Which Coffee Is Healthier: Light vs. Dark Roast?

Which Coffee Is Healthier: Light vs. Dark Roast?
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Dark roast coffee is more effective than light roast coffee in reducing body weight.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

For those drinking non-paper-filtered coffee, like boiled, French press, or Turkish coffee, the amount of cholesterol-raising compounds in the lightest roast coffee may be twice as high compared to using very dark roast beans. So, it appears some of the cholesterol-raising compounds are destroyed by roasting. So, in this case darker would be better, or, you can just use a paper filter and eliminate 95 percent of the cholesterol-raising activity of coffee, regardless of the roast, as I’ve described before.

But I did another video showing dark roasting may also destroy up to nearly 90 percent of the chlorogenic acids, which are the antioxidant anti-inflammatory phytonutrients purported to account for many of coffee’s benefits. So, in that case, light roast would be better. On the other hand, dark roasting can wipe out up to 99.8 percent of pesticides in conventionally-grown coffee, and more than 90 percent of a fungal contaminant called ochratoxin, which is a potent kidney toxin found in a wide range of food ingredients that can get moldy.

But then, what about the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon products of combustion that are “suspected to be carcinogenic” and DNA-damaging? Darker roasts may have up to four times more than light roasts. Thus, they advocate controlling roasting conditions to cut down on these combustion compounds. Just to put things in perspective, even the darkest roast coffee might only max out at a fraction of a nanogram of benzopyrene per cup—considered to be “the most toxic” of these compounds—whereas a single medium portion of grilled chicken could have over 1,000 times more.

Overall, you don’t know if light versus dark roast is better until you… put it to the test. This study found that “Dark roast coffee is more effective than light roast coffee in reducing body weight…” Folks were randomized to a month of drinking two cups a day of light roast coffee or dark roast coffee, roasted from the same batch of green coffee beans. And in normal weight subjects, it didn’t seem to matter—no significant weight changes either month—but in overweight study subjects, they ended up about six pounds lighter drinking dark roast coffee compared to light roast coffee; more than a pound a week lost just drinking a different type of coffee.

What about light versus dark in relation to blood sugars? We’ve known since 2015 that even a single cup of coffee can affect the blood sugar response. Here’s the blood sugar spike over two hours after drinking a cup of coffee with more than a dozen sugar cubes in it (like a quarter cup of sugar in one cup of coffee), compared to the spike from the same amount of sugar in just plain water. What is not known is whether this increase in blood sugars is actually clinically meaningful. After all, coffee consumption does not seem to increase the risk of diabetes, and if you compare light roast coffee to dark roast coffee right before chugging down about 20 teaspoons of sugar, there didn’t appear to be any difference. Perhaps the take-home message is: light or dark, maybe we shouldn’t be adding 20 spoonfuls of sugar.

And finally, what about the effect of different roasts on heartburn and stomach upset? We’ll find out next.

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Image credit: Free-Photos via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

For those drinking non-paper-filtered coffee, like boiled, French press, or Turkish coffee, the amount of cholesterol-raising compounds in the lightest roast coffee may be twice as high compared to using very dark roast beans. So, it appears some of the cholesterol-raising compounds are destroyed by roasting. So, in this case darker would be better, or, you can just use a paper filter and eliminate 95 percent of the cholesterol-raising activity of coffee, regardless of the roast, as I’ve described before.

But I did another video showing dark roasting may also destroy up to nearly 90 percent of the chlorogenic acids, which are the antioxidant anti-inflammatory phytonutrients purported to account for many of coffee’s benefits. So, in that case, light roast would be better. On the other hand, dark roasting can wipe out up to 99.8 percent of pesticides in conventionally-grown coffee, and more than 90 percent of a fungal contaminant called ochratoxin, which is a potent kidney toxin found in a wide range of food ingredients that can get moldy.

