Keto Diet Results for Weight Loss

Keto Diet Results for Weight Loss
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Ketogenic diets and the $33-billion diet gimmick.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity, the underlying theory that ketogenic diets have some sort of metabolic advantage, has been experimentally falsified. The keto diet’s proponents’ own studies showed the exact opposite: ketogenic diets actually put you at a metabolic disadvantage and slow the loss of body fat. How much does fat loss slow down on a low-carb diet?

If you cut about 800 calories a day of carbohydrates from your diet, you lose 53 grams of body fat a day, but if you cut the same number of fat calories, you lose 89 grams a day. Same number of calories, but nine pats of butter worth of extra fat melting off your body every day on a low-fat diet, compared to a low-carb diet. Same number of calories, but about 80 percent more fat loss when you cut down on fat instead of carbs. Here’s the graph. Cut 800 calories from your diet by cutting carbs, and you do lose body fat. But cut out the same number of calories by cutting fat, and you lose even more body fat—80 percent more body fat lost. The title of the study speaks for itself: “Calorie for Calorie, Dietary Fat Restriction Results in More Body Fat Loss than Carbohydrate Restriction in People with Obesity.”

But just looking at the bathroom scale, though, would mislead you into thinking the opposite. After six days on the low-carb diet, study subjects lost four pounds. On the low-fat diet, they lost less than three. So, step on the scale and it looks like the low-carb diet wins, hands down. So, you can see why low-carb diets are so popular.

But what was happening inside their bodies tells the real story. The low-carb group was losing mostly lean mass—water and protein. This loss of water weight helps explain why low-carb diets have been “such ‘cash cows’ for publishers” over the last 150 years. That’s their secret. As one weight loss expert noted, “Rapid water loss is the $33-billion diet gimmick.”

When you eat carbohydrates, your body bulks your muscles up with glycogen for quick energy. Eat a high-carbohydrate diet for three days, and you may add about three pounds of muscle mass onto your arms and legs. Those glycogen stores drain away on a low-carb diet, and pull water out with it. (And, the ketones also need to be flushed out of the kidneys, pulling out even more water.) On the scale, that can manifest as four more pounds coming off within 10 days, but that all can be accounted for in water loss.

The bottom line: keto diets just don’t hold water.

But the thrill of seeing the pounds come off so quickly on the scale keeps many coming back. When the diet fails, the dieters often blame themselves. But the intoxication of that initial rapid weight loss may tempt them back, like getting drunk again after forgetting how terrible the last hangover was. This has been dubbed “the false hope syndrome.” The diet industry thrives off of “repeat customers,” something low-carb diets were built for, given that rapid initial water loss.

But what we care about is body fat. In six days, the low-fat diet extracted a total of 80 percent more fat from the body than the low-carb diet. And it’s not just one study. If you look at all the controlled feeding trials where researchers compared low-carb diets to low-fat diets, swapping the same number of carb calories for fat calories or vice versa. If a calorie is just a calorie, then all the studies should have crossed this zero line in the middle, and indeed, six did. One study showed more fat loss on a low-carb diet, but every other study favored the low-fat diet: more loss of body fat eating the same number of calories. Put all the studies together…and we’re talking 16 grams more daily body fat loss on the low-fat diets. That’s four more pats of butter melting off your body on a daily basis. Less fat in the mouth means less fat on the hips, even taking in the same number of calories.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: karandaev via adobe stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity, the underlying theory that ketogenic diets have some sort of metabolic advantage, has been experimentally falsified. The keto diet’s proponents’ own studies showed the exact opposite: ketogenic diets actually put you at a metabolic disadvantage and slow the loss of body fat. How much does fat loss slow down on a low-carb diet?

If you cut about 800 calories a day of carbohydrates from your diet, you lose 53 grams of body fat a day, but if you cut the same number of fat calories, you lose 89 grams a day. Same number of calories, but nine pats of butter worth of extra fat melting off your body every day on a low-fat diet, compared to a low-carb diet. Same number of calories, but about 80 percent more fat loss when you cut down on fat instead of carbs. Here’s the graph. Cut 800 calories from your diet by cutting carbs, and you do lose body fat. But cut out the same number of calories by cutting fat, and you lose even more body fat—80 percent more body fat lost. The title of the study speaks for itself: “Calorie for Calorie, Dietary Fat Restriction Results in More Body Fat Loss than Carbohydrate Restriction in People with Obesity.”

But just looking at the bathroom scale, though, would mislead you into thinking the opposite. After six days on the low-carb diet, study subjects lost four pounds. On the low-fat diet, they lost less than three. So, step on the scale and it looks like the low-carb diet wins, hands down. So, you can see why low-carb diets are so popular.

But what was happening inside their bodies tells the real story. The low-carb group was losing mostly lean mass—water and protein. This loss of water weight helps explain why low-carb diets have been “such ‘cash cows’ for publishers” over the last 150 years. That’s their secret. As one weight loss expert noted, “Rapid water loss is the $33-billion diet gimmick.”

When you eat carbohydrates, your body bulks your muscles up with glycogen for quick energy. Eat a high-carbohydrate diet for three days, and you may add about three pounds of muscle mass onto your arms and legs. Those glycogen stores drain away on a low-carb diet, and pull water out with it. (And, the ketones also need to be flushed out of the kidneys, pulling out even more water.) On the scale, that can manifest as four more pounds coming off within 10 days, but that all can be accounted for in water loss.

The bottom line: keto diets just don’t hold water.

But the thrill of seeing the pounds come off so quickly on the scale keeps many coming back. When the diet fails, the dieters often blame themselves. But the intoxication of that initial rapid weight loss may tempt them back, like getting drunk again after forgetting how terrible the last hangover was. This has been dubbed “the false hope syndrome.” The diet industry thrives off of “repeat customers,” something low-carb diets were built for, given that rapid initial water loss.

But what we care about is body fat. In six days, the low-fat diet extracted a total of 80 percent more fat from the body than the low-carb diet. And it’s not just one study. If you look at all the controlled feeding trials where researchers compared low-carb diets to low-fat diets, swapping the same number of carb calories for fat calories or vice versa. If a calorie is just a calorie, then all the studies should have crossed this zero line in the middle, and indeed, six did. One study showed more fat loss on a low-carb diet, but every other study favored the low-fat diet: more loss of body fat eating the same number of calories. Put all the studies together…and we’re talking 16 grams more daily body fat loss on the low-fat diets. That’s four more pats of butter melting off your body on a daily basis. Less fat in the mouth means less fat on the hips, even taking in the same number of calories.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: karandaev via adobe stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the third installment of my keto series. In case you missed the first two, see Is Keto an Effective Cancer-Fighting Diet? and Keto Diet Theory Put to the Test.

Coming up are:

This keto research arose out of my research for my upcoming new book, How Not to Diet. (All proceeds I receive from my books is donated to charity.) You can preorder How Not to Diet here, but in the meantime, please feel free to check out some of my popular weight-loss videos:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

270 responses to “Keto Diet Results for Weight Loss

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    1. You mean you don’t agree with the studies about salt. Dr. Greger merely shows you existing studies. He does not publish his own “opinions” about it.

      1. They didn’t specifically say they didn’t agree about the presented studies, maybe they meant just not on his conclusion which is to ideally never use added salt. Dr. McDougall isn’t on the exact same page as Dr. Greger on salt in that regard–but does eliminate salt entirely to his severe patients–and they’re colleagues who overall are in general agreement on things. You could also speculate that the negative impact of salt could be negated with antioxidants given the miso data and vitamin c study.

        1. Dr Greger is on the same page as the World Health Organization and the US Dietary Guidelines though. As he is on most things.

          It’s amusing that the saturated fat/cholesterol/sodiumetc sceptics always describe the evidence presented by him as merely his opinion.

          1. Where did anyone here, particularly, where did I describe Dr. Greger’s salt recommendation as his opinion? I simply addressed that his conclusion to entirely get rid of the salt shaker was indeed his conclusion based upon his findings which do not in fact coincide with all recommendations based on the evidence though it is certainly agreed upon that sodium should not be overused. Dr. Greger’s takeaway is that any addition is overuse so to avoid as much as possible except in the case of miso which is most likely due to the antioxidants in the soy leading to my point that antioxidants likely play a large role in negating ill effects of added sodium as also demonstrated in the vitamin c study. That isn’t skepticism, Tom, it’s the ability of using our own thought and speculation based upon collective data and nowhere in there was I taking the “oh I don’t see it quite that way, so that’s just his ‘opinion'” route nor have I ever and I’m sure you’ve seen my comments adamantly pointing out to people who do just that, that Greger’s entire MO is that he is NOT opinion based. So keep your own opinions on me if you’re attached to them, but I will point out where you’re wrong in throwing me into the skeptic bucket.

              1. I didn’t see their statement as that, normally comments implicating Dr. Greger presents his opinion as opposed to the evidence are a lot more blunt as well as unreasonable.

  1. Wow! This is an explanation you won’t find all over the net ! No wonder I have been seeing ‘keto gurus’ attaching intermittant fasting and other food rules to bolster the weightloss capability of their fat laden menus. Well done Dr Greger, Avocado Video, and team.

    1. This is why “put it to the test” is the gold standard.
      ———————————————————————–
      Depends… there are a lot of studies that are only up to the lead standard.

      1. which is why it’s so valuable to know what makes something a good study and what makes studies lacking–something I highly appreciate Dr. Greger teaching along with the information he gives.

        1. there are a lot of studies that are only up to the lead standard.
          ————————————————————————————
          which is why it’s so valuable to know what makes something a good study and what makes studies lacking–something I highly appreciate Dr. Greger teaching along with the information he gives.
          ———————————————————————————–
          I understand why those without a science background accept the Greger word as the last word.

          And while I also do not have a science background, I am well read on many subjects and also a knack for trying to learn a person’s backstory. And in his case I feel he is WFPB or bust. And to me that means he will accept no other solution to good health.

          I’m o.k. with that as long as I understand his dogma. I still listen and when something he says resonates, I’ll adopt it. But if it seems dogmatic to me, I may discard the advice and move on.

          (And yes, his videos and blogs are implied, if not implicit, advice.’-)

          1. “I understand why those without a science background accept the Greger word as the last word.”

            Lonie, what the hell are you talking about? That is nowhere near the universe of what I said nor did I see anyone else say anything like what you just said. The point I made and the point that doesn’t need to be made because it’s right in front of our faces in every video and, in particular, the cited sources category under each video, is that Dr. Greger reports the evidence and goes a pretty remarkable step further in teaching about the importance of thorough studies and how many tiny little things can skew results if not controlled for in ways even the most consciously unbiased scientist have to be careful of. Your statement was both condescending and thoroughly unfitting to anything anyone said here. Furthermore, that is what we all admire about Dr. Greger, the very fact that we don’t take his word nor does he offer us his word–he offers the evidence and we see for ourselves.

            1. “I understand why those without a science background accept the Greger word as the last word.”
              ——————————————————————————————————————————
              Yeah, this statement was uncalled for… apoligies to you and all WFPB followers.

              Sometimes one needs someone to believe and Greger is probably one of the better people to adhere to his findings, overall.

              1. Well thanks for the apology, it was nice of you to offer it, but it still sounds condescending, you can’t help it can you? That wasn’t a dig, it’s actually funny and boarder line part of your charm.

                The thing about Dr. Greger is that you don’t need to believe in him, you just see the presented evidence and the fact that Dr. Greger always presents the evidence and does not expect anyone to believe in HIM and has explicitly said even ask HIM for the evidence. So that’s WHY intelligent people believe in him or simply know he’s a good source for real information because they see for themselves. And I don’t think people need someone to believe in anyway, they just need the truth and transparency and that’s exactly what Dr. Greger delivers.

                1. Well thanks for the apology, it was nice of you to offer it, but it still sounds condescending, you can’t help it can you? That wasn’t a dig, it’s actually funny and boarder line part of your charm.

                  The thing about Dr. Greger is that you don’t need to believe in him, you just see the presented evidence and the fact that Dr. Greger always presents the evidence and does not expect anyone to believe in HIM and has explicitly said even ask HIM for the evidence. So that’s WHY intelligent people believe in him or simply know he’s a good source for real information because they see for themselves. And I don’t think people need someone to believe in anyway, they just need the truth and transparency and that’s exactly what Dr. Greger delivers.
                  ——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
                  Thought about offering a knee jerk response… but then thought, Nah, that might appear to be trying to have the last word… and since you posted to another comment of mine below (that didn’t boil my blood ‘-)… that can serve as you having the last word on this subject.

                  (No promises for any future disagreements though ‘-)

          2. “And while I also do not have a science background, I am well read on many subjects and also a knack for trying to learn a person’s backstory. And in his case I feel he is WFPB or bust. And to me that means he will accept no other solution to good health.”

            First of all, try to be more discreet when shamelessly boasting yourself. And of course it would seem that since the EVIDENCE continues to support that a WFPB diet is the diet best for optimal health and disease prevention and even reversal. It isn’t as if the entire animal agriculture industry and most of the world hasn’t spent their emotions and wealth trying to stand up against the collective data, they just couldn’t.

            It’s possible I was being a bit bitchy here, but I know you enough to know you can handle it.

            1. First of all, try to be more discreet when shamelessly boasting yourself.
              ———————————————————————————————
              I gave this some thought to see if I was in fact boasting… and came to the conclusion it was a necessary statement as background for the point I was trying to make.

              And while I do have a high opinion of myself, that wasn’t the purpose of the statement. ‘-)
              _____________________________________________________________________
              And of course it would seem that since the EVIDENCE continues to support that a WFPB diet is the diet best for optimal health and disease prevention and even reversal. It isn’t as if the entire animal agriculture industry and most of the world hasn’t spent their emotions and wealth trying to stand up against the collective data, they just couldn’t.
              ———————————————————————————————
              Here is another place where we have a divergence of opinion. That is, I’m not convinced that simply eating WFPB is optimal for health and disease prevention and even reversal. And I have no personal attachment to the agriculture industry (other than owning stock in Industrial Hemp ‘-)… as a matter of fact, I just sold my remaining crop land to a brother, yesterday.

              I’m putting my faith in science to pave the way forward to health and longevity.
              ___________________________________________________________________
              It’s possible I was being a bit bitchy here, but I know you enough to know you can handle it.
              —————————————————————————————————————————
              Good call… I welcome being challenged as it causes self reflection. If I feel I’m in the right, I’ll defend.

              1. Lol well there’s nothing wrong with having a high opinion of yourself, no doubt it’s better to have good standards for yourself and I will take your word for it and apologize for my boasting remark.

            1. What is a “WFPB”? Thanks.
              ————————————-
              Whole Food Plant Based

              Had trouble with that one myself when I first came here. ‘-)

      1. Jon, I am sorry, but if you do not anything else, low fat = high carb. Do you really want to tell me that low carb = control of your insulin? Have you ever studied at least basic lectures of biochemistry?

        1. Have you ever studied at least basic lectures of biochemistry?
          ——————————————————————————–
          From reading past posts by Jon, I suspect the answer might be “only if they are presented in a beer hall.” ‘-) ‘-) ‘-)

            1. Lonie – Demeaning someone isn’t helpful to any discussion. This is a science website. Can we keep a decent respectful dialogue please?
              ——————————————————————————————————————————
              Ruth, I think you are going to feel a little foolish when I explain… that is, Jon is a professor of beer… that’s right. He teaches beer. Can’t get much more scientific than that.

