Flashback Friday: #1 Anticancer Vegetable

Flashback Friday: #1 Anticancer Vegetable
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There are two superfood classes of vegetables most adept at blocking human cancer cell growth in a petri dish.

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That doesn’t mean some veggies aren’t better than others. Some of these vegetables target multiple cancers at the same time. So, using this groundbreaking new data, let’s play “Which is healthier?”

Imagine you’re standing in line at one of those custom made-to-order salad places, where you get to choose your lettuce, choose your toppings, then choose your dressing. Let’s assume you don’t have a strong family history of any particular cancer, and so, aren’t trying to hone in on avoiding one tumor over any other.

First, let’s choose our lettuce. Boston, endive, radicchio, romaine, or spinach? Which is healthier? Out of the five, spinach is #1 against breast cancer—remember, the farther down, the better it is at slowing down these cancer cells. #1 against brain tumors, #1 against kidney cancer, #1 against lung cancer, and pediatric brain tumors—that’s why we need to feed our kids spinach! #1 against pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and stomach cancer.

Now it’s not #1 overall; there are 16 vegetables more powerful at stopping stomach cancer growth than spinach. But out of those five salad greens, spinach wins out across the board, against every cancer type tested.

What if the salad place said they were out of spinach, though? Which comes in second, out of the four left to choose from? For breast cancer, radicchio is #2. Against brain tumors? Radicchio. Kidney cancer? Radicchio. Radicchio, romaine, radicchio, radicchio, and radicchio. So, overall, out of those choices for greens, radicchio is second healthiest.

Back to the menu. Next, we get to choose four toppings. Now, there’s a long line of people behind you, all staring at us to make our choice. We don’t have time to ponder and pick the four absolute best, but we can at least make a guess as to roughly where on the graph they are.

Yes or no? According to this amazing new data, do carrots slow down cancer cell growth rates more than 50%? Yes or no? The answer is no. No, no, no, no, no, no, and no. So, shredded carrots aren’t going to make our top toppings choice.

What about shredded beets? Yes or no? Yes. Super yes! Brain tumor? Just beet it. Kidney cancer is a no; close to 50%, but not quite there. But then yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. So, overall, yes for beets.

Are we putting cucumber on our salad? As tasty as they may be, no. For most cancers it suppressed tumor cell growth less than 50%.

What about tomatoes? No tomatoes, either.

What about a potato? You can actually choose potatoes for your salad. Yes or no? No potatoes, either.

Wait a second; no iceberg lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoes—that’s all people eat! That’s the problem. Even people eating their vegetables, aren’t really eating their vegetables. The majority of veggies people commonly eat have little effect.

Cutting to the chase: the line at the salad place is now out the door at this point. In this study, there was one clear winner. One vegetable that completely 100% stopped cancer growth in seven out of the eight tumor lines. One of the most important findings of the year. Which vegetable was it? Was it bok choy? Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, fiddlehead ferns, garlic, kale, or red cabbage?

#1 against breast cancer? Garlic. #1 against brain tumors? Garlic.#2 against kidney cancer: Garlic. Lung cancer? Garlic. Childhood brain tumors? Garlic. Pancreatic cancer? Garlic. Prostate cancer and stomach cancer? Garlic. So might I suggest a garlicky salad dressing?

But wait. Is it just that garlic is toxic to all cells? Yes, it stops the growth of cancer cells, but maybe it stops the growth of healthy cells, too? That wouldn’t be good. They tested for that. The black bars are the cancer cells; the white bars are the normal cells. As you can see, garlic slams cancer cells, but doesn’t touch normal cells, and the same thing with pretty much all the vegetables. They’re selective; they go after the cancer cells, but leave the normal cells alone. Veggies are amazing.

Now, if you didn’t pick garlic, and instead chose one of those others, you probably weren’t far off. The two best families of vegetables for cancer prevention are the cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, kale, cabbage, and the allium family vegetables—like garlic, onions, and leeks. Let me just run through this one last time to highlight this important concept.

Starting from the beginning. Cruciferous vegetables in green; allium family vegetables in yellow. So what I want you to notice is the clustering of colors over to the right side, which illustrates the power of these two superfood classes of vegetables—whether for breast cancer, brain cancer, kidney cancer, lung cancer, or brain cancer.

Interestingly, you’ll notice that bok choy is often the kind of odd one out—apparently the least healthy of the cruciferous vegetables. Pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and finally, stomach cancer. So you know all those recipes that start with garlic and onions, and then throw you in some greens? That is the way to eat.

The researchers conclude: “The inclusion of cruciferous and Allium [family] vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary-based chemopreventive [or cancer-preventive] strategies.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

<a href=”https://stock.adobe.com/search?filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aphoto%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aillustration%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Azip_vector%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Avideo%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Atemplate%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3A3d%5D=1&filters%5Binclude_stock_enterprise%5D=0&filters%5Bis_editorial%5D=0&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aimage%5D=1&order=relevance&safe_search=1&serie_id=209632002&search_page=1&get_facets=0&asset_id=242059130&”>sewcream</a> / Adobe Stock

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

That doesn’t mean some veggies aren’t better than others. Some of these vegetables target multiple cancers at the same time. So, using this groundbreaking new data, let’s play “Which is healthier?”

Imagine you’re standing in line at one of those custom made-to-order salad places, where you get to choose your lettuce, choose your toppings, then choose your dressing. Let’s assume you don’t have a strong family history of any particular cancer, and so, aren’t trying to hone in on avoiding one tumor over any other.

First, let’s choose our lettuce. Boston, endive, radicchio, romaine, or spinach? Which is healthier? Out of the five, spinach is #1 against breast cancer—remember, the farther down, the better it is at slowing down these cancer cells. #1 against brain tumors, #1 against kidney cancer, #1 against lung cancer, and pediatric brain tumors—that’s why we need to feed our kids spinach! #1 against pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and stomach cancer.

Now it’s not #1 overall; there are 16 vegetables more powerful at stopping stomach cancer growth than spinach. But out of those five salad greens, spinach wins out across the board, against every cancer type tested.

What if the salad place said they were out of spinach, though? Which comes in second, out of the four left to choose from? For breast cancer, radicchio is #2. Against brain tumors? Radicchio. Kidney cancer? Radicchio. Radicchio, romaine, radicchio, radicchio, and radicchio. So, overall, out of those choices for greens, radicchio is second healthiest.

Back to the menu. Next, we get to choose four toppings. Now, there’s a long line of people behind you, all staring at us to make our choice. We don’t have time to ponder and pick the four absolute best, but we can at least make a guess as to roughly where on the graph they are.

Yes or no? According to this amazing new data, do carrots slow down cancer cell growth rates more than 50%? Yes or no? The answer is no. No, no, no, no, no, no, and no. So, shredded carrots aren’t going to make our top toppings choice.

What about shredded beets? Yes or no? Yes. Super yes! Brain tumor? Just beet it. Kidney cancer is a no; close to 50%, but not quite there. But then yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. So, overall, yes for beets.

Are we putting cucumber on our salad? As tasty as they may be, no. For most cancers it suppressed tumor cell growth less than 50%.

What about tomatoes? No tomatoes, either.

What about a potato? You can actually choose potatoes for your salad. Yes or no? No potatoes, either.

Wait a second; no iceberg lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoes—that’s all people eat! That’s the problem. Even people eating their vegetables, aren’t really eating their vegetables. The majority of veggies people commonly eat have little effect.

Cutting to the chase: the line at the salad place is now out the door at this point. In this study, there was one clear winner. One vegetable that completely 100% stopped cancer growth in seven out of the eight tumor lines. One of the most important findings of the year. Which vegetable was it? Was it bok choy? Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, fiddlehead ferns, garlic, kale, or red cabbage?

#1 against breast cancer? Garlic. #1 against brain tumors? Garlic.#2 against kidney cancer: Garlic. Lung cancer? Garlic. Childhood brain tumors? Garlic. Pancreatic cancer? Garlic. Prostate cancer and stomach cancer? Garlic. So might I suggest a garlicky salad dressing?

But wait. Is it just that garlic is toxic to all cells? Yes, it stops the growth of cancer cells, but maybe it stops the growth of healthy cells, too? That wouldn’t be good. They tested for that. The black bars are the cancer cells; the white bars are the normal cells. As you can see, garlic slams cancer cells, but doesn’t touch normal cells, and the same thing with pretty much all the vegetables. They’re selective; they go after the cancer cells, but leave the normal cells alone. Veggies are amazing.

Now, if you didn’t pick garlic, and instead chose one of those others, you probably weren’t far off. The two best families of vegetables for cancer prevention are the cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, kale, cabbage, and the allium family vegetables—like garlic, onions, and leeks. Let me just run through this one last time to highlight this important concept.