But then, what about the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon products of combustion that are “suspected to be carcinogenic” and DNA-damaging? Darker roasts may have up to four times more than light roasts. Thus, they advocate controlling roasting conditions to cut down on these combustion compounds. Just to put things in perspective, even the darkest roast coffee might only max out at a fraction of a nanogram of benzopyrene per cup—considered to be “the most toxic” of these compounds—whereas a single medium portion of grilled chicken could have over 1,000 times more.

Overall, you don’t know if light versus dark roast is better until you… put it to the test. This study found that “Dark roast coffee is more effective than light roast coffee in reducing body weight…” Folks were randomized to a month of drinking two cups a day of light roast coffee or dark roast coffee, roasted from the same batch of green coffee beans. And in normal weight subjects, it didn’t seem to matter—no significant weight changes either month—but in overweight study subjects, they ended up about six pounds lighter drinking dark roast coffee compared to light roast coffee; more than a pound a week lost just drinking a different type of coffee.

What about light versus dark in relation to blood sugars? We’ve known since 2015 that even a single cup of coffee can affect the blood sugar response. Here’s the blood sugar spike over two hours after drinking a cup of coffee with more than a dozen sugar cubes in it (like a quarter cup of sugar in one cup of coffee), compared to the spike from the same amount of sugar in just plain water. What is not known is whether this increase in blood sugars is actually clinically meaningful. After all, coffee consumption does not seem to increase the risk of diabetes, and if you compare light roast coffee to dark roast coffee right before chugging down about 20 teaspoons of sugar, there didn’t appear to be any difference. Perhaps the take-home message is: light or dark, maybe we shouldn’t be adding 20 spoonfuls of sugar.

And finally, what about the effect of different roasts on heartburn and stomach upset? We’ll find out next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Free-Photos via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Stay tuned for Does Low Acid Coffee Cause Less Acid Reflux?, coming up next.

The videos I showed are Does Coffee Affect Cholesterol? and Does Adding Milk Block the Benefits of Coffee?

How Much Added Sugar is Too Much? Check out the video!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

54 responses to “Which Coffee Is Healthier: Light vs. Dark Roast?

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  1. I love the coffee studies! I’m a store manager at a major coffee retailer as well as a home roaster. I love coffee, so learning the health benefits and other interesting facts are always appreciated!

    1. That’s cool, Philip. I think it’s awesome when those selling things actually know about them (actually being the operative word as opposed to a lot of the meaningless “information” some have to offer e.g. health food food store clerks boasting the benefits of the cholesterol in a duck egg… true story).

    1. Hi, Garry Floyd! You might be interested in these articles:
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5740146/pdf/41598_2017_Article_18247.pdf
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5503418/pdf/pnfs-22-100.pdf
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207714/pdf/41598_2018_Article_34392.pdf
      In a brief search, I did not find any studies directly comparing cold and heat brewed coffee, but these might help you get started. I hope that helps!

  2. What about cafesterol, which raises cholesterol. As a heart patient of Dr. Esselstyn, I was told to stay away from more than one cup of decaf every once in a blue moon.

  3. I just got into coffee leaf instead of the beans. It supposedly is higher in antioxidants than even green tea and has a smooth taste with caffeine equivalent of decaf coffee. (Note; there is one company marketing this in the US that is marking up the price ridiculously for coffee leaves. The coffee leaves can be found from Ethiopian online retailers located in the USA for less than 8 bucks/pound as that culture has drank this since, well, forever.)

    1. Jimbo,

      What does it taste like? Coffee-ish or more like tea?

      There is a woman who does a tea called Teaspresso, where they use tea more like coffee.

      I am so used to tea now, but have had coffee a few times lately, since the coffee benefits video. I just require a non-dairy creamer for coffee and don’t require anything for tea.

      1. This may be heresy Deb but I would think that non-dairy creamer is even worse for us than actual dairy (I don’t use either).

        Most creamers are made using hydrogenated oil (ie trans fats), corn syrup and sodium in some form …. nt ood, as they say. Perhaps it might be better to use a plant milk?

