good.

    drc

    1. You are going to cause me to buy the book again.

      I keep giving mine to people with health problems, but I am trying to feed my dog Whole Food Plant Based for his Cancer and I would like some of it to actually taste good.

      He likes the super foods, but I went a little over board and need to start with recipes, then, figure out how to adjust the nutrition properly from there.

  2. I have loved seeing all of your blogs and video blogs on various topics. Here is a random topic: Placenta capsules. There’s a grassroots movement in the natural childbirth arena that endorses women grinding their placentas into capsules to be imbibed after birth. Supposedly it helps with iron stores and stems off postpartum depression (all things that could probably be treated with a whole-food, plant-based diet). I have tried finding research on this topic and seeing if it’s been “put to the test.” However, as you’ve covered so many various topics that apply to pregnancy, I was wondering if you’d cover this one or at least something related to postnatal recovery with current recommendations versus a plant-based diet. Obviously, I am pregnant but I’m also a nurse practitioner that LOVES nutritionfacts.org and the fact that I can pass along this vital information to patients I treat. Thanks for all you do and for keeping me laughing while doing it.

        1. Eww, as if picking your nose isn’t gross enough, you’re implying it pairs with eating one’s findings? Gross! Though true for that one 7 y/o in class who “picks their nose and eats it!”

          I don’t know about every animal, but many do eat the afterbirth. I got to witness this in a feral cat friend of mine who I was able to help during pregnancy before her spay and release. It was impressive!! I never saw afterbirth before and it was pretty… intense, but it took her not 30 seconds (or so it seemed) to clean everything all up to the point you that you couldn’t tell she had just given birth (apart from her two kittens).
          But I’m not sure how I feel about humans consuming such things, personally.

          Loved your post Kate, that would be an interesting video and I think it’s so cool when people like you, in medical care, learn this stuff and pass it on to your patients!

          1. S, we don’t have to worry about predators coming after our babies after giving birth, so we don’t have to eat our placentas to get rid of the evidence.

            A couple of weeks ago a fawn was born in our front field. In the tall grasses I noticed a doe getting up & sitting back down several times. Then she got up & slowly walked out of the tall grasses onto the lawn. Behind her came the tiniest, little fawn I’ve ever seen – still wet & wobbling on its long, spindly legs. I watched from my front porch as the doe coaxed her newborn up into the woods. I could see she was still dilated. I’m sure there was afterbirth, & I’m sure the mother ate every trace of it. There are plenty of foxes & a few coyotes around here, too.

            1. Isn’t Mother Nature and all of her beautiful animals amazing! Even the tiniest creature has a way to hide from its enemies.

            2. That is amazing Nancy! You know I never actually thought about the predators but I kind of feel stupid not thinking about that, it makes perfect sense. I had assumed it was just to replenish which I imagine it probably does help with, but these animals don’t get time to rest and be cared for after giving birth in the way most humans do.

              Yes, YeahRight, I agree!!

      1. How’s about drinking your own urine…?
        Big stuff, especially in the political circles of India (and 1.32 billion Indians can’t be wrong!)

        Of course, you could try eating your own fecal matter. Although I haven’t been able to find a culture that would admit to subscribing to this practice (yet).

        1. And if 1.32 billion people jumped off a bridge? Kidding of course, didn’t think you were being too serious. But really, not all Indians drink urine.

    1. Unless you are desperately short of calories, there doesn’t seem to be any sciengtifically-established benefit from eating the placenta ….. and capsules would be neither here nor there in terms of calories anyway. I suppose it might theoretically help with iron deficiency but apparently a study showed no effect on women’s iron levels.

      However, the WHO has concluded that eating red meat is ‘probably carcinogenic’, and these capsules are just meat capsules so unless there is a good reason to take them, it might be wise to avoid. Since ther is no scientific evidence of benefit and very little evidence of harm, I doubt if there is enough scientific evidence available for Dr G to do a video on this topic.
      http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-16/placenta-eating-capsule-no-proven-benefits/9154026
      http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/ct-cdc-warns-against-placenta-pills-20170706-story.html

      It’s pretty scary the way that large numbers of people take up all sorts of weird and wonderful diets and supplements based on hype, internet claims and personal anecdotes. Mind you, on the other hand, it’s even more scary the way the medical system still performs all sorts of procedures for which there is little or no evidence of benefit and even for which there is evidence of actual harm
      https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/02/when-evidence-says-no-but-doctors-say-yes/517368/

      1. Agreed, TG.

        Speaking of the carcinogenic possibility in this circumstance, Dr. Greger’s video (wish I could remember the title) comes to mind where he explained why animal protein can cause cancer growth: because it’s so similar to our own. And so theoretically, he pointed out, human flesh could be especially cancer-promoting.

    2. Yea, you are right, eating the placenta after giving birth is a great thing – it saves some costs at the hospital, give you a good meal to restore you power after giving birth without to stress the personal of the hospital but, the most important thing, don’t forget it to record it on video by your husband…. it would be a shame if you can’t show it one day to your kids….

  3. This video highlighted the fact that most Americans spend their waking hours in a state of postprandial oxidative stress. I look forward to your series on intermittent fasting. I am a dedicated adherent to OMAD which is the most extreme form of intermittent fasting. After committing to the new lifestyle I can attest that there is no excessive hunger during the day and combining this mode of eating with the meal contents as suggested by Dr. Greger there are some significant health benefits! Lower blood pressure (113/70), lower cholesterol (137), lost 10 lbs and I wasn’t even trying to do that! BMI is now 19 so I haven’t fallen below the healthy range.

      1. Interesting, I haven’t digested the whole source, but it would go against what Longo et al are finding. Longo does say that IF is not very effective though. I can’t really fast since I had a heart attack 6 months ago, but I used to do 5 – 14 days when I was younger and training more.

      2. The article on intermittent fasting was interesting.

        I have just recently been incorporating intermittent fasting, but not whole day fasting.

        I have been doing more, time restricted eating. I am doing more, eat dinner early, no snacks after dinner and eat breakfast a few hours late.

        Not sure if it is doing something or not, because I was losing 2 pounds per week just doing WFPB before it and I am still losing 2 pounds per week using it, but I liked the logic that the fat stores get utilized.

        The mice studies of alternating every other day eat how ever much they wanted alternating with fasting, increasing factors toward Diabetes VERSUS the human study of eating normal and fasting on the third day improving insulin sensitivity is confusing for my mind to process.

        Restricted time still has a logic.

        I am trusting WFPB with preventing Diabetes, so I am just going to keep doing what I am doing for a while.

        1. I agree it’s confusing. I am not sure which study on humans with T2D you are referring to but I am familiar with the 5:2 diet for T2D reversal from the University of Tyne where on 2 nonconsecutive days calories are dropped to about 25% of the other days.
          In contrast to the rat study, there are no days of total fasting, and as Mirkin mentions, this could be key. As you most likely know, it seems that pretty much any diet that causes significant weight loss in overweight people with T2D can reverse the disease (this is not to say there are better and poorer ways to do this). Personally, I would not be very concerned about reasonable time-restricted eating based on this study. Dr. Mirkin, who has a family history of T2D, did not say that he or his wife have altered their eating pattern based on this one study (they eat only 1 or 2 meals per day. Also, studies all too often do not carry over to people. For another, as mentioned, time-restricted eating is quite different. I practice time-restricted eating, although following Mirkin’s advice, I now keep my fasting interval to 12-13 hours until more is known. I happen to just bump into this study:

          https://www.sciencealert.com/extreme-diet-reverse-type-2-diabetes-up-to-86-patients-remission-weight

          https://www.diabetes.org.uk/research/our-research-projects/scotland/the-direct-route-to-type-2-remission

          But here too there were no days when no food was eaten.

      3. Yes, I remember reading an obscure French study from back in 1998 or possibly1988 of extended fasting that reported that 3 of 16 participants (I think) developed type 2 diabetes. Can’t find it now of course ……

        Anyway, as Mirkin suggests, time restricted feeding might be a safer option than lengthy fasting.

