Breast Cancer Survival & Lignan Intake

Breast Cancer Survival & Lignan Intake
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One teaspoon of flax seeds may double one’s daily production of lignans—phytonutrients that appear to play a role in both breast cancer prevention and survival.

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Breast cancer is initially so slow-growing that women may have tumors years, or even decades, before they’re diagnosed. So, it makes sense that the same dietary factors that helped grow the tumor in the first place would keep goading it on, before and after diagnosis.

This is not always the case, evidently. Alcohol, for example, is strongly associated with breast cancer risk. But once you already have a full-blown tumor, it may not make a difference if you continue to drink or not.

But in general, the same diet that helps prevent breast cancer appears to be the same type of diet that’s going to help prolong survival. That seemed to be the case in this recent New York study. Started out with about a thousand women with breast cancer. Ended up with less than a thousand.It must be so sad to do these survival studies; you never know who’s going to make it to the end.

Several investigations have suggested that plant-based diets rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains, as well as their related nutrients, may have a beneficial effect on survival after breast cancer. Evidence pointed to lignans, phytonutrients found throughout the plant kingdom. We know they may prevent breast cancer. Now we know dietary lignan intake is associated with improved survival among postmenopausal women with breast cancer. In fact, it appeared to cut mortality risk in half!

Where do you find it? Well, there’s some in red wine, whole grains, vegetables like kale, big jump to sesame seeds, and then meteoric rise to flax seeds. Let me squish down the scale. Look at that. Nothing comes close to flax.

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project estimated the quantity of lignans Long Island women average on a daily basis. From their entire diet, about six milligrams a day. That’s how many lignans are found in a single teaspoon of flax seeds. So, you add just a teaspoon to your diet, and you may have just doubled your entire intake for the day.

Just maybe not during the last two trimesters of pregnancy, as preliminary data suggests flax use may increase the risk of preterm delivery.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Aka, stu_spivack, Rasbak, Jitujetster, and Sanjay Acharya via Wikimedia Commons.

Breast cancer is initially so slow-growing that women may have tumors years, or even decades, before they’re diagnosed. So, it makes sense that the same dietary factors that helped grow the tumor in the first place would keep goading it on, before and after diagnosis.

This is not always the case, evidently. Alcohol, for example, is strongly associated with breast cancer risk. But once you already have a full-blown tumor, it may not make a difference if you continue to drink or not.

But in general, the same diet that helps prevent breast cancer appears to be the same type of diet that’s going to help prolong survival. That seemed to be the case in this recent New York study. Started out with about a thousand women with breast cancer. Ended up with less than a thousand.It must be so sad to do these survival studies; you never know who’s going to make it to the end.

Several investigations have suggested that plant-based diets rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains, as well as their related nutrients, may have a beneficial effect on survival after breast cancer. Evidence pointed to lignans, phytonutrients found throughout the plant kingdom. We know they may prevent breast cancer. Now we know dietary lignan intake is associated with improved survival among postmenopausal women with breast cancer. In fact, it appeared to cut mortality risk in half!

Where do you find it? Well, there’s some in red wine, whole grains, vegetables like kale, big jump to sesame seeds, and then meteoric rise to flax seeds. Let me squish down the scale. Look at that. Nothing comes close to flax.

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project estimated the quantity of lignans Long Island women average on a daily basis. From their entire diet, about six milligrams a day. That’s how many lignans are found in a single teaspoon of flax seeds. So, you add just a teaspoon to your diet, and you may have just doubled your entire intake for the day.

Just maybe not during the last two trimesters of pregnancy, as preliminary data suggests flax use may increase the risk of preterm delivery.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Aka, stu_spivack, Rasbak, Jitujetster, and Sanjay Acharya via Wikimedia Commons.

Nota del Doctor

This is the third of a five-part video series on improving survival for those diagnosed with cancer. See also Breast Cancer Survival and Trans Fat, and Breast Cancer Survival, Butterfat, and Chicken. For more on exploiting the slow growing nature of breast cancer, see Cancer Prevention and Treatment May Be the Same Thing, and Slowing Growth of Cancer.  Check out my other videos on flax, and also my more precautionary pregnancy videos, such as Caffeine During Pregnancy, and Iron During Pregnancy. In this video, I mentioned alcohol consumption and mortality—more on balancing the risks in Alcohol Risks vs. Benefits.

Note that two of the sources for this video are open access, so you can download them by clicking on the links in the Sources Cited section, above. And lignans are not the same as lignins, in case anyone is confused.

Be sure to also check out my associated blog posts for some more context: Breast Cancer Survival and SoyHealth Food Store Advice: Often Worthless or WorstTreating an Enlarged Prostate With DietGerson Therapy for Cancer?How Tumors Use Meat to GrowMushrooms for Breast Cancer PreventionFoods That May Block Cancer FormationFlax Seeds for Prostate CancerFlax and Breast Cancer Survival; and Treating Breast Pain with Flax Seeds.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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