Starting from the beginning. Cruciferous vegetables in green; allium family vegetables in yellow. So what I want you to notice is the clustering of colors over to the right side, which illustrates the power of these two superfood classes of vegetables—whether for breast cancer, brain cancer, kidney cancer, lung cancer, or brain cancer.

Interestingly, you’ll notice that bok choy is often the kind of odd one out—apparently the least healthy of the cruciferous vegetables. Pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and finally, stomach cancer. So you know all those recipes that start with garlic and onions, and then throw you in some greens? That is the way to eat.

The researchers conclude: “The inclusion of cruciferous and Allium [family] vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary-based chemopreventive [or cancer-preventive] strategies.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

<a href=”https://stock.adobe.com/search?filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aphoto%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aillustration%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Azip_vector%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Avideo%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Atemplate%5D=1&filters%5Bcontent_type%3A3d%5D=1&filters%5Binclude_stock_enterprise%5D=0&filters%5Bis_editorial%5D=0&filters%5Bcontent_type%3Aimage%5D=1&order=relevance&safe_search=1&serie_id=209632002&search_page=1&get_facets=0&asset_id=242059130&”>sewcream</a> / Adobe Stock

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

219 responses to “Flashback Friday: #1 Anticancer Vegetable

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  1. Imagine how many lives could be changed if this video were required viewing. Garlic, onions, spinach, kale, broccoli and the like could change the trajectory and course and quality of our lives in this country and around the world. My father’s friend’s daughter passed away from pediatric brain cancer and I can’t help but wonder if she was fed a very poor diet leading to her death. This stuff is life and death, I believe.

  2. In my opinion, this is one of Dr G’s best videos! They are all great, but this one stands out, not only for it’s superb practical content, but also because of the presentation style. The pace of the video is smooth, calm, and slow enough that I hardly had to use my pause button at all :-)

    1. Hal,

      This is one of my favorite videos, too. So practical. It is one I think about every time I walk through the produce aisle of the grocery store.

      Today, I went to the grocery store in the morning and bought produce for lunch.

      My lunch is berries, an orange, an apple, a banana, plus spinach, edamame and baby carrots.

      1. Dinner has been the veggie wraps this week, it has been broccoli slaw, cauliflower, cherry tomatoes, shitake mushrooms, kale, avocado, red peppers, artichoke and chickpeas.

        The stores keep running out of organic cauliflower.

        I would like a charity dedicated to converting small farms to organic.

        1. Oh Deb! Your lunch and your wraps sound delicious. I am making my shopping list from your posts lol.

          I love this video. Kudos to Avocado video for this rendition! If I only had a dollar for every time I dug this video out to share with someone….

          1. Barb,

            Yes, this is the one I recommend the most, too!

            I loved this whole series!

            I usually add pomegranate seeds and a little bit of purple cabbage to my wraps and it makes everything so pretty.

            It is funny because I bought all kinds of recipe apps, but just eating fruit and vegetables as a salad or in a wrap works for me.

              1. Lida, I keep trying different wraps, mainly because they are there.

                I have used Ezekiel and BFree and Tumaro Garden Veggie.

                Raw Wraps is what I am looking at now. 60 calories, 30 mg Sodium, less than 3:1 carb to fiber ratio the ingredients are: apple, spinach, onion, quinoa, psyllium husk (fiber)

        1. Dennis,

          Thanks. That is sweet of you.

          Yes, some of us have a hard time staying away.

          I am working on fixing my brain and I went away and had to come right back to look at the brain videos.

    2. I agree with you about this video. It’s excellent, longer than newer ones, and listening to his slow speaking helps my digestion of the presentation.

      1. Janis Kenyon – I just wanted to pipe in and mention that I, too, find the video’s easier to follow, understand, and digest when the presentation is slowed a bit. The fast speaking slurs words and makes it difficult to hear and understand. But, like others, this is my most favorite and well-used video. I also use the “Life is A Bowl of Cherries” (for inflammation) quite a bit. When I had an osteoarthritic hip flare up – and I literally could not walk at all for about 2 weeks – I used this video to help me heal. I also used Cosamin ASU supplement to help support my hip. I progressed to walking with a cane and then finally complete healing. (best price for Cosamin ASU was at Costco online). My Chiropractor told me about Cosamin ASU and said it was developed at Arizona State University. The combination of the two got me back on my feet without one drug from the pharmaceutical companies.
        I also did go to an orthopedic specialist to get an x-ray of my hip and his only recommendations were NSAIDS for pain, cortisone injection, and then hip replacement. I used none of those options.
        Thanks!

        1. Janis,

          Well done on finding workable solutions, without drugs or surgery !

          Regarding the video’s speed you might find that changing the speed, go to the small roundish icon on the right and it will give you an option to change the speed all the way down to 25%. will make it a more enjoyable experience.

          \Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    3. WFPB-HAL–

      Yes!

      That is what immediately appeals about this video– its very pace is the mark of a professional instructor. Presentation of new information in a deliberate, clearly structured manner, and at a measured pace, allows for processing of the new information by the listener’s brain.

      But equally important, Dr. Greger pauses to repeat / review what already has been said. As learning science emphasizes, retention is affected in a major way by the simple act of repetition. Repetition fosters memory cell participation in the biochemical process we call “learning”.

            1. I am not sure but this old Chinese study found that pickled vegetables appear to have a carcinogenic effect, at least in a Petri dish
              https://academic.oup.com/carcin/article-abstract/1/8/685/305564?redirectedFrom=fulltext

              And this Iranian study found an association between pickle consumption and obesity and high blood pressure.
              https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209736/

              As for probiotics, why not concentrate on prebiotics instead?
              https://nutritionfacts.org/video/culture-shock-questioning-the-efficacy-and-safety-of-probiotics/
              https://nutritionfacts.org/video/prebiotics-tending-our-inner-garden/

              1. Tom, is it safe to use a probiotic to make fermented cabbage or other vegetables ? What I did was take some sliced red cabbage and jalapeños and garlic a little pre boiled water and a some spices and a tiny bit of salt and a bit of vinegar , then sprinkled with the probiotic. After about 24 hours it was bubbling away like making beer. Would say this is a bad practice? I’ve only made two jars, and eaten one so far.

                End

                1. Hi

                  I honestly don’t know the answer to your question.

                  My suspicion is that it is the sodium/salt and acetic acid levels in picked vegetables that are the problem. High acetic acid levels kill dangerous bacteria in pickled vegetables but can have harmful effects on humans.
                  https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+40

                  On the other hand, low acetic acid levels in pickled vegetables may also be problematic

                  ‘ new research shows that a small amount of acetic acid does not have the intended effect, but rather the opposite — it increases the amount of toxin from the harmful bacteria in the food.’
                  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100624104934.htm

                  I doubt whether the small amount of probiotics in pickled vegetables will have a signficant lasting effect unless you are eating them every day. In which case, any benefits may be outweighed by harms from increased sodium and acetic acid consumption. However, that’s just a personal opinion. If you are only eating these things now and then, though, there may be no significant risk (but probably no significant benefit either).

                  A concern for me is that, while pickled vegetable consumption may have short term benefits, chronic consumption appears to increase the risk for gastric and oesophogeal cancer.

                  1. Thanks Tom.  Excellent thoughts on this.   That makes perfect sense based on the research that has been posted in the group by Dr. G, and yourself and a couple others.  I dont eat from it everyday.    I guess I’m going to see if i can research the acidic level needed to make sure im not going to die of botulism.  I know if i consume too much salt especially non dissolved salt it hurts my stomach.  and i don’t want that, so I want the minimum salt in it.   It also appears that the Probiotic takes over on the mixture and multiplies substantially, as you can see a big cloud on the bottom of the jar. it also appears the acidity increases from the time I start the mixture, to the time i refrigerate it, as it taste like a mild vinegar.   I had been leaving them out for about 2 weeks, then refrigerating them.   Last time I had my blood work done, I was also LOW on sodium.  So they checked me for Hyponatremia, although I didn’t feel weak or dizzy,  I guess I had cut back my sodium a little too much. so hard to find the right balance.

                    1. I also have low sodium levels as well as low chloride in my blood. My blood pressure also dropped two extremely low levels, 88/44 last week and today was 84/50. So I added more Bubbies dill pickles with Probiotic cultures thinking I was doing a good thing. Now I’m not so sure. I also added iodized salt daily and I have increased my water intake. We tried to be so healthy and sometimes it is counter productive and counterintuitive…

                    2. Fawn, I’m a highly trained competitive endurance athlete, and exercise between 10-15hours weekly, so I sweat out a lot of minerals. However, my blood pressure is normal at best, even with low sodium, so I have to be carful. I’ve never been lightheaded or low blood pressure, but I’ve been weak and lethargic from being low. Sodium is a delicate balance and Dr. G is right to say ( for most Western society ) we don’t want to much slat because of its drawbacks, but we need enough to keep us going. Also the more water you take in, the more it dilutes the sodium in your system. If you drink a lot and sweat a lot, you will need more sodium than someone who doesn’t.