        1. I believe there is currently no evidence to make such a claim that time restricted feeding might be a safer option than lengthy fasting.

          Dr. Longo and others subscribe to this vision off human frailty when it comes to prolonged fasting because they work with weak and sick people.

          We should accept that the literature is hinting at fasting, even for prolonged times is a natural mechanism found in humans that can be expected to be safe and possibly even beneficial. Fasting seems to happen in humans at the goldilocks zone of +4% body fat, anything else is properly called starvation.

          1. Netgogate You wrote: ‘I believe there is currently no evidence to make such a claim that time restricted feeding might be a safer option than lengthy fasting.’

            Evidence has already been cited of increased T2D risk with extended fasting but I am not aware of any studies that show increased health risks associated with time restricted feeding. So, unless you can cite evidence of increased risk of harm with TRF, I would have to say that you may be mistaken on this particular point.

          2. >>>We should accept that the literature is hinting at fasting, even for prolonged times is a natural mechanism found in humans that can be expected to be safe and possibly even beneficial.

            Why would anyone “hints” from “the literature”? Why should we expect it to be “safe”? Saying it is “possibly even beneficial” is not exactly a ringing endorsement. Seems to me the judicious thing to do is to avoid extremes until there is very solid evidence of lack of harms and proven significant benefits. The studies I’ve seen on reversing T2D using restricted calories alternate days of regular calories with fewer calories e.g. the 5:2 diet, rather than total fasting. I don’t recall ever seeing any convincing evidence that prolonged, total fasting is healthspan or lifespan increasing, despite its popularity in some circles. Think I’ll stick with time-restricted eating.

            1. Why would anyone “hints” from “the literature” ===> Why would anyone ***accept** “hints” from “the literature”.

              So much for cut and pasting without an edit button.

      4. Two problems

        1) Rats fasting 1 day would be the equivalent of 4 weeks in humans
        2) Humans are unique in having such fat reserve capacity, their fasting happens above 4% body fat, before we call it starvation. Rats are lean creatures, thus do we call it fasting or starving?

        1. Re point 1, this sounds overly simplistic.

          Re point2 rats in the wild may well be lean but lab rats? I think you need to provide some evidence for this claim.

    1. How is intermittent fasting different from yo-yo dieting which we have been told not to do because the body hangs onto fat and lowers metabolism when it senses starvation?

      1. I haven’t read all the comments on fasting, but based on my experience I think you raise a good point, Wegan.

        I’ve heard so much praise on fasting but all I experienced on a long term fast was depression, moodiness, headaches, etc. I experience the benefits I’ve read attributed to long or even hours long fasts simply from eating WFPB.
        I do like when I let my body relax and tend to prefer not to eat past a certain time at night, but not only did I actually find intermittent fasting time CONSUMING (everything was on this stressful food hour allowance schedule and that basically occupied my mind all day) and a bit maddening, but I hated the way it made me feel because I had to get my nutrition in such a small window that I didn’t really get to allow my body to get truly hungry between meals and my digestive system just felt overwhelmed. Also eating was not a relaxing or enjoyable experience.

      2. Hi I’m a health support volunteer. That is a great question. I think yo-yo dieting describes more of the process of go on and off sometimes rather unhealthy diets and gaining weight and loosing it and gaining weight and loosing it over and over again. . . I think the research on fasting is a little new. Dr. Greger has said he has some videos coming out for fasting but I don’t think they are up yet. I’m looking forward to it.

        Interestingly, the old idea of wanting fast metabolism is being called into question. Some are now saying fast metabolism speeds up everything- aging, disease process etc. We don’t want super slow metabolism, but we don’t want really fast metabolism either. Again, I think this research is relatively new.

        I think some experts recommend an initial longer fast at the beginning of a lifestyle change to break the cravings for unhealthy foods and lower dangerously high blood pressure and cholesterol etc. And then start a healthy diet and maintain it. Not a yo-yo diet. Maintenance fasting is usually more like 8-12 hours. I think part of the idea is, we evolved to not always have food around. There would always be periods without food and fasting is simulating that in a small way. The other thought is if your body is constantly metabolizing food, you don’t get to a catabolic state where your body can properly heal, like it does when you sleep.
        The Drs. at the True North Health Center are big proponents of fasting and you might like to read their thoughts on it.
        http://www.healthpromoting.com/water-fasting/fasting-research

        I will say, at this time, I’m not convinced it is necessary for health. Some people may benefit from it but honestly, I have NO desire to do. I fully embrace the whole foods plant based diet lifestyle but have NO desire to go hungry. I think it sounds miserable and as far as I know, Dr. Greger does not practice this himself. I figure I’ll fast about 7-8 hours every night while I sleep. We’ll have to look for more research as it comes out.

        NurseKelly

  4. Enjoying these type of videos. My interest lies in finding ways to (hopefully) sway friends, relatives… even enemies to find ways to ameliorate their unhealthy diet by finding counter-balance.

    1. Hey Lonie, there has been a lot of discussion here on nutritionfacts over the years about how to sway other people into better lifestyle patterns. It seems like the consensus that we usually arrive at is that unless they are swayed by science and evidence (most people aren’t unfortunately) and you can direct them to nutritionfacts, your best bet is to lead by example and wait until they are interested in why you are so darn healthy and trim.

      Suggesting that they change their eating patterns subtly implies that their diet is wrong and by extension that they are wrong and no one wants to be wrong. That would hurt their self-esteem. Until they show interest in change, confirmation bias, cherry picking anecdotes of people who ate poorly and lived a long time, and processed food makers will convince them that they are just fine the way they are. Unless you’re controlling their menu (kids and elderly parents) it’s an uphill battle to get people to change.

  5. The avocados are consumed raw, one of the other ingredients was peanuts. Are these the green ones out of the ground or dry roasted? Seems like that was missing. Most folks would not consume the raw peanuts. I think a comparison of raw to raw would be helpful. Even nuts that are considered raw have had some heat applied to avoid moisture and vermin and mold.

  6. i just really wish the Canadian and American governments could allow healthy eating to be properly taught in school… wish I had been taught it and now I have to try to learn and try to change and try to teach my daughter and wife…. and I feel so overwhelmed.

    Thank you NutritionalFacts.org

    1. That would be nice but it wouldn’t go over too well with the animal agriculture industries…

      t, instead of feeling overwhelmed, try thinking of it as something exciting and positive… you’re on the right track and you have all this amazing info available and power to utilize it! It can also be fun getting creative with healthy recipes.

    2. To be fair, the US Government (and most other governments for that matter) do provide a range of edicational materials to help people adopt and learn about healthy eating, which can be used in schools and elsewhere.
      https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/resources.asp

      Problematically though, they don’t incorporate WHO guidance about the carcinogenicity of meat. However, the guidelines do officially recognise that ‘vegetarian’ and ‘vegan’ eating patterns are a healthy choice which is an important step forward.
      https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-5/

      Unfortunately, the meat, egg and dairy industries provide many free resouces to schools etc supposedly providing information about healthy eating. There appears to be no law against this sort of thing. What happens all too often is the nutritional equivalent of Gresham’s Law whereby bad money drives out good money. Look at the success of keto/low carb diets, the equally incredible sucess of people like Atkins and Hyman etc etc. Ssomeone once wrote that Atkins was responsible for more (premature) deaths than World War 2 and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if this was actually true.

      1. What ridiculous claims. You are clearly choosing the set of studies on meat and cancer and ignoring other studies that show no correlation. Fair folks would rather recognize the fact that it isn’t settled science.

        Could you provide support for your claim that meat, egg, and dairy industries provide free resources to schools?

        And to suggest that low carb/keto interest is driven by corporate money is just crazy. It is as grass-roots as I can imagine for such a science based movement.

        And the claim about Atkins is just pure craziness. No wonder people often talk about zealots within the plant-based community as practicing a religion instead of science-based nutrition.

        1. I was referring to Tom, should have specified.

          David I suggest you read “How Not To Die” or simply actually watch the videos on this site.