      2. Deb, I drink my coffee black. Ever since I poured some bad coffee creamer into my coffee at work — after which, a co-worker extolled the taste, flavors, and aroma of freshly brewed black coffee so much that I couldn’t wait to try it! And he was pretty much right. I also drink my tea plain. So, no added sugars or milk products, not even plant milk products, of any kind. It’s a plus for keeping my weight down; every little bit counts.

        Though I have recently started adding ginger to my coffee. I tried iced ginger coffee last June in the DC area, and liked it so much that I started making it at home. When the weather cooled, I switched to hot ginger coffee. I use ground ginger, 1/2 teaspoon, which I add to my coffee. Then stir with a whisk.

        And I agree with Mr. Fumblefingers: did you read the ingredients on the packaging for the non-dairy creamer? Are those ingredients that you want to be eating?

  4. I noticed reference, in one of the studies, to “healthy overweight men”. Hmmm? Also, I still would like you and your team to review these articles on coffee: From the booklet “Calamity in a Cup: Caffeine, Are the Perks Worth the Price?”

    More than 80% of Americans drink coffee, the world’s #2 trade commodity, out-sold only by oil in volume and financial value.

    “Each 10 mg of caffeine consumed causes a 1 mg calcium loss in the bones.” American Journal of Epidemiology, 117:113-127, 1983; 132(4)675-684, 1990, and Nutritional Research 4(1)43-50, 1984.

    “Coffee drinkers, as compared to non-coffee drinkers, have a greater incidence of overweight, and consume more alchohol and cigarettes.” –American Journal of Cardiology, 52:1238-42, 1983.

    “Caffeine seems to increase coronary heart disease deaths independent of serum cholesterol levels.” –British Medical Journal 300:566-569, 1990.

    “Caffeine consumption should be considered as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (heart attack).” –American Journal of Epidemiology 138(8)602, 1993.

    “Rats that ate a refined-food diet and were offered 10% alchohol or water, gradually drank increasing amounts of alcohol. When given coffee, their alcohol consumption dramatically increased.” –Journal of the American Dietetic Association 61:159-162, 1972.

    “Coffee drinkers are more prone to use other drugs. Not only do they smoke more, but they more often use minor tranquilizers or sedative-hypnotics.” –Comprehensive Psychiatry 22:565-571, 1981.

    “A dose of 30-36 ounces of caffeine a day presents a significant health issue.” –British Journal of Addiction 78:251-258, 1988.

    “People consuming as little as 100 mg (6 ounces of coffee) per day had withdrawal symptoms.” –New England Journal of Medicine 327(16)1160, 1992.

    “The lethal dose of caffeine is 10 grams, or about 70 cups of coffee. Many people are taking 1/10 the lethal dose every day!” -A: Journal of Family Practice 4(6)1183, 1977.

    “A cup of coffee reduces iron absorption by 39%, and a cup of tea will reduce it by 65%. Drip coffee will lower iron absorption by 72%, while doubling coffee’s strength will reduce it 91%. In comparison, orange juice, with its vitamin C, may increase iron absorption in a meal by 250%.” –Am Journal of Clinical Nutrition 37:416-420, 1983; and, 32:2484-2489, 1979.

    “After observing that caffeine is capable of inducing acute psychotic symptoms, a state hospital staff eliminated caffeinated beverages from the diet of all patients. Almost immediately the patients were quieter and suffered less from insomnia and nervous agitation. Physical assaults on both people and property decreased significantly, too.” Hospital and Immunity Psychiatry, 42(1)84-85, Jan. 1991.

    “Studies have shown that people with psychiatric problems consume nearly twice as much caffeine as the general population.” Psychology Reports, 59(1)83-86

    “…normal people given caffeine were shown on psychiatric tests to have elevated levels of anxiety, depression and hostility. Amazingly, the doses of caffeine given in this test were much less than the average coffee drinker consumes each day.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 93(1)120-122, 1984

    “Caffeine can increase blood pressure, interfere with normal sleep patterns, and increase body fat stores.” Journal of the American Medical Association [JAMA], 231:965, 1975

    “Not only does it [caffeine] slow muscle function, but just 250 mg. (2-2.5 cups) causes a 30% decrease in brain blood flow.” Life Sciences, 47:1141-1146, 1990

    “…cyclic AMP [adenosine monophosphate] [accumulates abnormally in cells by stimulus of caffeine] also stimulates growth in glandular tissues, like breast tissues…[and] may product cell growth beyond normal boundaries. This can lead to fibrocystic disease (lumpy breasts) which may increase the risk of cancer.” Surgery, 86;105-109, and, Internal Medicine Alert 2:53, 1980, and, JAMA 255(2):259-260, 1980.