                      My (not genetic) mother was in the assisted living center, and they took away her salt, and gave her salt substitute. She became so weak she was almost hospitalized. Got her salt back to normal and she was ok.

                      So, if you have low blood pressure, and test low on sodium by all means eat some table salt. because it’s a sign that you need it.

                      I bought a blood pressure machine. If I feel weak I add salt until my blood pressure starts to go up. If it’s higher like 130 I stop using salt. But I can change in the course of 3-4 days.

                2. DArmstrong–
                  Like you, I enjoy sauerkraut (German for sour/pickled cabbage) whenever I can– the best sauerkraut is very tasty and satisfying over many hours afterward, probably due to the benevolence of the kraut bacteria on meeting the 110 trillion inhabitants of the typical GI tract.

                  The only critical factor is the choice of fermenting bacteria. Famous sauerkraut brands like California-based Bubbies follow the tradition of using a particular pickling bacterial culture. Not just any bacteria– probiotic, or no– will do.

                  Although YouTube instruction on home-made sauerkraut scarcely mentions any management of the pickling bacterial culture, there may be a reason for the omission. From all appearances, traditional reliance on the bacteria already present in the finely chopped cabbage is exactly the bacterial culture required.

                  All that said, I have stopped eating sauerkraut, for now. Aware of latest research on pickled foods, in general, in relation to stomach and other cancers, I have stayed clear of any pickled food until the research becomes clearer on what factors in the pickling process contribute disease risk.

                  It helps to remember that pickling food began, at least, in part, as a preservative process, an effort to keep food from rotting, and it seemed to work to provide edible food when there was little other food on hand. In a choice between malnutrution/starvation and survival, pickling and salting food was a “safe” process. Obviously, addition of sodium to most pickling processes is another reason to avoid eating large quantities of the admittedly delicious food.

                  1. That’s sounds good thanks for the info. I was more hoping to be able to increase the amount of probiotic from the amount bought to make it cost effective, and get a large enough dose to actually do some good, more than trying to make good sauerkraut or any other vegetable. Thinking is If bacteria are suppose to eat all this high fiber food, and flourish it should theoretically do well in a jar with vegetables. But perhaps not. So I might let this idea die.

                    End

                1. High blood pressure makes sense with all of the sodium, but I don’t associate pickled foods with obesity.

                  Pregnant women and McDonalds and delis are my association.

                  I am glad you said it again because I just had pickles recently for the first time in years and might have incorporated them in. I almost bought some, but looked at the sodium and stopped.

    1. I ended up watching the best cooking method video again because of your question.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/best-cooking-method/

      Glad I did because I had forgotten that if you eat 7 florets of boiled broccoli, it is the same antioxidant value as 6 florets of raw broccoli. Just add a floret.

      Bell peppers are the ones which you need to eat raw. Looks like garlic can be cooked.

      I also forgot that celery was like carrots and tomato. Cooking them added to their value.

      Boiling was the worst way, except for sweet potatoes, I think.

      Boy, those cooking videos are ones I need to watch over and over again, but hearing I can just add a floret of broccoli makes me happy.

      I started eating my onions raw from Dr. Fuhrman’s advice. I am not ready for raw garlic.

      1. Re: cooking vs raw, I recall from a Dr. Greger video that cooking/steaming broccoli destroys the production of sulforaphane, the main cancer-fighting ingredient in it, unless you sprinkle mustard powder on it first.

        1. Vic, actually, you sprinkle mustard powder onto the cooked vegetable. This is because cooking destroys the enzyme that converts the precursor into sulforaphane, though both the precursor and the sulforaphane are not destroyed by cooking — but mustard powder contains enough enzyme to synthesize sulforaphane, I guess as you eat it. We keep mustard powder on the table to sprinkle a bit (a little bit will do, a pinch) onto our cooked broccoli.

          Under normal conditions, the precursor and enzyme are stored in separate compartments in plant cells, but breaking the cells (as in insects chewing on the plant, or us chopping and/or chewing them) allows the enzyme to come into contact with the precursor to make the sulforaphane. Which is why chopping your cruciferous veggies well in advance of cooking them results in higher sulforaphane levels.

      2. Deb, I found it interesting that the antioxidant content of the vegetables was not the main factor in it’s anti-cancer effect. (See quote below.)

        Unfortunately, the research paper in the “Sources Cited” is behind a paywall, so not freely available to read. But the abstract has the following statement:

        “The antiproliferative effect of vegetables was specific to cells of cancerous origin and was found to be largely independent of their antioxidant properties. These results thus indicate that vegetables have very different inhibitory activities towards cancer cells and that the inclusion of cruciferous and Allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary-based chemopreventive strategies.”

        1. Hi WFPB-Hal, thanks for your comment, as you realize by watching and listening to Dr Greger there are so many components of fruits and vegetables that not only act as antioxident but also have different components such as Polyphenols. They can be classified into main classes including phenolic acids, flavonoids, stilbene and lignin’s. However, in whole food generally contains a complex mixture of those compounds, at variable concentrations, which can act as the protective effect.

        2. Hal, that is so useful to know.

          Laughing, I am trying to fix my eye and brain and have so many videos and so many foods running through my head.

          But diseases make the categories more complicated.

          Looking at Alzheimer’s, I think that I have antioxidants on the brain. Hopefully.

          Though, I don’t know if many of them actually cross through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

          Astaxanthin crosses the blood-brain barrier AND the blood-retinal barrier (beta carotene and lycopene do not)

          I have been researching TMS to see if it damages the Blood-Brain Barrier or if it opens it up briefly to let the antioxidants in maybe or something like that.

          My Micropulse ICES was used in a brain injury healing study and helped, but Alef has me aware that it may open the Blood-Brain Barrier and I am trying to figure out whether they have researched things as temporarily opening it or permanently opening it. They are researching strengthening it and opening it. Is TMS safe or does it wreck people’s Blood-Brain Barrier? If it temporarily opens it, I could use the ICES and work on the brain plasticity and eat my antioxidants while the Barrier is open.

          But I can also just try to find the algae or supplement Astaxanthin.

          1. Here’s the thing, I am going to end up trying it. They are having phase 3 success with transcranial magnetic stimulation and Alzheimer’s.

            https://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/transcranial-magnetic-stimulation-ad-boasts-success-phase-3

            I feel like the fact that it healed brain injury and had success with Alzheimer’s, I want to just go for it and drink carrot juice and eat my spinach and flood my system with antioxidants while I am pulsing the magnet and see what happens.

            I just want to find one study where the permeability of the barrier increased and then decreased after a while.

              1. It lowers cortisol and cortisol is related to circadian rhythm problems and is related to cue-based food cravings.

                https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20925970

                So maybe lowering cortisol would help me sleep and maybe lowering it is similar to stimulating the vagal nerve to change food attitudes. I looked up the foods, which lower cortisol and there are foods, which lower cortisol and that might be what I tell people to do if they have food cravings.

                I feel like I took care of the blood sugar and homocysteine and I am supplementing with a viable B-12 and I changed my copper-zinc ratio and I did the silica-water to get out the aluminum, but now, I am interested in seeing if I can do this and affect my sleep and increase the increase BDNF and increase the brain plasticity. This is Day 1. I won’t keep track on here, except that it is the Ides of March makes it easier.

                If I get better, it will be obvious.

                I just feel that it is time to heal my brain.

              1. Thanks Tom!

                I had bought a gamma pulsing light and I started using specific sounds a long time ago, but I had put everything aside researching everything else. I don’t know if I remember where the lights are. I will look for them. I also can start the nasal light again. That helps with blood flow to the brain. So does the Micropulse ICES.

                My brain feels better after 2 TMS sessions with that. It feels like it fixed my circadian rhythm already. I am feeling sleepy before midnight.

                It is like a sleep machine for me and getting sleep might be what has improved things for me so quickly.

                I am finding lots of strategies. Dr Barnard spoke about Vitamin E from food helping.

                It was encouraging because even just drinking grape juice twice a day helped people after their brains were compromised.

                I have upped my brain foods considerably.

                I feel like I might turn the corner on it.

                1. I had read the original MIT article and I will say that I immediately bought the light kit and also immediately went to YouTube and started playing the gamma sound waves and my MicroPulse ICES has a gamma function.

                  Maybe I will switch from TMS setting to gamma.

                  The brain injury study with the Micropulse ICES might have used gamma. Trying to remember.

