CHIP: The Complete Health Improvement Program

CHIP: The Complete Health Improvement Program
4.79 (95.74%) 61 votes

A community-based education program educating physicians and patients alike about the power of nutrition as medicine.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The best kept secret in medicine is that, given the right [conditions], the body [can sometimes heal] itself.” And: “When it comes to cardiovascular disease, there is no substitute for nutritional excellence.” So, Ornish, Pritikin, Barnard, Esselstyn—all the great names in evidence-based nutrition. But, how many have heard about the CHIP program (the Coronary Health Improvement Project), a volunteer-run community-based education program “educating physicians and patients alike, about the power of nutrition as medicine is perhaps the best investment we can make in the fight against heart disease.” More effective, cheaper, safer. And, what are the side effects? Improved overall health, and not just physical health.

“Lifestyle change programs, such as CHIP, aimed at improving physical health behaviors can likewise have a profound effect on mental health.” Based on studies of thousands of individuals who went through the CHIP program, there were significant improvements in a number of “sleep or stress disorders,” like sleeping restlessly, not sleeping at all, stress, upset, fear, and depression. Here are the numbers; most of these cut in half. All highly significant findings. The question is why?

Well, “[t]he psychological well-being of the CHIP participants might have been positively affected by increasing feelings of empowerment, making strides toward reducing their body weight, and improving other health indicators.” As they start eating better and making strides, feelings of despair and failure “may be replaced by a growing sense of accomplishment, increased social support, and a new sense of hope.” Or, they may just be physically feeling better. If your diabetes goes away, that’s reason enough to perk you up.

While these before-and-after results looked great, what was missing? Right, a control group. Now, you say, “Wait; they each acted as their own control, before and after.” Ah, you’re forgetting about “the Hawthorne effect”. Remember? Just being in a study under observation can affect people’s behavior. So, if they put you on a scale, weigh you, and say they’re going to weigh you again in six months, people may consciously—or unconsciously—just eat better on their own, even if they’re not told to do anything special. So, how much of these improvements would have happened without the CHIP program?

Yeah, it’s great that you can take a thousand people and markedly reduce their risk-factor profiles for our leading killer in just four weeks—regardless. But, to know exactly what role healthy eating and living advice can play, you need to… put it to the test, by performing randomized controlled trials.

And, as expected, there were small improvements even in the control group. But, “[f]or almost all variables, the [CHIP] intervention group showed significantly greater improvements”—so much so as to have “the potential to dramatically reduce the risks associated with common chronic diseases in the long term.” Ironically, CHIP was so successful in this city of Rockford, Illinois that dozens of restaurants started offering special plant-based menu options. So, the control group might have been sneaking in some healthier meals too.

Okay, but what about the mental health improvements? A randomized controlled trial, and…”[t]hose in the [CHIP] group showed significantly greater [improvements] in physical functioning,…pain, general health perceptions, vitality, social functioning, [and] emotional and mental health. For example, significant improvements, particularly in mild to moderate depression, compared to the control group. And, not just right after the program ended, but six months later.

So, the CHIP acronym started out as the Coronary Health Improvement Project, but as study after study “showed the efficacy of the intervention in addressing other chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and even depression,” it [has since been] renamed…the Complete Health Improvement Program.”

As Hans Diehl—the founder of CHIP—explains, “We [as a society] are largely at the mercy of powerful and manipulative marketing forces that basically tell us what to…eat….Everywhere we look, we’re being seduced to the ‘good life’ as marketers define it,…[b]ut this so-called ‘good life’ has produced in this country an avalanche of morbidity and mortality”—disease and death….What [he’d] like to see in America is not this so-called ‘good life,’ but the ‘best life’…a simpler lifestyle…characterized by eating more whole [plant] foods,” in other words, “foods-as-grown.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: chiphealth.com. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The best kept secret in medicine is that, given the right [conditions], the body [can sometimes heal] itself.” And: “When it comes to cardiovascular disease, there is no substitute for nutritional excellence.” So, Ornish, Pritikin, Barnard, Esselstyn—all the great names in evidence-based nutrition. But, how many have heard about the CHIP program (the Coronary Health Improvement Project), a volunteer-run community-based education program “educating physicians and patients alike, about the power of nutrition as medicine is perhaps the best investment we can make in the fight against heart disease.” More effective, cheaper, safer. And, what are the side effects? Improved overall health, and not just physical health.

“Lifestyle change programs, such as CHIP, aimed at improving physical health behaviors can likewise have a profound effect on mental health.” Based on studies of thousands of individuals who went through the CHIP program, there were significant improvements in a number of “sleep or stress disorders,” like sleeping restlessly, not sleeping at all, stress, upset, fear, and depression. Here are the numbers; most of these cut in half. All highly significant findings. The question is why?

Well, “[t]he psychological well-being of the CHIP participants might have been positively affected by increasing feelings of empowerment, making strides toward reducing their body weight, and improving other health indicators.” As they start eating better and making strides, feelings of despair and failure “may be replaced by a growing sense of accomplishment, increased social support, and a new sense of hope.” Or, they may just be physically feeling better. If your diabetes goes away, that’s reason enough to perk you up.

While these before-and-after results looked great, what was missing? Right, a control group. Now, you say, “Wait; they each acted as their own control, before and after.” Ah, you’re forgetting about “the Hawthorne effect”. Remember? Just being in a study under observation can affect people’s behavior. So, if they put you on a scale, weigh you, and say they’re going to weigh you again in six months, people may consciously—or unconsciously—just eat better on their own, even if they’re not told to do anything special. So, how much of these improvements would have happened without the CHIP program?

Yeah, it’s great that you can take a thousand people and markedly reduce their risk-factor profiles for our leading killer in just four weeks—regardless. But, to know exactly what role healthy eating and living advice can play, you need to… put it to the test, by performing randomized controlled trials.

And, as expected, there were small improvements even in the control group. But, “[f]or almost all variables, the [CHIP] intervention group showed significantly greater improvements”—so much so as to have “the potential to dramatically reduce the risks associated with common chronic diseases in the long term.” Ironically, CHIP was so successful in this city of Rockford, Illinois that dozens of restaurants started offering special plant-based menu options. So, the control group might have been sneaking in some healthier meals too.

Okay, but what about the mental health improvements? A randomized controlled trial, and…”[t]hose in the [CHIP] group showed significantly greater [improvements] in physical functioning,…pain, general health perceptions, vitality, social functioning, [and] emotional and mental health. For example, significant improvements, particularly in mild to moderate depression, compared to the control group. And, not just right after the program ended, but six months later.

So, the CHIP acronym started out as the Coronary Health Improvement Project, but as study after study “showed the efficacy of the intervention in addressing other chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and even depression,” it [has since been] renamed…the Complete Health Improvement Program.”

As Hans Diehl—the founder of CHIP—explains, “We [as a society] are largely at the mercy of powerful and manipulative marketing forces that basically tell us what to…eat….Everywhere we look, we’re being seduced to the ‘good life’ as marketers define it,…[b]ut this so-called ‘good life’ has produced in this country an avalanche of morbidity and mortality”—disease and death….What [he’d] like to see in America is not this so-called ‘good life,’ but the ‘best life’…a simpler lifestyle…characterized by eating more whole [plant] foods,” in other words, “foods-as-grown.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: chiphealth.com. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

This is the third in a four-video series on CHIP. In case you missed the first two: What Is the Optimal Diet? and The Weight Loss Program that Got Better with Time. Stay tuned for A Workplace Wellness Program that Works.

I’m looking forward to writing a whole book on evidence-based dietary approaches to mental illness. Stay tuned!

Here are a few videos I have so far:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

123 responses to “CHIP: The Complete Health Improvement Program

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Just returned from a visit to our American south. Finding a thin person was a bit of a task. Reminding me of a photo of a group of motorcycle riders from back in the day, 1940’s late…..all thin as rails with not a thin fat body type, but muscles and bone. And seeing a photo of a current group(called motorcycle gangs hells angels and such)….not a thin one in the group. Motorcyclists on the road Harley riders, on their bikes, I can state not a one did I see of normal weight.

    I don’t know what other people are seeing. Even saw one fool stating he could not find one fat person around(while he was wearing three shirts to conceal his own fat)on video.
    No offense to overweight peoples to condemn them personally is not my intent. But just look around these peoples, are not as they were in any old photos and thin people are indeed getting hard to find in other than some select communities such as athletes. Curiously I found this most obvious in riot video from the past…all thin people in them about every one. Now, unless they are very young teens or early 20’s fat.