    “Caffeine also blocks pde [phosphodiesterase] from doing another important job: shutting down the release of free fatty acids from body stores of fat, thus increasing fats in the blood.” HA Horoer,, Review of Physiological Chemistry, 135th Edition, Lange Medical Publishing, 1971.

    “Triples risk of pancreatic cancer (3 cups/day)” NEJM 304:630-633, 1981.

    “Doubles fatal bladder cancer risk. (2 cups/day)” Am J of Publich Health 74(8)820-823, 1984.

    “Raises colon cancer risk 250% (2 cups/day)” Family Practice News 116(18), 1986.

    “Raises risk of fibrocystic disease (3 cups/day)” Surgery, 86:105-109, 1979.

    “Increases breast cancer risk (3 cups/day)” Surgery, 86:105-109, 1979.

    “Increases ovarian cancer risk (2 cups/day)” International J of Cancer 28(6)691-693, 1981.

    “Doubles female bladder cancer risk (1 cup/day)” Medical World News 63-73, 1/26/1976.

    “Even decaffeinated coffee has hundreds of potentially harmful chemical components. One class of these compounds is caffeols…which are very irritating to the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, many other chemicals which have been linked to cancer and heart disease are still present [in decaf].” Journal of the National Cancer Institute 54:587, 1975.

    “Many in mental institutions with depression and anxiety need no other treatment than to be taken off caffeine.” Journal of Rehabilitation, 45:July-August-September, 1992.

    “Certain depression and anxiety patients were able to be released from institutions after being taken off caffeine.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 133:12, 1976.

    “Caffeine confuses the vascular system because it dilates blood vessels near the skin while ordering the brain to constrict them. It constricts vessels in the brain while dilating them in other organs, which may result in high blood pressure. One to five cups of coffee a day increase heart attack risk by 60%; six or more increases it by 120%.” [not sure how many ounces is a “cup”? Used to be 6 ounces, but that size cup is rarely seen at coffee shops!] New England Journal of Medicine, 289:63-67, 1975

    “Stress-related hormones were considerably higher in people using caffeine as compared to those who ingested a placebo.” Psychosomatic Medicine 56:147-180, 1994.

    “People who ingested 400 mg (4 “cups”) of caffeine [not sure how many ounces is a “cup”? Used to be 6 ounces, but that size cup is rarely seen at coffee shops!], then placed in a stressful situation, showed a 3-fold increase in axiety as those consuming the same amouint without stress.” Psychiatry Reports 59(1)83-86, 1986.

    “…brown drink users lose body fluid due to the diuretic effect of tea, coffee, and soda.” Garatini, Silvo, “Caffeine, Coffee, and Health”, Raven Press, 1993, pp 98, 114.

    “Heavy tea drinkers often have vitamin B definciences, and tannin, a chemical component of tea, has been shown to interfere with iron absorption. Tea drinkers may feel fatigued and listless as a result. Tannin has also been linked to stomach cancer. While all methylxanthines have been implicated in goiter development, tea is highest in theophylline, which is most damaging to the thyroid.” Endocrinology, 85:410, 1961.

    “[caffeine] can elevate cholesterol & triglycerides.” New England Journal of Medicine, 308:1454-1457, 1983.

    “[caffeine] can aggravate eczema and pimples.” Custis, 40:421-422, 1987.