                  1. I had gotten out of the habit of those disciplines but I am getting back into it.

                    I do believe that any stimulation of the nerves to the brain increase plasticity.

                    The Brain That Changes Itself, I think is the name of the documentary which you can watch on YouTube.

                    The stroke community has successfully used stimulating the feet with electric foot massagers and they have used TMS and ultrasound and cold laser and electric acupuncture and they have stimulated the tongue or the hands or feet. They have even succeeded with vibration and other things.

                    I feel sure that I can keep trying things and it will work.

                    1. I slept again last night.

                      Three nights in a row.

                      I love the Micropulse ICES.

                      I thought of the tumor treating fields people and they use that day and night for a long time and I haven’t heard any negative side effects from it.

                      I woke up feeling so refreshed.

                      I tried it on Gamma setting and I will move it around to different parts of the brain.

                      I know with the visual gamma, they felt like they only reached the visual cortex. I am so happy that you found one which used sound. If that only reaches the auditory part of the brain, then I can use the ICES for the rest.

                      I had already gone back to the YouTube gamma videos with knowing that they really had those results from the audio gamma on a hunch.

                      Obviously the ICES gamma is a hunch, too, but even just sleeping makes my mind feel so much clearer.

                      I am hoping it helps me be more productive earlier in the day so I don’t have to be at work all night long.

                    2. If I remember right, I could try Serrapeptase and that dissolves the tangles, too.

                      I have to look that part up again.

                      While I was using the ICES on gamma, I became so happy just visualizing the immune system of my brain being turned on and the Microglia cleaning up any mess.

                      I have to combine that understanding with the parts of the brain, which tend to be compromised with Alzheimer’s.

                      I need to Google which part of the brain got damaged that I can’t smell out of my left nostril, for instance.

          1. Tom,

            Your a good guy.

            I appreciate that you acknowledge when he gets something right.

            He posted it in such an easy to access format.

            Pretty cool.

            Interesting that it is about antioxidants and cancer. I wonder if some of the things like tomato which have healed people like the prostate cancer guy might have something other than antioxidants.

            I say that because I do know people who were healed by Gerson and that guy got healed with tomatoes, even though carrots and tomatoes don’t test well.

            1. Laughing that I didn’t notice that my phone switched the you’re to your.

              Wow, I just found a persistent glitch in my new phone.

              It offers me words and I just push the button for those words and most of them work, but I clicked on the you’re button over and over again and it reads you’re on my button, but then I looked up at the screen and that one word fails. All the rest have succeeded.

      3. What I do Deb, is take a clove if garlic and I slice off a sliver. And leave the rest in the cutting board and then while I’m nibbling throughout the day, I keep cutting off slivers. Eat a clove in 24 hours is easy. I could eat a lot more but my system and only take so much. If you start bruising stop eating it for about 3-4 weeks.

        End

    2. IIRC, the researcher dripped extracts of the raw vegetables onto the cancer cells in a pitri dish. From other videos, the magic effects do make it into the bloodstream because dripping the blood of people who ate the vegetables had the same effect. They didn’t test cooked that I know of. So maybe and maybe not.

    3. Sidney, MD – Hi! Regarding the cooked vs raw question. . . . The allicin in garlic (the good stuff) is activated when the cells in the garlic are broken open and the two components (I’m sorry I’m now drawing a blank as to their names) combine – this is what makes garlic so healthy. If you press, smash, mince, or somehow crush the cells and allow the garlic to sit for 10 minutes the chemicals combine and give, then, garlic it’s compounds that are so healing/protective to us. If you think about it, this crushing mimics chewing. I don’t know about you, but as much as I just love garlic I would have a hard time chewing it. Anyway, after you let the components mix for about 10 minutes the chemical reaction is complete and you can then cook the garlic and retain its good stuff.
      I got this information from Jo Robinson’s book “Eating on The Wild Side” which I recommend to everyone on this site. It’s a wonderfully complimentary book to Dr. Greger’s information on this site. Here’s a link:
      http://www.eatwild.com/PDF%20files/Eating%20On%20The%20Wild%20Side_3.pdf

  3. Love this version. I was a little leery of Flashback Friday when it started, but I’m a convert now. Had to go back and stop on the charts to look at the data a little closer, there was so much included. Interesting was how green beans did, made me wonder if there is any research similar to this on legumes. Guess I have to do some searches on legumes and watch some more videos on this site now.

  4. Great information, thanks for sharing!

    As I was watching I couldn’t help but wonder if all those graphs had been compiled into a simple one page summary. Vegetable on the X axis, cancer type on the Y axis, and the color from red to green indicating the effectiveness against the cancer lines on the body of the chart?

    Information is beautiful!

  5. This is not good news for those of us who need to eat foods low in FODMAP, which rules out garlic and onions. Wish Dr. Greger had included those of us with GERD and other digestive issues that require us to avoid these things.

    1. FODMAP diet itself is not good news. From Wiki, click link for studies referenced:
      A low-FODMAP diet might help to improve short-term digestive symptoms in adults with irritable bowel syndrome, but its long-term follow-up can have negative effects because it causes a detrimental impact on the gut microbiota and metabolome. It should only be used for short periods of time and under the advice of a specialist. More studies are needed to evaluate its effectiveness in children with irritable bowel syndrome. There is only a little evidence of its effectiveness in treating functional symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease from small studies which are susceptible to bias. More studies are needed to assess the true impact of this diet on health. In addition, the use of a low-FODMAP diet without medical advice can lead to serious health risks, including nutritional deficiencies and misdiagnosis, so it is advisable to conduct a complete medical evaluation before starting a low-FODMAP diet to ensure a correct diagnosis and that the appropriate therapy can be undertaken. Since the consumption of gluten is suppressed or reduced with a low-FODMAP diet, the improvement of the digestive symptoms with this diet may not be related to the withdrawal of the FODMAPs, but of gluten, indicating the presence of an unrecognized celiac disease, avoiding its diagnosis and correct treatment, with the consequent risk of several serious health complications, including various types of cancer.
      A low-FODMAP diet is highly restrictive in various groups of nutrients, can be impractical to follow in the long-term and may add an unnecessary financial burden.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FODMAP#Effectiveness_and_risks

    2. Lida – I thought I’d just share that the information in this video was taken directly from research published and Dr. G simply reported the findings. So he would not have been able to fine tune it to FODMAP situations – or any other for that matter – that different from the research presented. You can look at the research directly if you go to this site: https://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/ There is a link on this site where you can view the research directly to see if anything there addresses your situation more fully. I tried to view the research off of this site but it was behind a paywall. Chris, on his site, has the research displayed for all to see.
      Good luck to you.

  6. I like everything about this one except – it could be much simpler. Why not simply state what veggie is better? Brevity is the soul of wit. Or it used to be anyways.

    1. Hi Bill, thanks for your comment. This video I understand Dr Greger wants to educate people to realize about the great nutrient benefits of different kinds of vegetable. As we tend to eat the same kind of habitual choices of food. So introducing the benefits of other varieties of vegetable are welcoming as well.

  7. Oh yeah, just remembered my major issue with spinach is the oxalates. These can cause kidney stones, and other deposits throughout the body. Unless you are getting certain binding minerals simultaneously.

  8. Every morning I make a smoothie with Kale, Broccoli, and Cauliflower. Now I also add strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, banana, and some coconut water, that way I ensure to get those veggies to start the day.
    I can actually feel myself getting younger…LOL

  9. Tomatoes are not cancer-fighting? What happened to the benefits of lycopene, at least for prostate cancer? Or is lycopene beneficial to prostate health but not so much against prostate cancer?

    1. Vic, From previous information on this website as well as others, yes, lycopene is great, but has a very low concentration in whole tomatoes. The best “whole food” source is tomato paste. Also, in most cases, it is usually better to get these single ingredients from whole foods, even though processed to some extent, rather than getting a single ingredient from a pill.

    1. Vic – WFPB Hal is correct – the best lycopene source is tomato paste. The reason: lycopene increases in cooked tomatoes. The longer it’s cooked the more the lycopene, so paste has a greater concentration. I use tomato paste as a sandwich spread (along with other stuff). Adds flavor and health at the same time. A book that you may find interesting is Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson http://www.eatwild.com/PDF%20files/Eating%20On%20The%20Wild%20Side_3.pdf She explains this and how to make garlic most helpful to all of us in her book. A great compliment to Dr. Greger’s work.

  10. I like the format of this video very much. Yes, it may be simplifying things somewhat but there are reviews of studies for those who want detailed data.

    Has a similar presentation been used with Diabetes 2?

    I would encourage the production of similar videos for all major health concerns!

