Flashback Friday: Which Fruits & Vegetables Boost DNA Repair?

Flashback Friday: Which Fruits & Vegetables Boost DNA Repair?
4.84 (96.88%) 64 votes

Every hour, there are 800 incidents of DNA damage in our bodies. Which foods help us patch back up: apples, broccoli, celery, choy sum, lemons, lettuce, oranges, persimmons, or strawberries?

Discuss
Republish

In light of strikingly consistent observations from many population-based studies, there can be little doubt that the habitual consumption of diets high in fruits and vegetables helps to reduce the risk of development of degenerative diseases, including many types of cancers. Not satisfied with just telling people to eat their fruits and veggies, scientists want to know the mechanism.

Fruits and vegetables are not just vehicles for antioxidants; they contain innumerable phytonutrients that can boost our detoxification enzymes, modulate gene expression, and even repair DNA.

Until fairly recently, it was generally assumed that functions as important as DNA repair were unlikely to be readily affected by nutrition. But if you compare identical twins to fraternal twins, only about a half to three quarters of DNA repair function is genetically determined; the rest we may be able to control.

It is estimated that, on average, there are 800 incidents of DNA damage in our bodies per hour. That’s 19,000 hits to our DNA every day. And that DNA damage can cause mutations that can give rise to cancer—if not repaired.

Thankfully, the regulation of DNA repair may be added to the list of biological processes that are influenced by what we eat—and, specifically, that this might constitute part of the explanation for the cancer-preventive effects of many plant-based foods.

Any plants in particular? Nine fruits and vegetables were tested to see which was better able to boost DNA repair: lemons, persimmons, strawberries, oranges, choy sum (which is like skinny bok choy), broccoli, celery, lettuce, and apples. Which ones made the cut? Lemons, persimmons, strawberries, apples, broccoli, and celery each conferred DNA protection at very low doses.

Here’s what lemons could do, for example. Cut DNA damage by about a third. Was it the vitamin C? No, removing the vitamin C from the lemon extract did not remove the protective effect. However, if you boiled the lemon first for 30 minutes, the effect was lost.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to lightwise / 123rf, PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay, Evan-Amos / Wikimedia Commons, Olegivvit / Wikimedia Commons, Donnawetta / Pixabay, PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay, kattebelletje / Flickr, Fir0002 / Wikimedia Commons, Popolon / Wikimedia Commons, Selena / Wikimedia Commons and Silberfuchs / Pixabay

In light of strikingly consistent observations from many population-based studies, there can be little doubt that the habitual consumption of diets high in fruits and vegetables helps to reduce the risk of development of degenerative diseases, including many types of cancers. Not satisfied with just telling people to eat their fruits and veggies, scientists want to know the mechanism.

Fruits and vegetables are not just vehicles for antioxidants; they contain innumerable phytonutrients that can boost our detoxification enzymes, modulate gene expression, and even repair DNA.

Until fairly recently, it was generally assumed that functions as important as DNA repair were unlikely to be readily affected by nutrition. But if you compare identical twins to fraternal twins, only about a half to three quarters of DNA repair function is genetically determined; the rest we may be able to control.

It is estimated that, on average, there are 800 incidents of DNA damage in our bodies per hour. That’s 19,000 hits to our DNA every day. And that DNA damage can cause mutations that can give rise to cancer—if not repaired.

Thankfully, the regulation of DNA repair may be added to the list of biological processes that are influenced by what we eat—and, specifically, that this might constitute part of the explanation for the cancer-preventive effects of many plant-based foods.

Any plants in particular? Nine fruits and vegetables were tested to see which was better able to boost DNA repair: lemons, persimmons, strawberries, oranges, choy sum (which is like skinny bok choy), broccoli, celery, lettuce, and apples. Which ones made the cut? Lemons, persimmons, strawberries, apples, broccoli, and celery each conferred DNA protection at very low doses.

Here’s what lemons could do, for example. Cut DNA damage by about a third. Was it the vitamin C? No, removing the vitamin C from the lemon extract did not remove the protective effect. However, if you boiled the lemon first for 30 minutes, the effect was lost.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to lightwise / 123rf, PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay, Evan-Amos / Wikimedia Commons, Olegivvit / Wikimedia Commons, Donnawetta / Pixabay, PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay, kattebelletje / Flickr, Fir0002 / Wikimedia Commons, Popolon / Wikimedia Commons, Selena / Wikimedia Commons and Silberfuchs / Pixabay

Doctor's Note

If it’s not the vitamin C, what might it be? That’s the subject of my video Citrus Peels and Cancer: Zest for Life?.