    “etc

    1. Bittersweet you have provided us with extensive references and it would take a team of people to research the questions you raise. The aspect of coffee as a gateway drug may also reflect the underlying causes of addiction. Even in those who have undergone successful rehabilitation from addictive substances, in my practice I have seen transition to excessive exercise, extremely strict ‘healthful’ dietary patterns, and other healthful but harmful to the extreme lifestyle practices. Some people, such as myself, must restrict caffeinated beverages to the early morning hours and limit the amount consumed to avoid anxiety and insomnia. I’m sorry that I can’t find the reference, but years ago researchers suggested that enjoying your food and drink not only has psychological benefits but allows us to better absorb nutrients. I use shade grown organic coffee which is better for the environment and may be better for the consumer with fewer pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides though these poisons have become more ubiquitous in the modern world. As per Dr Greger’s reference to grilled chicken compared to coffee, maybe just sticking to a whole food pant based diet, including coffee and/or tea or not, the relative harm or benefits of coffee or tea are insignificant compared to diets including animal products.

      1. Robert,

        You are right about the team of researchers.

        Bittersweet, thanks for posting the exhaustive list.

        Somehow, caffeine and tea and coffee and coffee as a gateway drug needed to each are looked at separately.

        1. Those of us who used to drink coffee didn’t have any urge to drink alcohol or smoke or smoke pot or any of the other things.

          But for the people who are alcohol drinkers, using coffee might increase their drinking would be something to think about.

          The caffeine studies interest me.

      2. Robert, you are absolutely right about eating whole food plant-based to avoid pesticides, herbicides, and other unwanted adulterants. I can’t find it right now but I distinctly remember a video on this website showing research that the overwhelming portion of our exposure to heavy metals and pollutants comes from flesh and dairy consumption due to bioaccumulation.

    2. I would be wary of studies from over 20 years ago on coffee. Until rather recently, coffee wasn’t considered a health food, and coffee use was strongly associated with bad lifestyle patterns like smoking/alcohol drinking/shift work etc.

      1. As Darryl writes any of these 1990s 1980s and earlier studies need to be treated with caution

        For a long time coffee was considered a risk factor for heart disease etc However, or so I understand, once studies began controlling for other variables like cigarette smoking the excess risk disappeared and coffee consuption was even associated with reduced risk of such diseases

        This may explain why all Bittersweet’s references are to studies done in the days when such studies did not often control for potentially confounding variables such as nicotine, alcohol consumption etc i remember that back in the day coffee and a cigarette was a common breakfast and morning/afternoon work breaks were usually de facto coffee and cigarette breaks

    3. Bittersweet, you would enjoy reading the book “Caffeine Blues–Wake Up To The Hidden Dangers of America’s #1 Drug” by Stephen Cherniske, M.S. Research and Clinical Nutritionist. He covers much of what you posted and then some. There is a notes section in the back of the book for the journals he got his information from.

  5. Gotta love those Chemex coffee makers… (t=0:30)

    I went through a phase in life when I wanted to be a coffee purist. So I went out and bought a French press. Didn’t like the fuss or the mess at the end.

    But with my Chemex maker I can control just about all the nit-picky parameters of the FP brewing system (viz., water temp, mass of H2O to coffee, and brewing time) – without the fuss or mess. And I use a cone paper filter, so I don’t get the cholesterol making ickies.

    1. dr. cobalt, I control all those parameters with my little AeroPress coffee maker. It’s both pour over and immersion brewed. And the result can be very low acid coffee. Plus, it can make a coffee concentrate, which can be used in any number of ways — including to make fresh brewed iced coffee (the concentrate is diluted with ice and iced water), which is the original reason I bought it. Oh, and it uses little round paper filters, too. Great for travel.

  6. green coffee beans are roasted over an open flame. dark roasts should be considered in terms of the side effects of charring end products.

    1. ron greenberg, I did look it up. I downloaded the file a long time ago from Dr Greger’s sources Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods and Practical Guidevto Their Reduction. bAnyway, it’s all good. A cup of coffee is negligible at 4, while 30 gm cashews is over 2900 to give some perspective. Leave coffe on the burner for an hour and it goes up to 34. Virtually nothing. The foods to worry about are meats, fish, grilled tofu, oils, nuts etc.