          Animal agriculture has long been known to use their money and power to sway (to put it lightly) even politics.

          I’m no statistics expert but I think that information wouldn’t be impossible to figure… how many people had followed or have been influenced by Atkins, how many died of related diseases (mind you numbers are growing, people still take this approach), and how many people were killed in the war. I think someone actually did collect those numbers, I remember reading or hearing that as well.

        2. David

          These are just claims you have found on crank websites. Rhe report on meat and cancer was compiled by experts from 22 countries under the aegis of the inWHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer – huffing and puffing won’t change the facts. And I didn’t suggest that keto/low carb was driven by corporate money – read what I wrote again please.

          As for the meat, dairy and egg industries providing free ‘educational’ resources to schools etc, you only have to do a quick Google to find these. The cranks of course simply refuse to accept evidence and facts they do not like – like industry trying to influence the education of our kids.
          http://meatandeducation.redmeatinfo.com/resources
          http://thedairyalliance.com/teacher-resources/https://www.aeb.org/eggs-in-schools/schools/egg-ideas-resources/eggs-in-school-white-paper

          The claim about Atkins is extremely reasonable in the light of modern science – meat consumption is assocaited with cancer and heart disease, so is dairy fat consumption. You people are sadly living in denial of the facts – which is why the loons always accuse others of practising religion when in fact they are respecting what the facts show. They can’t argue based on the science so they make ad hominem attacks like these.n This religious claim is a sure sign that you are getting your views from cranks.

      2. Tom – also, the Kaiser Permanente organization – which is a health care insurance and management group – has formally adopted the message that a whole food plant based diet is the healthiest option and states so in its literature. It also recommends this site (among others) for good information on WFPB eating. Kaiser is a very large group in the Western United states and has the highest rating possible with Medicare. The American Dietetic Association has also endorsed whole food plant based eating as the healthy option.
        Getting people to pay attention is the challenge.

        1. Ruth

          Yes. They are not the only ones of course. Harvard recently announced the results of a study on meat consumption and mortality which found that a third of all deaths could be prevented by giving up eating meat
          https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/04/26/third-early-deaths-could-prevented-everyone-giving-meat-harvard/

          Harvard also assessed the effects of dairy fat consumption on cardiovascular disease risk

          “When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.”
          https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

          Given that Atkins promoted high consumption of dairy and meat foods, and his first book was published in 1972, and his beliefs have been eagerly adopted by people all around the world, the claim that he and the people he inspired are responsible for more premature deaths than WW2 may have some considerable truth to it.

          Of course, people like David simply to refuse to accept any evidence they don’t like and cling to observational studies which fail (for one reason or another) to control for significant confounding factors. They also cite carefully designed short term trials (often funded by the Atkins Foundation) which appear to show improvements in biomarkers from eating their way. But as the Twinkie Diet experiment showed, you can pretty much make any diet (however bad) improve biomarkers if you set it up in the ‘right’ way and you choose the ‘right’ study participants.

          That said, their dietary choices may be less unhealthy than the SAD which is high in trans fats and refined carbs and other processed foods. However, less unhealthy is not the same as healthy

          I thought it was perfectly delicious for a defender of Atkins to accuse people who eat a diet that the actual evidence shoiws is healthy (even the mainstream US dietary guidelines accept that properly planned ‘vegan’ and ‘vegetarian’ diets are healthful. they make no such statement about low cab and keto diets) of having a religious faith in their dietary approach. David appears completely blind to the irony of such an accusation.

          While this is quite funny, the sad thing is that people are still eating fdiets high in meat and dairy foods as Atkins advocated. How many needless deaths, heart attacks, strokes and cancers is this causing?

  7. Seems to me the only valid (though weak) results were concerning burger plus avocado, comparing one adulterated food (burger) with an added component of an unadulterated food (avocado). The other three experiments are questionable. They compared fats from a food (avocado) to food containing added isolated fats: sandwich + olive oil, milk shake + vegetable oils, ice cream – processed fats/sugars. Thus, the only conclusion I can draw is avocados are healthier (not necessarily healthy) than foods containing processed fats and sugar.

    1. My take home message is that phytonutrients in foods are necessary to counteract the oxidative and inflammatory effects of fat and sugar. Fat and sugar are inflammatory, no matter where they come from, and the phytonutrients in whole plant foods are necessary to ameliorate that damage.

      1. You can’t really claim that fat and sugar are damaging no matter what the source when whole plant foods containing high naturally occurring fats, such as walnuts, or high naturally occurring sugars, such as fruit, are shown to be anti inflammatory and improve health in various ways even by maintaining blood sugar levels to such extremes that simply adding some of these foods to essentially junk food meals can counteract some of the negative effects of meals so bad they could induce a heart attack.
        In actuality we need fat, but there are healthy sources and unhealthy sources.
        You can argue that because extracting and isolating fats from even healthy sources can have a negative impact on our health and so therefore fat in general is unhealthy, but then really, the source is changed – it’s no longer a whole plant food but a single thing extracted from it. I would also then argue that because we need fat and even sugar, these things can’t innately just be thought of as unhealthy but rather that depends solely on the source i.e are we getting these compounds in the package nature has designed for them to be delivered to us from?

        1. Howdy S! We CAN definitively say that fat by itself is bad… well, trans fat and oxidized fats anyway. Like you said, that’s not necessarily true for other types of fat. We also don’t need fats in our diet at all other than the two essential fatty acids, linoleic and alpha-linolenic which are found in plants. Our body is more than capable of making any other fat that it requires from a combination carbohydrates, alpha-linolenic fatty acid, and/or limoleic fatty acid.

          We don’t really need sugar either. We can get by without fruits and subsist on only complex carbohydrates and starches without any negative consequences. Our body and gut flora will break these down into simple sugars but we don’t need to ingest them. I can’t think of any situation where added sugar would be considered beneficial nutritionally other than to prevent a caloric deficit.

          1. “We also don’t need fats in our diet at all other than the two essential fatty acids” … a bit of an oxymoron don’t you think?
            So as you point out, indeed, we DO absolutely need fat, it is essential to our bodies in a multitude of ways and of course I was referring to the essential fats and by no coincidence these essential fats come in the packages nature had designed for us to receive them in.
            I could also argue that we do need sugar but like you point out, our bodies are capable of making them on their own if we eat the right fuel. However, it would be difficult to obtain one’s potential for optimal health without the inclusion of fruit in our diet – it’s actually been said that one of our biggest killers is too much salt and not enough fruit.
            When you say added sugar, I’m assuming you’re talking about things extracted from whole sources and I agree, of course, that it’s not necessary to add extracted parts of whole foods for survival or optimal health.
            You’re absolutely right that we can say some fats are bad such as trans fats, but not fat in general was simply my point.

            1. >>>our biggest killers is too much salt and not enough fruit.
              Good point. It seems to me the most likely reason is potassium. Many people get sufficient potassium, which helps offset sodium. On the other hand, there are many sources of potassium e.g. potatoes.

              1. You’re probably right about potassium being a major factor (and potatoes are an outstanding source), I imagine the phytonutrients and vitamin c are another.

      2. I’m ok with that.  But before we declare avocado a health food, let’s compare the effects of an avocado with a banana on endothelium.  My bet is on the banana.

        1. Maybe so, but avocados are still healthy in their own right. Blueberries would be better than bananas in this regard but it certainly doesn’t knock bananas off the health food list.

    2. ‘Vegetables oils, partially hydrogenated fats, and fried foods are responsible for the persistently high rate of heart disease. The most effective way to prevent coronary heart disease and sudden death according to these conclusions is to eat fewer commercially fried foods, fewer polyunsaturated fats and to avoid partially hydrogenated fats. Conversely, we should eat more vegetables and fruit as a source of antioxidants.”

      https://universityhealthnews.com/daily/heart-health/oxidized-cholesterol-vegetable-oils-identified-as-the-main-cause-of-heart-disease/

      Overall, the evidence suggests inflammation is an even greater cardiovascular disease risk than blood lipid levels, and an anti-inflammatory diet may be beneficial in protecting against atherosclerosis. For example, a plant-based diet that also includes dairy foods.