    I can not imagine this does not enter into mental health issues. How can you not continually be feeling slightly bad all day being in that state. Sure you would get depressed not to mention with diabetes and who knows what else to come.
    Peoples need to wake up to this and the first step is really just to look around. Fat is not normal for people even as they age. And it has consequences.
    And fat speaks only a bit of the dramatic changes we would likely find underneath the skin.

    There have always been some obese peoples perhaps one in ten. And they get along fairly well perhaps it is their body type. But this is firmly not that.
    Really one just has to really objectively look around not at what we are used to seeing but compared to a not so distant past.

    1. I will not bother to prompt up the statistical studies. And this just points to women and we can be certain men are the same in this…

      From bing search first prompt…”Today, the average American woman is 5’4″, has a waist size of 34-35 inches and weighs between 140-150 lbs, with a dress size of 12-14. Fifty years ago, the average woman was 5’3-4″ with a waist size of approximately 24-25″, she weighed about 120 lbs and wore a size 8.”

      I think recent study shows much higher numbers but will not bother as this is so obvious. And waist size points to fat not muscle.
      What the heck is happening to us. How long can we continue to fool ourselves this is not what we are and that there is a cause to it?
      The cause fast food processed food junk food and snacks right there pointing to that.

      1. You hit the nail on the head. You are absolutely correct. Look at photos of Woodstock, look at old movies from the 30’s/40’s/50’s. Everyone had a waistline. Here is the real test – look at old films or photos of Laurel and Hardy. The ‘fat one doesn’t look all that bad by today’s standards. Same thing with Curly of the Three Stooges. People didn’t go out jogging all the time. We need to get back to cooking and eating real food properly. WE EAT TOO MUCH! WE EAT TOO OFTEN! It’s that simple.

        1. I don’t really think it’s a matter of quantity or how often a person eats, it’s about what they eat. They ate like crap back in the day and died young, but they didn’t eat it as much as they do now, portions were smaller and there wasn’t a McDonalds at every corner and “bacon” wasn’t America’s sigil. But in a lot of those old movies, actually a lot of the men playing the heroes and heart throbs were quite out of shape looking and same with some of the women whereas by todays standards of what’s considered ideal, they’d be considered overweight for their role. But as the norm goes, there’s a lot of overweight people now and on the contrary to ron’s statement, I find it especially true with kids and younger people comparatively. But people eat more animal products and more refined crap than ever and more of it. Meanwhile you have whole foods plant based vegans or WFPB eaters and a lot of us eat tons of calories and are very thin (healthfully). I’ve found that I can eat so much more since going vegan and then WFPB vegan and my body just uses it efficiently. My portions are really big and I don’t worry about calories or anything, but everything I’m eating is really healthy and my body tells me when to stop. I noticed even when eating treats and stuff, when it’s real food, while I eat a lot I also don’t have a desire to over eat. I theorize that the brain works better at signaling when we’re full when we’re eating the foods we’re meant to which results in getting the nutrition we need which I also believe helps us not want to keep eating. Back in the day when I ate things like McDonalds, I would eat so many calories worth of crap and be genuinely hungry a half hour later because my body was still starved for nutrition.
          If you’re eating the things we really shouldn’t be eating like eggs, etc. then portion is very necessary to control weight.

        2. I wouldn’t cite the Hollywood actresses of yesteryear as an examples of healthy living. They were weighed and measured and put on strict diets if they didn’t measure up to some studio head’s ideal. Just read about Judy Garland’s struggles. And don’t forget that women were stuffed into girdles and corsets to get those defined waists. Then as now, actresses and models set an impossible standard for women.

          A slender frame is not necessarily an indicator of good health, and holding that up as some sort of ideal can be triggering for people dealing with disordered eating.

          1. Hi, JJackson, while excess body fat is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses, I would agree that slimness is not necessarily the same thing as wellness. Many people in the performing arts do all sorts of unhealthy things to attain the shapes required for the roles they play. You make a good point about unrealistic ideals being triggers for people dealing with disordered eating patterns. I think that good health is beautiful, and more important than trying to be a certain size.

      2. Ron- I definitely think that’s part of the problem that nearly EVERYONE down south is overweight. Overweight is normal down there so there is probably less impetus to eat better because, “I’m the same size as my neighbor, I must be alright” attitude. Plus I think part of the problem is that it’s been a relatively slow change as far as human attention span. I read somewhere that on average, people only put on 1-3lbs every year that they don’t end up losing later so it’s a slow transition until someone goes, “Holy beef steak, what happened to me?!”

        I can look at my relatives in Texas and see just from their skin quality that they don’t eat fruits and vegetables. And that Aunt is the only overweight sibling out of my grandma’s 7 kids. I feel bad and I want to help but my uncle’s attitude is, “What’s cilantro? What’s a chickpea? You’re eating the food that my food eats” not realizing that his food is literally fed reject Skittles and whatever other cheap calories farmers can find

        https://nypost.com/2017/01/20/farmers-have-been-secretly-feeding-cows-skittles/

        1. It may seem a bit odd to say this as it is based only on personal observation, but to add, in the south at least, it appears to me by far the fattest are the poorest. People of color in the south tend poor and seem almost all fat. I’d bet my bottom dollar if they did any study on this there is a absolute positive correlation between income and weight. Poor whites seem the same, all fat. Not just a pound or two way overweight.

          Really at this level of obesity I don’t think it can be less access to fitness exercise equipment. That may help for a pound or two dozen, but for things bordering on morbid obesity, I think a change in diet is really the only way.
          This level of gross obesity can only be diet.
          Expect there are no studies on income levels and obesity but I’d say one has to be done to confront the obvious and try to find out the why of it.
          Seems just income considered making things at home is as cheap or cheaper with a little effort.
          I wonder if the poor are being in some manner disproportionately the focus of advertising. Perhaps by subtle means not obvious to a person outside the field.
          How many of the poor schools are buying into Dr Gregers school educational program I wonder?. Is it by far those from higher income areas, or do the poor school districts participate as well equally?
          Perhaps that may be a place to start…if true the why of that?

            1. Living longest is not being of a healthy weight which I am referencing.
              No where in my posts do I reference longevity.

              1. From baby center but multiple similar sources are available..
                “Latinas and weight management.
                Among all women in the United States, Latinas rank first in being overweight and second — right behind African Americans — in obesity. Despite the Latino diet being a healthy eating style overall, various social, cultural, and genetic circumstances affect our population and favor our being overweight.”

        2. I know obesity rates are higher in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana than the rest of the country, but is it true that almost everyone in the US South is overweight and is that substantially greater than the incidence of being overweight in other areas? I seem to live in one of the top states for low obesity rates and I’m not able to travel as much as I once could. So maybe the difference is more striking than I realize.

          1. Hey Scott, no it is not true that everyone in the South is overweight, myself included. While I agree that there are segments of the Southern population that fall into this category that is not a generalized issue any more than it is in most areas of the country. More true in the African-American and Hispanic communities. Overall obesity rates are approaching 30% in in children and 60% in adults in almost every area of this country, and 80-90% of all American adults are either overweight or obese. This is a pandemic problem in our country but may be worse in certain segments. This rapid rise in Obesity goes hand in hand with the unprecedented rise of Type II Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease. Our Standard American Diet as well as the sedentary nature of culture anymore are the culprits, with diet being #1.

            “Health may not be everything but without health everything is nothing”
            – Dr. Hans Diehl, CHIP Founder

        3. I think I found part of the answer. In 2016, it seems that 71% of adults in Mississippi were overweight or obese and this was the highest incidence in the United States. That is definitely alarming, though it isn’t exactly what “nearly EVERYONE” brings to my mind. However, if you meant by that the majority of adults, you would be correct by a large margin. What I saw https://www.statista.com/statistics/266152/people-who-are-overweight-or-obese-in-selected-us-states/
          ranked the leading 10 states for overweight and obesity combined. Texas was #10 at 68%. I’d be interested in seeing those same stats for all states. Obesity rates alone seem to be less meaningful.

