Pesticides in Marijuana

Pesticides in Marijuana
4.65 (92.92%) 48 votes

The biggest barrier to reducing toxic pesticides in cannabis is, not surprisingly, the cannabis industry itself.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana. When labs started reporting they were finding high levels of “pesticide residues,” the LA city government “covertly acquired and then tested” three samples from dispensaries, and found that two of the three samples had “exceedingly high levels” of a pesticide—up to a thousand times the legal limit.

Yeah, but how much ends up inside the consumer? Only about 10 percent or so of the pesticides in tobacco make it through a filtered cigarette, which was found to be comparable to using cannabis in a water pipe with filters attached. But use a regular bong, and about half the pesticides end up in your lungs. And, a glass pipe is even worse. Because most users don’t attach a carbon filter to their bongs with seven and a half grams of activated charcoal, “in general the portion of pesticide recovery [from cannabis would be] alarmingly high and is a serious concern.” Although we don’t know “precisely how damaging these chemicals are, the fact they are present in smoke at such high levels should be concerning.” “Considering these results, high pesticide exposure through cannabis smoking is a significant possibility, which may lead to further health complications in cannabis consumers”—especially if we’re talking about medical marijuana. Sick, vulnerable people, potentially making things worse.

“[T]he potential of pesticide and chemical residue exposures to cannabis users is substantial and may pose a significant toxicological threat in the absence of adequate regulatory frameworks.” Okay, so what are states doing about it? Colorado recently suffered some “high-profile recalls of…marijuana batches” contaminated with “harmful pesticides” that made it into some of the edibles. Evidently, “growers sometimes find themselves…overwhelmed by pest issues [and] resort to nuclear tactics”—trying anything to protect their crop. This has created “a public safety threat,” with “intensified toxicity in concentrated products of particular concern.” “[P]esticide levels were [found to be] approximately 10x higher in concentrated cannabis products,” like the oils and waxes sometimes used in edibles or dabbed as concentrates.

“A study of pesticide use on cannabis crops in Oregon” found a similar problem. A survey of samples off store shelves in Washington state found five out of six contaminated, “including [with] potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents.” “Many [samples] harbored multiple contaminants, attaining levels” basically off the chart, including “24 distinct pesticide agents,” insecticides, fungicides—none of which are approved for use on cannabis. But, it’s not their fault—the EPA hasn’t approved any because it’s still a federally illegal crop. In fact, testing labs in California have “become hesitant to publicize their service or list agents for which they could [test], as they suspected that such information” might just be used as an instruction manual by unscrupulous growers to seek out even more toxic agents.

Okay, so just regulate it. They’ve tried, but guess what the biggest barrier was they came up against? Surprise, surprise, the cannabis industry—the multi-billion-dollar cannabis industry. Like the tobacco industry before it, “the cannabis industry is attempting to weaken pesticide regulations.” “Reportedly, the Colorado Department of Agriculture…initially hoped to limit permissible pesticides to the most nontoxic,” but this proposal was quashed by industry pushback, just like the tobacco industry was able to do.

Big Tobacco “has provided a detailed road map for” King Cannabis: “deny addiction potential, downplay known adverse health effects, create as large a market as possible as quickly as possible, and protect that market through lobbying [and campaign contributions].” “[B]olstered by enormous profits,” the tobacco industry was able to get itself “exempted from every major piece of consumer protection legislation.” So that should be a cautionary tale for us now, given that public health advocates have definitely fewer billions to work with.

Big Tobacco may not just be providing the roadmap, but waiting in the wings to own the road. “As a result of [lawsuits] against the tobacco industry, more than 80 million pages of internal company documents became available.” And what they reveal is “that since at least 1970, despite fervent denials, major multinational tobacco companies” like Philip Morris having been scheming, willing, and prepared to enter the legalized marijuana market to become Big Blunt. “Because of the tobacco industry’s demonstrated ability and willingness to modify its products to increase addictiveness, obfuscate information, deceive the public, and…target vulnerable groups to increase demand, the industry also has the power to dramatically change [the game.]”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Andrea via Adobe Stock photos. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana. When labs started reporting they were finding high levels of “pesticide residues,” the LA city government “covertly acquired and then tested” three samples from dispensaries, and found that two of the three samples had “exceedingly high levels” of a pesticide—up to a thousand times the legal limit.