Surprised that the lemon benefit was abolished by cooking? Find out which vegetables it may be best to eat raw in Best Cooking Method.

What about cooked versus raw garlic? See my video Inhibiting Platelet Activation with Garlic and Onions.

For more on DNA protection and repair, see:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

61 responses to “Flashback Friday: Which Fruits & Vegetables Boost DNA Repair?

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Oranges ,bok choy and lettuce not making the cut . Makes me wonder what type of lettuce was it ? It also looks like they used orange juice instead of an orange? Was that compared to a fresh lemon?

    1. Hi mrpinkerton, thanks for your question. In the cited source that Dr Greger refered it does indicate that. Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). I understand Dr Greger is indicating the powerful effect of lemon not that there other fruits and vegetables are not important.

        1. Micaela,

          The study quoted did use a “lemon extract”, however it was made from 100 g of the actual whole fruit, not the essential oil. As a note the essential oil is high in limonene (39.74%) and β-Pinene (25.44%) (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5543433/ ) which are isolated components of the lemon and not the same as the whole fruit used in this study.

          With most items in nature, it’s an interplay between the various components and not the isolated chemistry that makes it valuable.

          Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  2. Are you aware of Zack Bush research which shows that the ‘medicine’ in our fruits and veggies is being destroyed by glyphosate etc?

    1. Hi Richard, thanks for your comment. Yes, I have read Dr Zack Bush work on Glyphosate. He is trying to educate people on the effect of GMO crops and the active ingredient, glyphosate. Dr Greger has a number of blog and video on this matter as well. That is why Dr Greger also indicate that organic produce do not contain these harmful chemicals.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-monsantos-roundup-pesticide-glyphosate-safe/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-gmos-safe-the-case-of-roundup-ready-soy/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/glyphosate/

      1. Thanks for your reply. I watched the videos.
        Dr. Greger is ignoring the facts about glyphosate in non-gmo conventional foods. He presented a study showing zero glyphosate in both organic and conventional non-gmo. Nothing could be further from the truth. Dessication, using glyphosate, is widespread and leaves serious residues in both gmo and non gmo. And it’s only one of the many toxic herbicides/pesticides being used. I hope that Dr. Greger will start telling the whole truth about it .
        thank you

      1. Short and to the point video.
        ______________________
        a phytonutrient that beat out two dozen other phytonutrients last year in a test of human stomach lining protection.
        ————————————————————————–
        Thanks Spring 03. Very timely info about the stomach lining protection. I have a sister (wheel chair since having a stroke ~ 9 years ago. I’m going to visit her tomorrow and as she has been stomach trouble, I think I’ll get some Earl Grey to bring to her (along with the bottle of NMN I’ve recently ordered for her. ‘-)

      2. Thanks, as always, Spring03, you are so helpful.

        I will tell you that it is still rainy, long-sleeve weather almost every single day where I live and I didn’t see any Spring at all, except on this site.

        You are like sunshine.

        1. I accidentally put on short sleeves this morning and walked outside and it was pouring rain and mid-50’s.

          It rained all week again.

          I think the Jet Stream this year should be called a Wet Stream.

          I have gotten about 5 minutes of direct sunlight since September. Feels like the Fall was cold and wet, too.

          Not 100% sure if it really goes back to September, but I have been thinking it and when other people “guess” they say September, too, so I am thinking the fact that more than one of us thinks it was September, that it might be.

          They say the 85-degree day is actually going to happen soon, but I don’t think the last one they predicted ever happened.

          1. I am trying to catch the sun so that I can see if I can get some Co-enzyme Q10 and I have been eating my greens every single day and I am afraid because I am starting to want to eat beans and rice and chili again and I still haven’t caught any sun.

            1. I got to wear short sleeves today and I got some sunlight.

              15 minutes on my passenger’s arm and 10 minutes on my driver side arm and 15 minutes through my sunroof on the top of my head.

              Can you absorb it through your hair? That is a genuine question. If so, I can use the sunroof with an air conditioner this Summer because today was already too hot and I already got red on my passenger’s side arm and tomorrow is supposed to be closer to 90 degrees.

