Flashback Friday: Coffee & Mortality

Flashback Friday: Coffee & Mortality
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What effect does coffee and tea consumption have on longevity, cancer risk, GERD reflux, bone fractures, glaucoma, sleep quality, and atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)?

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Do coffee drinkers live longer than non-coffee drinkers? Is it, “Wake up and smell the coffee,” or “Don’t wake up at all?” The largest study ever conducted on diet and health put that question to the test, examining the association between coffee drinking and subsequent mortality among hundreds of thousands of older men and women in the United States. Coffee drinkers won, though the effect was modest. 10 to 15% lower risk of death for those drinking six or more cups a day, specifically due to lower risk of dying from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.

That much coffee was found to increase the death rates of younger people, though—under age 55. Hence, based on this study, it may be appropriate to recommend that you avoid drinking more than four cups a day. But, if you put all the studies together, the bottom line is that coffee consumption is associated with no change or a small reduction in mortality starting around one or two cups a day, for both men and women.

On a cup by cup basis, the risk of dying was 3% lower for each cup of coffee consumed daily, which provides reassurance with respect to the concern that coffee drinking might adversely affect health.

Well, at least, longevity. Healthwise though, a recent population study found no link between coffee consumption and symptoms of GERD, such as heartburn and regurgitation. If you actually stick a tube down people’s throats and measure pH, coffee induces significant acid reflux, whereas tea does not. Is it just because tea has less caffeine? No. If you reduce the caffeine content of coffee down to that of tea, it still causes significantly more acid reflux. Decaf did cause less though, so GERD patients might want to choose decaffeinated, or even better, drink tea.

Coffee intake is also associated with urinary incontinence, and so a decrease in caffeine intake should be discussed with women who have the condition, or men. About two cups of coffee a day worth of caffeine may worsen urinary leakage in men as well.

A 2014 meta-analysis suggested that daily coffee consumption was associated with a slightly increased risk of bone fractures in women, but a decreased risk of fractures in men. Not hip fractures, though. No significant association was found between coffee consumption and the risk of hip fracture, though tea consumption may actually be protective against hip fracture, though it appears to have no apparent relationship with fracture risk in general.

There are certain populations in particular who may want to stay away from caffeine; for example, those with glaucoma, and possibly even those with a family history of glaucoma.

It goes without saying that people who have trouble sleeping might not want to imbibe. Even just a single cup at night can cause a significant deterioration in sleep quality. Then there are case reports, for example, of individuals with epilepsy having fewer seizures after stopping coffee; so, I guess it’s worth a shot.  

We used to think caffeine might increase the risk of an irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, but that too was based on anecdotal case reports, like this one of a young woman who suffered atrial fibrillation after chocolate intake abuse. But these cases invariably involved the acute ingestion of very large quantities of caffeine. As a result, though, the notion that caffeine ingestion may trigger abnormal heart rhythms had become ”common knowledge,” and this assumption led to changes in medical practice. More recently, however, the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction. Why? Because we actually have data now: caffeine does not increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. And low-dose caffeine, which they define as less than about five cups of coffee a day, may even have a protective effect. Tea consumption also appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk, especially when it comes to stroke. However, given the proliferation of energy drinks that contain massive quantities of caffeine, one might temper any message that suggests caffeine is beneficial. Seems a little patronizing, but it’s no joke. Twelve highly caffeinated energy drinks within a few hours could be lethal.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Anne Worner via Flickr.

Do coffee drinkers live longer than non-coffee drinkers? Is it, “Wake up and smell the coffee,” or “Don’t wake up at all?” The largest study ever conducted on diet and health put that question to the test, examining the association between coffee drinking and subsequent mortality among hundreds of thousands of older men and women in the United States. Coffee drinkers won, though the effect was modest. 10 to 15% lower risk of death for those drinking six or more cups a day, specifically due to lower risk of dying from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.

That much coffee was found to increase the death rates of younger people, though—under age 55. Hence, based on this study, it may be appropriate to recommend that you avoid drinking more than four cups a day. But, if you put all the studies together, the bottom line is that coffee consumption is associated with no change or a small reduction in mortality starting around one or two cups a day, for both men and women.

On a cup by cup basis, the risk of dying was 3% lower for each cup of coffee consumed daily, which provides reassurance with respect to the concern that coffee drinking might adversely affect health.