      Dairy products and inflammation: A review of the clinical evidence.

      ‘Inflammation is a major biological process regulating the interaction between organisms and the environment, including the diet. Because of the increase in chronic inflammatory diseases, and in light of the immune-regulatory properties of breastfeeding, the ability of dairy products to modulate inflammatory processes in humans is an important but unresolved issue. Here, we report a systematic review of 52 clinical trials investigating inflammatory markers in relation to the consumption of dairy products. An inflammatory score (IS) was defined to quantitatively evaluate this interaction. The IS was significantly positive for the entire data set, indicating an anti-inflammatory activity in humans. When the subjects were stratified according to their health status, the IS was strongly indicative of an anti-inflammatory activity in subjects with metabolic disorders and of a pro-inflammatory activity in subjects allergic to bovine milk. Stratifying the data by product categories associated both low-fat and high-fat products, as well as fermented products, with an anti-inflammatory activity.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26287637

      The exception is the pro-inflammatory effect occurring in those allergic to cows milk, which is a fully expected outcome.

      Inflammation aside, Park et al (below) also demonstrate that dairy fats increase the level of both LDL and HDL cholesterol. That is, they ‘might not affect or even lower the total cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio’.

      ‘Results from short-term intervention studies on CVD biomarkers have indicated that a diet higher in SF from whole milk and butter increases LDL cholesterol when substituted for carbohydrates or unsaturated fatty acids; however, they may also increase HDL and therefore might not affect or even lower the total cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio. The results from the review also indicate that cheese intake lowers LDL cholesterol compared with butter of equal milk fat content’

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22585901

      The findings of these studies coincide with a great deal of other research demonstrating the benefit of dairy foods in reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer and a host of other chronic diseases.

      Ericson et al (below) demonstrates the risk from meat is not derived from its saturated fat, and that unlike meat, dairy foods are protective.

      ‘Dietary fats could affect glucose metabolism and obesity development and, thereby, may have a crucial role in the cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies indicated that replacing saturated with unsaturated fats might be favorable, and plant foods might be a better choice than animal foods. Nevertheless, epidemiologic studies suggested that dairy foods are protective.

      CONCLUSIONS:
      Decreased T2D risk at high intake of high- but not of low-fat dairy products suggests that dairy fat partly could have contributed to previously observed protective associations between dairy intake and T2D. Meat intake was associated with increased risk independently of the fat content.’

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832335

      ‘Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2017 Aug 13;57(12):2497-2525. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2014.967385.

      …recent research has shown that dairy lipids possess putative bioactivity against chronic inflammation. Inflammation triggers the onset of several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cancer.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28342603

      …Adolescents with high milk intake had lower CMRS, compared with those with low intake (10.6% vs 18.1%, P = .018). Adolescents with appropriate milk intake were less likely to have high CMRS than those with low milk intake (odds ratio, 0.531; 95% confidence interval, 0.302-0.931).

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24418246

      ….Higher intakes of whole fat milk, yogurt, and cheese were associated with better cardiovascular health. Even when controlling for demographic and dietary variables, those who consumed at least 5 servings per week of these dairy products had a significantly higher CHS than those who consumed these products less frequently.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25476191

      Participants in the highest tertile of whole-fat dairy intakes (milk, cheese, yogurt) had significantly lower odds for being obese (global obesity: OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.29-0.72; P < .01; abdominal obesity: OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.23-0.54; P < .001), compared with those in the lowest intake tertile, after full adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, dietary, and cardiovascular risk factor variables. Increasing consumption of dairy foods may have the potential to lower the prevalence of global and abdominal obesity.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25159495

      Accumulated evidence from prospective cohort studies suggests that dairy consumption is inversely and longitudinally associated with the risk of childhood overweight/obesity.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26862005

      ‘Now evidence is emerging that suggests the link between dairy and heart disease is more complex than we realised. Instead of full-fat dairy increasing the risk of heart disease, some recent research suggests there is no link at all or, more radical still, full-fat dairy might protect us from it’

      http://www.abc.net.au/health/features/stories/2012/10/18/3607861.htm#.UH_K7GeWTi8

      ‘The totality of available scientific evidence supports that intake of milkand dairy products contribute to meet nutrient recommendations, and may protect against the most prevalent chronic diseases, whereas very few adverse effects have been reported’

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5122229/

      1. Pete,
        Dr. Mirkin takes the position that fermented dairy (cheese, yogurt) is healthful in limited amounts but milk is not, but the reason is not the saturated fat but the sugar, in particular, galactose.

        http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/cheese-and-yogurt-are-ok-but-milk-is-associated-with-a-higher-death-rate.html

        ” Cheese and Yogurt are OK, but Milk is Associated with a Higher Death Rate
        A Swedish study of more than 106,000 men and women shows that both drinking milk and restricting fruits and vegetables are associated with increased risk for premature death (Am J Epidemiol, Feb 2017;185(5):345-361):
        • Women who drank three or more glasses of milk and ate fewer than two fruits or vegetables a day were three times more likely to die than those who drank fewer than two glasses of milk per day and ate fruits and vegetables at least five times per day.
        • Women who drank three glasses of milk per day and ate fruits and vegetables at least five times per day still had a 60 percent higher risk of early death compared to women who consumed the same amount of fruits and vegetables but drank little or no milk.
        • Men who drank three or more glasses of milk per day were 30 percent more likely to die than men who did not drink milk.”

        “How Milk May Increase Risk for Heart Attacks and Diabetes
        Milk is a high-sugar drink. We know that D-galactose, a sugar found in milk, causes the same oxidative damage and chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes, heart attacks, certain cancers and bone loss (Biogerontology, 2004;5:317-25). The people who drank milk had increased urine levels of 8-iso-PGF2a (a biomarker of oxidative stress) and serum interleukin 6 (a major inflammatory biomarker). Chronic exposure of mice, rats and Drosophila flies to galactose caused their cells to develop signs associated with aging: shorter telomeres and DNA damage (Journal of Neuroscience Research, 2006;84(3):647-654).”

        “Cheese and Yogurt Appear to Help Prevent Heart Attacks and Diabetes
        Fermentation, used to create yogurt or cheese from milk, breaks down the galactose, which explains why fermented dairy products may help to prevent heart attacks (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, April 2015;63 (10):2830-9). People who ate a lot of cheese had very high levels of butyrate in their stool and urine and much lower blood levels of the bad LDL cholesterol. This means that the fermented dairy products are being converted by bacteria in the intestines to butyrate that prevents food from forming the bad LDL cholesterol that is associated with increased heart attack risk. The authors believe that they have shown that fermented dairy products encourage the growth of healthful intestinal bacteria that may help to prevent heart attacks. Another study of 27,000 people, ages 45 to 74, showed that eating cheese and yogurt lowered risk of type-2 diabetes by 25 percent (Am J Clin Nutr, April 2015).”

        I’m a committed vegan but have to admit that these issues are complex and not entirely understood. What seems to me hard to dispute is that a truly healthful diet will be 90-95% whole plant foods. Dairy of any kind, like other animal foods, is clearly unnecessary for a very healthful diet. That does not mean dairy is not better than fried foods, etc.

      2. Dairy is one of the most detrimental things to human health, the evidence that humans should not be consuming dairy is already overwhelming and thoroughly conclusive and new evidence keeps piling in. Dairy even negates some of the positives effects of plant foods such as berries and always in the case of cocoa and tea and I believe coffee.
        You can cherry pick positive results for pretty much any “food,” it’s easy to set up a study to get a desired outcome and it happens all the time. This is why it’s so important to see who funds the studies and look at how they’re designed and look at the COLLECTIVE evidence.