      1. Good to hear Marilyn Kaye… I’ve been drinking bergamot tea (pour a few drops in every cup, no matter if it’s black, green, or one of the other 8 or 10 types I drink. I love the smell of the drops when I shake them in.

      1. Laughing at the Gateway video.

        My dog and I are eating blueberries.

        I still eat them hidden with other things, and I have to hide them for my dog to eat them, too, but we both are eating them.

        My dog is still alive and it is over a year past his diagnosis.

        That is enough to make me smile.

        1. He is also eating broccoli sprouts with me. We both need those hidden, too, but we are both eating them.

          I think about the Purdue University study where they lowered the risk of cancer by 90% by adding vegetables to the dogs’ meals.

          If I had known that, I would have saved so much time and money. I would have been able to finish my house renovation if I had fed him vegetables the whole time.

          So everybody eat your vegetables and berries.

          Happy first day of Summer.

          1. Deb,

            I think I’ve mentioned that my dog is now a vegan; so are my daughter’s two dogs. Though we do use commercial vegan kibble (V-Dog), supplemented by home made food (cooked in my electric pressure cooker, an Instant Pot; I found some decent recipes online). Because my dog is now toothless (about 15-16 years old), I have to purée his food. (Though he can lap up the little dog kibble.) His favorite is puréed sweet potato; I make up a batch, then freeze it in ice cube trays, and serve a frozen cube daily to him. (He’s small, about 9 lbs). Every evening, he stays awake to wait patiently for his frozen sweet potato purée.

            But even meat-containing kibble and canned food can contain a lot of plant food. You can see it in the ingredient list. I don’t like the animal products, for several reasons. And I was thrilled to read that dogs can not only survive but also thrive on vegan dog food. I wish I’d known that earlier.

            Oh, that reminds me: the other little dog I rescued with him was diagnosed with mammary tumors soon after she came to live with us; we didn’t treat them, and her life expectancy was given as about 2 years, but she lived for 5 years after diagnosis. Estimating life expectancy is a very inexact science. And even for people, a vegan — or PBWF — diet is no guarantee of avoiding cancer, or of dying from it. Though we weren’t feeding her vegan dog food, since we didn’t know about it back then.

            1. Deb, re: ” His favorite is puréed sweet potato …”

              I never thought I would someday be eating like a dog :-) Puréed sweet potatoes rule! I eat some sweet potato in some form or another almost every day..

  3. I have a question for some of the nutrition facts volunteers.

    I have followed Greger for 4 years and up until a few days ago I had not found a single thing that I disagreed with him on. But I have found one thing I profoundly disagree with him on.

    Dr Greger seems quite anti-medicine in some regards. My concern is particularly around statins, which he claims only have at most a 3% reduction of CVD and ultimately no benefits only risks.

    I’m sorry as much in favor of a plant-based diet I am, this is just anti-science and bad information. It’s not only blatantly false and untrue, but it’s also harmful.

    The benefits of a plant-based diet on reducing LDL-C and CVD outcomes are good enough that you don’t need to lie to people and tell them that statins have no benefit.

    While I am in favor of trying a plant based diet first to reduce cholesterol than going on statins, I also agree it doesn’t address the cause which is people eating a high saturated fat, and trans fat diet, this doesn’t mean there isn’t a time for people to be on these medications

    If you tell people this lie that statins have little to no benefit and only risk, you are doing a disservice to the public.

    This could actually harm people. If people are on statin medication by their physician and read that they have no benefit and go off them they can have a second heart attack.

    In this way, he is no different to the saturated fat apologists and cholesterol denialists when they argue that statins do nothing for another reason, namely, that cholesterol is inherently good and you can’t have enough of it.

    This also opens Dr.Greger up to being labeled anti-science by the mainstream. If you ignore a mountain of evidence it just makes you look bad, and it discredits you by everyone else.

    1. @Beast from the East ~ I’m not sure what video or blog of Dr. Greger’s you read that includes: “…he claims only have at most a 3% reduction of CVD and ultimately no benefits only risks.” as you noted in your comment.

      But here on 1 December 2014, in “Eliminating 90% of Heart Disease Risk,” Dr. Greger wrote:

      “Pharmacological therapies, including cholesterol lowering statin drugs and blood pressure pills typically only reduce cardiovascular disease risk not by 90% but only by 20% to 30%. So, even on drugs, 70 to 80% of heart attacks still occur.”

      Nine peer-reviewed articles were cited in that article.