          1. The southern states are usually in the top seven nationwide in a review of the stats.
            However the stats are usually derived from the CDC which references things solely on a BMI calculation. BMI is not usually a very concrete indicator of how fat a person really is. Which is why the army for one, on qualification for entrance, considers things like comparison of neck size to waist size and not BMI as to qualification as to who can probably fulfill the requirements of physical training. Size only is indicated by BMI which may be a misread on large muscle massed peoples.

            In fact average weights in America have in a total probably trended slightly down recently but waist size has trended up.

            From Harvard EDU
            “T he Nurses’ Health Study, one of the largest and longest studies to date that has measured abdominal obesity, looked at the relationship between waist size and death from heart disease, cancer, or any cause in middle-aged women. (4) At the start of the study, all 44,000 study volunteers were healthy, and all of them measured their waist size and hip size.
            After 16 years, women who had reported the highest waist sizes — 35 inches or higher –had nearly double the risk of dying from heart disease, compared to women who had reported the lowest waist sizes (less than 28 inches). (4)
            Women in the group with the largest waists had a similarly high risk of death from cancer or any cause, compared with women with the smallest waists. The risks increased steadily with every added inch around the waist.
            The study found that even women at a “normal weight” BMI less than 25 were at a higher risk, if they were carrying more of that weight around their waist: Normal-weight women with a waist of 35 inches or higher had three times the risk of death from heart disease, compared to normal-weight women whose waists were smaller than 35 inches.
            The Shanghai Women’s Health study found a similar relationship between abdominal fatness and risk of death from any cause in normal-weight women. (5)
            What is it about abdominal fat that makes it strong marker of disease risk? The fat surrounding the liver and other abdominal organs, so-called visceral fat, is very metabolically active. It releases fatty acids, inflammatory agents, and hormones that ultimately lead to higher LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose, and blood pressure. (6)”

            Regardless of BMI compare this to the numbers on waist size for a average American woman presently…” women who had reported the highest waist sizes — 35 inches or higher –had nearly double the risk of dying from heart disease,”
            And you will find the average is buttressing up upon that number. Men are slightly below but not much. So a widespread public health crisis is in the making if this trend continues however they may try to parse the numbers.

            The truth of the matter is one can be fat and not be fat overweight or obese by BMI and quite often likely is that the case in America.

            Hence my observation I find a skinny person in the south very hard to come by. I do not mean a football athlete who may be obese by BMI standard and certainly overweight but a person with a protruding abdomen who obviously is having trouble getting out of a chair or into and out of their cars. Which is to a extend regardless of BMI.
            Skinny arms and legs and a great big belly may weight the same as big arms and big legs and skinny waist but usually they mean totally different things…one is observationally fat and one is not. Health wise the translation appears the same in general.

            1. Bothering now to look to the CDC, their statistical arm, as a search on media is showing only 2010 numbers curiously(or not so curiously) these are their numbers…
              “Men:
              Height in inches: 69.2
              Weight in pounds: 195.7
              Waist circumference in inches: 40.0* (101.5 centimeters)
              Women:
              Height in inches: 63.7
              Weight in pounds: 168.5
              Waist circumference in inches: 38.1* (96.9 centimeters)*Unpublished figure. Derived from converting published figures listed in centimeters to inches.”

              Of course somebody looking for holes will state but if you are 7 feet tall your waist size may be about right and you are not fat…but the real is……Americans are way way fat and at risk for a major health crisis by my read.

              Due to what they are eating also by my readcoupled with a inactive lifestyle. One can parse BMI and this and that waists don’t generally lie..they indicate fat or not..

                1. And one may care to disagree with this personal observation but I will state it….as my google search indicates this information is being actively surpressed in media. And likely BMI is being used to downplay how fat americans really are and to what a extend this country is in the beginnings of a major health crisis as result .

                  Why…………….. as it is all about what we eat and that industry has result in media influence and other to include governmental source.
                  But like the CDC numbers my eyes and your eyes do not lie….we need only to look around.
                  We cannot simply be allowed to think what we are eating is unhealthy….jobs jobs jobs depend on the inverse.

            2. To add there is some genetic based variance with waist sizes waist to hip ratio and all the rest, but by far waist size is a more secure indicator of fat than BMI considering only one qualifier and not multiple.

              Why is the use of BMI considered so secure a indicator may be the bigger question when assuredly it is not. This presents here on this board with nutritionists assumeing the solidity of that as indicator, basically because they have internalized a narrative the CDC and others reinforce. Which trends fat numbers down not up in general consideration for media.
              It is simply amazing how big americans waists have become in such a relatively short period of time.
              Their diet is plainly killing them….this cannot be allowed to be known.

              1. Go do your own search now on google..put in American womens average waist size……and you will find basically the whole first page and I don’t know how many others will come in with various articles and such based on 2010 numbers which had womans waist sizes in the 34-5 range. And then into dress sizes and this and that nonsense. Never mentioning the current by last analysis CDC numbers. Do you think that be accidental?

                Do it yourself don’t take my word on it. Search it now.
                The enemy here is not who is vegan part vegan all vegan, whole food part whole foods or this or that…it is who is killing us by their practices.
                Which clearly is our current food industry. Not calling for violence or any of that, but to fight a enemy to right a wrong to prevent a unnecessary death we must know who it is that is the cause and who it is we fight.
                A google search simply shows how far that reach. In the military they call it need to know. You are only told what you need to know to function in your position. All else is not kept secret but you simply are not told of it. You have no need.
                So it is truths are simply not found on search, nor much mentioned in mass media. A bit only is allowed.

                1. From to engineer is human, from a piece identifying the various and sundry criticisms to BMI a thing developed almost 200 years ago by a mathmetician, not a physician. Which speaks to my claim…

                  “Health professionals are aware of issues with using a mass index. Romero-Corral et al. (2008) published a study of over 13,000 Americans in the International Journal of Obesity to assess the accuracy of BMI as a diagnostic tool. Their discussion of the usefulness of BMI evolves around the inability to distinguish between lean mass and fat. They found that BMI > 30 classified 21% of the men and 31% of the women as obese. However, 50% of the men and 62% of the women were actually obese (defined as having greater than 25% or 35% body fat for men or women, respectively).”

                  BMI amongst americans at least vastly underestimated body fat and hence who is considered obese. Can we presuppose this is not a known?

                2. You’re pretty much preaching to the choir with me. I can’t prove it’s true, but I have also read that several major clothing manufacturers make clothing of any given waist size designation larger than what used to be.
                  To some extent, the distorted reality is probably a factor of it being what people prefer to believe. Too, I think some of the stats are based on self-reports, which are undoubtedly skewed more favorably than the reality.
                  My curiousity, however, was more about how much more prevalent overweight/obesity is in the Southern US in relation to the rest of the nation. For this type of comparison purpose, the BMI figures alone may get it in the ballpark. But yeah, even the overweight/obesity stats as reflected are very disturbing.

                  1. Ok the stats are not really viable as I mention. What is viable is the thing of military readiness…
                    “,,A research study released by The Citadel in collaboration with the U.S. Army Public Health Center and the American Heart Association is the first to show that the low fitness of U.S. Army recruits from 10 Southern states poses a threat to military readiness and national security. According to the findings, recruits from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas are significantly less fit, and consequently are more likely to encounter training related injuries (TRI) than recruits from other U.S. states.”

                    Obesity is overall the largest disqualifier for military service.
                    This speaks generally this study of the relative levels of overweight in comparison to a equal grouping of like males in other states.
                    Are these young males exempt from other groupings of peoples in their states….nothing suggest them as exceptional.

                    Other data speaks of this but the military is not inclined to participate in nonsense when it comes to important things like readiness.
                    It has gotten so bad in recruit training in the navy for instance the numbers on physical tests necessary to pass to complete training are known as continually fudged.Overall it is being found increasingly hard to field recruits and spots are being left vacant.

                    And the south a historical place of most recruitment is found the most lacking. If it presents here in what should be our most fit, young males imagine the overall state of affairs.

                    1. This is indeed alarming, Ron. I wonder how much regional cuisine is the culprit. Frying seems to be the default cooking method in the South. Thanks.

                    2. They can lie with the CDC misrepresenting BMI to show lower fat americans, they can lie to nutritionists training them to accept BMI as a rule, they can lie to media and report only 2010 stats when current stats are available, they can misrepresent and understate this and that…

                      But when the rubber meets the road the military…is when the truth of American fatness shows. Reality eventually always wins the day…southerners…way fatter. Americans all fat. On average.
                      Even George Bush had to declare there were no WMD’s in the end…reality always wins the day…this is that reality intruding into their narrative. And BMI..yes it is part of that narrative.