  11. This is amazingly simple format that is profound and life changing for many people. I think this maybe the best video you’ve ever done, because it shows the contrast of what people eat with what they could eat, in a setting they might actually eat it. It’s like the one on antioxidants capacity of food but this one seems to easily digested (pun)
    Love it.

  12. Oh yes this is slightly off topic but how bad is silicone dioxide and sulfur dioxide, they add to ground spices like paprika , cumin, ginger?

  13. Great information. Unfortunately the study is not freely accessible. It would be nice to have more complete information available to help guide choices.

    I am wondering what is known about the mechanisms at work that would account for why some particular food works better for some cancers than others or why e.g. bok choy is the ‘odd cruciferous vegetable’ out.
    Always more to learn.

    1. Ruth – from 1 Ruth to another, :-), 10 minutes to let garlic sit will give the garlic plenty of time to make its good stuff. When I cook, I press my garlic immediately and let it sit while I’m working on other aspects of a recipe. By the time I need to use it, it’s ready to go. The timing information can be found in Jo Robinson’s book Eating On the Wild Side. http://www.eatwild.com/PDF%20files/Eating%20On%20The%20Wild%20Side_3.pdf It’s a great little book.

  14. I was curious about the word “superfood” so I did a search, and didn’t really like what I found. Wiki states: “The purported health benefits and effects of foods described as superfoods are unsupported or disputed by scientific studies.[1]”
    Hopefully, some reader here will see to it to update the Wiki.

      1. “Superfoods” is a loose term that is used more often then not, to sell a product. It’s generally is used to describe a food source with some level of “good” for something or has a unique something. But if if it’s really great and only grown in a tiny patch of tropical rain forest 5 feet either side of the equator, who cares. If you can’t get your hands on it why bother. It’s not that super.

        Dr G is giving you example of foods that actually make a difference in your life using some of the same “buzzwords “ as society is using.

        But some foods are just flat out better for you. You can eat iceberg lettuce all day and it won’t really help your body function. But other foods help you body function a great deal better. But every time you put a bite of food in your mouth you eliminating something else that might go in there. So will you shovel in a chemical laden twinkie, or a piece of broccoli. If you do that enough times in the day and make the right choices many of your health problems, will dissolve. Health problems don’t start overnight, and don’t go away overnight,

        But if your eating radicio and Broccoli we might not get them in the first place.

        End

        1. Ok. Let me spell it out for you: WIKI, which is read (and believed!) by multiples of more people than anything on this site, states that “superfoods are unsupported or disputed by scientific studies.”

          Part of our Mission is to spread the Truth. Dr. Gregor is doing his darnedest to give us the tools to spread that truth. The WIKI can be updated with the Truth. Dr. Gregor has already documented the Truth (Double blind placebo yada yada yada.)

          Does anyone want to take on the challenge of updating WIKI? Or are we doomed to be a small enclave, shunned by the rest of the world, viewed as a cult because we think we know a Truth?

          1. Bruce, are you a flat earth guy? if you don’t believe the science of anything why are you here?

            If you don’t believe that diet plays a huge role in health why are you here. I see quite a few people in my little town pop 3500, that live well over 100. Most of those people few habits of you will that me think. They like tea, coffee, they didn’t drink, of if they did rarely. They didn’t smoke. But the other biggest 2 factors I see is the healthiest people, grew up eating out their own garden, didn’t eat meat often. Like 3x a week or less. More or less what DR. G says. So what’s your point? Yes in the case of “superfood” which is another term for overpriced supplement generally there is not much evidence. Dr g is not talking about those. He talking about real food that is just Super. Thanks for your question. End

            1. Wow. Your misinterpretation of the words I have written is scary and inflammatory. I guess I have to spell it out even more.

              I have NOT at this time found anything Dr Gregor says that I disagree with. However, the Standard American Diet is pervasive and kills millions of people. Most people in the United States eat the Standard American Diet and are unaware of Dr. Gregor (or the Truth.) Most people in the United States view Dr. Gregor’s advice as extreme and are unbelieving of advice they view as opinions, not facts.

              SuperFoods IS a marketing term. However, actual SuperFoods DO exist. Anyone eating a S.A.D. and reading Dr.Gregor might well go to the Wiki page, and very well might believe the Wiki page because, like it or not, no matter if the Wiki is true or not, people will read that “The purported health benefits and effects of foods described as superfoods are unsupported or disputed by scientific studies.”

              Let me be clearer for the reading impaired: I believe Dr. Gregor. I do not believe the Wiki.

              My point is not necessarily to promote NutritionFacts on Wiki, but to promote scientifically proven nutrition facts.

              I’ve spent all the time I can spare trying to convince that the Wiki should be edited.

              Obviously not by DArmstrong or Barb.

          2. Bruce Tritch, I have been reading Dr Greger’s information for years now. If I came across that wiki page you speak about, I would tend to agree with it and move on. I agree with DArmstrong here in that for me ‘superfood’ is a word used to market foods which have been given false or exaggerated attributes, and sold for ridiculous prices. I don’t see imo a discussion of NF on that page as being useful.

            Dr Greger reports on nutrition studies (sometimes political or environmental concerns also) of various types. His book ‘How Not to Die’ has been translated to many languages and sold world-wide. Same with the other plant-based docs. I just do not perceive the plant based community in the same way as you do I guess.

                1. Not intentionally, but yes. Not sure how it happened. I use multiple computers. I probably had to register separately. Thanks for pointing it out.

          3. Bruce,

            I would like to encourage you and other readers to indeed update the Wiki pages. Unfortunately it’s a time consuming process however, with the references provided by Nutrition Facts, it’s made much easier.

            Please circle the wagons and get a team working on this project. It’s really needed in so many areas and with nutrition being such a hotbed of controversy, even more input is necessary. Keep in mind that you will find that the well paid food interests are not asleep at the wheel and consistent checking and reposting is part of the process.

            Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

          4. Bruce,

            I would like to encourage you and other readers to indeed update the Wiki pages. Unfortunately it’s a time consuming process, however with the references provided by Nutrition Facts it’s made much easier.

            Please circle the wagons and get a team working on this project. It’s really needed in so many areas and with nutrition being such a hotbed of controversy, even more input is necessary. Keep in mind that you will find that the well paid food interests are not asleep at the wheel and consistent checking and reposting is part of the process.

            Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    1. My view is that it is unfortunate that Dr. Greger (not the spelling!) used the word superfood without either scare quotes or a definition to separate his use from the many abuses of the ill-defined term.

      1. Very good video. I like the slow, calmness of Dr. g’s voice, and how it’s presented. Easy to understand with no “hmm/questions” afterward. I don’t usually comment … but it would be nice to see more videos like this.

      1. Know I think he is actually talking about how the site ask for his info before he post a question maybe. It used to do that every time until I had it save and remember it.

        1. Oh, you mean way down at the bottom where he forgot to check the little box in front of: “Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.”

  15. To repeat Anne’s question, “Will garlic powder provide the same or close to the same benefits as using the whole plant?” Thanks to anyone who knows…and tells.

    1. Yours is a good question and I tried to find a clear answer with limited success. It’s complicated because to quote one source;”Garlic supplements differ in bioavailability of key phytochemicals.” It appears that while several studies have looked at garlic’s cancer-fighting powers, the ones that were based on whole, dietary intake (the epidemiological ones) showed more promise than the interventional studies using garlic powder or supplement. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4366009/ Garlic powder is produced by crushing and drying the garlic which may affect beneficial effect.
      I found an intriguing article pointing at a future research study looking at your exact question, but was unsuccessful in tracking down that study (Perhaps not completed yet?) I will attempt to track this down, but in the meantime, remembering how often supplements v whole foods fail to deliver, eating the garlic as a food v supplement seems warranted.

  16. As a child (1950’s) my grandparents insisted that the grandkids eat buttered toast with a heaping amount of crushed garlic twice a week from the first snowfall until early April. Must have worked as my siblings or I never had colds. Went back to doing this years ago and have seldom been sick with upper respiratory illness.

    Question about the veggies. Started to have some digestive problems doctor said might be age related etc. Found a European Market and started eating what could be best be described as Eastern European fermented (not pickled) veggies, slaws red cabbage and sauerkraut. Grew up eating these things, and added them back to my diet along with the usual regular fresh/frozen veggies. My stomach problems disappeared. My question is: Do fermented veggies still contain the cancer fighting abilities of fresh/frozen?

  17. Love this video. I never tire watching it.
    Raw garlic always ‘seems’ to ‘burn’ the inside of my mouth. I know it’s only temporary but does anyone know whether this is doing any permanent/significant damage to the lining of the mouth and oesophagous?

    1. vk2gho, Someone correct me if I’m wrong, but I think the lining of the mouth and stomach and intestine are replace about weekly.