    2. BeastFromTheEast, yes, I agree with you that some of the videos in the past have inferred that it can be an ‘either/or’ situation, … take meds or eat wfpb. The wfpb community can at times unsupportive of someone taking medications under their doctor’s directive. Ornish, and Esselstyn, both endorse the use statins and other meds including aspirin, and bp meds consistently since their patients are in the secondary prevention group. (proven benefit of these meds when used for secondary prevention). So, lifestyle first, but follow your doctor’s recommendations and take the medications deemed necessary for you.

      http://www.thennt.com/nnt/mediterranean-diet-for-post-heart-attack-care/
      http://www.thennt.com/nnt/statins-for-heart-disease-prevention-with-known-heart-disease/ http://www.thennt.com/nnt/aspirin-for-cardiovascular-prevention-after-prior-heart-attack-or-stroke/

    3. My brother developed neuropathy from long-term statin use. A side effect the drug companies know about. After going off statins and on a very strict diet (mostly WFPB), he has regained over 90% of the feeling in his tongue, hands, and feet. Plus, his cholesterol went down significantly more on the strict diet.

    1. Yes, the population target group is important. Statins aren’t appropriate for everybody.

      However, mortality isn’t the only yardstick for measuring the advantages/disadvantages of statin use. Nonfatal adverse cardiovascular events often outnumber fatal events quite considerably. These adverse events include heart attacks, strokes, TIA< PAD and eg revascularization surgery.

      Statins have been shown to reduce these and, for some groups, even if there is no clinically meaningful reduction in mortality, statins might deliver a worthwhile net benefit.. This aspect is often ignored by opponents of statin use

    1. YR, I read that article … fascinating that such shenanigans are going on. All the more reason to eat a whole plant, unprocessed, food diet. It may not be foolproof regarding “organic” but at least one can see the real food in it’s natural form.

      1. Slowly but surely, the swamp is being drained. :-) Lots of corruption out there. The mainstream media will not report on it, of course.

  4. Maybe it’s me, but I did not understand this video on fruits, vegetables, and DNA repair at all. And, I watched it twice! What is the bottom line. It appeared that the entire video did not play.

    1. The bottom line was just that out of the fruits and vegetables they tested, apples, broccoli, lemons, persimmons, strawberries, and celery were shown to work very well at protecting DNA from damage at low doses. It’s just showing that these foods in particular, work well to repair our DNA which isn’t to say many more don’t do the same or even better, but only a handful of fruits and vegetables were tested in this study.

  5. I was re-watching the dropping triglycerides videos and I saw this testimonial and what I know is that I am looking forward to Dr. Greger’s book. She is talking that she was told to eat 2500 calories and I laugh because people here are eating 800 calories and other people aren’t counting calories and I am not counting calories, I am more playing back and forth with fat intake, somewhat. Though I still am still eating nuts and avocados. I am sllllllllllloooooooowwwwllllyyyy as possible losing weight and know that I probably could lose faster if I cut avocado out or maybe got rid of my venti soy latte or something like that, which would give me more money at the end of the month for broccoli sprouts.

    Anyway, this woman had her triglycerides go up into the 500’s on a raw mostly fruit diet and had it drop back down to 60-something going The Starch Solution.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vor1pCRB7GI

    I liked Dr. Greger’s video about moving away from flour altogether, but I put this woman’s link because she was eating fruit and salad and sometimes rice.

    She gained 15 pounds at one point.

    It sticks in the back of my head that the raw community people are the ones who fail at veganism and she is another one who started gaining weight on the most fruit diet.

    It is still anecdotal, but I just thought it was interesting.

    I still have 6 months until the book.

    1. The stupid pushy man just told me “ploughing of kindness” that I am not qualified to analyze studies and I know that I am going to do my lab work sometime and I have to make sure my B-12 is sufficient and that I am eating properly for low triglycerides, etc.

      Blood pressure is okay, but I already know that he is very disciplined keto with lab results and I need to make sure that I don’t misrepresent Whole Food Plant Based.

      1. I don’t mean to call the man stupid.

        He is highly intelligent, but does a constantly arrogant process.

        He is basically saying to put up or shut up that if I don’t have the labs to back up the studies, not to talk about them anymore.

        Being post-menopausal and having started so far off, I figured that it would take a year or two to get the labs right and I don’t see a need to waste money before then.

        I much prefer just slowly getting the diet cleaner and cleaner.