Well, at least, longevity. Healthwise though, a recent population study found no link between coffee consumption and symptoms of GERD, such as heartburn and regurgitation. If you actually stick a tube down people’s throats and measure pH, coffee induces significant acid reflux, whereas tea does not. Is it just because tea has less caffeine? No. If you reduce the caffeine content of coffee down to that of tea, it still causes significantly more acid reflux. Decaf did cause less though, so GERD patients might want to choose decaffeinated, or even better, drink tea.

Coffee intake is also associated with urinary incontinence, and so a decrease in caffeine intake should be discussed with women who have the condition, or men. About two cups of coffee a day worth of caffeine may worsen urinary leakage in men as well.

A 2014 meta-analysis suggested that daily coffee consumption was associated with a slightly increased risk of bone fractures in women, but a decreased risk of fractures in men. Not hip fractures, though. No significant association was found between coffee consumption and the risk of hip fracture, though tea consumption may actually be protective against hip fracture, though it appears to have no apparent relationship with fracture risk in general.

There are certain populations in particular who may want to stay away from caffeine; for example, those with glaucoma, and possibly even those with a family history of glaucoma.

It goes without saying that people who have trouble sleeping might not want to imbibe. Even just a single cup at night can cause a significant deterioration in sleep quality. Then there are case reports, for example, of individuals with epilepsy having fewer seizures after stopping coffee; so, I guess it’s worth a shot.  

We used to think caffeine might increase the risk of an irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, but that too was based on anecdotal case reports, like this one of a young woman who suffered atrial fibrillation after chocolate intake abuse. But these cases invariably involved the acute ingestion of very large quantities of caffeine. As a result, though, the notion that caffeine ingestion may trigger abnormal heart rhythms had become ”common knowledge,” and this assumption led to changes in medical practice. More recently, however, the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction. Why? Because we actually have data now: caffeine does not increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. And low-dose caffeine, which they define as less than about five cups of coffee a day, may even have a protective effect. Tea consumption also appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk, especially when it comes to stroke. However, given the proliferation of energy drinks that contain massive quantities of caffeine, one might temper any message that suggests caffeine is beneficial. Seems a little patronizing, but it’s no joke. Twelve highly caffeinated energy drinks within a few hours could be lethal.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Anne Worner via Flickr.

71 responses to “Flashback Friday: Coffee & Mortality

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  1. I cross train with my drinks. I drink coffee and tea (chi & green) to get the benefits of both. I will morning drink one or the other for awhile. The change up makes both taste better. I also drink a bit of hibiscus tea. Tea prep can be easy as microwaving a glass of water for two minutes or putting the tea bag in tap temperature water. The latter is better on hot days. I might drink some hibiscus tea today since it is May 1st. Goddess Flora would be pleased.

    1. Dan C,

      I now cold brew tea in my fridge: I pour water over a tea bag in a mug (could be loose tea in a little pot), and leave it in the fridge all day or overnight. That’s how I make hibiscus tea year round, and ginger tea during the summer. I still prefer my green tea hot, every morning.

      1. Dr. J.,

        My family always made iced tea that way.

        My brother used to make it 5 gallons at a time.

        But by the end of the summer, the last batch would always sit until someone eventually threw it out.

        I think little pots are a good concept.

        1. Lee,

          I pour room temperature water over my hibiscus tea bag, then refrigerate. Though I have used hot water, for example with ginger tea, which I then let cool and refrigerate.

          1. Thank you! I feel a bit foolish but I thought it would only be hot water that could properly saturate the teabag and brew the tea. I will try it your way. Thank you

            1. Room temp water works perfect for steeping, it just needs to sit a lot longer. I do at least 2 hours in the fridge but most often it sits for hours or over night

            2. Lee,
              Story: I had a sociology professor who was a proper, British Englishman. Dr. William Watson. He flew Mosquito bombers for the RAF in WWII. He called them flying barns, no match for what the Germans had. Many in the RAF flew drunk. Half of them did not come back. Sitting ducks. Anyway, I wound up working for him in my painting business, about 15 years after I took the class. He was quite the beer drinker. We drank several the way British drink beer, at room temperature :-0
              He instructed me on the right way the British prepare their tea, which is to boil it for five minutes. It was years later that I became aware that room temperature water is enough to distill tea. Dr. Greger has a video on tea showing there can be lead in some teas (Japanese tea may be an exception). It kinda seems to me that hot water might cause the lead to leach out more. Also I can make an instant cup of tea by running tap water on the bag and drinking the tea immediately. The first two or three sips may be a little weak.