Yeah, but how much ends up inside the consumer? Only about 10 percent or so of the pesticides in tobacco make it through a filtered cigarette, which was found to be comparable to using cannabis in a water pipe with filters attached. But use a regular bong, and about half the pesticides end up in your lungs. And, a glass pipe is even worse. Because most users don’t attach a carbon filter to their bongs with seven and a half grams of activated charcoal, “in general the portion of pesticide recovery [from cannabis would be] alarmingly high and is a serious concern.” Although we don’t know “precisely how damaging these chemicals are, the fact they are present in smoke at such high levels should be concerning.” “Considering these results, high pesticide exposure through cannabis smoking is a significant possibility, which may lead to further health complications in cannabis consumers”—especially if we’re talking about medical marijuana. Sick, vulnerable people, potentially making things worse.

“[T]he potential of pesticide and chemical residue exposures to cannabis users is substantial and may pose a significant toxicological threat in the absence of adequate regulatory frameworks.” Okay, so what are states doing about it? Colorado recently suffered some “high-profile recalls of…marijuana batches” contaminated with “harmful pesticides” that made it into some of the edibles. Evidently, “growers sometimes find themselves…overwhelmed by pest issues [and] resort to nuclear tactics”—trying anything to protect their crop. This has created “a public safety threat,” with “intensified toxicity in concentrated products of particular concern.” “[P]esticide levels were [found to be] approximately 10x higher in concentrated cannabis products,” like the oils and waxes sometimes used in edibles or dabbed as concentrates.

“A study of pesticide use on cannabis crops in Oregon” found a similar problem. A survey of samples off store shelves in Washington state found five out of six contaminated, “including [with] potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents.” “Many [samples] harbored multiple contaminants, attaining levels” basically off the chart, including “24 distinct pesticide agents,” insecticides, fungicides—none of which are approved for use on cannabis. But, it’s not their fault—the EPA hasn’t approved any because it’s still a federally illegal crop. In fact, testing labs in California have “become hesitant to publicize their service or list agents for which they could [test], as they suspected that such information” might just be used as an instruction manual by unscrupulous growers to seek out even more toxic agents.

Okay, so just regulate it. They’ve tried, but guess what the biggest barrier was they came up against? Surprise, surprise, the cannabis industry—the multi-billion-dollar cannabis industry. Like the tobacco industry before it, “the cannabis industry is attempting to weaken pesticide regulations.” “Reportedly, the Colorado Department of Agriculture…initially hoped to limit permissible pesticides to the most nontoxic,” but this proposal was quashed by industry pushback, just like the tobacco industry was able to do.

Big Tobacco “has provided a detailed road map for” King Cannabis: “deny addiction potential, downplay known adverse health effects, create as large a market as possible as quickly as possible, and protect that market through lobbying [and campaign contributions].” “[B]olstered by enormous profits,” the tobacco industry was able to get itself “exempted from every major piece of consumer protection legislation.” So that should be a cautionary tale for us now, given that public health advocates have definitely fewer billions to work with.

Big Tobacco may not just be providing the roadmap, but waiting in the wings to own the road. “As a result of [lawsuits] against the tobacco industry, more than 80 million pages of internal company documents became available.” And what they reveal is “that since at least 1970, despite fervent denials, major multinational tobacco companies” like Philip Morris having been scheming, willing, and prepared to enter the legalized marijuana market to become Big Blunt. “Because of the tobacco industry’s demonstrated ability and willingness to modify its products to increase addictiveness, obfuscate information, deceive the public, and…target vulnerable groups to increase demand, the industry also has the power to dramatically change [the game.]”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Andrea via Adobe Stock photos. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

73 responses to “Pesticides in Marijuana

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  1. It seems the whole world is riddled with nasties trying to do us in. If they ever work out the kinks in the merry mari, I might try it out for the first time. Maybe I’ll wait until my deathbed for this though; I’m not all that curious.

    And, meanwhile back at the ranch, if ron from New Mexico is here, he might be interested in the little critters hanging around food plants in his area:

    https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/03/production-plant-crawling-with-insects-workers-use-food-off-floor-in-products/

    1. YR (Mostly WFPB),

      From your linked article: ” Inspectors found Ruben’s Inc. was crawling with insects, did not have adequate plumbing, and was generally filthy.”

      Oh, yuck. What does this corporation make? So we can avoid it’s products? Or better yet, cook our foods at home from whole ingredients.