      End

  18. What would it take for me to consider Greger seriously. Not saying yuck to the most powerful yet bitter and astringent foods in nature such as amla or what tastes even more bitter. Or finding that brussel sprouts have 4x more ITCs than broccoli hence the results. Unless some plant has unique benefits such as fatty acids, other phytochemicals, minerals, carotenoids, tannins, etc., why eat anything but the best. Therr is a brassica with 400x the ITCs of broccoli; that to me is still not good enough. Until i find the very best in all of nature and best thst grows wild in my area, no good enough. All plants are treated as such.

    1. Remember Campbell’s idea of eating “whole” foods? I’ve been expanding that idea to eating a little of most vegetables. For example, turmeric is very powerful, but everyone on this site knows a little black pepper exaggerates the effect. So, I’m thinking maybe some of these powerful cancer fighting vegetables may work even better with some other, minor, ingredient in a whole food diet. Just a thought which prevents me from always abstaining from, say, even iceberg lettuce sometimes, albeit very infrequently…. This idea still allows me to eat a lot of alliums and brassicas.

      1. Indeed I really don’t use the term ‘best’ in some common sense, but sometimes my post is merely a reaction to things such as ‘optimal’ when it really isn’t, or that after millennia of changes in thought, concepts of knowledge, wisdom, science, changes in ways of life, and all that has happened. Particularly since we’ve gotten used to modern agriculture with plants grown according to factors such as shelf life, easy of transport, and so forth, the slow return to plants is merely a small step in perhaps a future re-realization of all that exists. Our concept too of nature is quite a change from the Greeks, and one of numerous reasons why it is difficult to think of world or cosmos in any we could say whole manner, in a way that profoundly influences the entirety of our language.

        As for lettuce, I recall a mention I found a few days ago about it going well with mediteranean argula (e. vesicaria). Possibly the one used by the Ancient Greeks was less cultivated, Pliny the Elder recommended mixing them, compensating the warming properties of one plant with the cooling of another. I am curious about the benefits of less cultivated and more traditional varieties of lettuce though I’ve focused more on plant families that tend to be of more worth in some known way such as brassica.

        Indeed variety is of significance, and perhaps in a future millennia, we’ll once again be like we were in older times and how many animals remain today, growing up around plants and knowledge of thousands of them as food, instinctively going to the appropriate plant according to moment. Without having an understanding of antibiotic/bacterial, unsure how many animals are as such, perhaps many, if chimps drink some contaminated water, and feel something, they then directly go to the needed plant.

        Someday, perhaps we’ll be used to the most bitter, astringent, and sour foods of this earth. Just as Greger has used words such as cancer (in a test) ‘decimated’ by amla, and so forth, such is merely a member of an entire family, and if we picked the plants with the strongest as they say medicinal value, longevity promoting, highest antioxidant, antibiotic, antiviral, etc., who knows, we’d perhaps still find thousands of plants of value for regular use. The note of someone else on this page mentioning olive as it is from the tree as too bitter to consume? Descendance. Better, a gift from Athena and Zeus’ reaction: exquisite. From lack of availability of the most valued plants most used as food in various traditional cultures over the centuries, my reaction to bitter and astringent olive was wow. Tannins, polyphenols, minerals, various other nutrients, more means more taste. As for amalaki, recently came across a study of 50 or so of traditional Egyptian medicinal herbs, and among the top 5 with anti-HIV activity, 3 of them are the same as in triphala, with I believe amalaki (phyllanthus emblica) on top. One food isn’t enough, but if perhaps we had several hundred of the most potent, perhaps most or all disease will be simple to treat. Another top herb from that study? A variety of oak. As Greger noted a study of the highest tested antioxidant among them, 1st was a tree bark. Animals still chew on bark; we’ve truly all capability of knowing what’s around us and instinctively reaching for at each moment what is most equilibrative.

        1. There’s iceberg and there’s iceberg. Sometimes I see fabulously green heads of iceberg at the grocery. I contrast that with the pale, sickly looking iceberg I see in some salad bars sometimes. Sometimes broccoli looks great–tight little green buds ready to burst into flower–and sometimes broccoli looks too sad to buy or eat….

  19. I am guilty of not consuming enough of these allium vegetables because of how they leave my breath smelling! Does anyone have a solution for that? I use them for cooking but there are several days when there is only time to make a smoothie and no time to cook!

    1. aI feel like I used to have that problem, in fact all of my life when I ate garlic, I had that problem, but it went away.

      I wonder what happened.

      I had stopped eating it and now I can eat it again.

      Gut bacteria? Tea neutralizing it? Better mouth and throat microbiome?

      For me beans used to cause gas and both onions and garlic started bothering me enough to not eat them and now I can.

  20. Hello,
    I have been seeing commercials on corn oil being better than olive oil in terms of health. I’d like to hear the doctor address oils with some of his usual great research.

    1. Why would you consume oil at all? Oil isn’t a “whole food.” I view it as being like sugar–an extract that is relatively worthless. Why would you not eat olives? or corn? Consumption of olives or corn would add the benefits of any fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc., but consumption of oil would add none of that to your diet.

      1. WFPBLisa – I’m with you, oil is a highly processed product (I intentionally do not use the word food – because it isn’t. Just because one can swallow it doesn’t mean it is a healthy food, imo :-). I thought I’d add to your comment by sharing that it takes approximately 44 olives to yield 1 tablespoon of olive oil. As much as I love olives and consume them I’d be hard pressed to eat 44 of them in one sitting. If I’m wanting a semblance of olive oil for some reason, I will blend a few whole olives in either some of the brine that they come in or the bean liqueur from canned beans or other medium. The bean liqueur makes a very reasonable foundation for an “olive oil” salad dressing or sauce. One can add other typical salad dressing components such as mustard and honey (for a honey-mustard dressing), Italian herbs for a Italian salad dressing, etc. This way one can get the luscious flavor of the olive without overly consuming too much olive oil.

        Dr. Greger has address the oil issue numerous times on this site – check the Search function for information on this. Dr. Greger advocates that we consume whole foods only, not refined products. Oil is a highly refined product. And once it has gone rancid it is deadly.
        Have a great day everyone!

      2. WFPBLiisa,

        Olives are a processed food; they are too bitter to eat as harvested. I don’t know what effect this has on olive nutrients. “All olives, whether green or black, require processing before they can be eaten…Depending on the curing method, pure water, caustic soda or lye, and coarse salt are used. Flavorings can be added to the brine. Among the favorites are red pepper or a variety of Mediterranean herbs for black olives and lemon or hot green peppers or chilies for green olives. Fennel, wine vinegar, or garlic can be used to add interest to any olive, but the time required for the olives to take on these flavors can range from a week for whole chilies to several months for a more subtle taste like the herb fennel.” (http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Olives.html#ixzz5iMjRkfyD)

        And olive oil is made from untreated freshly harvested olives, which are cleaned and washed, ground into a paste, and the paste mixed, possibly with added water; the oil is separated from the mix by centrifugation. (https://www.oliveoilsource.com/page/extraction-process) The cold pressed oil retains a lot of the oil-soluble phytonutrients, especially some polyphenols.

          1. Liisa, that’s not a bad way to look at things, and is generally good advice, but how many calories do you eat a day?

            Today, I need to eat between 3000-3800 calories to keep from having a deficit. And that’s not that unusual. My BMI is about 23. I personally can’t possibly eat that much whole plant food a day, without oil or some high calories choices. I’m somewhat not normal in the calorie department, but that’s my boat. I need some high calorie high protein density or I would wither and die, so I guess that’s why some people eat oils.
            Others do it because we’ve been taught to do it.

            End

              1. I eat tons on nuts and avocados. I buy 3-4 lbs bags of walnuts, almonds and pistachios, I also buy smaller bags of flax . I eat tons of avocados too. I guess I could eat 2-3 avocados in a meal, but, I think all things need some moderation, but ya especially oils. I eat tons of beans too. However, about 2 bowls is all I can digest in a sitting. Not sure what happens when HDL gets too high. I’ve read it can bad like if it’s too low. My HDL is already 84 way above normal.

                End

              2. We musn’t forget that “healthier” is not a universal attribute: I have been informed that nuts tend to be on the high side for phosphorus content, therefore not “healthier” for those concerned about kidney function.

                Proposition: “When all else has been eliminated, that which remains, no matter how improbable, must be true” -Sherlock Holmes’ father, attr.” Solve for the value of “all”.