                    3. Just a personal observation but….I think it is really the fast food. There were lines around the block at virtually every fast food place everywhere in the south at dinner time at the drive ins. I see in NM….is is busy but not like that,

                      I guess it is all they all eat for dinner..but guess it is and personal observation.
                      Could research it and find out with supporting evidence but as far as I am concerned that is the why. I never saw such lines years a go nor in other places in the Americas.

                    4. Self reporting study on fast food consumption is about worthless as everyone knows it is bad for them. So what you get in any observational study of self reporting nature is a read on how honest people are or dishonest per state not how many really eat the stuff or do not.

                      Kids… data is probably more relevant as they are occasionally not self reported studies but a third party monitor.
                      But still if any self reporting is involved what parent is going to admit their kids get fast food every day at every dinner…none, as they know it is bad and may be bordering on abuse.

                      Sales data by my guess would show a real take.

                      But again I am pretty certain personally. But that would be a way to prove it…. amount of fast food places per capita increases in places sales year by year and comparison by state…would prove it. Leave self reporting completely out of it.

                      Easily done but few would care to produce real data on this thing as it is not wanted.

                    5. Fast food anticipate revenue US 2015 around 200 billion estimated by 2020…223 billion……..
                      On a quick check…..which does indeed show this rubber meeting the road…where the dietary trend really is.
                      10% increase in 5 years……katie bar the door.

                      And each past year a similar trend upward. Won’t find that much reported though.

                      Thems the real apples….statistical data from the industry which about says it all.

                      From a MCD financial review web site focusing on statistical information in the sector with MCD as focus….i though they are actually loosing restaurants to other competitors.

    2. I’m 5-10 and it is a struggle for me to keep weight on. I weigh 145 lbs. (age54 male) And I eat healthy and exercise regularly. It is common for people to point out to me that I am skinny. They say “skinny” meaning unhealthy. I eat 3 meals a day plus healthy snacks between and drink plenty of water. I have been this way my whole life. Blood work always comes back as near perfect. When I golf, I eat Greek yogurt in the morning with orange juice, a banana, and two health bars, then go play golf in the afternoon. I walk the course and don’t use a golf cart. During golf I will eat another banana and a peanut butter and jelly sandwich on rye, plus water. When I get home and weigh myself, I will typically lose 3-4 pounds during the day. Frustrating.

      1. Sure, you need more protein Jack!

        Besides beans / legumes / nuts / tofu buy a tub of pea protein powder and have a good serve or two every day. Works great. But before you do all this please send me a chunk of your metabolism, I need it….

        1. Thanks Chris. The beans and legumes and nuts tend to irritate my IBS-D. I eat small portions of chicken, fish, turkey and red meat – the healthiest I can find, and I am hesitant about taking powdered protein that you get in a container. Organic peanut butter is usually ok with my gut.

      2. Jack, your BMI (20.8) is well within the normal range. In fact you are close to the middle of the normal range (18.5 – 24.9). Unfortunately, most people in the USA are overweight, which makes it seem like you are skinny. Your weight loss of 3-4 lbs on the golf course is almost certainly due to water loss. Same thing happens to me after my 40-60 mi bike rides.

        1. Wow…40-60 miles on a bike? I think walking 18 holes of golf is only about 4-5 miles? And even then it is stop and go. Hmmm. Maybe I will have to bring more water with me next time and see if there is a difference. As for my BMI, I hear what you are saying, but people look at me and comment like its the first thing they notice about me when they see me. Makes me feel self-conscious, especially as a man. Thank you for responding.

      3. Hi, Jack. It is possible that you are just not consuming enough calories to sustain your activity level. Have you had your thyroid levels checked? Sometimes an overactive thyroid can cause these types of issues. As long as that is normal, and your BMI is within normal limits, which it is, I would not worry too much about what others say about your weight. Weight loss like that over the course of a day tends to be water. Since you mentioned IBS-D in a later comment, I thought you might be interested in these:
        https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/irritable-bowel-syndrome/
        I hope that helps!

  2. I reflected on the list of “all the great names in evidence based nutrition” (0:27) and heard myself mutter aloud, “I think ‘Greger’ should be added to that list.

      1. I third that recommendation, his continuous daily schedule with this newsletter and lecturing throughout the country is a wonderful service and dedication that is amazing.

        1. Can I ‘fourth’ that recommendation? I would have no idea who those other great names in nutritional science were if it wasn’t for Dr. G and his fabulous staff.

          1. Thanks for your comment. I agree that Dr. Greger is wonderfully inspirational in how he leads all of us to new names and studies we would not be aware of without his guidance. Glad you’re continuing to learn through this site.

    1. Funny. I thought- The studies done by these people are atrocious. Really bad study design and ignoring confounding variables, etc. Just about all their studies included an intervention group that did many things different than the controls, not just diet. Things like quitting smoking, exercising, meeting with counseling to cope with stress, etc. And their studies included very small numbers. Nothing specifically can be concluded from these studies. The gist of them is- if you live a healthy, clean life and exercise and get enough sleep, you feel better and are more healthy. Wow. Shock. Not to be snarky. But none of these people are considered “top” researchers in nutrition.

      1. I can see where you are coming from.

        However, Greger did not describe these people as top researchers in nutrition. He described them as leaders in evidence based nutrition. That is a quite different kettle of fish.

        That description seems fair enough. Who else has reversed heart disease with nutritional programmes except Esselstyn, Ornish and Pritikin as demonstrated in articles published in peer-reviewed journals? Who else has published evidence so convincing that the financial hard-heads in Medicare and various insurance companies have approved a number of their programmes for financial reimbursement. For example, I don’t recall a low carb/keto/paleo/Atkins study or programme achieving anything like these results. Although their very vocal advocates do like to make the sorts of criticsms that you have made here.

        Sure you can critique the studies because this wasn’t a double-blind RCT or that one combined nutrition with meditation/exercise/conventional treatment etc. But there are very few if any nutritional studies let alone programmes that are immune to such criticisms.

        1. Their data is extremely weak. The supposed reversal of coronary artery disease is an extremely small study with very few people. And among the other interventions, the experimental group quit smoking. There is essentially no power in those studies. None. It is really astonishing to me that such studies are cited as evidence of anything.

          What most people do not know is that only 5-10% of articles in peer-reviewed nutrition and medical journals contain valid conclusions. That means that 90-95% of the peer-reviewed articles have invalid conclusions. Most physicians do not know how to read and interpret the literature.

          As to the names mentioned by Greger, I really cannot come up with quality evidence and data they are using to validate their claims. I am being completely honest.

          I can think of 50 or so nutritional studies that are very well designed and controlled and that demonstrated far more convincing results. Too often, ideology trumps data.

  3. I could not agree more with the recommendations above. It would be great to have a focus section on child nutrition. (CHIP for growing children) I have come across some videos and believe more can be done. From the evidence based playbook of course. This site has transformed the way I think and eat. Thank you!

    1. There is a program developed in Athens, Ohio by the Live Healthy Appalachia (LHA) Group (livehealthyappalachia.org) which is a 22 week hands on cooking, nutrition, and healthy lifestyle curriculum for 2nd graders. They are also finishing a version for 4-5 graders. Been teaching it in the Athens, Ohio are for 8 years and believe it is in its fifth edition. We have, with the help and mentoring of LHA group started a similar organization in NC, Live Healthy Carolinas (livehealthycarolinas.org) and will begin teaching the Live Healthy Kids Program here starting in September in 5 second grade classrooms. Both organizations also offer CHIP.

      1. Patrick Coleman, what a fantastic opportunity for those kids! We ate fairly well growing up ( the transfats in margarine and the admonishing to drink our milk aside) but many kids I see today don’t.
        It’s a terrific idea starting them off in grade 2 – and sending them home with handouts to read, new-found skills and recipe ideas to share with the family. Awesome! We need that in my community !