  2. Industry taints all.

    If you want the best tomatoes you must grow them. Same as anything else.

    But that nobody goes to jail for Arkansas Travelers.

    Similar but different: Also there is a promising “new” line of study into the efficacy of true psychedelics as therapies. Those interested look up Michael Pollan’s latest interviews/discussions. This not nutritional however, could be beneficial to the outside-the-industrially-manipulated-box thinkers.

    1. Wade,

      I looked at that a few years ago.

      I don’t trust that psychedelics would work better than WFPB.

      I see each of the things, including WFPB as industries, but when the military have to handle PTSD, they can either give nutrition and prevent it or give nutrition and stop the suicides or give nutrition or stop the violence or they can give psychedelics. There are meds, which are fairly successful at getting people off of drugs and alcohol now. Are the psychedelics as effective as those? Unregulated industries concern me just as much as Big Pharma.

      From life experience, psychedelics, in the sixties messed people up in the long run. I knew people who took them and, at first, they were happy with them, but long term, they felt like they got messed up and had a frightening lack of grasp of reality. Are the new ones better? Not sure yet.

      I see pot and psychedelics as huge money-making industries. The government of my state is already salivating over how to make money off of pot.

      I am not against scientists testing these substances, but it is all about money in the long run.

  3. Dispensaries all test for pesticide/herbicide/fungicide residue as well as mold, mildew. That is how it was found that most marijuana here in California was rejected the way most current growers are doing things. I know a few of these growers and have even went up to ‘mendo’ to trim. Most insist that they know everything they ever will need and their ways are the best, completely clueless to innovations and advanced in agriculture and not caring. But there are also many others who stay on the cutting edge ahead of the rest that use things like natural organic certified enzymes (that are edible) and UVC light instead of pesticides to kill insects and mildew. Basically there are two types of growers, the take it easy sleep until noon growers who have been growing for their sole income who refuse to take a loss and spray chemicals on their crop if a problem develops. And the second, growers who stay educated, constantly strive for improvement, and who have taken the time to learn how to cultivate properly so they do not even need banned chemicals at all. Schools like Oaksterdam exist for the very reason of catching people up.

    1. Technically the dispensaries do not do the actual testing but can legally only sell cannabis products that have been tested by a state approved lab.

    2. Another issue is that hemp is a bio-accumulator, otherwise known a a mop crop, which means it uptakes high amounts of heavy metals and other pollutants from the soil. It was even used for phytoremediation after the Chernobyl disaster. If those toxins are lipophilic they could further concentrate in products like cannabis oil. So even if cannabis is tested free from pesticides and mold, it can contain massive amounts of cadmium and lead. And radioactive leaks are found at 75% of US commercial power plant sites.

      https://nationalhempassociation.org/hemp-for-remediation-and-green-spaces/
      https://www.cbsnews.com/news/radioactive-leaks-found-at-75-of-us-nuke-sites/

  4. “Reportedly, the Colorado Department of Agriculture…initially hoped to limit permissible pesticides to the most nontoxic,” but this proposal was quashed by industry pushback.”

    Baloney. Here in Colorado, legally purchased Mary Jane is labeled showing the pesticide which was used on the crop. Mine all say “Boric Acid Pesticide.” Boric Acid is not toxic to human beans.

  5. Doesn’t organic canibus play into this at all. Pretty much means don’t smoke it and what about edables and by products as pesticides is ruining everything for all plant based products across the board . Doesn’t non GMO. Organically grown mean anything or don’t buy it unless it is.

    1. When it comes to pesticide levels organic does not in any way mean no pesticides. In fact most ‘organic’ pesticides have to be used in higher concentrations than conventional chemical pesticides leaving behind more residue. Cannabis growers often use the insecticide pyrethrins to control pest species and protect their crops. These come from a natural source—flowers of the chrysanthemum plant. Various forms of insecticidal pyrethrins can be extracted from the blooms of these plants. Being a natural product, some people think that pyrethrins must therefore be safe. Natural or not, everything is composed of chemicals. Pyrethrins should not be found on edibles or smokables at any significant concentration. But, when these chemicals are used on cannabis, they can be incredibly difficult to quantify. Pyrethrins kill insects on contact. But these chemicals hurt more than insects. Pyrethrins can also be harmful to humans, especially in cannabis products designed for smoking, because these chemicals can be easily absorbed through the lungs. Compared to many pesticides, pyrethrins are not very toxic to humans, and the most common problem is an allergic reaction, but it can last for days. The reaction gets worse with an increase in the dose. Pyrethrins are a pesticide tested for here in California and if it is there the cannabis is rejected. (An experienced grower would only use it early in the grow before the buds develop).