              1. We Brits do not boil tea but tourist to the USA always complained that tea was not made to their liking because the water had to be boiling to pour onto the tea leaves, it is then left to steep for three to five minutes. The Americans always made their tea by adding water from a hot water boiler which does not give the same outcome.

    2. I had a grandmother who drank her coffee from a saucer, probably to cool it off from the cup. She also chewed plug tobacco. She spit the juice in a coffee can. No, this was not added to the coffee.

  2. I am interested in more information on the association of caffeine with an increased risk of incontinence in men.

  3. Wondering if YR drinks with her pinky finger extended?

    I think I do with teacups, but my coffee mugs are heavy enough that I need to use my whole hand.

    1. Deb, I drink both my black coffee and tea in a good ol’ coffee mug. What’s a pinky finger? :-)

      Don’t like ANY drinks cold…or at the very least, sans ice.

      1. “There is little scientific evidence to suggest that drinking cold water is bad for people. In fact, drinking colder water may improve exercise performance and be better for rehydration when exercising, especially in hotter environments.

        However, drinking cold water may worsen symptoms in people with achalasia, which affects the food pipe. Drinking ice-cold water can also causes headaches in some people, particularly those who live with migraine.”
        – – – – – –

        https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325038

          1. I may have been Chines in another lifetime.

            My sister and I were born on the same day but one of is four years older. She MUST have her beverages ice cold. When she visited sometime ago (lives in another state), she was a bit upset when she saw my refrigerator freezer was packed with everything but an ice cube tray with ice cubes. Panic ensued! :-)

            1. Smiling.

              Siblings tend to be opposites.

              I was allergic to meat and struggled when the food was too spicy.

              My brother could have just eaten meat and he searches for the hottest peppers possible and, let me tell you, cold isn’t the only thing that can give headaches.

          2. The logic for cool versus warm was fun to read.

            A few studies, people drank more water and sweated less out when they drank cool water.

            Versus warm water can improve circulation.

            The bigger message was to actually drink water.

            But the one that fascinated me the most was when they gave the athletes an ice slush. They achieved the best performance when the ice-slush
            also had a menthol aroma.

            I wonder if it reminded them of their pain-relief patch or something.

          3. Brian Howe,
            A PBS history of Chinese railway workers in the U.S. showed they had a better survival rate than other workers because they boiled their water to make green tea.

  4. What actually constitutes a “cup” of coffee in these studies? In the US a “cup” is 8oz., but the lines on the carafe that came with my coffee pot measure out at approximately 5oz. “cups”. Is there a standard that was used in these studies?

    1. Hi Kyle, thanks for your question. It does not indicate in a few of the reference however in the below review one of the studies by Freedman et al did not look at preparation or additions to coffee indicated , A 16-oz cup of filtered black coffee has 5 calories. The same-sized latte has about 190 calories (without sugar).

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23486797/?from_single_result=Coffee%3A+advice+for+our+vice%3F&expanded_search_query=Coffee%3A+advice+for+our+vice%3F

      Freedman ND, Park Y, Abnet CC, Hollenbeck AR, Sinha R. Association of coffee drinking with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med 2012;366(20):1891-904.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

    2. Kyle,

      I love your question, because it’s one that I have all the time. Which is how I know that nutrition researchers aren’t real scientists, because real scientists always provide their measurements, as in: “where a cup of coffee is X ounces.” Our coffee maker, which is European, measures cups in 4 ounces. A fluid measuring cup is 8 ounces. The smallest size coffee “cup” at Starbucks is 12 ounces, I think. And I’m sure that there all kinds of cups in between. So, simply stating a number of cups a day is USELESS without also mentioning how many ounces are in those cups.

      On the other hand, nutrition science is very inexact even in the best of circumstances. As other readers have asked: “what else are study subjects eating?” One of the best questions ever. Without context, it is extremely difficult to interpret any results observed. Would the same effects be observed in whole plant food eaters? Those who eat meat, but avoid processed foods? Those who eat SAD? Those who eat CRAP? The list is very long.

      So, accept nutrition research results, and even more so the conclusions, with a huge healthy dose of skepticism. The broad brush conclusions may be fairly well established, but most of the details are rough approximations at best.