  4. I ate a typical American diet for years, was 5 foot 7 inches and weighed 168 lbs., had moderate to serious depression for years, and then had a heart attack 12 years ago, adopted a low fat vegan diet at the time and started more walking and yoga (my definition of yoga, basically stretching alternated with bench pressing your own weight, not for sissies) as I had no health insurance. Now weigh 138 lbs., feel great, and the best part, the depression went away, disappeared. I tend to think from the improved nutrition (so many more fruits and vegetables now, plus I think I was allergic to milk and cheese, looking back, ate cheese all the time in the past,loved a glass of milk with pizza, interspersed with home baked brownies and chocolate chip cookies) and more movement. I do yoga at least three times a week and walk or bike once or twice a week in the summer and do yoga 4-5 times a week in the winter, maybe swim once a week too in the winter and have become a terrific vegan cook, I prefer it now, wonder how I ate as I previously did. I enjoy my blessings from this way of living of being more physically able, I.e. moving so easily, my knees used to bother me previously, and being happy most of the time, sad things do happen in life, but they do not result in long term depression, a much better way to enjoy life for me.

    1. Marie, I think you are the perfect model of a modern major life changer. That is, many if not all of us generally do not change in a major way until we are motivated by illness, pain, or emotion. Maybe the CHIP program can educate us at a younger age to adapt so we do not encounter the illness, pain, or emotion that seems to act as motivators.

      1. Lonie, maybe, but many to most folks I know or know of don’t even change then: They are not “motivated by illness, pain, or emotion” and I wonder why not. I discuss this with a friend, and we can’t figure out the answer.

        1. When I was in primary school (early ’90s) five out of eight girls in my class were obviously overweight. (among the boys there was only one out of 14 who was overweight). The overweight girls and even the boys seemed to believe that the three slim girls were too skinny, sometimes even insulting them (children can be so cruel…).
          They really believed that overweight was normal (eventually confusing this with healthy). Generally their parents were overweight, too. So probably those parents would not tell their children that they are too fat (which is totally understandable, as it would not make sense to tell your child “hey, you are fat, do something about your nutrition”; moreover, parents will probably not like to make their children feel bad about themselves). As a result those children grew up learning that overweight was normal (healthy) weight. And some might even later in life vehemently argue that their weight is just normal. If they get sick then and are advised by their doctors to lose weight, changing their diet might extra for them because they would have to confess that they were wrong all of their life. It is hard for a lot of people, maybe for most people, to admit that they have been wrong.
          Another factor might be related to group dynamics. If you feel like you are part of a group (which also means that you feel accepted) then changing something which the majority of the group does not change can mean that you are no longer part of the group, since you do not share their common beliefs and values anymore.
          Finding a group for support can be so important!

          ps: I am really looking forward to the book on dietary approaches to mental illnesses. I will definitely make sure to purchase it.

          1. Those kids teasing the other kids about being “too skinny” were probably covering up their insecurities. No matter what their parents told them, they were aware of societal standards and were probably unhappy with their image and insecure. Seems like in the 90’s kids were far less overweight than they are today, I’m surprised to hear that most of the girls in your class were overweight.

            1. I think the fact that there were so many overweight girls in my class was just a coincidence. We all lived in a relativly small village (about 2000 inhabitants) and luckily things looked a bit different in the surrounding villages.

        2. I know what you mean. I know one guy that had a stent in his heart or artery, not sure, who bragged the first think he did when he was released from the hospital was go out and order a big steak. Some people are so set in their ways they will ask for a pack of cigarettes and one match if they are on their death bed. The real impact from a CHIP program may be to bring doctors on board and reaching children early so they can adopt a healthy lifestyle.

          1. Some time ago I used to volunteer in a hospice and indeed quite a number of people on their deathbeds did demand their cigarettes. The attendants used to wheel them outside on a gurney or in a wheelchair so they could smoke.

            The reasoning was that, at that stage, it was not going to make any meaningful difference and, if it gave them some pleasure and comfort (and the knowledge that they were still in control and could make their own decisions, thank you very much), why not?

            1. Have a close relative here in the states in a nursing home on 02 by cannula due to COPD is 100 pounds or so overweight and continues to smoke as much as he can. He would be definitely served by stopping smoking but he is not under legal guardianship of the nursing home nor me…so.
              He has cognitive problems and is under a legal guardianship but his person responsible allows this.

              Often is depends on what the legal guardian allows. Seems absurd to allow this, but I do not pay his way nor have any legal authority so have no standing in this determination. This has been going on for years with his COPD steadily worsening. His dementia involved violence so perhaps that plays into the allowance, but I only conjecture. That being perhaps he would get violent if denied.

        3. Dr. J that is so true. I’ve known people fighting serious diseases and complaining about pain and how they want to get better, etc., completely ignore information offered to them that would give them the power do to so… even the simplest little advice like adding turmeric and all the proven science behind it. But they’ll still complain. A lot of people, it seems, don’t want to actually change their lifestyle no matter how sick or miserable they get, and prefer to believe there’s a magic pill out there that they’ll eventually as they go through various meds and so on. It’s frustrating and sad. Of course, this is definitely not the case for everyone.

          1. eventually *find

            And to add, people don’t seem to want to accept the fact that our bodies are intricate systems and instead prefer to stick with archaic beliefs about diet and lifestyle and quick fixes.

          2. S, or they blame genetics, never lifestyle like diet and exercise. This is what frustrates me with some of the people I get sent. They always have some excuse “I was never athletic.”. I’ve just encouraged them to walk around the block to get started, because their doctor told me they have no leg muscle to speak of. At least start by walking to the mailbox.

            “It’s just my genes.” “Can’t you just give me a pill that will make me lose weight, I’ve always eaten this way”.
            Translation, I intend to sit on the sofa looking at TV all day and scarf down junk food.
            But, I don’t want to be in pain or have another heart attack. ???
            But the ones who change things and get well make the time spent worth it. But, frankly they aren’t the majority.

  5. The CHIP program is great, and certainly Hans Diehl “gets it.” But to be as bullet proof against disease as possible in one’s diet, it should contain no added fat (Ornish, Barnard, Esselstyn, McDougall, Forks over Knives, et al. And CHIP allows some added oils :(

    1. CHIP doesn’t allow added oils it actually discourages them but as a community based program we teach a food continuum. The program educates the participants as to the worst and best eating choices and why they are good or bad, each individual then has the knowledge to decide where on that continuum they want to be and how fast they move from the worse choices to the best choices. From the “good life” to the “best life”. Dr Diehl is a truly amazing, intellectual, compassionate individual totally committed to teaching these principles even today and is in my opinion one of the pioneers and greats of the plant based movement. He is in the class of Pritikin, Ornish, Campbell, Esselstyn, McDougall, Barnard, Fuhrman, etc.

      “Health may not be Everything but without Health Everything is Nothing” – Dr. Hans Diehl, CHIP Founder

  6. There was a time I could and would eat a large meal. I was pretty active and due to my body type didn’t get all that fat. I know eat less, actually do not eat according to “meal-time” but rather I eat when the mood strikes me… and one actual “meal” a day, although I eat various foods throughout the day.

    I’ve noticed I poop less and I pretty much maintain my body size (I don’t weigh myself) suggesting the amount of food I eat is well digested.

    And while I do not eat many of the super-healthy vegetables, I do make sure I get the nutrients I need through supplementation.

    I also think I am subject to the Hawthorne Effect. That is, knowing I will be seen by a Dr. and have lab work done spurs me to try to get those lab numbers all in the acceptable range beforehand.

    I agree that knowledge is a powerful aid to good health. I once suggested the govt. should start a health channel that 1. would promote healthy food knowledge and the studies that support that, and 2. down play advertisements that counteracted the emotional targeting of the public by giving the public just the facts. I eventually came to recognize that at the time anyway, government’s sole purpose was to collect our money in taxes and then spend it.

    And while we do not have the govt. health channel that would reach millions, we do have the NIH and other govt. funded agencies that try to separate the wheat from the chaff… they just don’t reach as many in the public as mainstream media does. Luckily, there are some private entities that are trying to fill that void.

    This CHIP program seems to be just the ticket for that.

    1. Lonie, the USDA publishes dietary guidelines — which are heavily influenced by lobbying, mainly from the meat, dairy, and egg industries. [https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dietary-guidelines] As Dr. Greger has stated, there is no lobby for Big Broccoli. The USDA “serves” 2 masters: the agricultural industry, promoting its products, and the public’s health. The second one is held hostage to the first. I arm beginning to distrust our federal agencies, and I say this as a former research scientist. money doesn’t just talk, it controls and corrupts.