  6. QUESTION;

    What foods are highest in tryptophan?

    I find I have to eat at least 4oz/day of 100% grass fed cooked on low heat beef or lamb to keep from being depressed
    (presumably from serotonin deficiency)

    1. Tryptophan is pretty low cost as a supplement. If you took it that way, then you would have a very consistent and controllable dosage every time.

      1. Geoffrey Levens:

        I remember when Tryptophan was banned as a supplement because people were dieing apparently due to a flaw in manufacturing. When tryptophan became available again, it was only on prescription and I recall people complaining about the high price. Don’t know what has happened since, but I prefer getting as many nutrients as possible from food..

        1. L-Tryptophan like all amino acids are made using microbiological fermentation with genetically engineered organisms. All amino acids are also made by one Japanese company, Showa Denko, who sells them to the many supplement companies. The deaths from tryptophan was the result of the GMO bacteria unexpectedly mutating to where it was producing a toxic byproduct along with the l-tryptophan. Showa Denko also had lowered the amount of filtration of byproducts right as this happened resulting in contaminated product being produced. Currently the toxic byproduct is closely monitored in l-tryptophan production and it is back on the market available without a prescription.

    2. I find I have to eat at least 4oz/day of 100% grass fed cooked on low heat beef or lamb to keep from being depressed
      (presumably from serotonin deficiency)
      ——————————————————————————-
      Not questioning your decision to eat meat as that is choice… however, why would you not eat turkey instead? I’ve always been under the impression that turkey meat is one of the highest sources of tryptophan.

      But I second the supplemental form that Geoffrey Levans suggested.

      1. Lonie:

        Compared to turkey, 100% grass fed beef has many times higher amounts of conjugated linoleic acid believed to help fight cancer.
        100% grass fed Lamb is even higher.

        1. Sydney,
          >>> conjugated linoleic acid believed to help fight cancer.
          Do you have a scientific studies to point to indicating this?

          Seems to me a poor reason to eat meat, grass fed or not. Not to mention the large amount of methane cattle produce, contributing substantially to global warming.
          https://gizmodo.com/we-ve-grossly-underestimated-how-much-cow-farts-are-con-1818993089
          “And problematic it is. Methane is about 30 times more efficient at trapping the Sun’s radiative heat than carbon dioxide over a timescale of about a century. There may be more CO2 in the atmosphere than methane, but by unit, it’s the more destructive greenhouse gas. “

          1. gengo-gakusha:

            about methane:

            I use public transportation and am considering moving to a net zero house.

            Anyone tries to ban 100% grass fed beef and lamb will…..

            1. hi Sydney, not sure if you have seen these videos yet. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/a-better-way-to-boost-serotonin/ There are 3 vids in this mini series.. The wrong way, a better way, and the best way to boost serotonin. It looks like they might answer your questions and concerns. Also, there is this one https://nutritionfacts.org/video/anti-inflammatory-diet-for-depression/ as well as a few more with suggestions for specific foods that been tested against antidepressants. Have a look under Doctor’s Notes for titles that might catch your attention.

          1. Mr Fumblefingers, I think some people try to convince themselves as much as us regarding their penchant for eating animal foods. Otherwise, why would someone bother to come on here to ask disingenuous questions? Anyway, that is some resource you linked to! I have only scanned the index, but every kind of meat is covered!

            1. Yes, grass fed organic beef/lamb has got to be healthy because – well, it’s better than conventional farmed beef right?

              Sydney has repeatedly been coming out with this claim for years despite the fact that I keep pointing to the data from Uruguay where all the cattle are grass fed and growth hormones are banned

