Flashback Friday: Biblical Daniel Fast Put to the Test

Flashback Friday: Biblical Daniel Fast Put to the Test
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Within a matter of weeks, participants placed on the vegan diet outlined by the prophet Daniel experienced improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol and insulin levels, insulin resistance, and C-reactive protein levels, a marker of inflammation within the body.

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Evidently not completely satisfied with the scientific rigor of the dietary trial presented in Daniel 1: 8 through 16, researchers in Tennessee published two papers recently, detailing a series of parallel experiments on a 21-day all-you-can-eat diet “devoid of animal products and preservatives, and inclusive of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.” In other words, “food intake in accordance with a stringent vegan diet.”

The purpose of the studies was to determine the effect of a 21-day Daniel Fast on both biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress, as well as the efficacy of the Daniel Fast to improve markers of the lion’s den of metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk.

No surprise that a diet composed of whole plant foods improves several risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular disease, as well as an improvement in selected biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress—including metabolites of nitric oxide, which I’ve talked about before. Participants experienced meaningful improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol, insulin levels, insulin resistance, and C-reactive protein; were all lowered to a clinically meaningful extent.

And this was in a young healthy population; imagine the miracles it could do for people who are really hurting. “This study extends the findings of other plant-based diets by documenting the impact of a strict vegan diet on multiple measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity.”

Of course, if, instead of a biblical Daniel Fast, they had called it a “strict vegan diet,” they would probably not have gotten a compliance rate of 98.7%, especially in Tennessee.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Evidently not completely satisfied with the scientific rigor of the dietary trial presented in Daniel 1: 8 through 16, researchers in Tennessee published two papers recently, detailing a series of parallel experiments on a 21-day all-you-can-eat diet “devoid of animal products and preservatives, and inclusive of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.” In other words, “food intake in accordance with a stringent vegan diet.”

The purpose of the studies was to determine the effect of a 21-day Daniel Fast on both biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress, as well as the efficacy of the Daniel Fast to improve markers of the lion’s den of metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk.

No surprise that a diet composed of whole plant foods improves several risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular disease, as well as an improvement in selected biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress—including metabolites of nitric oxide, which I’ve talked about before. Participants experienced meaningful improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol, insulin levels, insulin resistance, and C-reactive protein; were all lowered to a clinically meaningful extent.

And this was in a young healthy population; imagine the miracles it could do for people who are really hurting. “This study extends the findings of other plant-based diets by documenting the impact of a strict vegan diet on multiple measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity.”

Of course, if, instead of a biblical Daniel Fast, they had called it a “strict vegan diet,” they would probably not have gotten a compliance rate of 98.7%, especially in Tennessee.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to swordofthespirit.net

Doctor's Note

Also see the prequel video, Tightening the Bible Belt. Can the drop in biomarkers of inflammation actually translate into an improvement in inflammatory disease progression, though? See Dietary Treatment of Crohn’s Disease and Diet & Rheumatoid Arthritis.

The decrease in inflammation is likely a combination of the anti-inflammatory effects of many plant foods (see Fighting Inflammation in a Nut Shell), and the pro-inflammatory effects of animal foods (see the three-video series ending with Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia).

The improvement in antioxidant capacity is also not unexpected, given the different Antioxidant Power of Plant Foods Versus Animal Foods.

Since this video originally came out, I have published a lot more on inflammation and antioxidants. Here are a few of the popular ones:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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