        1. It’s actually amusing to me to see that with foods people are addicted to and come from billion dollar industries, despite irrefutable, towering evidence that concludes we should not be consuming these things, the battle still goes on… YET when it comes to the world being convinced that a plant food should not be consumed, all it takes to convince the masses is a measly trendy internet rumor e.g nightshades, beans, soy, grains, raw nuts and seeds, cruciferous vegetables, peanuts and peanut butter (the mold rumor based on a single incident far away and long ago due only to improper storage), and so on…

          You know that feeling when you’re like the observing jester in a Shakespearean playwright just sort of hanging out in the background witnessing the madness of the world?…

        2. Shaylen, if you only read the propaganda that you want to read, you will end up believing dairy is bad for you. It happens to be 100% wrong, but lets not let the facts get in the way of a good story. When it comes to research ‘Big dairy’ is no different to ‘Big vegan’. For example, there are reliable studies which demonstrate that both milk and pulses improve insulin sensitivity – and thereby diabetes. Both studies are sponsored by respective industry bodies. So, do we just blindly accept the ‘Big Vegan’ pulse research and dismiss the dairy research? Which happens a tad too much on this website. Last week Tom was claiming a favourable dairy study I quoted was likely a case of ‘Big Dairy’, when in fact it was done by a Chinese University – which is a long way from Big Dairy. When you cant explain why the research supports dairy, then just assign it to ‘Big Dairy’. Its all too convenient.
          Lets just take your example ‘ Dairy even negates some of the positives effects of plant foods such as berries and always in the case of cocoa and tea and I believe coffee’. Very popular in the radical vegan set, but completely false. Tom Goff and I already debated this at considerable length, and the short answer is that the net effect of adding milk to black or green tea is to increase the bioavailability of the active ingredients (polyphenols). The following is the gist of that discussion:

          ‘It is wrong to recommend against the addition of milk to tea (black or green) or coffee, particularly based upon the 2007 and 2013 research studies, Lorenz et al, and Nesteo et al. Both are in-vitro studies failed to include the consider the effect of the milk-bound polyphenols once digested in the human gut, which Lorenz subsequently conceded should have been done. This makes them completely worthless research studies.
          Subsequent research (Xie et al, Oct 2013, Moser et al, December 2014) indicates that when adding milk to tea (i.e., pre-consumption) *milk minerals* immediately increase tea flavanol bioaccessibility, *milk protein* (casein) reduce tea flavanol bioaccessibility – but the latter is completely reversed during human digestion (post consumption). Thus, the addition of milk increases (not decreases) the net bioavailability of tea polyphenols. Milk should be added to tea and coffee to obtain the maximum benefit of tea polyphenols.

          Reference 1: Moser et al, Dec 2014 *Milk protein, most notably S-CSN, significantly decreased (p < 0.05) bioaccessibility of flavan-3-ols relative to JK buffer controls (10 relative to 32%). Interestingly, the presence of milk minerals significantly increased (p < 0.05) flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility compared to that of controls (32 relative to 18%). These data combined with SDS-PAGE and fluorometric analyses suggest that both milk proteins and minerals may alter flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility, but normal GI digestion appears to minimize the impact of specific protein interactions.*

          http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996914006188

          Reference 2: Xie et al, Oct 2013

          *To summarize, the data suggest that milk addition may increase catechin bioavailability by enhancing their transepithelial absorption and uptake from green tea extract.*

          http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996912003079

          In response to Tom’s claim that the addition of milk to tea had the effect of lowering FMD:

          *FMD*

          Catechins in black tea appear to be improve FMD. (*Flow*-mediated dilation refers to dilation (widening) of an artery when blood *flow* increases in that artery.) However, flavan-3-ols include not only catechin, but also epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, proanthocyanidins, theaflavins and thearubigins. The bioavailability of most if not all of these flavanols are improved with the addition of milk to black tea.

          The increase in FMD is only 3.5% with black tea. Similar increases in FMD follow consumption of a high-flavanol cocoa drink, oral ingestion of epicatechin, consumption of dark chocolate, and drinking of white and red wine. Subsequent to your quoted study the authors conceded it is probable the catechins in black tea that are bound to milk proteins (casein) subsequently break down in the gut to amino acids and peptides. At which point they may also have a positive effect on FMD. Unfortunately, this was not tested. Moreover:

          ‘We are also aware of the study by van het Hof *et al.*,6 who did not observe a difference in plasma catechin concentrations after consumption of black tea with or without milk’.

          https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/28/10/1266/2887455

          The FMD study you refer to used skimmed milk, not whole milk. By your reasoning (your objection to milk proteins and minerals, see above) this would disqualify it as milk for the purposes of the experiment.

          In total, this makes their study next to worthless.

          *Milk protein, most notably S-CSN, significantly decreased (p < 0.05) bioaccessibility of flavan-3-ols relative to JK buffer controls (10 relative to 32%). Interestingly, the presence of milk minerals significantly increased (p < 0.05) flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility compared to that of controls (32 relative to 18%). These data combined with SDS-PAGE and fluorometric analyses suggest that both milk proteins and minerals may alter flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility, but normal GI digestion appears to minimize the impact of specific protein interactions.*

          These studies clearly demonstrate:

          1. By complexing, the addition of milk protein to polyphenol-rich drinks initially decreases the bioaccessability of flavan-3-ols

          2. Thereafter, milk MINERALS immediately increase flavanol bioaccesability even prior to digestion

          3. Digestion overcomes the initial decrease of bioaccessability caused by milk PROTEINS (casein).

          4. There is a net increase in bioaccessibility of tea flavanols with the addition of milk to tea.
          The good stuff in green tea are the flavanols – such as EGCG. They are bound by the addition of milk proteins. However this effect is reversed once processed by the gut. Indeed, cows milk may ultimately increase (not decrease) the bioavailability of these valuable flavanols:

          *Milk protein, most notably S-CSN, significantly decreased (p < 0.05) bioaccessibility of flavan-3-ols relative to JK buffer controls (10 relative to 32%). Interestingly, the presence of milk minerals significantly increased (p < 0.05) flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility compared to that of controls (32 relative to 18%). These data combined with SDS-PAGE and fluorometric analyses suggest that both milk proteins and minerals may alter flavan-3-ol bioaccessibility, but normal GI digestion appears to minimize the impact of specific protein interactions.*

          http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996914006188

          1. Pete, you quite literally have it backwards… The propaganda is as a rule, typically that which backs up a multibillion dollar industry with science against it, so it needs the propaganda.
            You’re really barking up the wrong tree here… The people on this site know better and actually learn about the studies, know how to spot a study set up for a desired outcome, follow the money, and so on. The scientific evidence is here on this very site that you’re currently on, I suggest you watch the plethora of videos here on or that include the topic of dairy as well as check out Dr. Greger’s book “How Not To Die.” I choose this website and favor Dr. Greger as a resource because he recites the unadulterated science unbiasedly.
            The simple fact is that you ignoring the overwhelming conclusive evidence published on dairy by highlighting a few cherry-picked studies in an attempt to exempt dairy as the negative thing science has proven it to be and even boast its benefits, is a red flag which reads “I am a person who will believe that which I prefer to no matter what the collective evidence has to say” or if it’s a matter of being professionally affiliated with dairy “I will defend my business no matter what the collective evidence has to say.”

            I think most people would prefer to believe that dairy is good for them, by the way, because who at one point was not addicted to the stuff? I was a vegetarian prior to going vegan and then WFPB vegan and I once couldn’t imagine living without dairy. At the time of going vegan, I didn’t even realize how bad it was for me so I was extremely surprised that simply going from vegetarian to vegan had dramatically improved my health within the first couple of weeks.

            Your response is absolutely nonsensical and I can only imagine you’re a dairy industry troll due to how ridiculous your statements are. If that is not the case, than you are one desperate individual wanting to believe dairy is good for you for your own peace of mind.