              ‘Results: In themultivariable model there was a significant increase in the odds of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx(OR=3.65, 95% CI: 2.21-6.01), esophagus (OR=3.36, 95% CI: 1.97-5.72), larynx (OR=2.91, 95% CI: 1.80-4.68),stomach (OR=2.19, 95% CI: 1.31-3.65), colorectum (OR=3.83, 95% CI: 2.37-6.20), lung (OR=2.17, 95% CI:1.52-3.10), breast (OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.04-3.75), prostate (OR=1.87, 95% CI: 1.08-3.21), bladder (OR=2.11,95% CI: 1.20-3.72) and kidney (OR=2.72, 95% CI: 1.22-6.07) with high intake of red meat and similar findingswere found for total meat. In addition, intake of beef and lamb were also associated with increased risk ofseveral cancer sites. High intake of processed meat was associated with increased risk of cancers of the esophagus(OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.08-2.47), larynx (OR=1.84, 95% CI: 1.21-2.78), stomach (OR=1.62, 95% CI: 1.07-2.44),colorectum (OR=2.15, 95% CI: 1.49-3.11), lung (OR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.28-2.25) and breast (OR=1.53, 95% CI:1.01-2.30).
              http://journal.waocp.org/?sid=Entrez:PubMed&id=pmid:19640186&key=2009.10.3.429

              Apparently though, according to the true believers, the meat is perfectly healthy. The higher cancer rates must be only because they BBQ and fry meat in Uruguay (and every other country around the world where red meat consumption is associated with higher cancer and CVD rates. The meats fine they say it’s only the cooking method that is carcinogenic. They never cite any real evidence for this though. The topic is dicussed in that IARC report.

    3. Grains, Seeds, Tofu, Beans are some of the vegan alternatives.

      Exercise raises Tryptophan. Though not over-exercising.

      So does bright light therapy.

      Serotonin is made in the gut though, so healing your gut microbiome may help.

      That would be my argument against animal products as a way to increase it.

      Here is the gut microbiome and serotonin

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393509/

      You would want resistant starch and fiber from food and a wide variety of organic produce for healing the gut microbiome.

      Plus, depression is often related to inflammation and vegetables and spices are how you lower that. Dr. Greger has videos and a blog on that. Increasing vegetable intake is highly effective, but it is a lot of servings. Something like 10 servings per day. I can’t remember if that was the depression study or not, but still it is eat a whole lot of vegetables. Dr. Ornish had a study where he was successful treating depression with diet 73% of the time.

      1. Thank you Deb! All very helpful… I will pick up some pumpkin seeds, and try out some tofu. I am good so far on the veggies and exercise.

          1. There are expensive ways and cheap ways to do most of it.

            For instance, you can buy an infrared sauna or you could buy an $8 infrared bulb or a $25 “official” therapy bulb both on Amazon and someone said that they are the same. I don’t know about that. You put those in a $10 brooder lamp. Tractor Supply store had a good one. (The one from Amazon came broken)

            There are also LED versions from inexpensive to full body expensive or you can join some Planet Fitness locations and do the $25 per month membership and some have a whole body set up.

            Vielight has been used in studies and that, you can get one for $500 or you can get a sinus product, which is a similar product with a similar wavelength on Amazon for $25.

            Yes, I bought the knock-off of that.

            Dr. Pawluck rents them and sells them. Amazon has one cheap brand where they sell a mini one versus the whole body one. I bought the Micropulse ICES because I couldn’t afford the ones I was looking at. Earthpulse tempted me because it helps with sleep, but I liked the inventor of the Micropulse ICES because he answers every email and is trying to make the least expensive product possible as his goal. I have successfully used it for healing my ankle and my shoulder pain and lower back pain and I used it as part of my getting over the emotional attachment to the wrong foods projects and now I am using that for sleep and, so far, it is working. There are other kinds, which people spend thousands on, but I am happy that I didn’t have to.

            Anyway, I say it because there are a lot of ways to raise serotonin.

            Foot reflexology is one my cousin swears by and there is some indication that it helps with psychiatric type conditions. Electric foot massagers or shiatsu or getting massages or getting a massage seat cushion.

            Here is foot massage with schizophrenics, for instance.

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27256944

            1. The Micropulse ICES is still being used for research. I say that because it isn’t a product. It is something invented for NASA decades ago to help reverse bone loss in astronauts. The researcher actually developed it after his own back injury as a fire chief. It isn’t a medical product. It is something which is for sale, but it is for self-hackers and researchers.

              I had an injury from an accident and it helped almost overnight and even before twelve hours was up.

              Dr Pawluck had a similar testimonial.

              I am saying this because it is being studied and has been for decades but it is a retired fire chief, ex-NASA employee. NASA tried to take his patents, but he won.

              I just like him because each new thing I have used it for, I have been able to email him and he tells me which setting to try.

              He doesn’t know me from Eve but he just gave me informstion in which wavelengths they have studied on which thing.