  5. This video makes me question all the research. Just because I love coffee, however I know when I drink coffee, especially strong coffee, it depletes my immune system & I often get sick & experience poor sleep. Furthermore, it’s an addictive drug like drink that puts you on a high.
    I honestly feel jittery, nauseous & just all around quite unwell from drinking a cup of good quality coffee. Yes, that would likely go away if I keep drinking coffee, however I cannot believe coffee to be healthy. It’s like the smoking in times when officials said it to be healthy, but your body tells you otherwise. Is this perhaps because the people who wrote or helped write this are not able to overcome their addiction to coffee & caffeine?

    1. Stefanie,

      I think this study was more about whether people who like coffee are at risk and the answer was: “On a cup by cup basis, the risk of dying was 3% lower for each cup of coffee consumed daily, which provides reassurance with respect to the concern that coffee drinking might adversely affect health.”

      That study involved hundreds of thousands of people.

      Smoking doesn’t have studies like that and never did.

      There is, however, a smoker’s paradox with COVID-19 and Parkinson’s – but you don’t have to smoke to get the benefit. Dr. Greger has a video on how to get the benefits without the risks of smoking.

    2. Coffee does not “deplete” the immune system. More likely that your lack of sleep is the reason for getting sick. Solution: Don’t drink anything with caffeine after lunch. Caffeine has a half-life, and it takes several hours to clear it out of your system.

    3. I agree with you, Stephanie. And the message the body sends is undeniable, isn’t it? The cleaner you get the louder it shouts.

    4. @Stefanie

      If Dr. Greger is right, coffee actually stimulates the immune system (he once said this in one of his videos). It might be a coincidence, but I haven’t really been sick since I started drinking it, even when everyone around me had fever/stuffy noses/… (though I also suspect this to be the main reason for my (admittedly only very slowly and slightly) receeding hairline (talking about ones own immune system attacking the hair roots)).

      Whats definitely true is that coffee is obviously quite acidic, which is usually not a good thing. Plus, one thing Dr. Greger did not mention, it can strongly irritate your stomach, especially when drunk black.

      I must say that I, just like you, felt it to be unhealthy when I was in my late teens (immediately quit it), so there might be more to the suspection that its effect varies not only from person to person (remember the genes video), preparation method to preparation method, and product to product (the way they were grown and later roasted), but also depending on your age.

      What’s always important to bear in mind is that your way of consumption can make a big difference. When? How much? When you’re feeling tired, in order to be able to further ignore your bodies messages/pleas for rest and recollection of strength and force? That’s how most university students use it, which temporarily enables them to finish their papers, but in the long run exhausts them.

      If you’re already using high quality coffee in a smart way, then it’s probably not your kind of drink, and you should listen to your body instead and quit drinking it. :) You might feel differently about it once you’re older, and thus a different body with different needs.

      I share your preoccupation that it might be much unhealthier for certain people/at certain times/in certain contexts than commonly believed, though. Let’s hope future scientific research will shed more light on this matter, too.

  6. No mention of caffeine as an ergogenic, that is, enhancing athletic performance. Years ago, my understanding was that caffeine indeed did enhance athletic performance and was the only ergogenic that was allowed in sanctioned competition. I wonder if there is any new information on that.

    1. This video cites a study finding high coffee consumption was associated with a small reduction in bone density that did not translate into an increased risk of fracture.It did not cite studies to strengthen bones in women While coffee has some beneficial effects (see: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/coffee) it does not lead directly to an overall recommendation of increased coffee of any amount for all . In fact see https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-the-health-benefits-of-coffee-apply-to-everyone/ No more than 4 cups of coffee a day is the usual limit, but for some this may be too much. In fact any at all may be too much.

  7. I think I ended up doing the Methyl B12 and ending up with B-12 deficiency symptoms again.

    I was wondering if my symptoms were COVID but every time I searched Vitamin B-12 deficiency was the answer that came up.

    I had to switch brands because of COVID-19 but it has only been a few months.

    Well, I will be switching again and I will find out.

  8. This video was first posted in 2015.

    However, there was a systematic review and meta analysis published in 2019. It came to similar conclusions

    ‘Results
    We included 21 cohort study articles (10 103 115 study participants and 240 303 deaths). We found a nonlinear association between coffee consumption and all‐cause mortality (Pnonlinearity < 0.001). Compared with no or rare coffee consumption, with a consumption of 3 cups day–1, the risk of all‐cause mortality might reduce 13% (RR = 0.87; 95% confidence interval = 0.84–0.89).