  8. Dear Dr. Greger and Staff,
    I tried a regimin of Active Stem Cell powder [From LDH Health in California], along with a collagen supplement and Hyaluronic Acid. I self prescribed this because of knee pain that had been lingering for two years following a severe reaction to an antibiotic treatment for a UTI that seemingly caused no problems.
    The resultant and lingering pain was so bad that my doctor approved me for a handicapped sticker for my car. After two months of following this triad of additions to my vegan diet my knee pains have gone away! I am walking without pain and not having to find the closest parking place from shopping and theaters. Walking no longer hurts.
    As a side benefit my skin is softer, bump free and more supple than it was before. I am very happy with the results but have decided to go for a time discontinuing the collagen, since it is derived from cow hide and definitely not vegan. I am hoping that the effects were curative and not just paliative. I also hope I didn’t build up too much carnitine.
    I just watched your latest video on avocado, walnuts and olive oil. Hopefully I didn’t do too much damage to my biome with the collagen. I plan to use the Active Stem Cell powder and the Hyaluronic Acid for another three months without the collagen to see if there is any difference in how my knees and skin feel. Of course back to the totally vegan diet, yet eventually adding Glucoseamine Condroitin. I hope the remedy yielded permanent effects.
    Best,
    Frances Morey

    1. I’m sure you’re aware of all the nutrients which support our own natural production of these things. Some take MSM for collagen along side vitamin C as it’s been claimed to help. I don’t know if there’s any evidence on that though. I did read evidence of hair growth stimulation on pub med a few months ago which was the reason I ever took it and in my experience it seems to work great for hair growth, I took opti MSM along with a tsp of camu camu powder.

    2. Avocado meat is considered as a carrier for some liposoluble nutrients, to let them go through the cell membrane during the absorption. I wrote the medical benefits of avocado as my daughter wrote a “millennium” recipes book. I have explored the composition of avocado, and my publisher controlled all, it took forever, to go to print and prepare the marketing. I worked extensively on Ginkgo leaves extracts and this guided me to understand better the observation on avocado health benefits. In fact in “The Avocado Affair,” I delivered a medical message for most recipe explaining the combination of foods. There are the recipes of vegan ice-creams done with avocado; you may be interested. I had juvenile arthritis with high chronic inflammation, as other friends of mine eating avocado almost every day, I am better than years earlier. If you have not a latex related allergy, Avocado can help you to reduce your inflammation level on a large scale.

  9. Amazing stuff dr G. I’ve argues this with people for years not all calories are the same. Processed food is crap.
    Thank you so much. Although this seems like a simple concept this video maybe one of the most profound ever.

  10. Great video! And I love the cute little peanut in the chart! Lol.

    I’d be interested to see how differently they’re metabolized as well. I eat significantly more calories since going WFPB and am thinner and in much better shape than before. I don’t eat low fat, either, I just get my fat from whole plant foods and occasionally small amounts of oil but that I proceed with caution.

  11. Dr Greger,

    You have been so kind and have answered so many of my questions and I have moved into your web-site and heated my turmeric for my dog and added in healthy fats for him (and, not avocado)

    But I just got confused again about the whole fermented and unfermented soy issue. I thought I understood it. And my dog loves Tempeh and I gave him some for his good gut bacteria, because he has been on 3 antibiotics and I am not sure how fast petting him will transfer my gut bacteria to him.

    This from PubMed confused me:

    “Twenty studies assessing the effect of the consumption of fermented soy food on GC risk were included, and 17 studies assessing the effect of the consumption of non-fermented soy food on GC risk were included. We found that a high intake of fermented soy foods was significantly associated with an increased risk of GC (odds ratio [OR] = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-1.44, I(2) = 71.48), whereas an increased intake of non-fermented soy foods was significantly associated with a decreased risk of GC (overall summary OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.54-0.77, I(2) = 64.27). These findings show that a high level of consumption of non-fermented soy foods, rather than fermented soy foods, is important in reducing GC risk.”

    I am not giving him a high intake of anything, just a whole synergy of every super food he can eat, but everything I have read has said the opposite.

    I wanted fermented, because of the gut bacteria, but that is the wrong results.

    1. I listened to a YouTube interview with you and you talked about salted fermented foods and Cancer? Is that related to these results?

      I know that Miso helps with Breast Cancer risks.

      And that The flavonoid beverage Haelan 951 helps with Pancreatic Cancer.

      I have to leave soy out of the equation right now, but I need to understand it better for myself.

    2. Here is another:

      Higher intake of non-fermented soy foods was significantly associated with a lower risk of stomach cancer (p for trend: 0.022 in men and 0.005 in women), whereas there was no significant association between the intake of fermented soy foods and a risk of stomach cancer. These results suggest that a high intake of soy isoflavone, mainly nonfermented soy foods, have a protective effect against stomach cancer.

    3. What’s GC risk Deb? You didn’t provide a link.

      GC can refer to gonorrhea or perhaps gastric cancer?

      I wouldn’t take too much notice unless that review unless it adequately controlled for sodium consumption. Salt consumption is significantly associated with gastric cancer risk and many fermented soy foods (miso, soy sauce etc) are high in sodium. I think tempeh is pretty safe though – it’s about 9% sodium by weight on average – brands will vary. This is much lower than soy sauce and miso. It also has many benefits eg
      https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/tempeh

  12. Even the intermittent fasting… and the fermented soy….

    I feel like I have to read all the nutritional studies I possibly can, even if you do, because studies on just about everything suddenly take a hard right turn while I feel like I can just jog straight ahead.

    1. I did find your PubMed salt and Cancer correlation and was surprised that they also link road salts to increased Cancer:

      The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers’ salt excretion through perspiration. Workers exposed to heat stress consumed as much as 13-38 g salt daily. As salt strongly enhances and promotes chemical gastric carcinogenesis and H. pylori infection in both humans and animals, there is an association between work, salt intake, and development of stomach cancer. Reducing salt intake, especially during pregnancy, also reduces the risk of developing breast cancer and many other diseases, as well as obesity. The risk of most cancers is reduced by losing weight. The geographical data and analyses currently available suggest that road salt (road salting in winter) may be associated with elevated mortality from cancer of the breast, lung, esophagus, throat, larynx, large intestine, rectum and bladder.

      1. Most road salt contains sodium ferrocyanide as an anti-caking and corrosion inhibitor. Under acidic conditions, in the presence of strong sunlight, this compound is known to break down, generating toxic cyanide forms, including hydrogen cyanide. These toxins appear to have caused serious fish kills as the result of sodium ferrocyanide’s use by the BC Ministry of Forests in fire retardants. Recent animal studies also have shown chronic cyanide exposure may be deleterious to liver and kidney functions and causes both time- and dose-dependent DNA fragmentation, accompanied by cytotoxicity. Hydrogen cyanide in cigarette smoke also is known to be cilia toxic, and may act as a pacemaker for the action of some carcinogens, such as aromatic hydrocarbons.
        Are you sure you want to inhale wind-blown road salt or drink water polluted by it? http://www.elements.nb.ca/theme/transportation/salt/salt.htm

  13. I have been following plant based diet for about 18 months now after a surfing accident led to a mild stroke followed by a heart attack and open heart bypass surgery. The diet has worked wonders for me and still fully active at 69.
    I recently added 1000 mg Kyolic garlic and it seems to have really picked me up even more. I don’t take any medications so hopefully the garlic will help keep me going for along time yet.
    I was surprised that the gel tablets were made from bovine so I buy the caplets which are vegan

    1. Wow! “after a surfing accident led to a mild stroke followed by a heart attack and open heart bypass surgery. The diet has worked wonders for me and still fully active at 69.”

      Glad that you are still active. That is a blessing.

      Wondering if you the garlic as food would work even better.

      1. There is a difference . One tablet is equivalent to 6 cloves. The garlic is aged which removes the odour. Cardiologist Mathew Budoff from Ucla has a website explaining the benefits. Worth looking up and having a read.

          1. Thanks for the link. A bit over my head but I think overall I got it . And yes I realise Mathew Budoff appears to be sponsored by Wakunga.
            Still,I have definitely perked up a lot since I started taking the garlic. It will be interesting to see a blood test in 12 months from now.
            My blood pressure seems to have dropped a few points as well.I do feel more energetic paddling on my standup, surfing and walking.
            I’ll let you know in 20 years time if it worked or not.