      From the guidelines: “● Drink and eat less sodium, saturated fat, and added sugars.” note the use of food constituents, instead of saying “Drink and eat less processed foods and animal products.” Because that’s basically where you find sodium, saturated fats, and added sugars. D’oh!!

    2. Check out the research from Dr Roy Walford MD on calorie restriction diets. (I wonder what Dr Greger would think). Dr. Walford’s research focused on the biology and mechanics of aging from the standpoints of immunology and molecular biology. He discovered that restricting caloric intake in laboratory mice by about 50% could more than double their normal life span. Later human studies showed that caloric restriction could lower blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol. Dr. Walford applied his theory to his own life; for the last 30 years of his life, he consumed only 1,600 calories a day, far below the recommended calorie intake for a man of his age. (He also talked about how war rationing during WW2 had the health of people all over in better health than populations are now)

      In 1991, Dr. Walford applied the low-calorie diet in the experimental Biosphere 2, a three-acre self-contained greenhouse in the Arizona desert. He and seven other researchers sealed themselves for two years in the closed ecological system. When food supplies ran low, Dr. Walford encouraged the others to follow a calorie-restricted diet, which produced dramatic weight loss and improved health.

      Dr. Walford authored several best-selling books, including Maximum Life Span, Beyond the 120 Year Diet: How to Double Your Vital Years, and The Anti-Aging Plan: Strategies and Recipes for Extending Your Healthy Years. He also published more than 300 scientific articles.

      1. Well, yes, but the current average age at death in the US is 79 and Wlford died at 79. (However, he diid died of ALS).

        However, very interesting stuff

        ‘Working with mice, he found that restricting their caloric intake by about 40% could nearly double their life span — but only if the diet was started at a very young age and they consumed a nutrient-rich diet that prevented malnutrition.
        The diet preserved both physical health and mental agility. He found that a 36-month-old mouse that had been fed the restricted-calorie diet could run a maze with the facility of a normal 6-month-old mouse.
        At first, researchers didn’t think it would work for older animals, however. When experimenters abruptly switched mice to a low-calorie diet, the animals suffered a variety of adverse effects and their life spans were usually shortened dramatically.
        But Walford and then-graduate student Rick Weindruch found that easing the animals into the diet over a two-month period allowed them to live at least 20% longer. That was when Walford decided to undertake the regimen himself.’
        http://articles.latimes.com/2004/may/01/local/me-walford1

        There is also now the view that it is not calorie restriction per se that delivers the benefits but methionine/animal protein restriction.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLAiu_fl2oE&list=PLR1msaqwLna3q-D_LcpSZxjyRa9u87EwI
        https://nutritionfacts.org/2016/07/14/caloric-restriction-vs-plant-based-diets/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/2014/07/08/a-low-methionine-diet-may-help-starve-cancer-cells/

    3. Lonie

      You wrote ‘I’ve noticed I poop less and I pretty much maintain my body size (I don’t weigh myself) suggesting the amount of food I eat is well digested.’

      My first thought was that you are just eating less fibre.

      1. My first thought was that you are just eating less fibre.
        —————————————————————————–

        No, my stools are not consisting of granite rocks that could knock a hole in the commode. They are pretty consistent with other stools that I’ve had under different dietary circumstances.

        For the record, I don’t eat for fiber nor do I eat to avoid it. It is just not that much of a concern to me. Not saying others shouldn’t seek extra fiber… just saying my knowledge base is different from others as is my metabolics.

    4. Lonie, I don’t agree that you can get all you need in supplements. There are, for instance, 100+ carotenoids in veggies, you might get one in a pill. There are probably phytonutrients not yet discovered in fruits and vegetables. And they all work together.
      Don’t kid yourself that you can duplicate that in pills.

      1. Lonie, I don’t agree that you can get all you need in supplements. There are, for instance, 100+ carotenoids in veggies, you might get one in a pill. There are probably phytonutrients not yet discovered in fruits and vegetables. And they all work together.
        Don’t kid yourself that you can duplicate that in pills.
        ———————————————————————————————————————————————–
        Marilyn, There are some supplements that are intense enough when extracted to be put in a pill. But don’t kid yourself that supplements only come in pills. Some come in desiccated whole plant powders that one uses by the scoop full.

        1. Amla or indian gooseberries come to mind. Which seem quite effective in dry form by some study to my dim recollection.

      2. There are, for instance, 100+ carotenoids in veggies,
        —————————————————————————–
        Forgot to mention that nature is redundant. Some of the things we get from one source may be doing the same thing we get from another source. Nothing wrong with diversity, but nothing says it is any more powerful than getting what you need from fewer sources.

  7. All I can say about the children is

    Sigh

    There are so many children who have never eaten a home cooked meal and who have never eaten vegetables and I mean none, ever.

    I watch the 7 year old, who I am pals with and she eats Chicken McNuggets and fries and then candy and ice cream and maybe something like popcorn.

    Her parents and grandparents and great-grandparents also don’t eat vegetables or fruit and also eat a lot of junk food and drink soda and alcohol and her great-grandmother is one of those annoying statistics, where she smokes constantly, drinks alcohol and eats junk food, and doesn’t eat healthy food almost ever, but doesn’t have any health issues at 85 and is one of those charismatic, funny people who kids want to be like.

    Several of them just moved away without the girl, so things are going to change, but she didn’t learn her alphabet until almost 7 and has no nutrition and has started moving around to different care-takers and different school systems…. and her parents and grandparents might not be as lucky as the great-grandmother.

    Just saying that it is like when they used to talk about welfare becoming multi-generational. It is so hard to change it, when every person in every generation has already bought into it.

  8. I met former Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders back in the 90’s. She talked about how we do not have a health care industry in America, we instead have a disease care industry. It kicks in most usually when a person develops a disease that does not go away on its own. And the medical establishment openly professes that it is not worth the ‘bother’ to try to get patients to do lifestyle choices. They do not believe people even want the information or know it is there. I talk with doctor after doctor about this even now. Anyhow Mrs Elders said we fail as a country because we do not TEACH people how or what to eat. The most the government does is occasionally toss out a new food pyramid that does not translate into the kitchen for most people. We have students that graduate high-school whose PARENTS get UPSET if the school tries to teach their kids anything that makes the kids question what the parents are feeding them. HOW DARE YOU MAKE MY KID WANT TO EAT VEGAN? Then these same people go right back into the fallacy and insist that diseases are hereditary and not passed down through family eating habits and anything controllable.

    She took on multiple industries trying to actually do something and they constantly lobbied to get her fired if you remember. It was her talk about HIV and AIDS saying there are the A-B-C-D’s to not getting HIV. A- be abstinent, B- be faithful to your partner, C- use a latex condom, or D- you gotta ‘do something else’ (to yourself) and that last one was what got her fired for telling the truth.

    1. I think the UK being government run does compensate docs for healthy patients. I suspect other countries have means to do that as well. The average Japanese has a large large number of doc visits each year. I can only assume those are not for treatments of existant disease as Japanese tend healthy, but for lifestyle guidance and maintence.

      My ex father in law speaking little English and understanding no written English received a booklet from his doc a cartoon like thing following his bypass of course in English..NO advise given to caregivers or close relatives.

      Eating eggs and bacon at my house a few days after release, and of course developed diabetes and was dead two years later, following one amputation…..By my guess his doc was one of those saying…we give them the information and they just don’t want to listen.

      1. In a privately run health care system,aside the insurance companies, there is no incentive under the sun to reduce risk or occurance of any disease process to include those caused almost entirely by poor diet,

        Docs hospitals rehab all are paid by patient use. Their income increase with more patients. We would like to think the medical profession is abstract from profit motivation but they are not. Rarely found are docs like Dr Greger.
        Insurance companies do a bit particularly with the elderly on their plans to cut costs But with your not elderly, they can really just pay off the claims as the profits will cover the costs and work at excluding those with disease from their plans.

        Really if you want to have docs take a real role in dietary and other risk factor management, you must include government with a cost savings motivator overall to incentivize.
        Pay docs yes..for healthy patients. So it becomes their business to prevent not just treat illness.
        The system is set up to the inverse. They will not advocate to make you sick of course…but will not really give time to things like a patient interview when it competes with a revenue grabbing patient care provision.

  9. i say it, because I grew up with daily junk food, maybe went years without home cooked meals or fruit or vegetables, gaining the 1 to 3 pounds per year, but I did have elderly people who ate them and I was at least exposed to them.