  7. I was wondering if the studies reporting the health benefits were investigating people who on the average follow the standard American diet. If instead a study investigated people who consistently followed a whole plant-based diet would there be any measureable benefit of coffee or caffeine consumption in general?

    1. Hi, Dennis Worthem! What a great question! Most studies I have seen on coffee consumption and benefits or risks use questionnaires to assess coffee consumption, and then compare it with data on biomarkers or actual cardiovascular disease incidence over time. I have not seen studies that break that down according to overall dietary pattern. If I find any, I will share them here.

  8. Funny, I just “quit” coffee. I quit drinking it every single day and my sleep improved immediately. Another nutritionally astute doctor brought the “half-life” of coffee to my attention. The number varies by source, but he said “seven” and that was enough for me to try abstaining.

    Of course I’m not overweight or have any digestive issues because I don’t eat SAD anymore, as it all resolved quite naturally with my dietary changes a few years back. (But I’m still ADHD no matter what I eat.)

    And by “quit” I mean now it’s in my “redistricted category” foods for weekends only, such that I just got a fresh order from Sweet Maria’s. All Ethiopian-three different producers. But now that’s a year’s supply and not a few months of daily quaffing.

    My main comment is that the ONLY time I’ve ever had a dark roasted Ethiopian, it was horrible (Sprouts, you listening?) and I threw it away. I prefer green beans to start with. Ethiopian coffees tend to be the most magnificent cup of anything I’ve ever put in front of my face—but only lightly to moderate roasting. Over-roasting wipes out all the wonderful nuances and dynamics of a good cup in my experience.

    Just sayin’ never confuse anyone’s exuberance over Ethiopian beans with something that’s been dark roasted, that’s not the good stuff.

    And that if you have sleep issues or insomnia, try ditching all the caffeine for a few days. But you might get a headache from withdrawal. This time I didn’t. But it is normal because the effect of caffeine on our vascular system. I love my improved sleep and also that other doctor was discussing Alzheimer’s and sleep deprivation. Cheers.

  9. I like that you gave us another cholesterol-raising factor.

    Coffee prepared without a filter!

    Adds to our list of why people can’t get their cholesterol levels down.

    Good news that using a paper filter eliminates 95 percent of the cholesterol-raising activity of coffee.

    I only had 3 cups of coffee this past year. Social gathering coffee drinker in cold weather.

  10. Interesting video. More interesting to me than the weight loss with dark roast, was the greater red blood cell vitamin E (increased by 41%, and the increased glutathione (14%). Wonder where medium roast would come out on thee parameters?

  11. Feedback to the G-team, I like this type of back and forth where both angles are shown.

    Kudos for that!

    The number of times that I have learned something on a website or in a PBS series and then learn the opposite and feel totally blindsided is a high percentage.

    THAT learn something and not learn the opposite until later is a crazy-making divisive system.

    I APPLAUD this!

      1. By freak out, I don’t mean do something crazy. I just feel deeply, deeply, deeply more affected by this one. I can’t even put enough deeply’s. by freak out, I think I mean that I may switch gears. It may be too hard to try to learn right now and learning is almost too sad when the learning doesn’t help the people I love so much.

        1. I think, what I know right now is that I am here interacting in the middle of strangers who have intellectually blessed me so much, but it almost feels hollow because so many of the people around me have real things and I am understanding that I am not doing the right social media process for this site. I am doing an emotional process on an intellectual site.

          My dog is by my side dreaming and his feet are running and time is like that.

          Anyway, I just am sad and learning feels like the wrong process.

          1. To Deb-27 weeks!!! —

            Hope things go well for your brother. Thanks for sharing about this. Helps place things into perspective. We are all going to die, but it is agonizing to watch those we love go through it, just as someday our own passings will impact others. Your agony for your brother is a sign of your own life well lived.

            1. Thank you Grant.

              He is someone who is constantly heroic, Mr always there for everybody. Quiet, but truly kind and helpful to everyone. The superglue of a fairly dysfunctional, but still functioning family.