              I could be wrong but I’d bet he’d feel right at home in a beer hall. My comment wasn’t meant to be demeaning and knowing his backstory, I doubt he would feel that to be so. I posted as I did to give him an in to bring his occupation into the commentary. ‘-)

              (However, he might find your take that the beer hall reference is demeaning, as the part that is demeaning?)

        2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15650564

          “Recent findings indicate little support for the value of low-carbohydrate diets as therapies for insulin resistance. In contrast, the limited data available suggest that the higher fat content of typical low-carbohydrate diets may exacerbate insulin resistance in the long term. Preliminary data indicate that proteins from different sources may have differing effects on insulin resistance. Preliminary data also suggest the potential value of whole grains, fruits and vegetables in therapeutic diets to reduce insulin resistance…. Those who wish to follow a low-carbohydrate diet should be encouraged to follow a new menu low in fat, and with most of the protein derived from plant sources.”

          1. I read something about inflammation in one study, which I found interesting.

            High-fat-diets were linked to inflammation, but Methionine-restriction while still eating High-fat prevented some of the complications.

            That is where the macro of High-fat is less important than that the fat come from whole foods and be plant-based.

            Methionine-restricted diets (MRD) have been shown to prevent high fat diet (HFD) induced complications including fat accumulation, insulin sensitivity decrease, oxidative stress and inflammation increase.

            1. I’m not a scientist or chemist by any means, however I was diagnosed in January as having diabetes..I immediately decreased my carb in take. I only was interested in getting ALL my “numbers” in a healthy range. within 3mths. my labs all came back in “normal” range. It isn’t a diet just another life change.
              I keep reading “reduces inflammation ” .. what does that mean? whats inflamed? my organs?

              1. Hi KG, thanks for your question. Firstly well done for taking care of your health and keeping your numbers under control. You asked about what inflammation is which is the body response from immune system to fight any virus or infection. So body produces inflammatory response to deal with that. Also in certain diseases as it arrises body immune system again show inflammatory response.

                https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/inflammation/https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/inflammation

          2. Deb,
            Consistent with that, there is new research indicating glucose is not the driver of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes.

            https://uknow.uky.edu/uk-healthcare/what-drives-inflammation-type-2-diabetes-not-glucose-says-new-research

            “The team was surprised to find that glycolysis wasn’t driving chronic inflammation. Instead, a combination of defects in mitochondria and elevated fat derivatives were responsible.

            Nikolajczyk said she sees applications for this research in both basic and clinical sciences. She hopes to precisely define pro-inflammatory lipid types and explore associations between circulating and/or tissue-associated lipids and insulin resistance, one key feature of Type 2 diabetes.“

        3. Insulin and inflammation are not the same thing. Both play a role in type-2 diabetes but most people with inflammation do not have diabetes.

          Anyone can look up the anti-inflammatory diet promoted by Harvard medical School and others. It is not by any means ‘low-carb’. It is good carb friendly.

          Excerpt:

          the substance that gives fruits like cherries, raspberries, and blackberries their color is a type of pigment that also helps fight inflammation.

          Whole grains: Oatmeal, brown rice, whole-wheat bread, and other unrefined grains tend to be high in fiber, and fiber also may help with inflammation.

        4. MartinNovotny,

          Yes, low fat probably does equal high carb.

          But not all carbohydrates are equivalent. There are refined carbohydrates, such as sugars and flour, and these are not desirable carbohydrates to eat, as they cause an increase in blood glucose soon after eating them, as well as other problems. They are a processed food component, and to be avoided; they are not included in a healthy high carb diet.

          Then there are complex carbohydrates, as are found in whole plant foods, such as veggies and fruits, legumes and whole grains, and nuts and seeds. These carbohydrates include soluble and insoluble fibers, etc and are only slowly digested by humans, but many of these complex carbohydrates are the preferred food of gut bacteria, some of which release short chain fatty acids, such as butyrate, which is the preferred food source of intestinal cells, as well as having other beneficial effects on humans. These carbohydrates are highly desirable in our food, and are a healthy carbohydrate to eat in a high carb diet.

          And actually, I did study biochemistry. But since you also did, apparently, I’m sure that you knew all this.

        5. MartinNovotny,

          Oh, and the evidence I’ve seen supports eating a high complex carbohydrate diet, such as Plant Based WHOLE Foods, where the “Whole” means unprocessed.

          My brother is just one example; he was on meds for type 2 diabetes (as well as meds for several other conditions; he was overweight and out of shape). When he switched to plant based eating, and later Plant Based Whole Foods eating, and started exercising moderately, he eventually went off his meds for type 2 diabetes (and all his other meds as well). And he lost 70 lbs.

        6. ” Do you really want to tell me that low carb = control of your insulin? Have you ever studied at least basic lectures of biochemistry?

          Do you mean low carb or are you referring to Jon’s comment about low fat?

          If you are trying to claim that low carb is the way to go to address the epidemic of T2D you really have to expalin why all those Chinese eating rice,and rural Africans eating equally low fat diets based on millet and yams, and South Americans eating maize and potatoes suffered high rates of type 2 diabetes. T2D diabetes only became a thing when they started adopting Westermised high fat diets.

          Even in the US, people were eating way more carbs and less fat before WW! than they eat now but T2D was apparently rare

          The fact is that saturated fats are inflammatory and people eating whole food high catb diets have lower rates of T2D. Are you objecting to such a statement?

      2. I certainly see the pattern, your wrong on both. My personal experience on Keto is a loss of 60 lbs., blood glucose as normal as possible for a diabetic and a huge reduction in inflation. Very helpful towards my heart issues. High fat, very low carb and moderate protein have worked very well for me

        1. if you lose weight, inflammation will decrease and your biomarkers will improve. The Twinkie Diet guy proved that. It doesn’t prove that either your diet or his diet is healthy.

          ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.

          The results were confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven prospective cohort studies with 447,506 participants and an average follow-up 15.6 years, which found 15%, 13%, and 8% increased risks in total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality with low (compared to high) carbohydrate diets.

          Professor Banach said: “Low carbohydrate diets might be useful in the short term to lose weight, lower blood pressure, and improve blood glucose control, but our study suggests that in the long-term they are linked with an increased risk of death from any cause, and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer.”
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

    1. You are correct Julie. Low-carb diets aren’t just about weight loss, which this video conveniently didn’t address. Low-carb diets are about insulin resistance and diabetes, as well as reducing inflammation. A side benefit is … weight loss.

      1. It’s a video about keto diets and weight loss that’s why. There’s nothing convenient about it.

        The site has a couple of other videos about keto diets and the claims made for them.

    2. Julie:
      “On the high-fat diet, the ketogenic diet, insulin doesn’t work as well. Our bodies are insulin-resistant.

      But, as the amount of fat in our diet gets lower and lower, insulin works better and better. This is a clear demonstration that the sugar tolerance of even healthy individuals can be “impaired by administering a low-carb, high-fat diet.” But, we can decrease insulin resistance—the cause of prediabetes, the cause of type 2 diabetes—by decreasing saturated fat intake.”

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/

      Sources available on the link

      1. Good point.

        Many of the benefits people attribute to the keto diet (or the Twinkie diet) appear to be the result of weight loss.(although giving up refined carbs is also very helpful). But neither weight loss nor excluding refined carbs from the diet are unique to keto diets.

    3. Julie Parry-Jones, the ONLY anti-inflammatory diet is a whole foods plant based diet. Meat, eggs, dairy, and animal fat in general are a disastrous recipe for inflammation. If you want chronic inflammation, the keto diet is a great choice.

      I don’t think only low fat diets are ant inflammatory though, as long as the food is a whole plant food e.g. nuts and seeds are very high in fat and are anti-inflammatory. ALA, an essential fatty acid found in plants, is anti inflammatory; GLA which is unique to only a few sources (plant sources) such as hemp is an omega-6 known to be anti inflammatory. I don’t think it’s about low fat but just the right sources of fat. I think it’s simpler in that it’s just about eating plant foods, whole plant foods.

      Furthermore, Julie, even if you believed that for some reason eating pigs and cows and butter reduced your inflammation and let’s pretend for a second that were actually true (it isn’t), considering the side effect is a shorter lifespan it doesn’t seem the optimal route.

  2. To me, a six day study on weight loss is almost meaningless. Show me a years worth of data and include other parameters like radiographic studies of arterial blockage, heart/calcium scans, CRP sensitive, oxidized cholesterol, A1c, etc Then we will have something worth discussing.

    1. …like radiographic studies of arterial blockage…
      —————————————————————–
      Ah! reading this reminded me to take one of my daily under-the-tongue dissolvable NMN tablets.

      Thanks.

    2. ‘Show me a years worth of data and include other parameters like radiographic studies of arterial blockage, heart/calcium scans, CRP sensitive, oxidized cholesterol, A1c, etc’

      It’s a pity people don’t take this kind of attitude when presented with strident claims that keto diets are healthful,

  3. For me, a water only fast of 12 days followed by a SOS free whole foods plant based diet is working magic so far. Not worrying about carbs, except whole carbs like beans, whole grains (not processed) and potatoes of all kinds. Getting my insulin resistance down I believe was key to making this work for me. Not KETO.

  4. Does blending really cause huge amounts of oxidation and petrochemical loss like someone claimed a few videos ago in the comments? Dr. Greger seems to recommend it in a bunch of his videos…

    1. YGR, no, what evidence did they provide? Considering Dr. Greger is one of the most well-researched people and M.D on the planet on the latest in nutritional science and has done multiple videos on smoothies, uses a vitamix himself, exclaims their exceptional health benefits in bioavailability of nutrients, and recommends recipes which use blended foods, I would say that this is nothing you would have to worry about. I do worry about paranoid claims like this because unlike hummus and strawberry nice cream, they actually can cause a lot of harm.

  5. I could not miss the “chicken thighs” as a symbol of “high-carb” (high fat = sticks of butter) – really funny ;-) This vid is once again over the edge and highly manipulative… Good luck with high carb to anyone religiously following Dr. Greger…

    1. But we don’t need luck Martin, Dr Greger has the science. For many of us this has proven to be life-saving information and we are grateful.

      Re the chicken legs: I think you are confused Martin. At the 1 minute mark, a plate of chicken legs are shown by the low carb person (image), and the plate of spagetti is shown by the low fat person.

    2. MartinNovotny,
      I am not sure what exactly is your position/platform. Are you advocating a diet high in fats, healthy fats, saturated fats? Exactly what is your learned approach to the best eating plan? I ask this in all sincerity. Thank you.

    3. Good luck with your high fat diet. There’s plenty if evidence low carb diets and keto diets are harmful.

      Cf.e.g.

      http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/keto-diet-may-lead-to-diabetes.html
      ————————————
      “How a Keto Diet Might Increase Diabetes Risk
      A keto diet may increase risk for developing diabetes by preventing your body from responding to insulin, presumably by causing fat to be deposited in the liver (Journal of Physiology, August 8, 2018). ”

      “In this new study, mice who were placed on a high-fat keto diet developed insulin resistance, higher blood sugar levels, and higher insulin levels than those placed on a high-fat and high-carbohydrate diet. This suggests that a keto diet might cause higher levels of markers of insulin resistance than the typical high-fat, high-sugar Western diet that is associated with the high incidence of diabetes and pre-diabetes. The authors conclude that “when fatty acids are metabolized, their products might have important signaling roles to play in the brain,” and that “carbohydrate-restricted diets which limit our plant and fiber intakes have bad effects on our gut health.”

      ————- ————

      https://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/lowcarbohydrate-diets-can-harm.html

      “Many older studies show that severely restricting all carbohydrates is associated with increased risk for premature death ( J Clin Nutr, 2012, 66: 694-700; Ann Intern Med, 2010, 153: 289-298; J Intern Med, 2007, 261: 366-374; Eur J Clin Nutr, 2007, 61: 575-581; PLoS One, 2013, 8:e55030).”

      Think I’ll stick with my higher carb (~65), medium fat (20%) 100% WFP diet. Result: Dropped my TC to 134, LDL to 83, triglycerides to 73, A1c to 5.0, hs-crp to 0.4, waist to 30”.

      Don’t mind chewing the fat but there‘s no way I’m going to increase it in my diet (might lower it though).

    4. Your tactic here is to make vague accusations eg that Greger is ‘manipukative’ and provide no detailed evidence for your claim, that can be checked and assessed.

      This is typical behaviour by low carb ‘alternative health believers who routinely accuse those who follow the scientific evidence instead of the claims of cranks and charlatans of behaving religiously. Very sensible – if you set out your own beliefs, they could be analysed and critiqued.

      I think that preemptively claiming that others have your faults is a typical tactic by low carb types.

    5. You don’t need luck with high unrefined carbs, Martin, it’s how our bodies are meant to eat and how they thrive. Calling this video manipulative just makes you look like a desperate keto troll.

  6. To those who avoid all forms of keto and have good results… I salute you!

    For those of us who have had good results from some form of keto… I salute us!

        1. Here’s why:

          whole body vibration … including reducing seriously unhealthy fat around the liver, where it produces damage similar to excessive drinking.

            1. Drinkers everywhere will nominate you for sainthood if this pans out.
              —————————————————————————————–
              I’m just the messenger… and I sure as hell ain’t no saint. ‘-)

          1. Wonder what that vibrator might do to brains. Let us know!
            ——————————————————————————
            gengo, I don’t think any of my lab tests are related to brain health. On the other hand, I can give you my take on it. That is, the way I’m currently using the vibration table at present is on low mode. Low mode is a cakewalk to be honest… if one keeps one’s feet close together. As I spread my feet apart, the shaking becomes more intense and gives a better imitation of Elvis singing “All shook up”.

            But that’s what I like about low mode… that is, I can adjust the strength of the vibration simply by adjusting my feet throughout the 10 minute pre-programmed session.

            I have done Pro mode a time or two and during the 10 minute segment it progressively gets stronger at shaking. One thing that could somehow be brain related is that I have trouble focusing my eyes in the latter stages of Pro mode. But seriously, no chance of becoming concussed, IMO.

            I do wonder if there may be a benefit derived internally for the brain… that is, I mean via the gut producing more Butyrate and thus somehow affecting the proper function of the brain cells.

            Anyway, all I can tell you at the moment is that… WAIT A MINUTE!… something I was thinking about just the other day as I was driving to town. There are times when I get a slightly stiff neck and there is an oblique angled intersection where I turn on to a highway.

            To check both ways I have to look back over my right shoulder. Before I would notice the difficulty of doing this because of neck stiffness. But the last time I made the trip the looking both ways presented no problems. Sitting here at my computer I am able to turn my head a full 180 with no noticeable pain or restriction.

            To be clear, I was slightly sore the first few days I used it, and was very conscious of my balance. A few days later and I was acting as though I was on solid ground while vibrating. I have a cat that gets on the vibrating table with me. Seems addicted to vibrating… both me and the cat. ‘-)

            I haven’t mentioned the brand of the vibrator I bought but since I have described my use in the detail I have, I think it o.k. to link to it… especially since there should be other brands mentioned.

            https://www.walmart.com/ip/BCP-Full-Body-Vibration-Platform-Machine-White/605208345

            1. Thanks for the description of your experience. I suggested it to my wife and daughter, both with blood sugar issues, but my wife said she’s not going to vibrate her brain, which led to my query. I had a serious concussion when young (head over heels over bike handles) and since then do not like anything that might mess with the ole noggin.