    This generation, healthy food is like a foreign language and if you don’t at least learn a few of the words as a child, it gets harder.

    i know a 26 year old who is well on the way to being a 600 pound person.

    She might be 400 pounds already.

    It is so hard to turn the Titanic around after it crashes into the iceberg.

    1. That 26 year old’s mother is a food addict, but she didn’t turn 300 pounds until her late 50’s.

      Her daughter crossed that mark in her late teenage years.

    2. Deb, I agree this generation is ignorant about healthy food. I’m always taken aback when I get to the checkout at the local stores. I am constantly asked “what is it”. They don’t recognize many vegetables at all.

  10. Admin: hi, I am suffering with Malabsorption, significant weight loss due to pharmaceutical Colchicine taken for Gout due to Spherocytosis/ aka Hemolytic Anemia. I am 66, 6’2” weight range morning 138 night 144, can’t gain weight. Please help. Thank you in Avance!!!!!

    1. Ted, would be best if you went to a knowledgeable Gastroenterologist. You need to first repair the gut.

      If you can’t get one, far Second best, would be to try fresh made vegetable juice, (juicer, not blender). Your system may not be able to handle fiber for a while. Celery, carrot, cabbage, cucumber is fairly easily digested. One doctor here prescribes the amino acid glutamine, and Pepsid G.I. for such patients. (Study done on this on NIH.)
      Then probiotics. But probiotics on an unhealthy gut can cause more problems. Don’t start with them.
      But there’s not much calories in this. You may need IV feeding for a while as you heal.

      You sure need a good M.D. before you lose more weight. Please try to get help!

      1. I agree Marilyn, figuring out what is in his diet that he got gout and fixing the gut are the way to go.

        I have never seen one doctor, except on-line who will give even one piece of information about nutrition.

        My friends’ doctors and cousins’ doctors and siblings’ doctors and father and step mother’s doctors all make fun of nutritional solution.

        Ted, you have a doctor who gave you Colchicine, instead of looking at your diet and maybe telling you to try tart cherry juice and modified citrus pectin and digestive enzymes or alkalizing your diet and getting off soda and beer and meat and whatever else might have caused it.

        The people around me who have gout are beer drinkers and the doctor gave my brother and a co-worker Colchicine, too, and didn’t say one thing other than medicine. Not one. So, everybody will send you back to your doctors and they will make fun of you and tell you that dietary changes won’t help.

        But PubMed will show a study where stomach ulcers were healed a lot faster on cabbage juice than on the medicines they give. 7 to 10 days and they won’t know about it and will say, “Don’t believe everything you read on the internet” and will say, “Are you watching Dr. Oz or some internet doctor?” and act authoritative. Been there. Done that. Over and Over and Over again. Everybody around who has tried natural products has gotten that same answer.

        To me, this is where you need to take responsibility to do as much research as possible and then, where they come in is they tell you whether cabbage juice is dangerous.

        1. I don’t do medical model, partly because I can’t afford it.

          I was watching Dr. McDougall talking about MS drugs costing $30,000 per year and was listening to my cousin talking about dialysis costing $75,000 per year. Yes, if you have the right insurance, you don’t have to pay the whole thing, but, to me, even with my dog, my vet is just a by-stander telling me not to expect it to work.

          I am the one researching everything possible to give him a shot and I paid him thousands of dollars to do lab tests.

          I think I am going to be buying another infrared camera, because one scan from him costs almost the same amount and I would rather keep track of it myself, even if they aren’t 100% accurate all of the time.

          I can use it periodically to check myself.

  11. Admin: Significant weight due to Malabsorption=Spherocytosis =Hemolytic Anemia =Gout=Colchicine. AM weight 138, PM Weight 142-44. Cannot gain weight. Pls Help Me !!

    1. Ted,

      Hoping they will help you, but I know that telling underweight people what to eat to gain weight is tricky.

      You need to turn the Calorie Density chart around.

      Watch a video on Calorie Density and shift your foods.

      Eat drier foods, rather than foods with high water content.

      Shift from green and yellow vegetables to starches.

      Lower the fiber content in your foods, by using things like juices before dinner and drink them fast.

      Increase your avocado and seeds and nuts intake.

      Increase your desserts.

      Don’t do intermittent fasting.

      Again, watch videos on Calorie Density and shift categories.

      1. Note: It is hard to gain weight on nuts.

        Don’t choose pistachios. 123 of them didn’t cause weight gain in studies.

        Watch Dr. Greger’s nut videos, because I think there were a few nuts, which caused a tiny bit of weight gain and the clinical people do shift to nuts and avocados and more starches when people have lost too much weight.

        1. I just thought of someone who could help you.

          Dr. Lisle.

          He has had people lose too much weight and he has told them which foods to eat to gain a little back.

          He has also had people who couldn’t lose the last ten pounds and he talked them through what to give up.

          I feel like he has a handle on that.

          He has a web-site and does either half hour or hour long phone consultations.

          I almost had one, but he told me that I was doing great and not to waste my money unless I needed it and I agreed with that logic.

      2. Thank you. The effects of Malabsorption affects the small intestine duodenum from macro nutrients transfer. Don’t really have the main symptoms listed. This is caused by Colchicine, a deadly pharmaceutical. Every Pharmaceutical listed has side effects, some worse than others. Looking for a “ whole organism” solution.

        1. Ted,

          I am going to ask is it like Crohn’s disease symptoms?

          Mostly, I looked for a diet for that and The Rice Diet put 92% of the people into remission.

          Not at all sure I am giving you good counsel at all at all at all.

          Gout, I would say Tart Cherries and Modified Citrus Pectin, but get a really good brand.

          I don’t understand Malabsorption at all. I just know that I have a friend who can’t eat anything and she had cut out rice, but I found out that the rice diet might be the answer to her problems.

          Not at all saying that it is the answer to yours, but things like Crohn’s it puts the majority of people into remission.

          That was cool.

            1. They say the bananas make pectin and I don’t understand if you could just take Modified Citrus Pectin and have that help with gout and your other issues, but I have a sense that if pectin is helpful MCP seems to have it.

              Anyway, hope the experts help you out.

                1. Ted,

                  I am also going to say:

                  Is it something like destroyed gut microbiome?

                  Malabsorption is one of the fecal transplant topics.

                  We joke about that topic, but people get healed of serious things. It can save lives.

              1. Is it that you have leaky gut from the med causing malabsorption or did the med cause a different kind?

                If the med caused leaky gut, causing malabsorption, then there are things like oats and enzymes and zinc

                http://www.enzymestuff.com/conditionleakygut.htm

                Or 7 days of cabbage juice

                https://healthyfocus.org/the-many-benefits-of-cabbage-juice/

                If it caused it by another mechanism, those probably won’t help, but it gives things to look up.

                1. Deb: the Gout and was prescribed Colchicine which one of many side effects is damage of the duodenum endothelial cells leading to Malabsorption of some sort without, in my case, many of the classic symptoms; in my case it is unintentional and substantial weight loss

                  1. Seems like I looked this up for my relative two years ago and came up with cabbage juice, broccoli sprouts and a low fat plant based diet.

                    He is a smoker and had lots of holes in his stomach lining and kept needing to receive blood. He was so freezing cold in every temperature. He was using an electric blanket in the Summer and couldn’t afford his electric bills.

                    He never said, “Wow, that worked” and he didn’t go plant based, but he did do the cabbage and broccoli sprouts and I have not heard him talk about being freezing cold and when I see him now, he isn’t wearing winter hats and mittens in July. It also pushed off the blood visits. At that time, he almost needed them all the time and now it is periodically.

                    I don’t know if they gave a medicine or something like ghrelin (I think that was one of the things.)

                    I just know that he drank the cabbage juice and ate broccoli sprouts and it didn’t solve things completely, but it made the quality of his life 10,000 times better. He wasn’t able to go outside and his electricity bills were so high that he wasn’t sure whether he would have to quit his job and go to a nursing home.

                    1. I think they put the anemia in autoimmune.

                      Dr. Greger has covered autoimmune.

                      Plant Based London has one of his interviews about it and they point to John McDougall’s teachings on it.

  12. Ted I am not qualified to give any medical advise and am just another blogger here.
    But that drug can have some severe side effects which though some are very rare, they may be life threatening.