  12. One note on the coffee filters make sure to use the unbleached paper kind. I think coffee is the most studied beverage of all time. I have been a dedicate coffee drinker since age 6, encourage and enabled by my very Norwegian mom. So 57 years of consumption with no ill effects that I can tell.

    1. There is NO chlorine found in chlorine bleached paper filters. The reason to not use bleached filters? A carcinogen, dioxin, is a byproduct of the production of chlorine beach.

      1. Neal,

        Correct and a great reason to use only unbleached paper filters…….. For those wanting to dig into how to make the best coffee with a paper filter consider reading: https://www.roastycoffee.com/coffee-filter/ or just take the easy road…. rinse the filter with hot water in your pour over assembly, discard the water and brew as usual.

        For an interesting take on which filter to use…… see this barista’s take: https://www.stumptowncoffee.com/blog/the-facts-about-filters

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  13. YES! Good news to my beloved dark roast preference. I liked the bit about elevated glutithione and vitamin E, I wondered why you only spoke about the weight loss. And what about the other antioxidants present in coffee? I’m not a regular coffee drinker but when I do enjoy it I like to revel in any added benefits, so the more info, the merrier.

  14. Coffee roasting doesn’t just destroy compounds, it also creates some beneficial ones, known as melanoidins. In animal studies, darker roast coffees are more effective at nhibiting the main regulator of inflammatory response and activating the main regulator of cellular antioxidant response.

    Paur et al, 2010. Degree of roasting is the main determinant of the effects of coffee on NF-κB and EpRE. Free Radical Bio Med, 48(9), pp.1218-1227.

    “Coffee consumption does not seem to increase the risk of diabetes” understates the case. In prospective studies, high consumption is associated with up to a 1/3rd lower risk.

    Ding et al, 2014. Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and a dose-response meta-analysis. Diabetes care, 37(2), pp.569-586.

    That said, I went through a dark roast phase, and for taste reasons I’m back to medium roasts. I’ve gotten more serious, with my own grinder, a thermometer regulated kettle and Chemex brewer. Heaven help me if I pursue roasting too. Though some amateurs experiment with air-poppers, there be some very expensive dragons that way.

    1. Great info, Darryl! My takeaway from all I’ve gathered so far, is that coffee can be beneficial with any of the roasts, but uniquely depending on roast.

  15. Thanks Dr. Greger (and your Team) for all the research you have done. I always look forward to your next post.
    Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

  16. Why no mention of acrylamide levels and the significant negative correlation observed between acrylamide levels and the intensity of color in roasted coffee?

  17. Neal,

    Great question ! It turns out that there is a difference in the actual amounts between the various coffees, as expected . You would think it would be significant however, I would bring your attention to this study that addresses your question. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24325083 .

    “There were no significant differences in acrylamide level between the coffee species ie. Arabica vs Robusta or a mixture thereof. The various methods of coffee manufacture also showed no differences in acrylamide (ie. freeze-dried coffee vs agglomerated coffee). A significant negative correlation was observed between acrylamide levels and the intensity of colour in roasted coffee; this was not the case however for instant coffee.”

    Of note is the substantially higher levels of acrylamide in coffee substitutes….. know way back in 2013.

    Now to expand on this subject and other aspects of the anti-oxidant content and the brand and production methods with different levels of acrylamide see: https://www.superfoodly.com/acrylamide-coffee-cancer-risk/ Interesting how the end result, the in your cup amount is similar.

    Drink dark roast and consider organic as a mainstay. Use an unbleached paper filter that will reduce cafestol, a coffee oil.

    “Research indicates that cafestol affects the body’s ability to metabolize and regulate cholesterol. According to a meta-analysis of controlled studies on coffee and cholesterol, coffee oils may decrease bile acids and neutral sterols. This may lead to increased cholesterol. Researchers concluded that cafestol is the “most potent cholesterol-elevating compound identified in the human diet.” https://www.healthline.com/health/high-cholesterol/coffee-link#coffee-andcholesterol

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

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