              1. I had a serious concussion when young (head over heels over bike handles) and since then do not like anything that might mess with the ole noggin.
                ——————————————————————————-
                Completely understand… myself and a friend had a combative experience with three other guys (of which I slept through the last half of the encounter, but was apparently rendered ugly by the kicking in the head of one or more of the opposition.)

                I don’t know if I had a concussion or not since we didn’t go to a doctor for anything other than a gunshot wound (one of my older brothers, shot accidentally by the brother just older than me) or a severe illness.

                That said, I assure you there would be no danger of shaking the brain to the point of damaging it. And besides, I’ve found I can dictate where the most vibration occurs simply by changing the position of my body.

                That is, by bending forward slightly I can initiate the vibration of the flesh under my chin. But by slightly bending my knees, I can limit the shaking to my lower body only. By standing straight up, I can move the shake to my abdomen. Even if there is no health benefit (and there most certainly is) I find the vibrating fun… and once I’ve completed a session, there is no after effect.

                I think that is why I find it pulling me back to do a session soon after doing one. But I’ve decided to limit myself to 2 or 3 sessions per day.

                  1. Scanned the first link and will dive into the second one later. Thanks for sharing. Like you said, good they are doing the research on this.

                1. Notice in particular from the last study sent.

                  Results

                  For a given frequency, transmissibility was independent of intensity when below 1g. Transmissibility declined non-linearly with increasing frequency.
                  Depending on the WBV device, vibration ranged from levels considered safe by ISO-2631 for up to eight hours each day (0.3gp-p @ 30Hz), to levels that were seven times higher than what is considered a safe threshold for even one minute of exposure each day (15.1g p-p @ 30Hz). Transmissibility to the cranium was markedly attenuated by the degree of flexion in the knees.
                  Conclusions

                  Vibration can have adverse effects on a number of physiologic systems. This work indicates that readily accessible WBV devices markedly exceed ISO guidelines for safety, and extreme caution must be practiced when considering their use.”

  7. Hello Dr. Greger!

    My name is Elena and I gonna start my letter with a short story of me. I was born in Russia and since becoming a university student lived in St.Petersburg. Last autumn I met a man who ate mostly fruits and has stayed on a vegan diet for about 10 years. And from him I heard your name for the first time. Honestly speaking I didn’t pay attention to the videos, links to which he sent me. I mean your videos about harmful effects of animal products. I always liked eating and any restrictions influenced me the opposite way: the more something is forbidden the more I want it. I used to like sweets (especially baked stuff) and ate them a lot, fruit and vegetables were never my favorite food till last summer when I felt that I wanted them more and more and sweets no more looked so attractive for me. And when fruits became the major part of my diet I stopped needing additional sugars. But I went on eating dairy and eggs. While I stayed with my boyfriend I ate plant based food but at the same time I dreamed of a piece of cheese or a fried egg, my body asked for this stuff and got it when I stayed by myself.
    In a couple of months he invited me to see his house in Crete. I wanted to try local food which contains a lot of meat, fish and oil, the smells of local desserts were so attractive, but all my attempts to try something caused barely a scandal and most of Greek dishes stayed unknown to me. But when I came back to Russia, I decided to try to remove all animal products from my diet and succeeded. It took me 1 day. I used some oil and very little salt and ate cooked food usually once a day, the rest ate raw. And I wanted eggs and cheese no more.
    In Costa Rica, where we live now, for the first three months we ate only raw fruit and vegetables: no cooked food, no oil, no salt and sugar, even no nuts (my friend always told me that they are harmful for the health). My strict vegan diet lasted 8 months.
    I began watching your videos on Youtube channel. I’m sure you’re doing the great work showing the results of scientific researches and helping people to cure from the serious diseases. The ones who succeed in improving their health must be appreciated to you a lot. It’s interesting to know how easy the retreatment could be and that the medicine is food we eat. You show it in such a simple and easy way that there are no doubts left.
    Here in Costa Rica we’re going to start a retreat center, which will have a cafe or a restaurant with healthy food. One part will offer cooked food and another one – only raw dishes. I’ve got your cookbook How not to die and want to use some recipes in the menu of the first part, to help people to realize that healthy food can be delicious. I’d like to ask if you allow to do it and maybe to use your name as an author of the recipes.
    And I will return to myself. I’ve never suffered from any serious disease, such as cancer, diabetes or heart disease, same as my relatives. ). I’ve never eaten too much meat or poultry, but dairy was part of my everyday meals. I was not addicted to fast food, maybe several times a year, usually I boil or bake food, not using much salt or oil. I’ve always been physically healthy, strong enough and active person, with no extra weight (maybe some kilos, but it was not visible to others. My normal blood pressure used to be 60/90. So vegan diet didn’t change a lot in my life and feeling, I can’t say that it made my life much better. I don’t really feel the difference. A little mistake) My digestion works much better, especially when I eat only papayas and bananas. And the other thing is loosing weight, now I’m too slim, even skinny, for some people. I feel good but sometimes I feel the lack of energy for example while riding a bike for a long time. I thought that this diet would make my skin clear but it’s still covered with spots. And the main problem is not having menses for more than 10 months. I really want to get pregnant (I’ve got already 2 children), but I can’t and it makes me sad and unconfident. I don’t know the reason but I’ve got this problem for the whole period of the vegan diet. Can it be the cause?
    Another question. I used to like eating and for me it’s interesting to taste local food while travelling for example. So if I’m on a vegan diet and sometimes allow myself to eat dairy, what it will change? Yes, after several months of a raw vegan diet I feel heaviness in my stomach after cooked food, that’s all. I can say that after 8 months of such diet I tried fish and then some cheese, but it didn’t change my feeling. My body doesn’t need these products but I miss tastes and need to feel something different in my mouth. I think that this amount can’t be harmful to the health if it’s very rare. Am I right or not? And one more thing… This diet helps people to live longer life, but if I don’t want to live too much? For me 50 years is enough, I don’t want to stay alive up to 80 and more. And what the people on this diet die of if they do not suffer from any diseases?
    And the last. I never could keep any diet: counting calories and volume of food is nor for me. I prefer listening to my body and rely on my feelings. Now I eat a lot: big bowl of salad, papaya and a dozen of bananas per meal – it happens sometimes. I don’t want to stop eating nuts or measuring 2 handfuls per week: I think that my body knows what it needs and what nature gives can’t damage it.
    Your cookbook is great: good quality of pictures, simple instructions and interesting combinations. But for me there are too many ingredients and spices. I prefer the taste of pure vegetables and fruit, beans and legumes are also delicious as they are. But I promise I’ll try to cook these dishes when I’ve got good equipped kitchen. Thank you for the inspiration, Dr.Greger! Come to visit our beautiful land in the small town Uvita on the Pacific ocean, where we are growing fruit trees and enjoying the nature around. I think you’ll get pleasure to have rest, try local tropical fruit and see how we live our simple life. Also there is the festival Envision where I believe you can participate. If you wish, I could do my best to manage it.

    Best regards,

    1. Elena,

      Your losing your menses means that you probably are eating too few calories.

      I will also add that Dr. Greger is not against nuts. He recommends people to eat nuts every day as part of his Daily Dozen.

      The people who struggle with veganism tend to do very strict and limited forms of it and tend to eat too few calories.

      Many of us eat simple versions -eating fruits and vegetables whether raw or cooked simply.

      Just don’t be too narrow in what you eat. A wide variety is important to make sure you get a proper balance of nutrition.

    2. Elena- I’m glad you are finding the information on NutritionFacts.org helpful. In the future you may want to go to the SEARCH box on the top of the website screen and type in a topic to see what Dr. Greger may have already researched. For example, I typed in ” Acne” and found these videos which may be helpful to you:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/benzoyl-peroxide-vs-tea-tree-oil-for-acne/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/treating-acne-barberries/
      You can also go to the topic section on left (Drop down from Video Library and you’ll see “Browse Video by Topic” In this case you could look for “SKIN” to see what has been prepared on this topic.
      While I did not find anything on NutritionFacts.org on stopped menstrual periods, you should be aware that this condition can be caused by many conditions besides nutrition. Check out this video which explains;https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stopped-or-missed-periods/ Most experts recommend talking to your doctor for followup testing after 3 or more months with no period and no clear reason why your periods have stopped. Thyroid problems or sudden weight loss could be causes.
      Since you mentioned you have lost weight and are concerned about this Here’s what Dr. Greger said about healthy weight gain:
      “As explained in my video Eating More to Weigh Less, the key to healthy longterm weight loss is understanding calorie density and eating low calorie-dense foods. When applied in reverse, the concept of calorie density can be used to gain weight. In other words, you would want to eat more foods that are more calorie dense. The idea is to not just add a single one of these foods, but to add several foods into your diet until the amount of calories you take in exceed your energy needs. Examples of higher calorie dense foods appropriate for a whole food plant-based diet include: nuts, nut butters, dried fruits, tofu, avocados, and whole grain breads/crackers/dry goods. Eating more cooked food than raw also helps with calorie intake.”
      You can incorporate several of these relatively healthy foods into each meal and snack, and eat primarily cooked foods. For example, a person wanting to lose weight will want to use vegetable-based sauces, but you would use nut-based sauces. While a person wanting to lose or maintain weight would include a lot of raw food, say big salads with some lemon juice as the dressing, you might eat smaller amounts of raw food and far more cooked veggies, beans, and grains.”

      You asked what people die from if they’re eating whole food plant based and do not have chronic health conditions. I’d say they die of good old age-in other words since we are not programmed to live forever, once their body finally has lived its full life,they might die of an accident, an infection, etc.–in other words, natural causes, but with less likelihood of cancer, heart disease, diabetes-related causes.

      Finally, I will forward your question on regarding use of the recipes in How Not to Diet in your future restaurant as well as your invitation for Dr Greger to visit in Costa Rico. If you look on the left on the website, you’ll see Dr. Greger has a very ambitious schedule for the upcoming month, especially as his new book, How Not to Diet comes out, so he may not be making any extra trips, nice as your home area might be. To your good health, Joan- NurseEducator

    3. Hi Elena,

      Thank you for your comment. I’m glad these resources have been so helpful for you. You are welcome to use the Recipes we have available on the website: https://nutritionfacts.org/recipes. Many of them are from the cookbook. For any other recipes, we strongly encourage you to contact the book publisher for permission.

      I also encourage you to invite Dr. Greger to come speak in Costa Rica via this form: https://nutritionfacts.org/speaking-inquiries.

      Thank you again for your support.

  8. There is one type of fat whose consumption may be beneficial in weight loss.
    DHA increased CPT1 about 2.6-fold in mice, and resulted in their group having the greatest weight loss in that trial.
    PGC-1a gene expression was as follows: Oleic (1x), Linoleic (2.6x), DHA (3.6x).
    CPT1a gene expression was a linear function of PGC-1a gene expression. Diabetologia (2005) 48: 2365–2375.
    Consider DHA as healthy fat to be consumed in moderation.

  9. I am definitely a proponent of WFPB eating, but, coming out of a keto lifestyle for a period of time where I lost almost 70 pounds, I just don’t buy that this was water weight loss. I suppose this is designed to be more of a forum than an “ask Dr. G” site since I don’t ever see him responding to our questions, but I’m curious as to why he does only short-term keto experiments. All the major weight loss keto-ers I know will shun his advice because of this strange stance and will continue the keto diet until they die.

    1. Naomi,

      He is using the studies which are available and losing lean mass and muscle and water and some fat is what he said happened, but they lost MUCH MORE fat on High-Carb. They did lose some fat on Keto.

      But a lot of people do fail on it. Most of the people around me are failing on Keto right now and my brother and I failed on it when we were young and my close friend’s father died of a heart attack directly after losing a lot of weight. It might have been 70 pounds. Something like that, but almost immediately after saying that sentence to us, within the next few weeks, he dropped dead before he got to do all the exciting plans he had.

      Also, there is a Bariatric surgeon, Garth Davis, who speaks about how almost all of his patients are failed Keto diet people and he said that he used to try to get people to do Keto, but now he has them do WFPB.

    2. To be flippant, I would say yes and “sooner rather than later”

      The longest study I am aware of was only 24 weeks by a group of Kuwaiti pro-satuarted fat researchers but there was no control group, unsaturated fats (presumably vegetable oils) were added to the diet and a host of micronutrients were added.

      On the bright side, the participants all achieved weight loss with no adverse effects observed. On the other hand, all the participants were very very obese – a BMI of 36 for the men and 39 for the women. It’s known that lean and obese people react differently to low carb diets though.

      However, studies lasting years rather than weeks or months indicate that there is no spevial magic to keto diets whatever people like to claim.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763382/

  10. I tried the Keto Diet for one year – and actually gained weight. The book authors all seem to ignore the undeniable fact that calories matter. And fat has a LOT of calories. Since March I’ve been adding moderate carbs, carefully restricting calories and have knocked off 50 lbs and I hope to go 50 more. But I still carefully monitor carbs, which is something the anti-KD camp often forgets. Bad carbs are just bad for you and there’s a world of difference between bad and good carbs. No sugar – in any form – no wheat, corn, pasta, bread…just lots of veggies. Add in fish and chicken and losing weight is almost easy.

    1. Yes, fat has more calories.

      Another issue is that people tend to not even get into Ketosis in the first place.

      Also, people cheat. They go out and have a beer or go to a birthday party and have some cake and if they are Keto, that seriously affects them.

      It is less of a big deal for people who are mostly WFPB.

  11. What about the positive low carb/keto studies??

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022637

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost an average of 5.8 kg (12.8 lbs) while the low-fat group lost only 1.9 kg (4.2 lbs). The difference was statistically significant.Conclusion: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight (about 3 times as much). There was also a statistically significant difference in several biomarkers:
    Triglycerides went down by 38 mg/dL in the LC group, compared to 7 mg/dL in the LF group.
    Insulin sensitivity improved on LC, got slightly worse on LF.
    Fasting blood glucose levels went down by 26 mg/dL in the LC group, only 5 mg/dL in the LF group.
    Insulin levels went down by 27% in the LC group, but increased slightly in the LF group.

    Overall, the low-carb diet had significantly more beneficial effects on weight and key biomarkers in this group of severely obese individuals.

    Effects of a low-carbohydrate diet on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor in overweight adolescent https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022347602402065

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 9.9 kg (21.8 lbs), while the low-fat group lost 4.1 kg (9 lbs). The difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost significantly more (2.3 times as much) weight and had significant decreases in Triglycerides and Non-HDL cholesterol. Total and LDL cholesterol decreased in the low-fat group only.

    A randomized trial comparing a very low carbohydrate diet and a calorie-restricted low fat diet on body weight and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy women.- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12679447

    **Weight Loss: The women in the low-carb group lost an average og 8.5 kg (18.7 lbs), while the low-fat group lost an average of 3.9 kg (8.6 lbs). The difference was statistically significant at 6 months. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight (2.2 times as much) and had significant reductions in blood triglycerides. HDL improved slightly in both groups

    A low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-fat diet to treat obesity and hyperlipidemia: a randomized, controlled trial – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15148063

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 9.4 kg (20.7 lbs) of their total body weight, compared to 4.8 kg (10.6 lbs) in the low-fat group. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight and had greater improvements in blood triglycerides and HDL cholesterol.

    Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC538279/

    ** Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight, especially the men. This was despite the fact that they ended up eating more calories than the low-fat group. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight. The men on the low-carb diet lost three times as much abdominal fat as the men on the low-fat diet.

    Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X

    **Weight Loss: The women in the low-carb group lost 6.4 kg (14.1 lbs) compared to the low-fat group, which lost 4.2 kg (9.3 lbs). The results were statistically significant. Conclusion: The low-carb diet caused significantly more weight loss and reduced hunger compared to the low-fat diet.

    The effects of a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet and a low-fat diet on mood, hunger, and other self-reported symptoms – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17228046

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 12.9 kg (28.4 lbs), while the low-fat group lost only 6.7 kg (14.7 lbs). Conclusion: The low-carb group lost almost twice the weight and experienced less hunger.

    A low‐carbohydrate diet is more effective in reducing body weight than healthy eating in both diabetic and non‐diabetic subjects – https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2007.02290.x

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 6.9 kg (15.2 lbs), compared to 2.1 kg (4.6 lbs) in the low-fat group. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight (about 3 times as much). There was no difference in any other marker between groups.

    Effects of weight loss from a very-low-carbohydrate diet on endothelial function and markers of cardiovascular disease risk in subjects with abdominal obesity -https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326593

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 7.9% of body weight, compared to the low-fat group which lost 6.5% of body weight. Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight and there was no difference between groups on Flow Mediated Dilation or any other markers of the function of the endothelium (the lining of blood vessels).

    Efficacy and Safety of a High Protein, Low Carbohydrate Diet for Weight Loss in Severely Obese Adolescents – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892194/

    **Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost more weight and had greater decreases in BMI than the low-fat group. Conclusion: The low-carb group had greater reductions in BMI. Various biomarkers improved in both groups, but there was no significant difference between groups.

    A Randomized Trial of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet for Obesity- https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022207

    “The largest and longest feeding study to test the ‘carbohydrate-insulin model'” concludes that a lower carb intake burns more calories, which may help people maintain weight loss over a longer period of time.— https://www.bmj.com/content/363/bmj.k4583

    1. I don’t think you watched the video. The video clearly states low carb eaters lost more weight. The weight they lost however was mainly water and lean muscle mass. Low fat eaters actually burned more fat. Also low carb is different from keto. Ketosis suppresses appetite.

    2. Greg

      Chronic alcoholiism is associated with long term weight loss too. There are healthy and unhealthy ways of losing weight.

      Obesity is definitely a major risk factor for premature death. Losing weight is an important thing to do to regain health. Doing it by keto or other low carb diets though seems to be jumping out of the fireand into the frying pan. It’s why most health authorities don’t recommend it as a first line therapy

      ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.’

      “Low carbohydrate diets might be useful in the short term to lose weight, lower blood pressure, and improve blood glucose control, but our study suggests that in the long-term they are linked with an increased risk of death from any cause, and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer.”

      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

      1. Interesting but as I am sure you recognize, it does not settle the issue of whether it’s the animal consumption (protein, sat fat, etc.)or the low carb that’s at fault.

        A 100% WFP diet with relatively high fat from nuts/seeds (say 40%) could well be very healthy. I am not aware of studies examining this and unfortunately that population is tiny. But I am hoping that’s true as that diet seems far better for my slim, prediabetic wife than a higher whole food carb diet, which works fine for me.

        Also, it seems much of these discussions, and some of the studies, conflate key issues such as definitions of low carb, high fat, insulin resistant vs not, obese/overweight vs. not, etc. There are so many variables intertwined, it seems to me little progress in understanding what individuals should do can be made at such a high level of generality, other than to conclude diets high in animal products, typical of standard keto diets, are, in the long run, linked to various chronic diseases and increased mortality. Or if you are an obese/overweight tyoe 2 diabetic, you should focus on losing lots of weight.

        1. I don’t disagree.

          However, I would throw the type of fat into the equation.

          Saturated fat appears to be a major villain here and may be a major reason why animal food based low carb diets increase mortality. However, ‘vegan’ keto types who buy into all the coconut oil hype may well also be at risk of increased mortality.

          It’s also telling I think that many of the intervention studies done by committed keto researchers seem to include significant added amounts of added PUFA/MUFA fats ……… even though many online low carb types seem to think that all vegetable oils are toxic. Low carb paleo types also crtiticide ‘vegan’ diets because of the advice to supplement with eg B12 to obtain optimum health. Yet many of the studies of low carb/paleo diets by professional researchers almost all include supplementation of some kind.

    3. Hi, Greg! I think the studies cited in the video above are more recent and of higher quality than some of the ones you mention. There are some glaring issues with at least some of the studies you cited. In this one: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022637, “Dietary compliance was estimated by means of a previously validated instrument in which subjects are interviewed to obtain data on 24-hour recall of dietary consumption.” This is certainly a less than ideal way to collect accurate dietary intake data. In addition, 53 of the original 132 participants dropped out, and their last measured data were simply carried forward. This means that more than a third of the final data was not based on actual, end-of-study measurement.
      Weight loss by any means will generally improve lipid profiles. Metabolic ward studies such as the once cited in the video allow researchers to also evaluate changes in metabolism and body composition, which the studies you cited largely did not, while having complete control over dietary intake of participants.

  12. As far as the repeat process, I know that I did the diet twice because of how many pounds I lost the first time, but each time I gained the weight back, plus, 5 or 10 pounds.

    Getting older, the people around me, like my brother, who lost a lot of weight when he did it when we were young, he isn’t losing any weight this time. He probably does cheat enough to never really have even anything show up on the scale. That is what I am seeing with the older people. They aren’t succeeding.

    Yes, I have only lost a clothes size, but they aren’t losing weight and are in such pain that it stopped them from exercising.

    I think that might be why they aren’t seeing weight loss.

    I stopped having any pain at all and am going to the gym now.

    They are in more pain and are doing less.

    Not sure how much of a factor that is.

    Losing fat versus lean is a big deal to an older person though and that concept of losing muscle, which you probably won’t get back is a very big deal to me.

    1. Enfeldt has been promoting his dangerous claims for years.

      Suppressing one symptom of a disease isnt curing it The people on such diets still have diabetes and it progresses – as is painfully obvious whenever such people try to eat normal food.

      PlantPositive did a series of 4 videos on Eenfeldt and his claims back in 2012 I think. They are still eye openers. The first one can be found here

      http://plantpositive.com/37-cherry-picked-research-by-a/

  13. I’m having a hard time believing that the weight keto – low carb people lose is only water weight. I know people close to me, losing 20-40 lbs. and that is not possible to be only water.

    After being diagnosed with fatty liver , My brother in law got his liver enzymes back to normal with keto type diet. And over 30lbs weight loss. Imo, his skin doesn’t look as healthy, and no telling about kidney issues it may cause or other problems of long term keto.
    the weight loss that happens beyond water weight, maybe a calorie consumption reduction along with water weight, but to say that’s all water seems biased.

    I personally don’t think the diet is healthy, so I would never do it, and I need a lot of carbs.

    I really appreciate Dr.G taking this on and giving us the broad picture that the main media will not. And look forward to the rest of the videos.

    1. David,

      He said that people lose water weight as why their initial weight loss is so strong.

      They also lose lean mass/muscle.

      They also lose some fat.

      They would have lost MORE fat eating High-Carb is the whole point.

      1. He said that people lose water weight as why their initial weight loss is so strong.

        (He said) They also lose lean mass/muscle.

        (He said) They also lose some fat.

        (He said) They would have lost MORE fat eating High-Carb is the whole point.
        ———————————————————————————————————–
        And earlier you posted three links:
        ____________________________________
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/diabetes-as-a-disease-of-fat-toxicity/

        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-diabetes/

        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/
        ———————————————————————————–
        Do you see a pattern here?

        I’m just sayin’ that Dr. Greger is not the only “He said-er”… maybe someone with a different opinion can be right too?

  14. Lonie,

    Dr. Greger wasn’t the one who did the study and he ALSO wasn’t the one whose words were being quoted.

    The video was a comparison between the HIGH FAT lost MORE weight, but lost LESS fat and MORE water and MORE lean/muscle.

    I feel like people are missing the whole point is that the “water weight” is an explanation of how they lose MORE weight and LESS fat at the same time.

    People aren’t understanding that it isn’t that they ONLY lost water.

    They also lost muscle and some fat.

    1. Dr. Greger wasn’t the one who did the study and he ALSO wasn’t the one whose words were being quoted.
      —————————————————————————————————-
      True, but presumably he is the one who chose the words to quote, meaning he gave his blessing on the words.

      My point was that simply being the words of doG Greger doesn’t necessarily make them the last word on the subject.

      (Otherwise, you do make excellent posts in your own right. ‘-)

      1. Thanks, Lonie.

        You are right.

        He chose those studies and read those words in his video.

        I would agree that science is “in process” and there will likely never be anyone alive who gets to have the last word on any topic.

  15. Or can I explain it.

    High Carb diets

    Lost more fat and GAINED muscle

    High Fats diets

    Lost more weight, but they lost more water, lost muscle and they lost some fat, but the High Carb diet lost more fat than the High Fat group AND the High Carb group gained muscle.

  16. Either way, Dr. Greger is quoting the people who wrote the studies and they are saying that people can lose more weight on high-fat, but that some of it is that they lose muscle and some of it is that their kidneys need to flush out the ketones and that causes extra water loss.

    That isn’t an opinion. That is a reality.

    1. High Carb diets

      Lost more fat and GAINED muscle

      High Fats diets

      Lost more weight, but they lost more water, lost muscle and they lost some fat, but the High Carb diet lost more fat than the High Fat group AND the High Carb group gained muscle
      ————————————————————————
      The lady in the Ted Talk below would say your high carb diet is the cause of the present diabetes epidemic and the more explosive one that is coming (carbs cause insulin resistance and fat has no ill effect on insulin)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=da1vvigy5tQ

      1. Lonie,

        I watched that Ted Talk a while back and she is clumping all carbs together.

        Whole Food Plant-Based doctors are also against refined carbs and excess sugar.

        Dr. Greger does have a video on the different mechanisms by which both types of diets work for Diabetes.

        Fat doesn’t spike sugar, and that was her strategy for getting her patients off of insulin.

        Whole Food Plant-Based gets people off of insulin by unplugging the receptors in the Pancreas and the Pancreas starts functioning again.

        There are literally thousands of testimonials of people going completely off their Diabetes meds going high carb, Whole Food Plant-Based.

        I already posted a list of testimonials from the Mastering Diabetes site, but I just saw a European site today and they had a whole list of people where it was stated that they got completely off their medications and got non-Diabetic A1C levels. Their bodies just function normally again. Keto can’t say that.

        Keto CAN get people off of insulin, but my brother and my sister-in-law and friends don’t do the process well enough to stay in Ketosis and they aren’t losing weight and they all have out of control Diabetes and I do have a close friend who did lose 50 pounds, but her doctor just told her that she had the worst lab results that he had ever seen and she just bought Furhman and Barnard’s books and is going to try WFPB and her Diabetes is out of control and she has so much hair loss and bad neuropathy now, so it will be interesting to see what happens.

        1. she is clumping all carbs together.
          ————————————————
          Good point… and the same thing that is happening in Dr. G’s video, I think… that is, lumping all fats together.

          I think the lady has a point if one uses mostly plant derived fat, although I personally like a little herring fat and yogurt fat thrown in on occasion. ‘-)

          Furthermore, my own regimen includes many inflammation fighting supplements.

          I subscribe to many approaches, including Dr. Greger’s.

        2. Whole Food Plant-Based gets people off of insulin by unplugging the receptors in the Pancreas and the Pancreas starts functioning again.
          ——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
          Funny you should mention that… IIRC, the Whole Body Vibration thing also gets the Pancreas functioning properly again. I’ll re-read the article and if I’m wrong I’ll repost.

          Decided to just post the link to the article instead.

          https://neurosciencenews.com/whole-body-vibration-diabetes-14739/

            1. Those are fun results.
              ——————————–
              Yeah, hoping they translate… then they will be earthshaking results.

              I’ve been doing this for a couple of weeks now. I’m seeing some changes but I’ll wait until I get October lab results back before detailing.

              I’m very excited and hope the labs confirm my gut feeling (pun intended ‘-)

              P.S. The cat keeps coming back for more so I’m guessing his gut feeling is the same as mine. ‘-)

      2. Americans were eating way more carbs and way less fat 100 years ago but there was no diabetes epidemic.

        Now, Americans are eating more fat and fewer carbs and there is a diabetes epidemic.

        So, yes it’s the carbs that cause diabetes. Obviously.

        https://www.fns.usda.gov/USfoodsupply

        And T2D was scarece in China when they were eating mainly carbs.

        1. Americans were eating way more carbs and way less fat 100 years ago but there was no diabetes epidemic.

          Now, Americans are eating more fat and fewer carbs and there is a diabetes epidemic.

          So, yes it’s the carbs that cause diabetes. Obviously.

          https://www.fns.usda.gov/USfoodsupply

          And T2D was scarece in China when they were eating mainly carbs.
          ————————————————————————————————–
          Tom, that is faulty logic.

          I can’t speak for 100 years ago but I can speak for ~ 3/4 of that time… and we had meat fried in hog lard and later Crisco every meal. And the same saturated fats were used in making cookies, cakes, and pie crusts. We drank whole milk and poured the raw cream over our cereal.

          And when Dad would take me into town for a hamburger at the Crystal Cafe, they would pour grease over the grill and turn the buns face down and saturate them in the grease.

          Yes we did eat some carbs like corn on the cob and blackeyed peas, green beans, mashed potatoes and pinto beans… but even those had bacon grease or butter added.

          I think you have it reversed… that is, we are eating way more carbs than fats.

          So, even though it was meant as sarcasm, your statement “So, yes it’s the carbs that cause diabetes. Obviously.” is the only true statement in your post.

          Even the China statement doesn’t hold water due to mitigating factors like working hard all day and who knows what actually went into a stir fry in re: fat.

          1. I;m simply stating what the evidence shows about what was the carb and fat content of Americans’ food 100 years ago compared to today..

            Carbs can’t be the cause of diabetes as the woman you quote claims, If they were, most Americans 100 years ago would have had diabetes as would most Chinese 50 years ago. In fact, most people throughout history would have had diabetes since every civilisation in history has been based on high carb diets.

            Per day in 1909, Americans’ food supply contained on average 499 grammes of carbohydrates, 101 grammes of protein and 119 grams of fat. By 2010 (the last year for which stats are available), Americans’ food supply per head was 474 grammes of carbohydrates, 120 grammes of protein and 150 grammes of fat. yet these low carbers want us to believe that the reason why Americans today are experiencing an epidemic of diabetes whereas they weren’t a hundred years ago is because people are eating more carbs! What is more, since people had fewer calories available back in 1909, carbs made up a proportionately part of the diet than they do today. That’s according to official US Govt statistics
            https://www.fns.usda.gov/USFoodSupply-1909-2010

            The idea that carbs cause diabetes is frankly ridiculous.

            1. Also your attempt to explain away the Chinese experience is much the same.

              How people can believe this kind of stuff is beyond me.

              1. How people can believe this kind of stuff is beyond me.
                ———————————————————————
                Your honesty is commendable… I’ve often thought you had a narrow range of ken but didn’t want to say it. Now that you understand your limitations, maybe you can work to remedy that?

                Wishing the best for you.

                1. Thank you Lonie .

                  I can only observe in wonderment the ability of people to beiieve nonsense. But then as Einstein said

                  ‘Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former.’

                  I hope that you get better soon.