    Conclusions
    The findings of the present study provide quantitative data suggesting that coffee consumption plays a role in reducing the risk of all‐cause mortality. Similar inverse associations are found for caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee.'
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jhn.12633

    i drink coffee every day myself so I hope it is correct. Nonetheless, the possibility remains that the association is just a statistical artefact. That is, if people are consuming coffee in place of eg beer, cola, liquor, juice, milk, energy drinks etc, the mortality benefit may be caused by not drinking those things. The coffee itself may offer no actual benefit or it may even be unhealthy but less so than than those other things. Any of those possibilities could potentially explain the observed mortality benefit. Or am I missing something?

  9. Hi,
    I know this has nothing to do with coffee or tea, but just in desperate need of help.

    I’m in Sydney Australia and just been informed that my best friends dad back in the UK has been diagnosed with ‘Mesothelioma’

    Does anybody know much about it/ is there anything at all that can help.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated as I don’t know what/ who else to ask/ do.

    1. I went to a page on Mesothelioma and they do recommend a Whole Food Plant-Based Diet.

      Dr. Greger has a lot of diet and cancer videos. They are packed full of information.

      Poultry and processed meats are specifically linked to Mesothelioma. When they studied the diets of people who got Mesothelioma they often eat fewer cruciferous vegetables particularly. I would go to the foods versus cancer video and look at the foods.

      Some of the areas that I have been watching for lung cancer are:

      https://www.mesotheliomahelp.org/treatment/photodynamic-therapy/

      Tumor Treating Fields https://www.asbestos.com/treatment/ttfields/

      and Check Point Inhibitors which are sometimes used before Chemo. There are usually studies.

      I would look into water fasting and mimicking fasting particularly if the person decides to do chemo.

      I am not a medical person.

      My brother has kidney cancer and my mother died of breast cancer and I do have people around me who reversed cancer with a vegan no oil, high vegetable diet and Gerson. But none of them had Mesothelioma.

      Dr. McDougall said that going Whole Food Plant-Based no oil vegan heals some people of cancer, but even if it doesn’t heal them, it tends to extend people’s lives and it tends to increase the double-time of cancer.

      There is a video on Amazon Healing Cancer from the Inside Out, but again, I am not sure how many of those cases were with Mesothelioma.

      Sorry that I couldn’t be of more help.

      Broccoli sprouts would be one thing I would be learning about because of how it affects the enzymes to clean up the lungs. But that is more my hunch because vegetable intake helps COPD and asthma and broccoli prevents air pollution from causing harm. Dr. Greger has videos on those things.

      I eat broccoli microgreens because I find them easier to eat than broccoli, but all cruciferous are good.

      1. Deb,
        Re: Dr. McDougall, WFPB-no oil. Question: Does the “no oil” include oils in plant foods like peanut butter, or extracted oils? I seem to feel, maybe wrongly, that I do better with fat, like from peanut butter. I also eat unsalted peanuts, maybe a one pound jar per week.

        1. Dan,

          There will always be some oils in naturally occurring foods and their essential.

          The no-oil reference is intended for refined oil use, such as the common olive/sunflower/safflower/etc. oils used in cooking and other applications.

          Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

      1. I am wondering if Methionine-restriction would be good for mesothelioma, and I did find articles but they were all ones you had to pay to look at or request full-text.

        I also saw an Arginine-restriction and mesothelioma study, so it looks like they have tried a lot of different approaches to amino acid restrictions.

        Well, I am not sure any of them are a good idea, but cruciferous vegetables are a good idea.

  10. This is an interesting study done on Japanese miso and blood pressure. The notable parts of the study are that: 1)consumption of miso (despite the high sodium content) seems to not have an affect on daytime blood pressures, and a decrease in nighttime blood pressure; 2)the miso used was provided by a Japanese company and created by them with an ace inhibitor; 3)the conflict of interest section needs to be deciphered by nutritionfacts professional staff; 4)here’s a doozy, this created miso RAISES LDL-C levels significantly!!! What The Heck!!!; and 5)this is a recent study having been published in August of 2019. Any kind of help would be greatly appreciated nutritionfacts! Aloha from Honolulu, Hawaii!!! Ken

  11. Oops here’s the study, please put into search string on pubmed:

    Long-term intake of miso soup decreases nighttime blood pressure in subjects with high-normal blood pressure or stage I hypertension

  12. PBS has a documentary about recycling and just seeing American products from American recycling poured out over the Indonesian landscape is enough to make someone cry.