              I bought one and went to PubMed and looked up everything PEMF and cold laser and TENS have been studied for.

              Not trying to sell you on his product. It is experimental and I don’t want to make it sound like a medical product.

              It is my favorite gadget, but the infrared therapy bulb healed my skin rash in 5 days.

              These things are powerful.

              I also do use the YouTube relaxation music and have done float tanks and other things.

              Guided meditation is excellent.

              I know that Dr Ornish raps about studies on yoga, but I prefer Pilates reformers. Those helped me emotionally when I was a suicidal younger person.

              Decades ago.

    1. Forgot for a moment this is a WFPB site and some may prefer the pesticide laced natural version to the yeast grown synthetic version.

      1. Show us where yeast based THC and CBD products are actually being sold and only then will you have a point. A few years ago someone crossed THC into oranges and I have yet to see one of those either.

        1. Jimbo, if you read the entire piece you will have noted there are many other products the company is already selling (that are derived from yeast.)

          The point is, they have solved the process and have a history of getting product to market. And if you read the whole piece you may also understand that they have teased out other components that aren’t readily available from consuming marijuana products because they are in such small amounts. They can tease these other substances out and enhance them, making the yeast-derived canibis even more medically viable.

          As to THC oranges, I do not believe past failures dictate future successes. After all, don’t we learn from our failures? I certainly do.

          As Einstein said, insanity is doing the same thing over and over expecting a different result. THC and CBD from yeast is different than from oranges. ‘-)

  7. So, let’s recap what we’ve learned so far about marijuana use. Reviewing a few of the videos listed in the Doctor’s Note above:

    1. Is Marijuana Addictive?

    What I got out of it: Yes, One in 11 adults and 1 in 6 children are at risk for addictive behaviors.

    2. Does Marijuana Cause Health Problems?

    What I got out of it: Yes. Two million years of healthy life are lost every year, according to the study cited Also, mentioned in a different paper were accidents and injuries, bronchitis, acute cardiovascular events,infectious diseases, cancer, poor psycho-social and mental health outcomes.

    3. Does Marijuana Cause Permanent Brain Damage in Teens?

    What I got out of it: Yes. See the video.

    4. Effects of Smoking Marijuana on Lungs

    What I got out of it: Respiratory inflammation found to be comparable with tobacco use; three to four joints per day are as bad (inflammation) as an entire pack of cigarettes in terms of lung inflammation damage.

    5. Are Cannabis Edibles Safe?

    What I got out of it: No. There is an increased risk to children and pets in terms of overdose.

    And finally

    6. Pesticides in Marijuana

    What I got out of it: There is a frightening array of pesticides in commercial marijuana products and high levels of exposure to them from smoking marijuana.

    What I’d like to see Dr. Greger do sometime is make a video addressing this topic:

    7. Are Humans Singularly the Most Self-Destructive Creatures on the Earth?

    Let’s see what the data suggest here as well.

    1. dr cobalt,

      what proportion of those who use marijuana smoke “three to four joints per day?” None that I know. Three to four joints per day seems like a lot. And expensive.

      Chocolate is dangerous to dogs. I know this because my feisty Border Terrier once managed to knock a cup of chocolates off a high shelf (how? with help from the cat?) and proceeded to gobble them up, foil and all. That was some vet bill.

      Also, what about all the contaminated meat products legally sold in this country? Over one million cases of food poisoning per year, with some deaths.

      Should children and adolescents be using marijuana? Of course not. Nor should they be drinking alcohol, smoking tobacco, and I would add, engaging in sex.

      I could go on. I think you catch my drift.

        1. Demodex is common in most of the human population. About a third of children and young adults, half of adults, and two-thirds of elderly people carry them.

      1. Medical cannabis users easily go through more than 4 ‘joints’ per day. A medical user does not have the luxury of not using frequently resulting in a very high tolerance to the THC so more is needed for effectiveness.

      2. Actually, I don’t really catch your drift, Dr. J., except for ¶ #4 – I could sign my name to that statement.

        I’m confused, because topics like recreational pot use are usually quite divisive, and people tend to come down hard on one side or the other. But I don’t get a clear sense of where you are in regard to my remarks above.

        I’d be interested in hearing you explain more, if you are so inclined. I appreciate your civil tone.

    2. Dr Cobalt,

      Are human beings the most self-destructive creatures on earth?