            2. That’s according to official US Govt statistics
              https://www.fns.usda.gov/USFoodSupply-1909-2010

              The idea that carbs cause diabetes is frankly ridiculous.
              —————————————————————————
              I won’t quote your whole post ’cause it is riduculous udder nonnsense (see? I can use charged words too ‘-)

              For one thing, how did USDA manage to get anything near an accurate reading on what hard working Americans were eating off their small-sized plates but still didn’t go to bed hungry, in 1906? They didn’t have Facebook or Amazon to monitor our every purchase like we do now. The 2010 stats are likely more accurate and they showed (from your own pen):

              ” By 2010 (the last year for which stats are available), Americans’ food supply per head was 474 grammes of carbohydrates, 120 grammes of protein and 150 grammes of fat.”

              I’m not good at math but it seems like we are eating 3 times as many grammys of carbs as we are fat.

              1. It’s food supply data, it includes spoilage and wastage.

                ‘I’m not good at math but it seems like we are eating 3 times as many grammys of carbs as we are fat.’

                I’m not good at logic but how does that prove that carbs cause diabetes?

                There were more carbs (both absolutely and proportionately) in Americans’ 100 years ago. And less protein and fat. But there was no diabetes or obesity epidemic.

                Today, Americans’ food contains fewer carbs and more protein and more fat. And there is an obesity and diabetes epidemic.

                And that traditional Okinawan diet was what/ 85% carbs and yet there was no obesity or diabetes epidemic among the Okinawans studied.

                But yes it’s still the carbs. As you say, I have severe intellectual limitations and therefore am unable to understand how all this delonstrates that carbs cause diabets and obesity. I’m such an idiot.

                1. I’m such an idiot.
                  —————————-
                  Certainly not an idiot… just susceptible to faulty information just because it is put out by the WHO or a govt. agency anywhere in the world. You often use those as your proof to back up your skepticism when you could be better served to apply skepticism to those reports and studies.

                  I get it… we all would like to have absolutes, but until our world is being run by AI and the the human element in science is reduced, we will still get conflicting, biased, inaccurate data.

                  Cheers.

                  1. TBH, it just seems to me that you are ignoring evidence that dioesn’t fit into your worldview. Calling it scepticim is fine but only if you can articulate a rational case for doubt.

                    Bu,t ye,s I am swayed more by reports by scientific panels that assess the evidence than I am by people selling stuff and/or appearing in YouTube videos. It was my impression that it is you who needs to be a lot more sceptical about the claims made by such people.

    2. There is also the fact that if eating a lower carb diet your body doesn’t need quite so much water to process the carbs. Hence the water loss.
      If you look hard enough you will always find a study somewhere that will support your own hypothesis.
      There is No Such Thing as an unbiased study Anywhere!
      Dr Greger is a great resource for healthy diet. I agree with the whole food plant based diet AND I also do lower carb and higher fat (not as low as typical Keto). I also like occasional grass fed beef and free range chicken. As long as it’s real food that doesn’t come in a package with a list of ingredients we can’t pronounce, no additives, no preservatives, no artificial color, no added flavoring it might be worth trying!

  17. This video does not address how well people follow these diets, in the long term. I think my whole foods plant based diet is the healthiest I can get and I have no trouble staying on it. But I have friends who have been doing very well on low carb diets, even after a couple of years. They have lost a lot of weight and are maintaining their weights. They seem to find it easier to stick to a low carb diet than other diets. Personally I found low carb diets hard to follow. So for weight loss, I think your best choice is whatever diet you can stick to.

    1. David,

      That might be true if weight loss was the only factor.

      The fact that they lose muscle becomes an issue for older people.

      Kidney-health, too.

      Plus, there are people who lose a lot of weight and then drop dead of a heart attack.

      On top of that, there are studies that they have more pain, where WFPB gets rid of pain. Keto has studies of increasing pain.

      The Keto people around me are popping Advil and Tylenol all-day long and that can’t be good. Plus, they have constipation and are using things for that.

      I do look at it from both directions and think that intermittent fasting and nuts and seeds and avocado is a way where it might work

      But most people around me aren’t doing that type of Keto. They are eating high animal proteins and higher intake of unhealthy fats and oils. (versus nuts and seeds and avocado) Those types of fats cause problems to the endothelium and it can cause an increase in insulin resistance, which can get worse if they ever cheat at all.

      Plus, when the people are using animal proteins, that can already cause kidney problems and ketones stress the kidneys more.

      I am seeing people go in and out of the hospital with that type of eating.

      1. We all did Ketosis when we were young and were happy with the results on the scale, but we all failed back then, and it was high animal fats that we did more than anything.

        Many, many people who go Keto are eating a lot of animal products and don’t go into Ketosis at all and some genetically can’t go into Ketosis.

    1. You ain’t kidding there and it isn’t just heart disease they have to worry about

      ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.’
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

      Perhaps this is why all the keto/low carb advocates never do studies lasting more than a few months. As the twinkie Diet guy showed, pretty much any bad diet will look good in the short term if it’s accompanied by weight loss.

  18. Dr. G,

    Most people associate Keto with high animal product consumption. Are there many studies comparing a WFPB Keto to a typical high-carb WFPB diet? I’m picturing a WFPB Keto diet where the majority of calories come from nuts, seeds, avocados, and fruits/veggies consist of relatively low-carb veggies like leafy greens, cruciferous veggies, and limited berries. It sounds pretty restrictive and difficult to maintain long-term, but I’m curious if the research suggests this could be as healthy as a high-carb WFPB diet.

      1. Dr David Jenkins published a paper discussing eco-Atkins. However, the macros on that diet are not low enough for most people to get into ketosis. I will look it up and add the specifics. I contacted Dr. Jenkins personally, and he agreed that eco-Atkins was not a ketogenic diet.

  19. How about the pro Low Carb/Keto studies??

    Samaha FF, et al. A low-carbohydrate as compared with a low-fat diet in severe obesity. New England Journal of Medicine.

    Details: 132 individuals with severe obesity (mean BMI of 43) were randomized to either a low-fat or a low-carb diet. Many of the subjects had metabolic syndrome or type II diabetes. The low-fat dieters were calorie restricted. Study duration was 6 months.

    Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost an average of 5.8 kg (12.8 lbs) while the low-fat group lost only 1.9 kg (4.2 lbs). The difference was statistically significant

    Conclusion: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight (about 3 times as much). There was also a statistically significant difference in several biomarkers:

    Triglycerides went down by 38 mg/dL in the LC group, compared to 7 mg/dL in the LF group.
    Insulin sensitivity improved on LC, got slightly worse on LF.
    Fasting blood glucose levels went down by 26 mg/dL in the LC group, only 5 mg/dL in the LF group.
    Insulin levels went down by 27% in the LC group, but increased slightly in the LF group.
    Brehm BJ, et al. A randomized trial comparing a very low carbohydrate diet and a calorie-restricted low fat diet on body weight and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy women.Trusted Source The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

    Details: 53 healthy but obese females were randomized to either a low-fat diet, or a low-carb diet. Low-fat group was calorie restricted. The study went on for 6 months.

    Weight Loss: The women in the low-carb group lost an average og 8.5 kg (18.7 lbs), while the low-fat group lost an average of 3.9 kg (8.6 lbs). The difference was statistically significant at 6 months.

    Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight (2.2 times as much) and had significant reductions in blood triglycerides.

    Yancy WS Jr, et al. A low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-fat diet to treat obesity and hyperlipidemia.Trusted Source Annals of Internal Medicine.

    Details: 120 overweight individuals with elevated blood lipids were randomized to a low-carb or a low-fat diet. The low-fat group was calorie restricted. Study went for 24 weeks.

    Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 9.4 kg (20.7 lbs) of their total body weight, compared to 4.8 kg (10.6 lbs) in the low-fat group.

    Conclusion: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight and had greater improvements in blood triglycerides and HDL cholesterol.

    JS Volek, et al. Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women.Trusted Source Nutrition & Metabolism (London).

    Details: A randomized, crossover trial with 28 overweight/obese individuals. Study went on for 30 days (for women) and 50 days (for men) on each diet, that is a very low-carb diet and a low-fat diet. Both diets were calorie restricted.

    Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost significantly more weight, especially the men. This was despite the fact that they ended up eating more calories than the low-fat group.

    Conclusion: The low-carb group lost more weight. The men on the low-carb diet lost three times as much abdominal fat as the men on the low-fat diet.

    Nickols-Richardson SM, et al. Perceived hunger is lower and weight loss is greater in overweight premenopausal women consuming a low-carbohydrate/high-protein vs high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet.Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

    Details: 28 overweight premenopausal women consumed either a low-carb or a low-fat diet for 6 weeks. The low-fat group was calorie restricted.

    Weight Loss: The women in the low-carb group lost 6.4 kg (14.1 lbs) compared to the low-fat group, which lost 4.2 kg (9.3 lbs). The results were statistically significant.

    Conclusion: The low-carb diet caused significantly more weight loss and reduced hunger compared to the low-fat diet.

    McClernon FJ, et al. The effects of a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet and a low-fat diet on mood, hunger, and other self-reported symptoms.Trusted Source Obesity (Silver Spring).

    Details: 119 overweight individuals were randomized to a low-carb, ketogenic diet or a calorie restricted low-fat diet for 6 months.

    Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 12.9 kg (28.4 lbs), while the low-fat group lost only 6.7 kg (14.7 lbs).

    Conclusion: The low-carb group lost almost twice the weight and experienced less hunger.

    Sondike SB, et al. Effects of a low-carbohydrate diet on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor in overweight adolescents. The Journal of Pediatrics.

    Details: 30 overweight adolescents were randomized to two groups, a low-carb diet group and a low-fat diet group. This study went on for 12 weeks. Neither group was instructed to restrict calories.

    Weight Loss: The low-carb group lost 9.9 kg (21.8 lbs), while the low-fat group lost 4.1 kg (9 lbs). The difference was statistically significant.

    1. Greg,

      This is not contradictory to what Dr. Greger has said in his video.

      He is acknowledging that the Keto people can lose much more weight, particularly the first few weeks, but they lose muscle and they don’t lose as much fat as the high carb group.

      There are people who have lost 250 pounds plus, both on Starch Solution and Eat to Live without counting calories or being hungry, and Whole Food Plant-Based eaters tend to have lab improvements in triglycerides and cholesterol and A1C and blood pressure, etc.

      1. Dr. Greger is acknowledging the weight loss.

        I have never seen a Keto doctor acknowledge that they don’t have the same fat loss

        I have never seen a Keto doctor acknowledge the muscle or water weight loss.

        On top of it, I have one friend who did lose the 10 pounds on it before a trip a few years ago, but the next time I saw her, she had gained so much weight and was barely able to walk.

        A year later, she was back on the Keto shakes and meals plan and didn’t lose that original 10 pounds back and got bored by the plan again and gained it back again.

        She loves Keto and thinks it is just that she goes off of it and eats carbs, which causes her to fail over and over again, but she has stopped losing the same rate that she did in the beginning and she is in so much pain and that is true for my closest friend.

      2. Thanks Greg. In was particularly interested in the 6 month study because all the other studies I have seen were much shorter. This one actually discusses the effects on self-reported symptoms by participants in two studies. I’ll provide a link below to the study that did a comparison with another lower fat diet.

        It’s worth noting perhaps that fundung came from the Atkins Foundation and Atkins himself was listed as one of the authors. The lead author was Eric Westman, a long time promoter of Atkins/low carb/keto diets. The headlined results are perhaps no surprise then,

        Some other observations:

        1) the low carb keto diet group was also treated with supplements – “Nutritional supplementation was given to the LCKD group only; it consisted of a multivitamin, chromium picolinate, diet formula, and essential oils.” I have no idea what the diet formula was or which essential oils or how much.wre provided

        2) the ‘low fat’ group actually obtained 29% of total calories from fat. Given that the World Health Organization states that total fat consumption should not exceed 30% of total calories, this is arguably a high fat diet (being compared here to a very high fat diet)

        3) “However, 2 participants in the low-carbohydrate diet group dropped out of the study because of concerns about elevated serum lipid levels. In 1 participant, the LDL cholesterol level increased from 4.75 mmol/L (184 mg/dL) at baseline to 7.31 mmol/L (283 mg/dL) at 3 months. One participant dropped out after a local physician measured her serum lipids 4 weeks into the study; her LDL cholesterol level was 4.70 mmol/L (182 mg/dL) at baseline and increased to 5.66 mmol/L (219 mg/dL). Among participants for whom data on LDL cholesterol were available at both baseline and week 24, the LDL cholesterol level increased by more than 10% in 13 (30%) of 44 recipients of the low-carbohydrate diet and 5 (16%) of 31 recipients of the low-fat diet (P > 0.2).”

        4) “Several symptomatic adverse effects occurred more frequently in the low-carbohydrate diet group than in the low-fat diet group, including constipation (68% vs. 35%; P < 0.001), headache (60% vs. 40%; P = 0.03), halitosis (38% vs. 8%; P < 0.001), muscle cramps (35% vs. 7%; P < 0.001), diarrhea (23% vs. 7%; P = 0.02), general weakness (25% vs. 8%; P = 0.01), and rash (13% vs. 0%; P = 0.006). One participant sought medical attention for constipation but had no complications. One 53-year-old man in the low-carbohydrate diet group who had a family history of early heart disease developed chest pain near the end of the study, and coronary heart disease was subsequently diagnosed."

        https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/717451/low-carbohydrate-ketogenic-diet-versus-low-fat-diet-treat-obesity

        None of this convinces me that low carb/keto diets are entirely safe (even with unspecified added oils and the mysterious 'diet formula")

    2. Thanks for posting this Greg… this is the kind of study data we don’t expect to see on NF.o and offers a different perspective altogether.

    3. Having waded through the results of thousands of studies, I can bet without looking that the “low-fat” diets in the studies your linked aren’t truly low fat diets (~8-15% calories from fat) but are medium fat diets with 25-30% calories from fat–meaning only a little bit less fat than the typical American eats (~34%). Virtually all of the discussion of low-fat diets “not working” is clouded by the fact they weren’t studying truly low-fat diets. But these medium fat diets that are erroneously labeled “low-fat” still can beat out high fat diets.

  20. I have a couple questions. First: Low carb and keto are different obviously. What was the fat loss in a normal caloric deficit diet vs. a person actually in ketosis? Second: Shouldn’t you disclose that you wrote a book about dieting? Third: Taking 6 days of data and extrapolating results is just misleading and disingenuous. Reducing 800 calories is 267 grams of carb and 89 grams of fat but what were the remaining macro nutrient numbers at? Did they eat the same amount of protein? Why pick such an extreme amount of calories why not do a 200 calories deficit over 3 months ensuring the keto group was below 20g of carbs a day and in ketosis?

    But this video has made me want to find actual studies based on ketosis and it is absolutely true you lose a ton of water weight when starting (carboHYDRATES). But eating more carbs doesnt make them stronger it just makes them retain more water. Its the reason why bodybuilders run huge card deficits to cut fat and lean out and then binge on carbs before competing to vastly increase the size (the look) of their muscles. They didnt get any stronger. If you are looking to do actual physical activities competitively especially distance running you shouldnt do the keto diet because carbs are way easier for your body to use than fat.

    1. James,

      Dr. Greger has disclosed many times about his book, which still isn’t out, but he was not the one running the study.

      As far as ketosis goes, most people who do Keto don’t stay in ketosis and some genetically can’t get in ketosis.