    Are you under the care of a doctor right now and/or are you continuing the medication?
    Homolytic anemia that condition being present would infer you are being treated with other medications to remediate that situation.
    Are you on other meds and most importantly…. what does your doc say?
    Did your doc advise you here?

    Why are you seeking advise on nutrition here? Is the condition remediated and you are in recovery? How long have you been in remission?
    Please specify. Even if I may not answer, someone with qualification may likely need to know these things.

    1. If you are in severe distress feeling dizzy sweaty or symptomatic in any manner beyond the normal for you…..I would if in that situation contact a emergency medical care provider immediately.

      This may be accessed through 911 in the United states.

      Please reply if that is your situation. “Pls Help Me !! seems to imply a urgency to the situation beyond that of normal nutritional advise.

    2. Thanks for writing back. The pharmaceutical Colchicine is horrific it it’s effects and stated taken as prescribed can be lethal. Prescribed by MD with zero warnings. My problem now is Malabsorption: age 66: Height: 6’ 2”. Weight in morning 138. Night 142-144. I am on the Greger MD Diet and cannot gain back weight.

      1. I cannot provide any personal professional advise as stated. I lack qualification in the subject. But often when I comment other will see it and follow suit, those with qualification.

        So a whole foods plant based diet is very helpful in combating things like gout. Assuming you are under treatment for the condition you mention and you are stable at this time I will offer a few things which may be helpful.
        Dr Greger has a video on using cherries to treat gout put it in the search and it will show up along with five others in the same vein. Click on that. Watch them all.

        AS to increasing calories on a WFPB diet one may add things that contain fat such as nuts walnuts almonds and such. Check with your doc to see if she/he has advised against that. Normally gout is correlated with increased protein in diet not fat. Anything containing fat is a good bet in increasing caloric density and thus calories consumed. Avocado things of that sort. Protein is probably not desired to increase with a propensity to gout. Protein content is normally limited with a gout patient.
        So search for and consume plants veggies nuts that contain relatively higher amounts of fat. This assuming also you have no existant cardiac or cardiovascular compromise nor narrowing of the arteries due to plaque formation nor high cholesterol readings and no known allergies to any food products such as peanuts.

        So that is my advise on a WFPB diet.
        Others with qualification may go more in depth.

        1. There are specific drugs/supplements which may be prescribed for malabsorption….are you on them?
          Is this a diagnosed condition or just a personal summary conclusion?
          That drug typically causes very loose bowel movements/diarhea..is that leading to your consideration of this as cause?.

          1. The reason I ask is……….. diarrhea with medical conditions which result in that as outcome, fat is a relative contraindicator. Fat tends to increase diarrhea in some patients.

            So do you suffer from diarrhea presently and what are your prescribed meds to counter that if you are?
            Malabsorption syndrome can have various causes and has specific courses of treatment to include drugs and usually nutritional supplementation and digestive aids to assure adequate levels when suffering and symptomatic.
            Your doc should have advised you to a nutritionist if you have this syndrome.

      2. If I had tissue damage in the digestive tract like you had from the drug, I would not eat much of anything until it healed. Various teas and Vitamin C to stimulate collagen growth.

      3. Ted,

        Look into enzymes.

        I was looking at them again tonight because I re-read a “hemangiosarcoma cured by enzymes” article.

        While I was looking at the reviews of various brands on Amazon, I kept coming across 5 Star ratings from people who had Colitis and Crohns and various digestive problems. There were enough people who said it worked for those, that I do suggest you talk to a doctor about whether it might work for your issue. One of the things enzymes do is to help break the food particles down further and that is supposed to help absorption of the nutrition. (I read that on the internet and I don’t just read brilliant doctors, so double check everything I say to you.)

  13. Is plant estrogen the same as hormonal estrogen generated by the body? For cancer patients is plant estrogen safe or should it be avoided?

    1. Nancy no one has replied and it has been a while so I will. To add however I am just another blogger here with no particular qualification in this regard.

      Plant estrogens or.phytoestrogens are not the same as human estrogen nor do they function in similar manners in the body usually.

      Most commonly they are found in soy or soy products but may be found in many other source materials such as Flax.
      Some study suggests a protective effect from breast cancer and some study also suggests a better outcome for those undergoing treatment for breast cancer consuming these.. But this is however not considered conclusively proven.

      Some docs have in the past and probably still are, restricting their patients with breast cancer from consumption of soy.

      They may be contending that the plant estrogen has cancer promoting agent in it…which seems not a proven and very unlikely, human estrogen would promote breast cancer.. Or they may be restricting soy on the potential of IGF-1 production potential.
      Soy in gross quantities such as more than 5 servings a day has been shown to have the potential for increasing the bodies production of IGF-1. IGF-1 is a growth hormone which a cancer patient does not want to have circulating in excessive amounts as it stimulates growth possibly of cancers as well,.

      So a doc may want a cancer patient to restrict soy consumption on that basis. But as stated there is the possibility for various bodily functional reason which are quite complex that plant estrogens may actually decrease chance of spread.
      Keep in mind the most gross form of IGF-1 inciting food is cows milk, far beyond that of soy. The docs claiming a restriction for soy will often add no restriction for cows milk nor meat products which also may for other reason stimulate IGF-1 production and contain other cancer promoting agents.

      So that is the situation as I read it. Personally if I was in that situation I would go for the protective effect of soy and phytoestrogens against breast cancer but keep consumption at below 5 servings daily..
      But in any event if you are in that situation consult with your doc on it. The videos on soy and breast cancer here, can be found by putting breast cancer and soy in the search box and clicking on the response video it elicits.

      IGf-1 has some other videos one specifically referencing soy…how much soy it to much may be a title to put in the search box.
      Hope that helps.

    2. Nancy, the only testing I am familiar with is in prostate cancer patients. They generally do test psi every 3 months so they can tell what works for them. Some do better on soy, some find it grows their cancer. So not all cancer cells are the same. This may apply to women.

      But there’s no good way to know how you personally will respond to soy.
      It seems soy is protective in premenopausal women in general, probably fills the estrogen receptors with a healthier type of estrogen. (Even the estrogen you make is not all the same. One type is even thought to be protective).
      For postmenopausal women, it’s less clear, as they are usually making less. Most of the estrogen is made in fat cells after menopause.
      Sorry, don’t think there’s an absolute answer to your question with current state of knowledge.

    3. Soy is one of the toughest ones to figure out. It’s almost like it will either save you or kill you depending on who you listen to. The paleo people of course think soy is poison, but I believe they are fundamentally wrong about a lot of things. There are quite a few fellow prostate cancer patients I know who avoid all soy, but so far, I continue to consume it in moderation. I could be wrong, but I believe Dr. Greger thinks that unprocessed (or mostly unprocessed) soy not to exceed 3 servings per day (or is it 5?) is likely to be cancer protective. I don’t know if he’s gotten into it this specific, but my impression is that soy concentrates and isolates are to be avoided. Tofu and soy milk without additives seem to be okay, best I can tell. Soy is notoriously genetically modified, so I think non-GMO (or preferably organic) is important. I find soy of value as a part of my plant-based diet for its protein and modest calcium content.

      1. Hi, Scott! You are right about widely varying “information” available on soy. I think it is important to follow the research. It is also worth noting that, while it is true that most soy grown in the US is GMO, most of that is fed to livestock, and not to people. Your paleo friends may not realize that animal products are hidden sources of concentrated GMO soy and corn! I agree that concentrates and isolates should be avoided, but there is plenty of research supporting a protective role for minimally processed soy foods with regard to cancers. You can find everything on this site related to soy here:
        https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/soy/
        I hope that helps!

    4. Hi, Nancy Felland. No, plant estrogens are absolutely not the same as estrogen produced by the human body. There are many different estrogens produced by your body, and there are many different types of phytoestrogens produced by plants. Their effects may be a bit different based on the estrogen receptors with which they connect. Some phytoestrogens have anti-estrogenic effects, some have pro-estrogenic effects, and some have both. It is worth noting that eating animal products exposes people to animal estrogens, which are closer to human estrogens than phytoestrogens from plants. This is true even if the animal products are free of added hormones, as the animals themselves produce hormones.
      You can find more about estrogen on this site by following this link:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/?s=estrogen
      I hope that helps!

  14. Hello,

    How does one get involved with CHIP? Is it something I can sign up or bring to my community? Does anyone know the contact people?

    Curious how to spread the word…

    Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This