      I don’t think Dr. Lisle would say that we are.

      He would point to the animal experiments with the pleasure trap and I think he would say that we are all the same.

      Animals starve themselves to death in the studies where they have to choose between food and over-stimulation.

      And that is more than one type of over-stimulation.

      I would not necessarily come from his perspective because I am a Christian and do believe that the power of sin can be broken off, but you don’t have to look at the world for very long to know that billions of people might be falling into pleasure trap after pleasure trap.

  8. Is very disconcerting to see the remarks below when people stated all products need to be tested in California, I own a testing lab in California and I can tell you that most people are doing R&D testing and when they don’t pass they send it to all the illegal dispensaries in Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles is doing nothing about closing the illegal dispensaries and the state of California is absolutely doing nothing to enforce these laws, consequently we have seen pesticides test between 300 and 1000 times the legal limit for pesticides and those products just get sold to the illegal dispensaries in Los Angeles, so whoever thinks their product is safe that they are smoking is sorely mistaken.

    1. You are so correct. So called ‘medical’ growers that I know ALL sell their rejected crops to the black market. And what about that crooked testing lab that got caught not doing the tests because they were paid to approve bad marijuana as clean? They tainted the credibility of the cannabis testing lab industry.

  9. Thanks for another important video.

    Just a note, the audio was kind of ‘boomy’. Perhaps a better microphone or something is in order.

    Thanks, doctor, for all you do!

    1. Not one person has mentioned a FOOD that is high in tryptophan, a critical nutrient.
      —————————————————————————————————————–
      I did… turkey (and chicken too, to a lesser degree.)

  10. Sydney, I did teply to your post, above. The vids I linked to do discuss why you want to be trying an anti inflammatory plant based diet. Here is a link for tryptophan foods/vegetables https://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-011079000000000000000.html?maxCount=60 at the us data base. This site is a great resource to keep handy Sydney. Spinach and other greens, beans and mushrooms look like good things to include for a start at bumping up seratonin levels. Exercise too if you are able.

  11. Any advice for nocturia? Although i have an inguinal hernia, and this could be causing a problem too, I’d like to know what i could do to reduce my urine production at night. I’ve broken my sleep to pee everyday for who knows long. It’s having an effect on my thinking. Mostly on planning, organising.

    1. Arthur,

      The most common cause of urinary urgency and frequency in men is an enlarged prostate. A board certified urologist can help you with this problem.

      Alan L. Lasnover, MD

    2. I’ve broken my sleep to pee every night…
      ———————————————————–
      Me too, but it’s because I drink two, three, sometimes 4 cups of tea (a diuretic) during the evening before bed. Not a problem though… it’s not like I awake with an urgent need to pee… I wake up gradually with a knowledge of the dream state I awake from.

      When I finish my pee, I go right back to bed and sleep well till time to get up, even if I drink some water during my mid sleep awakening.

      1. Have you watched the foundmyfitness video interview with Matt Walker? The topic is about how important sleep is. One factor that is important is sleep continuity. I’m not getting that so fixing it might help me. Also I forgot to mention that I tend to get a little thirsty just before bed.

        1. Arthur, if you are up to supplementation consider a tablet (or my preferred choice, a few drops in water/tea etc.) of Melatonin before bed.

          I usually only do this when I need to arise early. Not only has it produced the ability to sleep through the night but I also awake after about 6, sometimes 5, hours of sleep fully rested and ready to get up from bed.

        2. Perhaps some contact with someone else or a pet for at least a minute before bed may be enough to trigger release of oxytocin and stimulate vasopressin release. If someone could find something on the web or PubMed about this and share that would be great.

        1. That made no difference. I tried depriving myself of water in the hours before bed and I won’t be doing that again. Got back pain from it. It’s possibly malnutrition that’s causing the problem.

      2. “When I finish my pee, I go right back to bed and sleep well till time to get up”
        – – – – –

        Heck, Lonie, so do I. As we age, is it even “normal” to sleep a whole 7-8 hours throughout the night? I envy those who can do this, if they exist. But I’m a light sleeper, and so expect I’ll wake myself up every 2-3 hours. And while I’m awake, I figure I may as well take a leak whether I have to or not (I usually do).

        But, unlike some of my cronies, I have no trouble resuming where I left off in dreamland. Yeah, it’s a damn nuisance, but on the other hand I don’t mind stretching the ol’ bod the hell outta the bed just for a change of scenery.