      Popular Science wrote about how hard it is to get into ketosis and stay there because you have to eat 80 to 90% of your calories from fat to get there and most people eat too much animal protein thinking it is okay. They said that one apple or one banana would already reach the upper carb limit, but it is animal proteins that people generally eat too many of on the diet.

      https://www.popsci.com/not-in-ketosis/

    2. ” First: Low carb and keto are different obviously.’

      All keto diets are by definition low carb diets (but not all low carb diets are keto diets).

      Second, why don’t you take your complaints about the study Greger discusses to the authors and funders? This was a study commissioned and funded in effect by the most prominent and vocal promoters of high fat diets at that time – Gary Taubes and Peter Attia – and they still couldn’t make high fat diets look good. It’s not like Taubes and Attia wanted to make high fat diets look bad – quite the opposite. Why didn’t they ask for a longer study for example?

      in any case, weight loss is a side issue really. People can lose weight on pretty much any diet. The real question is whether the diet is healthy. There are genuine concerns about the long term safety of low carb diets (perhaps that’s why keto/low carb researchers don’t do long term studies?)

      ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.’
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

      1. “in any case, weight loss is a side issue really. People can lose weight on pretty much any diet. The real question is whether the diet is healthy. There are genuine concerns about the long term safety of low carb diets (perhaps that’s why keto/low carb researchers don’t do long term studies?)”

        Excellent point, that’s exactly it.

    3. Hi, James! A ketogenic diet is one of many forms of low-carbohydrate diets. Regardless of how effectively people do or do not lose weight on ketogenic diets, the fact remains that ketosis is an emergency backup system to prevent death from starvation, and is not intended to be maintained as a long-term state. It has many, well-documented and potentially dangerous side effects, gathered from a century of use with epileptic children, one of which is dehydration. The inclusion of “-hydrate” in the word carbohydrate does not mean that carbohydrates help the body hold onto water. It refers to the chemical structure of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate molecules, like water, include hydrogen and oxygen. Dr. Greger has disclosed many times his authorship of a weight loss book that has yet to be released. You are encouraged to click the “Sources Cited” links below NutritionFacts videos and review the research yourself. I hope that helps!

  21. My question after reading the Popular Science article is:

    They said that to get people into ketosis as adults, it requires such an extreme version of Keto that nutritionists don’t even attempt to get adults into the deep ketosis and that it is only young children with severe epilepsy they do try to get them into ketosis and keep them there.

    When I looked up Whole Food Plant-Based and epilepsy, people seem to be getting off of the epilepsy meds on Whole Food Plant-Based, so is there a mechanism that children could be spared the 80 to 90% fat diet?

    I know that there was a woman who was told to go high fat for her child with Down Syndrome and I saw some thriving children on Whole Food Plant-Based for that, too.

    I just wonder if they have to do that to epileptic children.

    I know that they say that they don’t know the mechanism in the first place, so maybe they don’t know what to try.

  22. What is interesting to me is that I have looked over at the YouTube channel and there isn’t hostility.

    A year ago, I think there would have been.

    I felt the same thing watching the 2020 USA Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

    A year ago, I went to a site about that and the audience seemed more evenly split.

    This time, the Whole Food Plant-Based message isn’t being resisted almost at all.

  23. Thank you for this but I’m still not clear.
    The keto advocates have examples of people over 300 pounds loosing over 100 pounds, would that be mostly water loss?
    So far it seems that we all are wearing blind folds and experiencing different parts of the elephant.
    Perhaps there will be a study that studies at all the major programs systematically and will point toi a unified theory.
    My preference and hope is for a plant based program but it’s all confusing from the micro study results.

    1. Rod,

      Yes, both diets have people losing over 100 pounds. The whole point is that WFPB people burn more fat and Keto, people lose lean.

      Also, with Keto, from what I have seen, most people do fasting and calorie restriction if they succeed at losing weight. I am watching a whole community of people not lose weight on Keto and what I know is that probably none of them have spent even a day in ketosis and that way of eating just plain isn’t going to work for them at all.

      Lately, I have been watching Krocks in the Kitchen where Brian went from over 500 pounds to closer to 350 in one year and his wife, Jessica went from 280 to 165 in that same year on Whole Food Plant-Based.

      I know that both, Dr. McDougall and Dr. Fuhrman have at least a few people who have lost 250 pounds without cutting calories or exercising or intermittent fasting.

        1. I want to add the paradox, where people eat high fat and actually become obese if they are not in Ketosis. That is what I have seen with a few of my friends. There is a mechanism given where the people who do both low carb and low animal protein can reverse obesity, but those who go just low carb can become obese from the diet and most of the people do not do the 80 to 90% fat version of Keto. Some do and my guess is that those are the ones who do lose 100 pounds, but some don’t go into ketosis and actually gain weight.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17141367

      1. Thanks Deb, I’ve saw that on the Krocs too.
        I did a five day fast and it was not until the 4th day that the keto urine test strips registered ketosis (mid range at the hightest reading).
        I was able to loose ten pounds on keto before stalling…. Years ago I went ot the Hippocrates Institure and lost 14 pounds in three weeks and will attempt that again but will try kale and mung bean and lentil sprouts mostly (for convenience), I prefer the plant based diet.
        My weight is stubborn and I will ramp up the exercises as well

        1. Rod,

          That is the problem. It takes more than people know to get into ketosis and if they don’t, they can actually gain weight.

          Plus, it can cause greater insulin resistance.

          There are people who do well with the intermittent fasting and calorie restriction, but some of us failed miserably at calorie restriction all of our lives and I did try oil, mostly because I was curious about coconut oil for brain health, but I threw up every single time. Sometimes I would make the short drive to work and then be standing outside throwing up against the fence or in the post office parking lot.

          And I barely put any of it in.

          I have decided that I am oil sensitive. I get queasy from it. Always have. I was also chemical-sensitive, but now I am wondering how much was oil and how much was chemical.

          1. I guess I can be grateful for that.

            My friends and family were all drawn toward Keto, but they are all in and out of the hospital and I don’t see it as healthier.

            It didn’t get them off their diabetes meds either and they are on 3 meds unless they go zero carbs and low animal proteins and they stress out even at things like cauliflower because they have to count everything and, honestly, they go to events or go out to breakfast after church and cheat on it and they just aren’t succeeding either weight-wise or health-wise.

            My getting sick on oil maybe kept me searching for something else. There was so much pressure on me to go Keto and I am the one person in the whole bunch who watched the same videos and went Whole Food Plant-Based vegan no oil, while they are having conversations about all the things they can do with coconut oil.

            I am not going to make a joke about what they can do with it, but that is the sentence that just went through my brain.

    2. Doubt is their product
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubt_Is_Their_Product

      I am not aware of any credible health authority in the world that states keto diets are healthy. At best, they say that it may be effective for weight loss, But they all say, that weight loss is best and most safely achieved on healthy diets high in wholegrains, fruit and vegetables.)not keto/low carb diets)

      But there’s a big market of sickly overweight people who want to be told that they can lose weight and become healthy by eating even more beef, butter, bacon and brie. The current situation simply reflects supply and demand …. not mention all that ‘research’ money and subsequent stream of media releases from the meat and dairy industries. Even if they can’t convince people of their claims, they can create enough doubt that many people will say “the experts can’t agree so I’ll just keep on eating what I like.’ I know several people with that attitude.

  24. After switching to plant-based from keto, the lining of my gut seemed to completely heal and my constipation was cured. I used to have blood in my stool from pushing and hemmorhoids. My LDL is within safe range now for the first time in my life, my fasting blood sugar is within normal range too, and my hormones feel more balanced. I had been put on a high meat diet by my nutritionist to control blood sugar handling but I had to stay in ketosis, basically starved myself, because it hurt so much to have a bm. Now I love preparing my meals, choosing all of the colors and flavors from mother earth, and being creative. I’m 55 and this is the first time I’ve liked being in the kitchen. Thank you Dr. Greger…and I’m doing the burpees I’ve seen you do too!

  25. To Dr. Greger:
    This is important.
    Your previous video is entitled “Keto Diet Theory Put to the Test”.

    You – of ALL PEOPLE – know that this should be titled “Keto Diet HYPOTHESIS Put to the Test”. As a scientist – and this is a site for science – should be honoring the difference between hypothesis and theory. I don’t have to remind you of the difference.

    A hypothesis is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from a theory.

    Why don’t you do a video on this?
    Thank you.

    1. First of all, Dr. Greger is reading someone else’s writing.

      My second point is that I looked it up and have been thinking about it and I am not sure that you are right.

      It said:

      In scientific reasoning, a hypothesis is an assumption made before any research has been completed for the sake of testing. A theory, on the other hand, is a principle set to explain phenomena already supported by data.

      There was a weight loss phenomenon already supported by data which needed explaining, wasn’t there?

      Yes, they did need a second hypothesis and more testing, but they thought that high fat caused more weight loss and that was demonstrated.

      Does it ever cross the line between theory and hypothesis?

      1. I thought that when you notice something in a study, such as people losing more weight on high-fat diets, that you come back out to having a theory of what the mechanism is. Then, if you get the funding, you form another hypothesis and test that one?

        1. Laughing.

          Yes, it is obvious that some of us were not into science as young people.

          I might have to go to the Science Music Video guy’s channel and see if he has a song for hypotheses.

          The fact that he wrote one explaining the Krebs Cycle, you never know.

            1. Low-carb advocates had a theory, though: the so-called “carbohydrate–insulin model of obesity.”

              Is the fact that they had a model and never put it to the test make it a theory or a hypothesis?

  26. Doc, really enjoy your research videos, esp the double-blinded tests, lol.

    However, it would be good if you could confirm for us, did the tests on Keto Diet Results for Weight Loss include a distinction between ‘good fats’ like Avocado, MCT or Coconut Oil and ‘bad fats’ like heated vegetable oils, processed foods, and all the bad stuff, etc?

    Given the brain’s preference for a cleaner-burning fuel like MCT Oil, if these were included in the test, I would find the findings surprising.

    Let me know your thoughts?

    1. You should read the original study to find the enswer to your question.

      Also, There is no reason whatsoever (apart from marketing hype) to believe that coconut oil is a good fat.

      If you want to know about good fats and bad fats, ignore the people selling stuff and the opinionated cranks with websites and YouTube videos. Read instead scientific reports by real experts eg

      https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/nutrientrequirements/fatsandfattyacids_humannutrition/en/
      https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510

    2. did the tests on Keto Diet Results for Weight Loss include a distinction between ‘good fats’ like Avocado, MCT or Coconut Oil and ‘bad fats’ like heated vegetable oils, processed foods, and all the bad stuff, etc?

      Given the brain’s preference for a cleaner-burning fuel like MCT Oil, if these were included in the test, I would find the findings surprising.
      ——————————————————————————————————————————————————–
      You ask the right questions and have a good understanding of oils. Just so you know, I’m right there with you.

    3. Hi, David Turner! From a metabolic perspective, there is no good evidence to support the idea that some fats are better than others. I must agree with Mr. Fumblefingers’ comment that purported benefits of coconut oil and MCT oil are just hype. While avocado has a place in a healthy diet due to its special combination of fat, fiber and nutrients, the same is not necessarily true for avocado oil. You can find everything on this site about fat here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/fat/ Oils are specifically covered here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/oils/ Coconut oil is here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/coconut-oil/ Avocados are covered here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/avocados/ I hope that helps!

  27. Good fats such as unheated extra virgin olive oil, the list of good fats go on … It could be argued that these together with the organic-based whole fibre vegetable based diets many of the doc’s other research videos appear to have established as superior to meat-based diets, are useful when addressing a healthy weight.

  28. Unreasonable fear of fat is another old nutritional quagmire to take care to avoid. Lumping diets under broad umbrellas of “high carb” “low fat” fails to delineate the importance of “high quality” carbohydrate and fat sources.

  29. Wasn’t the obesity epidemic caused by the low fat diet which caused people to eat high carbs and the food industry produced all the low fat food in the market. Drs came out to tell us the main cause of obesity is low fat diets which people always will replace by high carbs.

    1. No, this is just a fib told by people selling low carb diet books and by assorted cranks with websites and YouTube videos. It is repeated endlessly on the internet but is obviously untrue.

      IMHO, the obesity epidemic is caused by too many calories (see the US food supply statistics), too much fat, too much processed food and too little exercise. Whatever it is, it isn’t the total amount of carbs that people are eating nowadays that is driving the obesity epidemic.

      In fact, people in the US are actually eating fewer carbs now than they did before World War1 when there was no obesity epidemic.

      https://www.fns.usda.gov/USFoodSupply-1909-2010

    2. Wasn’t the obesity epidemic caused by the low fat diet which caused people to eat high carbs and the food industry produced all the low fat food in the market.
      ——————————————————————————————————–
      Yes.

    3. Laila,

      Dr. Barnard showed a graph and the myth was it was sugar causing the weight gain, but when the sugar intake in America stalled out (when people stopped drinking as much soda and switched to bottled water) it turned out that the graph of obesity had the exact same line as the intake of fats, not sugars.

      Also, when they have biopsied the fat on people’s bodies, they could see the composition and the fat on the body came from fats in foods.

    4. Americans never switched to a truly low-fat diet, which would be around 8-15% calories from fat, so you can’t blame their problems on low-fat because they never tried it–just diets misleadingly labeled “low-fat.”

      1. Quite correct.

        If you look at the US Food Supply data, it’s obvious that the fat content of the US diet is something like 50% more now than it was 100 years ago.

    1. Charu Jain, the same link caught my eye this morning. https://www.bbc.com/news/health-49579820 I looked up the study and hoped Fumbles might be interested in taking a look at it. https://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4897 What particularly concerns me is the higher stroke risk for vegetarians (they didn’t differentiate between vegan and vegetarian). 20 % higher risk for vegetarians!
      Overall too, the number of haemorraghic strokes (300) from a total of 1072 strokes seems high to me.
      The study uses data collected from 1993 to 2001, and 2010 so that is something to consider too.

            1. I started gathering the studies but accidentally clicked off the page, so you are going to have to look them up for yourself, but

              Low B12 is linked with Ischemic stroke (Note, high homocysteine is linked with it, so B-12 levels might not be off the hook and that study the people were B12 deficient)

              Low Folate (not eating plant-foods) is linked to Hemorrhagic stroke.

              High Homocysteine is linked to intercerebral hemorrhage in some studies (Nonsupplementing vegans might have that reason and other people may not, so it doesn’t surprise me that there might be people who have that type of stroke without having high homocysteine.)

              There is a significant inverse dose-response relationship between dietary fiber with Hemorrhagic stroke and all stroke

              Low Vitamin D is linked to stroke risk and when they give Vitamin D to stroke recovery patients they are less likely to have another stroke and they recover better.

              Vitamin C levels are significantly lower in people who have brain bleeds. They said that the people who had the brain bleeds had low Vitamin C and they tested a group which didn’t have brain bleeds and they had normal Vitamin C levels, but they still haven’t proved cause and effect.

              Lower EPA levels and a lower average ratio of EPA to Arachadonic Acid was a risk factor for For intracerebral hemorrhage for those aged 65 years and older.

              Sorry that I lost the links.

              1. Barb,

                Here is an analysis that this type of stroke might be increased risk for short people (versus the cancer risk for tall people) meaning it is the one type of condition where IGF-1 might actually help. They don’t recommend to eat meat though. They call it the vegan’s Achilles heel and say that it is more important for vegans to avoid salt and supplement Omega 3’s, B-Vitamins, and they recommend Taurine and Arginine, whole grains, green tea and exercise and eating a diet with high potassium-intake.

                https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12944100

                I have to look up the Taurine and Arginine again.