            1. Thanks Mike.

              I took Kyolic for a couple of years too but it didn’t appear to do anything for me (except empty my wallet). Glad it’s apparently working for you though Or do you use another brand?

  14. Thanks for the green light on guacamole. I hope that Dr. Greger will put out a tweet, blog and/ or video regarding the following new study (this excerpt is from a recent news article, dated last Wednesday, June 6, 2018:)
    “A blockbuster new study has found that middle aged men who follow high protein diets may be at higher risk of heart failure. That’s the conclusion of research conducted on nearly 2,500 men aged 42 to 60 who ate the most animal protein and dairy. Scientists who conducted the study published in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal… Interestingly, the men who ate a plant based protein diet had [a lower risk:] only a 17 percent risk of developing heart failure.”

  15. Here’s hoping that Dr. Greger will put out a tweet, blog and/ or video regarding this new study, below (the following excerpt is from a news article dated 6/6/18:)
    “A blockbuster new study has found that middle aged men who follow high protein diets may be at higher risk of heart failure. That’s the conclusion of research conducted on nearly 2,500 men aged 42 to 60 who ate the most animal protein and dairy. Scientists who conducted the study published in “Circulation: Heart Failure,” an American Heart Association journal… Interestingly, the men who ate a plant based protein diet had [a lower risk:] only a 17 percent risk of developing heart failure.”

  16. Hello Doc,
    I have recently been diagnosed with Interstitial Cystitis which is know for not having a cure but at best can be kept in remission. As an 18 year old I would prefer to not be stuck with this for the rest of my life. Is there anything you can suggest that might effectively cure this?

    Thanks a bunch!

    1. Eat a whole food plant based diet. Try to eat everything from the Daily Dozen every day. This is the best diet for every diagnose because it takes on the root causes of illness in the body that is shared among the major diseases ; inflammation, oxidation, etc…

    2. Hi I’m a health support volunteer with NutritionFacts. I’m so sorry to hear about your diagnosis. A very good friend of mine has this and it has been hard for her, but she has been in remission for a number of years. She’s managed to remain active and healthy despite her disease and is a marathon runner and a triathlete. I hope for the same with you.

      Unfortunately, we don’t know a lot about the cause of IC. They think it may be an inflammatory autoimmune process. A whole food plant based diet reduces inflammation and may very well help with your symptoms. So, I would eat Dr Greger’s Daily Dozen if you are not already. It is a free app. Eliminate all animal products- especially dairy which is suspect to be related to many autoimmune diseases.
      And then I would review some of Dr. Greger’s information specifically about autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and crohn’s disease.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/autoimmune-diseases/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/inflammation/

      All the best,
      NurseKelly

  17. You said a while ago that your next book would be “How Not to Diet.” Not sure if you were kidding or not but I know it would really help me!

    I have a significant binge eating issue and recently came across Dr. Doug Lisle’s Youtube webinar entitled “The Cram Circuit.” It resonated with me, but I wish it were backed by more science. Dr. Lisle posits that binge eating calories used to be a biological necessity for omnivores, and this addiction cycle would be normal and healthy were it not for us being surrounded by processed foods all day every day. This seems to mirror my experience, but like I said, I wish there were more science to his claims, besides one rat study.

    Have you put more thought into creating a weight loss book? I’m getting better at WFPB each and every day, but have trouble staving off those cravings for processed foods. I’d love to see a video or a book addressing people like me, who really want to be 100% WFPB but are often thwarted by our own addictive tendencies. Thanks.

    1. I’ve just seen the video from Doug Lisle and he could have “crammed” the 60 minute piece into a 5 minute video without losing anything. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77XP3t8gZwA

      The take-away is that in nature creatures like us (great apes) and many others, have food acces continually. Chimps in the jungle don’t need to limit themselfs to three meals a day, they don’t need to go to the supermarket because the fruit and the food is there in front of them.

      Therefore, the natural modus seems to be eating “ad libitum”, eat as much as you want, when you want. Therefore the natural human modus can be expected to be exactly this “eat as much as you want, when you want”.

      This is no problem in nature because a the food available is honest food with a low calorie density, you can eat it until you are literally filled with it and still not gain weight. So the problem in modern society is not eating too much, because eating ad libitum is the operational modus, the problem is eating these artificial foods, not found in nature, that have high calorie density. Now you need a psychologist or a dietician coming up with words like “binge eating” “overeating” or “emotional eating” too explain something that actually is a non issue. Eat ad libitum but with the correct foods, low calorie dense plant material ; fruits, vegetables and if you are normally active some beans, whole grains.

      1. Yes, I remember that about 10 years ago, the BBC did a programme about a group of volunteers who were put on what was called The Evolution Diet. It was basically .a diet of raw fruits, vegetables and nuts. The daily ration was 5 kilos of food (just over 11 pounds!) and most participants couldn’t eat it all.
        They were never hungry and despite this daily mountain of food, they actually lost weight.
        http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/6248975.stm

        It wasn’t exactly a scientifically rigorous experiment but it does illustrate what you are saying here.

    2. Hi Lauren, You are correct in remembering that Dr. Greger is writing “How Not to Diet.” He’s writing it as we speak :)

  18. I am wondering about the effects of eating coconut. The oil is full of saturated fats, and I believe Dr. Greger has commented that fat is fat, or something on that order. But, if a person ate the whole food, such as shaved coconut, would it have the same effect as avocado?

    1. I believe there’s info on this site about whole coconuts being fine (sorry I can’t give a link or specific title!), but coconut oil is bad and coconut milk isn’t good either.

      1. Wrong. There is no info on this site about coconuts being fine.

        The latest video concerning coconuts as a fruit on Nutritionfacts concluded that eating them increases plaque formation.

        But I wonder how this current video relates to coconuts and it’s phytochemicals. But there is still lots of difference between the high saturated fat profile of a coconut compared to no saturated fat from peanuts or avocado. While a coconut’s secondary plant compounds would offer some protection against oxidation, it would still be lipotoxic too every cell in the body besides the adipose cells. That is because it has virtualy no poly-unsaturated fatty acids to buffer the enourmess amount of saturated fatty acids that would flood the system.

        1. I remembered in a specific video he talks about a group of people somewhere in the world who eat a lot of coconuts, I believe (but could be wrong) that they were generally healthy and often referred to in order to promote coconut oil which would be inapplicable since the people were eating the whole food. Can anyone remember which video this was in? Mind you, I’m going by memory I could be getting something wrong, maybe they did have health issues and I’m just not remembering.
          But Netogate, I thought I saw the latest video on coconut (oil) and don’t remember Dr. Greger saying that. In fact, I thought he said you’d have to eat many coconuts to get a negative effect but could be completely remembering wrong, it’s very hazy and I’m not making any claims! But anyways, could you provide a link to the video where you say this was stated?

          1. Hi S

            Perhaps this one?
            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-about-coconuts-coconut-milk-and-coconut-oil-mcts/

            I think PlantPositive also has a video or two on this broad topic – specifically about some remote Pacific Islander populations the low ccarbers go on about
            http://plantpositive.com/blog/2012/3/27/the-tokelauans-the-samburu-and-the-masai-again.html

            There was also a claim in a book by one-time children’s entertainer and clown Dr Dropo who reinvented himself as a coconut oil guru (can’t remember what he calls himself now), who claimed that about 50 years ago they had a particularly low rate of a particular type of cardiovascular disease in Sri Lanka where they ate a lot of coconuts and that proves coconut (oil) is healthy. Misleading information taken out of context and the conclusion was nonsense of course but that sort of dtuff apparently sells

            1. Yes, that’s it! Thanks TG!

              Ok so with that reminder my takeaway would be whole coconuts are ok if you want to add some as a treat once in a while, but should more than likely not be a staple in your diet.