    1. We are just sending our trash to poor countries and they are dumping it in their poorest neighborhoods and in the water.

      I have been looking at laundry and a man tested a few different eco egg type things and the soap nuts but what struck me was that one of his controls was plain water washing and the results for his was that the water only did second best to Tide detergent.

      The brand where you put two eggs in did worse that the cheap brand where you only put one egg in but putting no eggs in was even better.

      Seems like other than treating Harder stains and getting rid of deodorant odor, water-only worked.

      The eco-friendly ones didn’t get rid of stains as well as water-only and they slowly left a residue that over time makes towels less absorbent.

      I am looking into Dropps next but steam and water only may be my contribution to the poor in Indonesia.

      1. Deb,
        I am cold water washing because I’ve learned that works the best. I use very little liquid soap and the bottle can last two years maybe, a year for sure.

        1. Dan,

          Thanks for sharing. That is fascinating.

          By that, what do you mean, “works better” could you share a little?

          I was doing cold water, but Dr. Annie’s Experiments got me to switch – especially during the pandemic.

          I have never been a germaphobe, but people are already not wearing masks and we are opening society and I don’t know how to process any of it.

          Do you mean that the stains go away faster? Or do you mean that you don’t spend the money on electricity?

          Electricity was my goal and it was brilliant. I got my electric bill down to $32 even with the added fees.

          But I am learning a lot about how and why logic changes.

          Priorities change.

          Most things, I can kill the germs in my Wabi Baby or with my steam cleaner, but I know that I have to change to an unscented deodorant if I am going to do that for shirts. Some people just use baking soda and other people get rashes from baking soda. I am going to try it soon and see if I can just do that.

  13. I have been seeing ads for the Microban 24 which supposedly kills bacteria, microbes and viruses and keeps killing them for 24 hours and it says, “New” but I looked up the ingredients and it was something we have been using since the 1940’s.

    Then, I saw this site, which says theirs protects for 90 days which obviously is better than 24 hours.

    But I got to the ingredients and the science and disinfection seems like it would be a good topic.

    The physical kill is accomplished by forming a nano-scale biostatic layer on treated surfaces that consists of millions of carbon-based nano-spikes made up of a carbon shaft and a nitrogen molecule base that self assemble in layers and bond covalently with the surface. The positively charged nitrogen interacts with the negatively charged germs/mold/mildew/fungus like a magnet that draws it down onto the carbon spike. The result is a physically ruptured or “stabbed” germ that can’t survive – or adapt to become resistant. That is how EV360™ effectively protects from FUTURE contamination! The nano-spikes are very durable and stay bonded to the surface through touching, cleaning and normal use. When properly applied they will even withstand cleaning with straight bleach and continue to protect.

    I am trying to understand it because it doesn’t say, “Kills viruses” except in one sentence:

    These atom-sized spikes are 99.96% effective at killing the dangers we cannot see – germs, bacteria, mold, mildew, and viruses.

    And I am a little bit confused about the whole bacteria thing.

    And I haven’t reached safety yet.

    90-days is a flashing light trying to get my money like a 20 year old in front of a live naked nude girls sign in Las Vegas.

    https://shop.everestantimicrobial.com/collections/frontpage/products/everest-antimicrobial-antibacterial-spray

    1. Nevermind, I just bought it for our shop.

      Might as well try things during a pandemic.

      The justification is that I can’t keep up with cleaning 3 floors all day and I don’t trust everybody to wash their hands.

      That will be the last one because I like the steam and UV already and I trust those but obviously I am paranoid that my favorite old people are gonna die.

      I am not sure when fear of viruses suddenly became such a big deal, but I got in my silvertize mask and I don’t wear it outside. I wear it 10 minutes twice a day and I use that to not have to sing happy birthday four times when I wash my face. (since my hands touch my face and I am not sure if I reinfect my hands from touching my face.)

      I am finished as possible, I hope.

  14. I *wonder* if the coffee/caffeine mortality study/studies take into account that coffee costs money and poor folks don’t drink so much coffee I do guess.

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