                  1. Barb,

                    You mentioned the dates and what I will tell you is that we are about to find out.

                    The number of vegans in Great Britain quadrupled between 2014 and 2018 with 42% of those people switching in 2018.

                    They expect vegans to be 1/4 of their population by 2025 if this rate keeps going.

                    1. Wow, there are a lot of indicators that great-big sections of the world are about to go vegan.

                      Places like Sweden, 1 in 5 young people are already there.

                      1 out of 4 people is drinking plant-milk.

                      And, Google shows that vegan searches on the internet have eclipsed gluten-free.

                      2019 has been called the year of the vegan by economist.com.

                      They said that the school district of Los Angeles will start serving vegan meals in all its schools during the 2018-19 academic year. and that, in 2018, the American Medical Association called on hospitals to offer more vegan meals.

      1. The overall picture is 7 fewer deaths per thousand in vegans/vegetarians versus meat eaters.

        That is 10 fewer heart disease deaths versus 3 more stroke deaths. However, the BBC to its shame decided to sensationalise the story and have a dig at vegans/vegans by headlining the increased stroke rate.

        I haven’t had time to look at the study in detail sorry but the study itself is actually very positive for so-called vegans and vegetarians because it shows they have reduced risk.

    2. Hi Charu Jain, thanks for your question. This is an interesting article. Dr Frankie Phillips, from the British Dietetic Association, gives a valid response about the study. She indicates that, this was an observational study.”They looked at what people ate and followed them for years, so it’s an association, not cause-and-effect,” she says.”The message, for everyone, is it makes sense to have a well-planned diet, and to eat a wide variety of foods.

      As you also know Dr Greger recommendations:
      Vitamin B12 (see also Which type of vitamin B12 is best)

      At least 2,500 mcg (µg) cyanocobalamin once each week, ideally as a chewable, sublingual, or liquid supplement taken on an empty stomach
      or at least 250 mcg daily of supplemental cyanocobalamin (you needn’t worry about taking too much)
      or servings of B12-fortified foods three times a day, each containing at least 25% U.S. “Daily Value” on its label
      Those over 65 years of age should take at least 1,000 mcg (µg) cyanocobalamin every day.
      Tip: If experiencing deficiency symptoms, the best test is a urine MMA (not serum B12 level)
      Omega-3 Fatty Acids

      250 mg daily of pollutant free (yeast- or algae-derived) long-chain omega-3’s (EPA/DHA)
      Vitamin D (daily recommendations for those in the Northern Hemisphere; D3 from animal or plant sources may be preferable to the D2 sourced from fungi)

      Below approximately 30°latitude (south of Los Angeles/Dallas/Atlanta/Cairo)
      15-30 minutes of midday sun (15 for those with lighter skin; 30 for those with darker skin)
      or 2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      Between 30° latitude (sample cities above) & 40°latitude (Portland/Chicago/Boston/Rome/Beijing)
      From February through November
      15-30 minutes of midday sun (15 for those with lighter skin; 30 for those with darker skin)
      or 2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      From December through January
      2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      Between 40° latitude (sample cities above) & 50°latitude (Edmonton/London/Berlin/Moscow)
      From March through October
      15-30 minutes of midday sun (15 for those with lighter skin; 30 for those with darker skin)
      or 2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      From November through February
      2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      Above approximately 50°latitude (north of Edmonton/London/Berlin/Moscow)
      From April through September (or even briefer above 60°latitude (Anchorage/Stockholm))
      15-30 minutes of midday sun (15 for those with lighter skin; 30 for those with darker skin)
      or 2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      From October through March (or even longer above 60°latitude (Anchorage/Stockholm))
      2,000 IU supplemental vitamin D
      Calcium

      At least 600 mg daily via calcium-rich plant foods—preferably low-oxalate dark green leafy vegetables, which includes all greens except spinach, chard, and beet greens (all very healthy foods, but not good calcium sources due to their oxalate content).
      Iodine

      For those who don’t eat seaweed or use iodized salt, a 150 mcg daily supplement
      The sea vegetable hijiki (hiziki) should not be eaten due to high arsenic levels
      Kelp should be avoided as it tends to have too much iodine
      Iron

      All menstruating women should increase their absorption by combining foods rich in iron and vitamin C at meals and should get checked for iron-deficiency anemia every few years
      Men should be checked for an iron overload disease before any attempt to increase intake
      Selenium

      Northern Europeans may need to take a supplement or eat a daily Brazil nut
      https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/

  30. Which one spikes your glucose level the most? If your glucose spikes from eating carbs your pancreas will release more insulin. That’s why many T2D have reversed there diabetes on a keto diet, along with losing weight. If one keeps eating high glycemic carbs you will never get off your meds. Dr G is a young guy and quite frankly he could use a little more muscle on that frame..would not exactly call him the picture of health.

    1. Ed,

      You are wrong.

      People going high-carb do get off of their meds. Often in about a week or two, if they are low fat and as long as they are not eating refined carbs or too much sugar.

      You need to understand that there are thousands of people now who are going off their Type 2 Diabetes using Whole Food Plant-Based, no oil.

      The Mastering Diabetes site has over 3500 people on it and there are European sites also with lists of people, plus sites like Forks Over Knives.

      There are documentaries like Simply Raw, where they got a whole room full of people off of all of their meds I think by the end of the first week.

      There are documentaries like Forks Over Knives and Eating You Alive, which have examples.

      There are studies and books from Dr. Barnard and Dr. Fuhrman.

      There are so many testimonials on the internet that you just have to look.

    1. The British vegetarian groups had much different results than other vegan and vegetarian studies.

      When I looked up to see what the Adventist study reviewers said about the British study, they said:

      “It appears that British vegetarians and US Adventist vegetarians eat somewhat differently.44 For instance, the vegetarians in our study consume more fiber and vitamin C than those of the EPIC-Oxford cohort: mean dietary fiber in EPIC-Oxford vegans was 27.7 g/d in men and 26.4 g/d in women compared with 45.6 g/d in men and 47.3 g/d in women in AHS-2 vegans; mean vitamin C in EPIC-Oxford vegans was 125 mg/d in men and 143 mg/d in women compared with 224 mg/d in men and 250 mg/d in women in AHS-2 vegans.38,43 Individuals electing vegetarian diets for ethical or environmental reasons may eat differently from those who choose vegetarian diets primarily for reasons of perceived superiority for health promotion.”

      1. Thank you Deb! It doesn’t really surprise me that the Brit’s vegan/vegetarian diet was lacklustre compared to the Adventist’s diet. But I eat more fiber than Adventists on average, more vit C, D, B12 etc, and yet here I am….

        This article we linked to seems to me yet one more ‘take a shot at vegans’. Not sure what the problem in Britain is, but maybe producers and sellers of animal products are reacting to the rise in popularity of plant based diets.

        1. Barb,

          I don’t doubt that there are people trying to take a shot at vegans, but it tells me mostly that it matters how we do this walk.

          The vegans in Britain are doing something wrong and it matters.

          It can be that they are higher salt or that they don’t supplement B12 or don’t eat soy or don’t get enough sunlight.

          We do know that they were lower in fiber, Vitamin C, D, and B12 and have a wrong Omega 3/6 ratio and all of those would be linked to the increased risk.

          What pleases me is that all of the answers I find already line up with what Dr. Greger is advising us to do.

          We can’t be afraid of being dispassionate about it. The IGF-1 making it that tall people have lower Hemorrhagic stroke means that we need to know how to live with that Achilles heel and that is the part the people who hate veganism and Whole Food Plant Based want to use to bring this diet down, but soy helps and you want to know what else, helps?

          Fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with risk of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.6 Results for fruit and vegetable subtypes showed that high versus low consumption of apples/pears, citrus fruits, and green leafy vegetables was associated with a significantly reduced risk of stroke.6

          1. They have a chart with things that affect stroke risk and lycopene was one that scored on the things we should be eating to prevent strokes.

            You want
            Lycopene
            Flavanoids
            Vitamin D
            Vitamin C
            Magnesium
            Potassium
            Omega 3’s
            Folate
            Soy

            Watch out for
            Sodium
            Calcium
            Diabetes
            Smoking
            Heavy alcohol

          2. Thank you Deb for all the searching around you have done on this question!! I very much appreciate it as will readers to follow. So far, I have been ticking all the boxes, including the lycopene. Dr Greger said in a video that green beans and tomatoes were antiplatlet aggregation so we eat them most days. I do not drink, but I could well be suffering a chocolate deficiency so I’ll do something about that! I agree that all that we are learning from Dr Greger is putting us in the best possible place to help avoid stroke or heart attack. Awesome.

            Thanks again Deb, very helpful.

          3. barb

            People who are ‘vegans’ for ethical and/or environmental reasons don’t necessarily eat healthy diets. It’s likely that many UK vegans/vegetarians are such for ethical/environmental reasons..

            North American 7th Day Adventists on the other hand are required to eat the msot healthful diet possible. it’s a fundamental belief of theirs.

            I suspect that this key difference is the problem in Britain.

    2. “Just seen this on the BBC website https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-49579820. I am new to this site and have only been pescatarian for 7 months, but there is a lot of contrasting views out there.’

      If you read beyond the misleading headline, it becomes clear that the study showed that vegans/vegetarians had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than meat eaters. – 10 fewer cases of heart disease versus 3 more cases of stroke for a net reduction of of 7 cases per thousand

      As for being pescatarian

      ‘The pescatarians were found to have a 13% lower risk of CHD than the meat-eaters, while the vegetarians and vegans had a 22% lower risk”

  31. I’m confused about fat. For a long time fat was the bad guy. Now we know that fat is part of a healthy diet it keeps blood sugar level and it is good for the brain.
    So are you saying to cut out fat to loose weight?
    This was the thinking a few decades ago like low fat non fat this and that. Fat was totally the bad guy.

    So they were right and cutting out fat is the key to weight loss b/c it is the most caloric thing . Simple cut out the most caloric thing (fat) and loose weight?

    What about avacado that’s all fat and very caloric?
    Or peanut butter or nuts all very caloric , makes sense to cut them out. But what about brain health ?
    I’m really confused? Weight Watchers has a pretty balanced plan but their approach is also confusing.

    1. Linda,

      When they biopsied the fat on the bodies of people after death, the composition of the fat came from fat in foods.

      Dr. McDougall uses the sentence, “The fat you eat is the fat you wear.”

      You do need some fat though and nuts and seeds and avocado don’t harm your endothelium the same way oils and animal fats do.

      Eating them whole versus nut butter is better.

      Also, don’t just snack on nuts. A third of an ounce is where you get brain benefits. An ounce is the most you want if you are trying to lose weight.

      People do have to measure their fats to lose weight.

      You don’t have to keep track of the carbs as much, but you do have to keep track of the fats and that would be true even if you went Keto.

      They use calorie restriction and intermittent fasting.

      1. Linda Larochelle,

        I am coming off of brain problems and you need to understand the bigger picture to understand what helps and hurts the brain.

        The Okinawans were very low fat in their diets and didn’t have brain problems. The Adventists have fewer than 5% of their people having Alzheimer’s or dementia. The Sherzai’s (husband and wife doctors) probably will help you more than anyone, but there are things like saturated fats and cholesterol which causes some types of brain problems – blocked arteries are one of the bigger causes of brain problems.

        Dr. Greger has a video showing the arteries of Alzheimer’s patients versus normal patients and they are blocked.

        That being said, he also has videos that whole food sources of fats can be helpful to brain health. Avocado and nuts are good for brain health, but saturated fat, cholesterol, and oil aren’t.

        Reversing my brain problems, I had to deal with blocked arteries from years of high saturated fat intake and I had to deal with aluminum in my brain from cheese and baked goods and cooking pans, etc. Plus, I had to deal with Homocysteine from not eating plant foods which have folate, we need to supplement B12 for that, too.

        There are superfoods like blueberries and turmeric and broccoli sprouts, which seriously help brain health and he has videos on those, too.

        When I first came here, I was coming off of years of serious brain problems, which have improved considerably. I had hallucinations and night terrors and I had been so out of touch with reality. I had such eye problems that I couldn’t tell which side of the road I was on when driving and I really thought I would wake up blind someday.

        I dealt with blood sugar (Dr. Greger has videos on blood sugar and Whole Food Plant-Based-no oil as how to heal from Type 2 Diabetes. Dr. Barnard and Dr. Fuhrman are who Dr. Greger recommends reading books by for that topic and Mastering Diabetes is a site, which has over 3500 people and lots of testimonials.)

        I dealt with Homocysteine by eating my vegetables and taking Omega 3’s and B-12.

        I dealt with the aluminum by drinking 1 liter of Fiji water every day for 12 weeks (That mostly got rid of my hallucinations, but they came back when I was having symptoms of B12 deficiency. I had been just using Methyl B12, but it wasn’t enough.)

        I got rid of my supplement which had copper and supplemented zinc for a while.

        I started eating watercress and seaweed for iodine and one brazil nut every day for selenium.

        There are other things, such as getting sleep, which I have not mastered at all, but I got a 1000% improvement without dealing with sleep and if I can ever get sleep, I think I would be so much better even.

        Increasing the blood flow to the brain and decreasing inflammation are major parts of it.

    2. Linda Larochelle, Dr Greger espouses a diet whole foods plant based. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/ along with B12 supplements. There is a video that describes it in detail. That is, a diet of fruit, veggies, beans, whole in-tact grains, and nuts and seeds, minimally processed, no salt, oil, sugar or animal products.

      I am slim and active but find I can not eat avocado, nuts, nut butters,
      coconut or other fatty plant foods without gaining weight. Some very athletic people do consume more fats regularly to maintain their weight.

      1. One of the answers to whether people can eat fats depends on whether they have sensitive stretch receptors.

        Dr. Lisle explains that many, many people have stretch receptors which are not sensitive to oil, for instance.

        If they aren’t sensitive to oil, they don’t adjust their eating when you add oil to their recipes.

        I definitely do not have stretch receptors which sense the oil.

        I know that because when I accidentally bought a brand of plant-milk which had oil it in, I gained weight.

        Someone who has sensitive stretch receptors senses the extra calories and they get fuller when fats are present.

        That has been tested in studies.

        Some people ate smaller portions when oil was added to a sauce and other people didn’t.

        Way more people are not sensitive than are sensitive and it is a real thing because there are hormones which cause you to feel hungry or full and the ones who are sensitive have that hormonal change occur. The people who didn’t have sensitive stretch receptors ate the same amount whether the oil was added or not.

      2. Sure, there is plenty of quick diuresis going on in the first week or so of a ketogenic diet. But, that doesn’t explain sustained weight loss over time. I lost 80 pounds over two years following a vegetarian ketogenic diet. And, that is not all due to the initial whoosh effect of ketosis.

        There is good research coming out of the University of Iowa. Sarah J Hallberg has paired up with Virta Health, a telephonic medical support program which uses a ketogenic diet to help in type 2 diabetes reversal and/or remission. I believe the study is going into its third year. Just search google scholar: SJ Hallberg.

        I hope these videos improve and expand on the science beyond what happens during the early days of ketosis induction. I am finding these a bit lacking. You can always find short-term studies to verify your own confirmation bias. I want some hard-hitting evidence in either direction (good or bad) about ketogenic diets. Right now, I am biased in favor of a vegetarian ketogenic diet based on personal experience.