        Alas, it comes with the territory. And I’d sure hate to wet the bed. :-(

        1. is it even “normal” to sleep a whole 7-8 hours throughout the night?
          ———————————————-
          YR, being well-read I suspect you are aware that before electric lights people would go to bed at sundown and awake in the middle of the night and talk or even cook something to eat, and then go back to bed some hours later and sleep till dawn. Of course they were getting the full amount of required sleep… just broken into two parts.

          To address your question, as a kid I probably slept 10 or 12 hours straight sometimes so I guess it was normal back then as sleep was important to growth. But growth isn’t something needed in later years so maybe it isn’t normal to need that un-interrupted period of sleep. Personally, I don’t think I’m being cheated out of the allotment of REM sleep.

          1. Lonie,

            I remember interrupted sleep while caring for an infant — and that involved much more effort and alertness and time than simple nocturnal trekking to the toilet. Which I do now. Luckily, I fall back to sleep easily. So easily, in fact, that if I’m having trouble sleeping, I trek to the toilet….might be the wrong kind of training, but it seems to work like a charm.

            1. I remember interrupted sleep while caring for an infant — and that involved much more effort and alertness and time than simple nocturnal trekking to the toilet.
              ————————————————————-
              That is something that has amazed me about women, knowing how important sleep is. That is, how do so many, especially those in a single mom mode, manage a job, housework, and infant care keep from becoming zombies? Oh wait… maybe that’s where all the zombies come from? ‘-)

      1. A quick search on Google shows me this study.

        Zinc status of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114577/

        It appears that the plasma zinc levels in the prostate are less in carcinoma and bph compared to healthy tissues. Of course this is just one study. Could I have enlarged my prostate prematurely by having a diet deficient in zinc? Can i reverse it by upping my zinc levels somehow? Zinc deficiency can potentially lead to so many anomalies that can’t be easily explained.

        1. Hi, Arthur! You can find everything on this site related to prostate health here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/prostate-health/, and everything related to zinc here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/zinc/
          In particular, you might want to see this video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/new-mineral-absorption-enhancers-found/
          Thanks for sharing the study on zinc and prostate health. It does seem to suggest a link between zinc status and BPH, but the urine testing reveals that could be due to increased zinc losses as much as reduced intake. Increasing intake of zinc-rich plant foods is unlikely to be harmful. Supplementing could affect your iron status. I hope that helps!

          1. While reading the comments on a video about zinc risks i found this website link: https://eatandbeatcancer.com/2014/03/01/anti-cancer-diets-and-the-pitfalls-of-plants-part-1-copper-and-zinc/.
            The article says that quercetin binds copper and increases zinc absorption and kaempferol helps quercetin work. Is there a good website to help me find foods high in these flavonoids? It says capers are good sources. I found the USDA table but i will probably have to download the database to find the best sources. I don’t want to add capers to diet because they’re so salty and I already use iodised salt to get my iodine. I saw some other sites but I’d like more foods to consider.

          2. I have a question about the effect of cooking on quercetin and kaempferol.
            Is it positive, negative or it depends? I’d like to know more about these flavonoids too in a video or blog.

  12. Is the purpose of this video to demonstrate the need for regulation of the use of pesticides…or is this just another angle from which to smear the legalization of marijuana? Would knowing that strawberries and spinach top the “Dirty Dozen” list of fruits and vegetables suggest that the two foods should be outlawed and that those who try to give spinach or strawberries to their children or pets should be incarcerated? Are we talking science or policy, Dr. G?

    1. Your comment strikes me as a little, um, paranoid :) or at least defensive. Then again, I’m a little stoned at present. (And I do mean “again” :) But seriously, especially with everything that happens as an industry grows and formalizes, how is highlighting a problem like pesticide residue or exposing some seamy underbelly of the industry the same as knocking legalization? Just as you can’t blame spinach for the pesticides used on them, it can’t be a knock on cannabis to lament its contamination or the industry that enables it to happen.

      1. I’m guessing that you haven’t read or watched Dr. G’s previous programs on marijuana. If you do, you might understand my reservations regarding the intention of this video. The point I tried to make with my references to spinach and strawberries and their retention of pesticides was to make the same point that you made, to wit: Don’t blame the plant for the presence of pesticides. Apparently, my allusion wasn’t well received. And thank you for your concern, but I’m not paranoid, and all my enemies know that.

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