              Ironic that the coconut oil guru was a clown…

              I have a hard time believing that coconut milk (was it full fat coconut milk?) is as bad as the sausage McMuffin so I wish they had tested it without the use of any added animal fat, but I could be wrong and it still appears obvious that it does impair arterial function, my question is just by how much w/o animal fat and whether or not they used whole fat coconut milk in the study.
              That being said though, this is enough for me to avoid coconut milk and I’m glad for the info because I used eat coconut milk ice cream thinking it was fine.

    2. Hi I’m a health support volunteer. Thanks for your great question. Dr. Greger discourages all oils- coconut oil, olive oil, peanut oil . . .
      There is a significant different between oil and the food it comes from. Avocados are a healthy, whole food. But avocado oil is a highly processed, not whole food. With the oil, you have sucked out just the fat. No vitamins. No fiber. No antioxidants. Just the concentrated fat and nothing like the avocado. I’ve heard it referred to as the fruit juice of the fat kingdom. I think the same applies to the coconut versus the coconut oil. The coconut will have the fiber, water, vitamins and will digest much slower than just coconut oil. We do not discourage whole food plant based sources of fat, like avocados and nuts.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-about-coconuts-coconut-milk-and-coconut-oil-mcts/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/extra-virgin-olive-oil/

      Nurse Kelly

  19. Which type of water should we be drinking?
    Spring water (bottles are not BPA free and I don’t like buying bottled water)? Tap water (where I live there is chlorine in the water. My fingers get pruned just washing the lettuce)? Filtered tap water (the filters turn my city water to an acid water)? Alkaline filtered water (per your video its a waste of money/hoax)?

    1. Just get a carbon type filter like Brinta to filter your tap water and then put it in the fridge when filled. The fridge is the offset the increased batercial activity one can expect from these filters compared to drinking the tap water directly. Or pour the filtered water into a glass can if you don’t like the plastic containers that come with these filters.

    2. Beth, I would reccomended a reverse osmosis filter. Most of not all have a stage where minerals are added back to the water, so it’s not completely stripped. But it’s the purest water available and gets out even fluoride.
      Others like distilled water which I know less about.
      If you’re only worried about chlorine, I believe boiling will do the trick, but make sure your city doesn’t use chloramine instead of chlorine as that is harder to get rid of.

      I use the Pelican system and really like it.

  20. This is completely off-topic but I wonder if the psychological train described in this study below also explains why so many people believe all those highly sensational too-good-to-be-true alternative health books and websites while refusing to believe all the scientifically vaiidated but rather dull evidence that the healthiest diets are those that are mostly plants and high in actual fruits, vegetables and whole grains etc

    “Consumers who perceive the benefits of large sums of money promised in mass marketing scams (MMS) are more likely to discount the risks and fall prey to perpetrators, according to new research co-authored by the University of Plymouth.
    The study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, also shows that less-educated consumers are more likely to be susceptible to the opportunity for a large reward.”
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180611133514.htm

  21. I am interested to know if there is a connection between dental implants and inflammation leading to heart disease and auto immune diseases.Also if following a whole food plant based diet would provide some protection against complications of dental implants or other dental work.

    1. Excellent question! The simple answer is that we don’t know 100%, but dental implant infection appears to be almost identical to periodontitis as we find the same bacteria and viruses in both lesions. We do know that periodontitis is associated with heart disease and autoimmune disease and we are quite certain there is a cause and effect relationship. There is also some evidence that following an UNPROCESSED whole food plant based diet will reduce the risk of these diseases (i.e., don’t eat whole wheat bread, eat whole wheat berries). In my opinion, the risk reduction will only occur if there is no preexisting disease. Also, the overwhelming evidence supports the recommendation that thorough meticulous brushing and flossing is critical at preventing these diseases as well. Other major risk factors for implant infection are: history of periodontitis, smoking, diabetes and, more than anything else, improper fit of the crown as well as excess extruded cement. I ALWAYS recommend that these crowns/bridges be fabricated with an abutment screw access hole such that the crown can be removed from the implant fixture to verify fit and for periodic disinfection of the crown and accessible surfaces of the implant.

      Dr. Ben

  22. Hi Dr. Greger and Staff:
    I am totally confused. The subtitle to this video is as follows (which I just copied directly from above):

    “The impact of high-fat plant foods—avocados, peanuts, walnuts—and olive oil put to the test.”

    I have reviewed the entire video 4 times now looking for ANY mention to olive oil. I didn’t see one. Is it me? Did I miss this piece of olive oil information somehow?
    Could someone from Dr. Greger’s staff please let me know what I’m missing? I really was interested in the olive oil component “put to the test”.

    I look forward to hearing from Dr. Greger or his staff. Thank you!!

    1. Hi Ruth!

      Olive oil is matched up against peanuts and walnuts for their effects on artery function! Olive oil vs peanuts is at 2:40 and olive oil vs walnuts is at 3:28.

  23. Do peanuts cause Cancer to spread or help protect against Cancer?

    Do nuts contain Methionine or increase Growth Hormone?

    I gave my poor puppy some peanuts today, but they are out of his diet until this cancer is gone.

    I am trying to figure out how to get him to eat Parsley and Artichoke, but no more peanuts.

    I found studies on soy, flax and certain mushrooms. Those are in.

    Also Glucosamine was on the anti-angiogenesis list. Not far from Turmeric and that is easy to find in pet form.

    All of it is so confusing.

    You don’t have to answer.

    I think I can’t get low enough with Methionine unless I take him off of nuts and possibly seeds, but I think the flax seed doing so well against canine cancers, I want to keep that one.

    I just was surprised at the concept of nuts and Methionine and Growth Hormone at all.

    Am I just so tired that I am reading things wrong?

  24. Love the videos and the book How Not To Die! One thing does puzzle me from the book though! I am looking for a more scientific explanation as to why Kombucha is not recommended by Dr Gregor. The book seemed to postulate that one person died from drinking Kombucha! One person! Does the science and evidence really stack up against Kombucha or is that an unfair, wrap? Thanks in advance, Charlie.

    1. Charlie, Dr. Greger has a video here on kombucha adressing how acidic it makes out blood. I’m completely going off memory here, but I believed it was compared to the level of acidity of battery acid. That was enough for me to stop drinking the stuff.

  25. I’ve had Restless Leg Syndrome since high school, and I’m now 35. Do you have any research on how to control this through diet? I follow your eating guidelines.and workout daily. Thank you!!

    1. Carolyn There are dozens of possible causes, but if vegan, it may well be linked to iron and/or vitamin B12 deficiency (cancer patients who lose part of the bowel associated with vitamin B12 absorption suffer from restless leg syndrome). Talk to your medico about supplementation with ferrous sulfate, folic acid or magnesium. (a vitamin B12 deficiency causes a folic acid deficiency)

    2. Hi, Carolyn. According to this study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19731029, “Celiac disease may be associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS) because of an association with iron deficiency.” If you have any symptoms of celiac disease, (see link below) you could possibly benefit from a gluten-free diet. Whether or not you have celiac disease, perhaps a plant-based iron supplement could help. It is a good idea to have iron levels checked before supplementing, because too much iron can be as harmful as too little. Plant-based iron is less likely to cause problems, because it is not absorbed as aggressively as heme iron from animal sources.
      https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/what-is-celiac-disease/
      I hope that helps!

  26. Sooo, while it’s fantastic these plant based support Boards have enough money to fund studies how is this deemed objective research? Especially in light of Dr Greger’s previous rails against the autoimmune, cancer, cardiovascular, and diabetes cartels funding research in support of the dairy and meat industries? Asking for a friend… :-)

  27. Would you please do a series in adhd and diet? I have read some information about diet and adhd but would love to hear what you find on the latest science. Thank you.

  28. Dr. Greger,
    I would love to have you do a series on adhd and diet. I have read some articles on it but would appreciate your input on the latest science on it.
    Thanks

  29. Has Dr Greger done any research on the effects of collagen on inflammation of joints, and benefits to hair, skin, and nails? I’d be very interested to know what he finds.

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