        My husband experienced total T2D remission after 12 years. He is off all medications, and continues to see A1C’s under 5.4 after 2 years. As I mentioned, I lost significant weight on a ketogenic diet, and IMPROVED MY BIOMARKERS. Sure, you can attribute that to weight loss alone, except that I was unable to lose weight for decades–trying all sorts of weight loss methods including SOS WFPB.

        1. Dr. Greger did say positive things about eco-Atkins / vegan keto.

          But he still isn’t in favor of adding in oil because of the effects on the endothelium.

          Were you adding a lot of oil or were you eating higher quantities of nuts and seeds and avocado?

          Most people do Keto where they never enter ketosis in the first place.

          Some succeed with intermittent fasting, but you aren’t saying that you added intermittent fasting, you accomplished it with diet.

          1. Were you eating 80 to 90% of your calories from fat and staying in Ketosis?

            Or were you just eating low glycemic index vegetables?

            Dr. Greger does have a favorable video for the eating low glycemic index foods.

            1. I have watched her and she is an advocate for very high fat, but if unplugging the Pancreas so that it will function properly is the goal, Whole Food Plant-Based reverses the cause, not just the symptoms.

              If you look at the Mastering Diabetes site, many of the people switched from Keto to Whole Food Plant-Based and reversed their insulin resistance and ended up with better scores.

              1. So, are you eating 80 to 90% coconut oil?

                That is what they are doing at some keto places for cancer.

                600 calories with 80 to 90% coming from coconut oil.

                1. They also are using intermittent fasting, even with that low calories, so it is hard for me to decide what the benefit of the diet is.

                  I am not going to count the diet unless people can enter ketosis with it.

                  1. Or maybe a more polite way to say that is that people are watching videos explaining the benefits of ketosis and they are doing diets which never get them into ketosis at all.

                    The vast majority don’t get into ketosis at all and yet they expect the benefits.

                    Some are doing closer to Nutritarian – swapping white potatoes for greens and calling it keto and that isn’t the truth.

                    I am not meaning to say that you aren’t keto. I am just saying that most of the people who claim to be keto aren’t keto at all.

                    Then, eventually, they do things like intermittent fasting and severe calorie restriction or water fasting and those, to me, are their own topic.

                    Whole Food Plant-Based people can use those techniques if they want.

                    1. For most of the time I was doing keto, I was tracking food on Cron-o-meter. I aimed to limit my carbs to less than 30 net carbs a day. I tested with keto-stix and was in ketosis. My fat consumption was about 75 – 80% calories from fat. I did not take MCT or eat a lot of coconut oil. I did eat avocado, nuts and seeds, however much of the fat I ate came from oils and butterfat (I am vegetarian, not vegan).

        2. The Twinkie Diet guy lost weight and experienced improved biomarkers on his diet. Such results aren’t necessarily an infallible guide to a diet’s long term safety

          Unfortunately, low carb diets generally seem to be associated with increased mortality:

          ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.
          The results were confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven prospective cohort studies with 447,506 participants and an average follow-up 15.6 years, which found 15%, 13%, and 8% increased risks in total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality with low (compared to high) carbohydrate diets.
          Professor Banach said: “Low carbohydrate diets might be useful in the short term to lose weight, lower blood pressure, and improve blood glucose control, but our study suggests that in the long-term they are linked with an increased risk of death from any cause, and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer.”
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

          However, a ‘vegan’ keto diet emphasising unhydrogenated and nonrancid PUFA and MUFA fats is probably the safest way of doing keto – although I am not aware of any long term data on this.

          As for VIRTA Health, it was set up by Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney, long time big wheels in the Atkins organisation. Not the sort of people I would want to trust my health to but you clearly feel differently.

        3. I ran across this a few minutes ago. Not sure if it is of any interest to you but it does seem kind of relevant

          ‘The study involved nearly 49,000 postmenopausal women across the U.S. to test whether a low-fat dietary pattern would reduce the risk of breast and colorectal cancers and coronary heart disease. After nearly nine years of dietary change, they found that the low-fat diet did not significantly impact outcomes for these conditions. However, after longer-term follow-up of nearly 20 years, researchers found significant benefits, derived from modest dietary changes emerged and persisted including:

          A 15-35% reduction in deaths from all-causes following breast cancer
          A 13-25% reduction in insulin-dependent diabetes
          A 15-30% reduction in coronary heart disease among 23,000 women without baseline hypertension or prior cardiovascular disease
          “The WHI’s Dietary Modification Trial has provided women with nutrition and disease prevention insights for some years,” Prentice said. “The latest results support the role of nutrition in overall health, and indicate that low-fat diets rich in fruits, vegetables and grains have health benefits without any observed adverse effects.”

          Unlike other studies examining the link between diet, cancer and other diseases, WHI investigators designed the study as a long-term, randomized controlled clinical trial to limit bias and establish causal conclusions. Participants made intentional dietary changes resulting from learned integrated concepts about nutrition and behavior, taught by trained nutritionists during the first year and reinforced quarterly for nearly a decade.

          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190904090302.htm

        4. Linda, I didn’t read your full post or any of the replies–though I did see Mr Fumbles offered some good science that looked helpful–but I saw you ask how that explained sustained weight loss and just to half-assedley weight in, I would speculate that sustained weight loss would continue to be the one of two things, or both things, explained in this video: loss of LEAN mass (smaller muscles) and less water. Personally, that would not be the loss I would want. I also saw you said that you were a vegetarian, so eating a lot of nuts likely served as a major protector in your favor despite all the butter fat as you said.

    3. No wonder you’re confused, Linda. You should be aware that there are many supposed research studies designed by Big Food to convince you that fat is now healthy, even saturated fat. Don’t fall for such misleading claims. Check this video out: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-butter-really-back-what-the-science-says/ You may also want to view the other videos Dr. Greger has done on the Paleo diet. Just go to the search box at the top and type in Paleo. Commenter Deb has made some good comments.about healthy fat and while it can be part of a healthy diet, it also can increase weight, so you may need to use caution Check out the videos on Flaxseed and DHA recommendations to give you a clearer understanding of healthy fats in the diet. Hope this helps

  32. I’m trying to lose weight, cutting carbs isn’t the answer based on my observation from your video. I would lose more weight eating a piece of Ezekiel bread than some thing low carb, (long term). Fat is bad but what if I put avocado on my Ezekiel bread, would that stop my weight loss? As long as I stick to while food plant base diet?

    1. Melissa, not answering the weight loss question but just wanted to point out that fat isn’t bad, it’s essential. We need essential fatty acids and they should come from plant foods and ideally whole plant foods. Dr. Greger said in one interview that it doesn’t matter if you’re on a low fat or high fat diet as long as it’s from a whole plant food–I believe that was in his quick interview on whatever show Kelly Rippa is on which you can find posted on this site. But I know he advises against coconuts and chestnuts. In reality, there is a ton of evidence that nut consumption is linked to greater health. It’s unwise to think in terms of macronutrients, that’s why Dr. Greger simply suggests a whole plant foods diet.

  33. Brilliant series and much needed information. My cousin’s boyfriend was hospitalized from doing the keto diet and now has to walk around with a catheter. My cousin still thinks the diet works because of the scale.

    I hope to see more studies in the future focusing on the differences between fat from plant sources (not talking hydrogenated oils) and animal sources and test to see what happens if you have equal amounts of fat in each diet but one strictly from the plant kingdom and the other animal. It would also be interesting to see the difference between the effects saturated fat has on the body based on the source, plant vs. animal. This isn’t a pro-coconut oil argument, I’m just very curious. I know there’s some existing data but most studies seem to focus on macronutrients without taking into account the source.

    Speaking of saturated fat-rich oils, though, Dr. Greger or someone on the team here, why hasn’t there been a video explicitly on the harms of palm oil yet? Palm oil is in more things than coconut oil and it’s even sold on health food store shelves now by the jar. Considering all the focus on coconut oil here, I am surprised and anxiously await a video on palm oil. I know Dr. Greger has stated elsewhere that palm oil is the worse oil (apart from hydrogenated oil I assume). And there is so much deforestation, animal cruelty, and global devastation over the incredibly unhealthy popular oil and additive that it wouldn’t only be a service to public health to have a video dedicated to why palm is an unhealthy oil, but to the planet and animals alike.
    And what about palmitate? Horrible stuff or so it seems. It seems a lot of horrible things come from palm oil including (going on memory) vitamin A palmate or palmitate increasing photosensitivity, yet it’s still found in many skin care products. If someone could pass my concern about palm oil and request for a video explicitly on it, that would be awesome! I know Dr. Greger and team are all super busy but I think it would be extremely worthwhile.

    1. I should also add that it would be a great service to people of countries like Borneo and Indonesia where lives are destroyed to the point that people in Borneo actually created a petition begging people to stop using palm oil a few years ago.

    1. His study was about dietary carbohydrate restriction versus dietary fat restriction.

      If keto diets and low carb diets aren’t actually about dietary carbohydrate restriction then life has suddenly become much more complicated..

      And the title of his study is “Calorie for Calorie, Dietary Fat Restriction Results in More Body Fat Loss than Carbohydrate Restriction in People with Obesity”
      https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(15)00350-2?

      His tweets don’t make a lot of sense to me.

      1. I think his point is that, although the low-fat diet in his study was indeed very low in fat, at about 8% of calories, the reduced carb diet wasn’t nearly low enough to be ketogenic. Therefore, the study cannot be used to support claims about ketogenic diet. This is explicitly pointed out in the text of the study itself.

    2. I think Dr. Greger does owe an explanation here. He does cite Kevin Hall’s research in support of claims that Hall himself does not think his research supports. Granted, researchers will not always agree with the way their work is used, but I think as a professional courtesy the points Kevin Hall raises in his string of seven tweets should be addressed–perhaps in a future video.

  34. I’ve only been on the keto diet for just 2 weeks I’ve more energy, not in pain because of ibs gone down 1 whole size in jeans have zero cravings…. Fuller for longer i now eat half the amount because i fill up quickly ive tryed every diet and this i can do easily its not a diet its more like a life change for myself

    1. Good for you. Something those selling keto diet books and plans etc seldom mention ……….

      ‘Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.

      The results were confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven prospective cohort studies with 447,506 participants and an average follow-up 15.6 years, which found 15%, 13%, and 8% increased risks in total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality with low (compared to high) carbohydrate diets.

      Professor Banach said: “Low carbohydrate diets might be useful in the short term to lose weight, lower blood pressure, and improve blood glucose control, but our study suggests that in the long-term they are linked with an increased risk of death from any cause, and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer.”‘
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180828085922.htm

    2. A very dangerous, unhealthy lifestyle change, Anita. You should really look at the science. Keep getting your heart checked in any case, you’re going to need to if this is indeed your new lifestyle.

  35. There was a salt study performed on cosmonauts. It claimed salt increased fat loss
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/08/health/salt-health-effects.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

    New studies of Russian cosmonauts, held in isolation to simulate space travel, show that eating more salt made them less thirsty but somehow hungrier. Subsequent experiments found that mice burned more calories when they got more salt, eating 25 percent more just to maintain their weight.
    The research, published recently in two dense papers in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, contradicts much of the conventional wisdom about how the body handles salt and suggests that high levels may play a role in weight loss.

      1. Right, there are a lot of unhealthy ways to achieve weight loss. Starvation is probably the most effective and you could argue that it’s an unsustainable method, but so is doing something that is harming your body in various other ways.

  36. Hello (kind of my first post here), (Late answer, haven’t read the other posts, sorry) I ment I’m going for the studies that show a moderate salt intake isn’t too harmful (I also eat salt because I have felt that I feel better when I eat some salt). /Krojb

  37. Nice EduVideo! Thank you for this piece.
    And in my 8 years being a plant based/Lifestyle physician the result shown in this video mirror exactly what I have seen my patients experience. And guess what, nearly all my patient that I have been seeing over the last 8 years end up adopting a whole food, minimally process, no added oil plant based diet. Why? Because it’s the only thing that works at making them feel better, lose weight and reverse their chronic diseases. It’s a process of becoming for my patients (a journey). Some are quicker than others to discover this, but as I tell most of my patients, “ it does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.“ Confucius

    Keep adding more whole fruits, veggies, starches and leafy greens to your daily diet.
    Remember who this ultimately helps—you!

  38. So how best to eat when your body doesn’t really tolerate any grains as well as many of the FODMAP vegetables.. That’s me and my painful irritable bowel symptoms have gone on for over 50 yrs. Many of those yrs I didn’t know the culprit. It has been a process of trial and error. Keto seems to eliminate most of my symptoms however. It is difficult to even come close to getting the recommended daily fiber intake without grains. I eat lots of chicken, very little fish as I detest it, allergic to shellfish, soy disagrees with me too. Love red meat but limit it to once a week. I eat lots of eggs. Recently slight inc in cholesterol so it is still borderline normal, slightly low iron and low thyroid. Low thyroid can lead to low iron and inc in bad cholesterol. Had my thyroid dose Inc so will need to recheck bloodwork soon. Had lymphoma 15 yrs ago. Had chemo and radiation which damaged thyroid. Everything else is normal and has always been so. Blood pressure and blood sugar has always been on low side of normal.

    1. Hi, MICHELLE ELLISON! You can find everything on this site related to irritable bowel here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/irritable-bowel-syndrome/ I suspect that eating lots of chicken and eggs is not really helping you. Although it may reduce symptoms, your diet may be contributing to the imbalance of microbes in your intestines that are likely causing the problems you describe. I would suggest gradually cutting back on animal products while introducing small amounts of well-cooked (possibly even pureed) fruits, vegetables and intact whole grains as a way of trying to build a tolerance for them by feeding healthier gut flora. I hope that helps!

  39. Dr Gregor, Can you review this follow up to the DIETFITS study? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30649213

    RESULTS:
    Participants consumed an average of 12-18% of calories from SFA. An increase of %SFA, without significant changes in absolute saturated fat intake, over 12 months was associated with a statistically significant decrease in triglycerides in the context of a weight-loss study in which participants simultaneously decreased carbohydrate intake. The association between increase in %SFA and decrease in triglycerides was no longer significant when adjusting for 12-month change in carbohydrate intake, suggesting carbohydrate intake may be a mediator of this relationship.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Those on a low-carbohydrate weight-loss diet who increase their percentage intake of dietary saturated fat may improve their overall lipid profile provided they focus on a high-quality diet and lower their intakes of both calories and refined carbohydrates. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01826591.

  40. New in this portal trying to understand what good healthy habits are. Currently reading “How Not To Die” book and pre-purchased “How not to diet” coming out in December. So, I’m in full learning mode, with a healthy dose of skepticism with ANYTHING that’s diet/nutritious related.

    Probably this video does not do justice to the quality of site, but it’s conclusions are at least “iffy” considering it’s only a 6 DAY study!

    Also, I’d noticed Keto Diet is usually not well defined and can include anything from double cheeseburgers with bomb coffee to adding 8 cups of greens to 70 grams of protein, <20 grams of carbs and fats until satiated.

    Look forward to a palatable learning experience.

  41. Every person I’ve ever known who went low carb diet failed. And failed repeatedly. Never maintained weight loss and were more prone to be on cholesterol meds and other meds. At 62, I’m still a size 6 and take zero medicines for nada illnesses. Yet, they’ll argue with me til they’re blue about those low carb diets they just love and that they KNOW work.

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