    2. Glenn, Dr Greger has addressed the topic of oils many times throughout the years. You can use the search feature of the site to check out particular topics, or start here :

      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/oils/

      Here ia a video about the deleterious effects of olive oil https://nutritionfacts.org/video/olive-oil-and-artery-function/

      As Liisa and YR have mentioned, Dr Greger does not promote the use of oils, and does not include their use on the Daily Dozen. ( There are videos about that too)

      I have seen in an old video interview where he was asked which oil he would use if he ansolutely had to use one, and he said at the time, organic cold pressed canola..(probably due to the good omega 3vto 6 ratio) but make no mistake, he has not made any statements to say that it’s beneficial to add oils to your diet.

    3. I rhink that this claim is based on studies like those summarised in the AHA’s scientific report on dietary fats and cardiovascular disease which concluded

      ‘We judge the evidence to favor recommending n-6 polyunsaturated fat, that is, linoleic acid, stronger than monounsaturated fat to replace saturated fat because of the positive results of randomized clinical trials that used polyunsaturated fat compared with the paucity of trials that used monounsaturated fat10; the greater relative risk reduction for polyunsaturated fats in observational studies12,17,18; the greater reduction in LDL cholesterol with polyunsaturated fat4; and the regression of atherosclerosis in nonhuman primates by polyunsaturated but not monounsaturated fat’
      https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510

      However, I don’t think that oils are desirable in the diet. Nevertheless, if people want to use them, I think that Dr Greger has said that canola oil is probably the best choice … or, rather, the least worst choice for cooking

      ‘Foods that are deep-fried in oil produce toxic volatile carcinogenic compounds, and deep-frying foods in an unventilated area in the house can put people at risk from the air pollution it causes. The worst oil to deep-fry with is coconut oil, which should not be used in any case, and the least toxic was found to be canola, with safflower and extra virgin olive oil in between.’
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/vegetable-oil/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/deep-frying-toxins/

    4. Hello Glen,

      First off, avoidance of oils is best for health as it cripples our arteries ability to dilate and injures the lining of our blood vessels; however, if you were to choose either corn oil or olive oil, my opinion would be that olive oil is better because corn oil is extremely high in omega 6 fatty acids (inflammatory). Either way I’m not sure that Dr. Greger has commented on this specifically, but the research is pretty clear that we should maximize our omega 3 intake, minimize our omega 6 intake and steer clear of added oils.

      I hope this helps,

      Matt, Health Support

  21. The study, kindly provided by Tom Goff, is extremely interesting and useful. I would note a couple of things: 1. the in vitro studies were done using raw juice extracts (showing the importance of preparing cruciferous and allium foods properly as described by Dr. Greger in other videos), 2. water insoluble molecules like lycopene and beta-carotene were not in the extracts, possibly accounting at least in part for their general lack of effectiveness, 3. even an overall very poor performer like orange bell pepper (0 /-1%) was respectably effective at inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferation (~75%), underscoring the advisability of eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables as stressed in the article, and 4. brussel sprouts had the highest concentration of glucosinolates (which get converted to the protective isothiocyanates with proper preparation).

    1. gengo-gakusha, yes, I read through the study as well. I have been reading about how people loved this video, and so do I. But I do have a couple of reservations about it. one is that I have noticed on NutritionFacts that people still hold to the supplement idea and want the short easy answer … ie eat this food, and you’re good. This is why I appreciate your comments today reminding us that the study was in vitro, in petrie dishes, using extracts and not in human beings. And also that Dr Greger devised the Daily Dozen with all the years of reporting these studies in mind. Eating that variety of nutritious foods plus exercise works together to deliver the best result. Pass the sprouts please!

    1. Why would ANY veggie “promote cancer growth”? Sure, the carnies claim veggies will kill us because they have weapons on their little bod to protect themselves from getting eaten. But farm and wild animals run when they’re chased, and try to save themselves from dying too. It’s a killer world we live in! As we’re finding out, day by day. :-(

      I can’t imagine being cautious about any vegetable, but then whaddo I know! The only thing I’m certain of, veggie-wise, is I never liked parsnips when I was a kid. But I think I’ll try them again; I hear they’re good baked in the oven.

      1. YR, In the research paper referenced in this video, I didn’t see any vegetable that stopped proliferation more than 100%. Yellow Onions had a value of 99+/- 2 %, but I think that was an average over all cancer cell lines. I would interpret that to mean between 97 to 100 %.

        1. All those stats sound too highfalutin to me. Why must the experience of food eating be so fearful? It’s a wonder some people can even digest what they take it. So much fret.

          They probably toss and turn every night wondering if what they had for dinner will do them in.. :-(

          1. Yep, totally agree! If we look at the Okinawans original diet from 100 years ago, I’m sure they didn’t count calories, and fret about cholesterol, and all the other fad diets going around! They simply ate their sweet potatoes and other delicious whole foods and lived to be 100 and disease free :-)

                    1. YR(Mostly WFPB) – Yes, I agree. WFPB-Hal: TMI, TMI. Plus, your comment was not only boring beyond belief -BBB- but completely not relevant to this site. I’m sure you could find some sites that teach class and manners.

                    2. hal

                      I thought that I was the only one who made jokes like that. My excuse is that I’m Australian.

                      However, thanks for making a comment that recognises that we are all rational adults here and not 90-year old retired Sunday school teachers from the Bible belt who think that sex shouldn’t occur but if it does nobody should talk about it.

                    3. Hal, we’ve all put our big foot in our mouth at some time or another, so your “offense” is certainly forgivable. Just go say three Our Father’s and five rosaries. :-) (I shouldn’t have introduced the subject in the first place.)

                      And I hate to bring it up again (no, I don’t), but these Mercury retrograde transits can be brutal! People in the communications business, especially, often seem to get in trouble big time. (For instance, Judge J.P.?)

                      And yeah, Fumbles, we know boys will be boys…..the dear sweet lil’ things. :-D

                    4. Mercury in retrograde always makes me laugh.  I wife runs around saying that too. have no idea where she got that from, but when she says it things do seem to get hectic.

                    5. YR & Tom, As you know, I usually don’t go there on this website, so I’m going to blame it on that Mercury Retrograde thing ;-)

                      And Tom, Thanks for clarifying that there are many ramifications to what we eat, and many aspects of the human body that some don’t like to talk about. But as long as we keep it in a medical context, knowledge of some of those ramifications can provide useful information to some people.

                    6. YR, Yes, there seems to be many bad long-term outcomes from the Keto way of eating. I think the science has just scratched the surface so far.

                      And BTW, you do have such a pleasant way of wording things … a talent to be admired :-)

        2. Certain vegetables may cause cancer – not necessarily in and of themselves but depending on how they are prepared. Think of the Jack Daniels and Marlboro diet for example – an all vegtable diet if ever there was one. Pickled vegatables too have been associated with higher rates of gastric cancer.

          Also mycotoxins found on a variety of plant can also promote cancer as can certain alkaloids found in some wild plants.

          You might want to be careful about those parsnips though, YR
          https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/natural-toxins-in-food

          1. “These toxins are present in many plants such as parsnips (closely related to carrots and parsley), celery roots, citrus plants (lemon, lime, grapefruit, bergamot) and some medicinal plants.”
            – – – – – –

            AHso! Somehow my cell memories from another lifetime urged me not to like them. I hope I hadn’t died a wretched death because of the darn things.

            Thanks for the link, Fumbles; now I shan’t put them on my shopping list. Yup, we live in a thing-devour-thing world.

  22. Am I seeing purple brussel sprouts in that photo? I… want those.

    So tomato didn’t suppress cancer more than 50% but they’re amazing foods for other things including heart health. Love this video except it kinda sheds an unjustifiable light of pointlessness on some of these other extraordinary foods. Regardless, I loved this video before and was great watching it again.

    In regards to the onions, are those still protective against cancer when cooked? I know that unlike garlic, when onions are cooked they lose their cardiovascular benefits, but what about their cancer fighting properties?

  23. I wonder about the specific varieties of each vegetable. For example, it says “onions”, “cabbage”, and “kale”. Does that include red onions, yellow onions, and white onions? Does it include red cabbage or lacinato kale?

    1. Matt, I suggest you scroll up to find Mr Fumblefingers post where he has given the link for the download of the study. It makes for interesting reading, and you can see what vegetables were prepared for the testing. In that trial, mature white onions were used, so that’s what the results refer to. Other colours were not tested, and therefore we don’t know. Remember though, this is just an experiment they did with vegetable extracts on cancer cells in petri dishes. It isn’t a trial of people eating vegies.

      If you haven’t seen it, daily dozen checklist is a great reminder for us to be eating a variety of plant foods on a regular basis. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/

      1. Matt, I should have added that I did try to repost Mr Fumblefingers link several times but no luck! And further to your question, whatever varieties of veg you enjoy and will eat is what will work. I did notice that even humble green onions did great, as did cabbage. They referred to curley leaf cabbage (would that be savoy?) that did well also. In general though, Dr Greger has encouraged us to eat the most colourful foods we can in all categories.

    2. Hi Matt,

      According to the study, here are the veggies with highest chemopreventive potential: Brussels sprouts, cabbage, curly cabbage, garlic, green onion, kale, leek, spinach.

      2nd highest: Asparagus, beetroot, broccoli, cauliflower, fiddlehead, green bean, radish, red cabbage, rutabaga, yellow onion

      Intermediate: Celery, eggplant

      Lowest: Acorn squash, bok choy, boston lettuce, carrot, endive, english cucumber, fennel bulb, jalapeno, orange sweet pepper, potato, radicchio, romaine lettuce, tomato

    1. YR, this raises an interesting speculation: Are “vegan” fish healthier for humans to eat than “carnivorous” fish? You know, sardines that eat mostly sea plants as opposed to larger fish which eat other fish. I’m guessing the larger fish have more chemical pollutants due to being higher on the food chain.

      1. Perhaps bottom feeders are less healthy due to precipitation of pollutants?

        Proposition: “When all else has been eliminated, that which remains, no matter how improbable, must be true” -Sherlock Holmes’ father, attr.” Solve for the value of “all”.

      2. Hal that’s pretty common knowledge. The small fish like sardines, mackerel, and anchovies, are the least contaminated. The higher up the food chain the more contaminated they appear to be. Shark is one of the worst.

        End

    2. YR, much bigger deal if she was an actual vegan… in Dr. Greger’s case, wouldn’t be such a big deal because he recommends WFPB eating for health reasons and said himself you could have anything once a year due to the body’s ability to repair itself but that the constant inflicted injury is the problem. Still, I would doubt he ever goes that far, I couldn’t picture it. A self-proclaimed vegan eating an animal product is a disgrace as that’s a moral/ethical issue, so that’s pretty sickening if that’s the case. I’ve never heard of the girl.

  24. I always wondered, why doesn’t doctor Greger include mushrooms as a separate group in the daily dozen?

    With the Ergothioneine having a specific carrier in the human body and exclusive acces to mitochondria? What’s he’s train off thought for not including them?

    Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190312103702.htm

    Ergothioneine: A New Vitamin?
    https://nutritionfacts.org/2013/04/02/ergothioneine-a-new-vitamin/#

    1. I think all the information he gives is so that we know what the best things are to eat and he probably wants to keep his daily recommendations simple and open and not too difficult to accomplish. Some people might not find it palatable to eat mushrooms everyday or possible and it might make some people just give up if they can’t accomplish the checklist.

    2. Netgogate,

      Because the daily 13 doesn’t sound as good.

      Plus, that is a weekly study not daily.

      He could add weekly wonders and put garlic, onions, mushrooms, etc.

      I liked the study. More than 2 setvings per week.

    3. I think S is on point but it would be good to learn his view on mushrooms. Dr. Fuhrman includes mushrooms in his mnemonic ‘GBOMBS’ (greens, beans, onions, berries, seeds) but overall his and Dr. Greger’s recommendations are closely aligned. I eat them virtually everyday, alternating types.

  25. The studies cite yellow onions, but what about red onions? Anyone know if red onions have the same health benefits? I always buy red onions thinking the red gave more benefits than yellow or white due to their red color.

  26. In his video “Stopping cancer before it starts” Dr. Greger talks about two studies where they put excrement and urine on bacteria from both meat eaters and vegans. Does anyone knows what studies he was referring too? Any titles, links, a nutritionfacts video? Much appreciated.

    DVD
    http://www.turnx.info/Stopping_Cancer_Before_It_Starts_Flash/

    @Sharon
    Red onions are indeed better because they hold extra secondary compounds compared to the white ones like anthocyanin (that gives the purpleness).

    1. I’ve always heard red onions are indeed healthier, so that’s the kind I’ve been buying.

      That Happy Healthy Vegan couple, however, avoid both onions and garlic. I happened to see one of their recent videos where they explained why.

      1. YR, omg that video was annoying, I saw it too. I like them, they seem like really nice, cool people, but their explanation was ridiculous and her idea that she could smell anyone who ate onions or garlic was just stupid… literally just not thoughtful at all. So you smell onion or garlic on one person and you assume that everyone else in your life who you “don’t smell” do not eat onions and garlic? Dear god.

        1. S,

          I think I saw it, but the video I saw was that he developed BO from them, so they didn’t use them, but we’re going to have someone readjust their recipes for people who want them.

          I think they were just trying to explain why they left garlic and onions out.

          I didn’t find it annoying. I feel like they made a cookbook without using garlic or onions and people kept asking them why.

          1. She made a rude comment in the video I’m referring to, Deb. She basically told people they could eat garlic and onions if they want to smell bad. I find that tactlessness incredibly annoying and also was annoyed at such a silly perspective possibly negating people away from eating foods that could actually save their lives.

            1. When I was young I would not eat an onion if my life depended on it. I would get dry heaves and actually vomited one time. However, I always like eating garlic. Small amounts like a slice or a sliver.

              It wasn’t until about 2 years ago that I started putting some onion in a smoothie, that I found it palatable. Later, I started adding to my cooking but cooking them all the way through. Like really cooking Them to death. ( yes I’m sure it killed the goodness from them, but the point is I can eat an onions even raw now. Because I baby stepped it to eating them. I still am selective in the dishes I use them with. But onions and I have made a truce .

              End

              1. DArmstrong–

                Your experience with onion matches mine. For decades, a slice of raw onion prompted immediate avoidance behavior, no questions asked. A cooked onion was only slightly better, as long as most of the “onion” had been neutralized.

                Since subscribing to Nutrition Facts, the power of learning and experimentation have come into play, especially from beneficial power of the onion family against cancer. So, I have given onion a second chance, and have taken “baby steps” toward regular use of onion on cooking.

                Because of the wonderful aroma stewed onions add to almost any vegetable dish, big, yellow onions became a regular ingredient in my crock-pot cooking routines. I actually would miss them, if I ran out of onions before visiting the grocery.

                And for what it indicates, even before watching today’s video, I was so convinced by prior research on allicin benefits against disease, I began eating the small, but luscious, water-packed onion core after slicing the rest of an onion bulb into stew. The water helped a great deal to avoid tears, but the small core of onion actually became a “reward” for finishing preparation of the next crock pot dish.

                1. For me it was pan fried onions that always smells so good not sure why people love that smell but when I start cooking onions and that’s all I’ve cooked wife comes in and mmm is smells so good. Hahaha

                  End

  27. So I was just putting some frozen white button mushrooms white precut frozen garlic pieces into the microwave to top my pasta with avocado and black peper sauce. And I just discovered that the mushroom+garlic combo tastes like bacon! A distinct bacon flavour.

    Anyone here who has an idea about possible flavour compounds in both that could explain for the coincidence?

    1. Were they smoked? I haven’t had “bacon” since before the age of 9 but I remember the general flavor (doesn’t hurt that I’ve had veggie bacon) and often when I eat something with a smoky flavor it’s reminiscent of bacon to me.

  28. This is a great video, but can the veggies be cooked? I make a lot of soups and use a ton on onions and garlic, does that hurt the benefit at all? Also, I do not use fresh garlic.

  29. I am addicted to crunchy kale chips.

    Does anyone have a dehydrator?

    I ate 2 bags of them yesterday, plus a bag of beet chips.

    All air dried. Dies that mean a dehydrator or does that mean leave them out on the counter?

    1. I am looking at the bag saying 1/2 pound of kale, so I basically ate a pound of kale.

      And that becomes 4 oz air dried?

      I am trying to figure out serving size, but I guess you just go by the package, not the starting kale value.

    2. In regards to kale, they’re dehydrated. I don’t have a food dehydrator but would love one. Kale chips are AMAZING. Apparently you can make them in the oven, too, they might not stay raw that way but you might be able to do it at a low enough temperature where they could qualify as “raw.”

      1. Thanks!

        Yeah, I like the concept of air dried, particularly because I don’t have to worry about burning 1 pound of kale.

        I am wild about the crunch.

        It reminds me of potato chips but they had the zing of Doritos.

        Yum!

  30. AUDIO CONTROL AND ROCKET SCIENCE– BLASTING AWAY AT THE LISTENERS’ EARS?

    Some adjustment needs to be made between the volume level for the signature opening of each video, and the subsequent volume level required to hear Dr. Greger’s narration. In this video, the void between the two audio levels is astounding– almost as though the production process involved two different people., and no editor to make the two levels even remotely similar.

    Think of the problem on the receiving/viewing end– the audience (as in listeners) are forced to turn down the volume drastically to deal with the thoughtless signature volume level, and then raise the volume by orders of magnitude to hear Dr. Greger’s voice clearly.

    Audio control is not rocket science, but it does require attention to the editing process.

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