        My only processed foods for the past year have been Amy’s dairy free burritos, sweet earth The Curry Tiger burrito, Boca vegan burger, Ezekiel bread, Mary’s Gone Crackers, a few beet bars and the holiday fare birthday cake with halo vegan ice cream, which I haven’t had for months.

        I don’t know if those wipe my numbers out, but they don’t change the studies.

        I don’t know if I can prove the studies.

        1. Deb, the way I see it, you don’t have to prove anything to anyone. All you need to do is to eat good food, feel better, and be happy. That’s it.

          I did have ‘before’ lab tests done, and then 30 days later. That was years and years ago, and those blood tests were the best I ever had. My diet has continually gotten better, ‘cleaner’, but my LDL is too high. Not sure what “studies” you are intent on proving, but I think we have to focus on our own issues first and foremost. Anyway, sounds like you are doing awesome – be proud of that!

        2. “He is basically saying to put up or shut up that if I don’t have the labs to back up the studies, not to talk about them anymore.’

          That is plain silly. Pardon my crudeness, but really that is just his way of challenging you to engage in a d*ck measuring contest.

          Simply measuring the lab figures for two different individual individuals proves nothing. If such results were truly meaningful, we wouldn’t need all these RCTs or well-designed observational studies. As another recent highly-opinionated keto person on these boards was fond of saying, that is ‘scientifically illiterate’.

          I am not sure why you think this person is highly intelligent. His arguments don’t seem highly intelligent. Possibly he says he is and it’s just another case of the Dunning-Kruger Effect perhaps? A later study seems to have expanded the original work by Dunning and Kruger to investigate the role of possible narcissistic tendencies in promoting such behavior:

          ‘ we show new evidence about who misunderstands their sensitivity and why. We find that those who perform the worst in social judgment and mindreading radically overestimate their relative competence. We also find origins of these self-estimates in general narcissistic tendencies toward self-aggrandizement.’
          http://www.columbia.edu/~da358/publications/ames_kammrath_mindreading.pdf

          The poster VD certainly seemed to fit that bill and your friend may well do also,

      2. There are many people qualified to analyse studies. They include panels of leading scientists, researchers and physicians who analyse thousands of studies to produce reports for the World Health Organization, World Cancer Research Fund, UK National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE).the US NIH and professional medical associations around the world. None of them recommend keto diets for the general population (some guidelines may recommend keto diets for intractable paediatric epilepsy or for weight loss in obese patients).

        What makes your friend so sure that they are all wrong and he is right, I wonder?

        1. There are many people qualified to analyse studies. They include panels of leading scientists, researchers and physicians who analyse thousands of studies to produce reports for the World Health Organization, World Cancer Research Fund, UK National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE).the US NIH and professional medical associations around the world. None of them recommend keto diets for the general population (some guidelines may recommend keto diets for intractable paediatric epilepsy or for weight loss in obese patients).
          —————————————————————————————————————————————————
          Tom I may be taking your statement out of context but having it stand on its on, I fundamentally disagree with you on some points. The main point is the assumed total acceptance on the findings of the Organizations you mention due to the people assembled to rubber stamp a set of findings.

          I daresay there are individual researchers, affirmed scientist or not, that may have findings that are more important to individuals who have learned of their work.

          I think that consensus is easily attained when younger researchers are afraid to rock the boat since in most cases, conformity leads to climbing the science community ladder.

          I put more trust even in you than I do the “scientific community” findings. ‘-)

          1. To further punctuate my point, the link below is to a story written by one of the experts assembled to promote the idea that the “use of supplements for brain health is a waste of money.” AARP (what a joke of an organization that qualifies in my mind as a waste of money) commissioned a similar study that the author of this article cites.

            https://neurosciencenews.com/brain-supplements-no-benefit-14294/

            If I were to read that (and be less well informed than the “experts” who assembled the findings) I might never have started taking such supplements as Naringin (to help remove brain waste when I sleep) beet root juice (that I consider a supplement, to provide nitric oxide to open up my blood vessels to allow perfusion to parts of my brain that may have gone dormant for lack of oxygen) white willow bark (to maintain my platelets so they do not get out of hand and create a clot in my brain, or fail to repair damage that could allow a break in my vessels and cause a stroke)… etc. etc. etcetera.

            1. that could allow a break in my vessels and cause a stroke
              —————————————————————————
              to be more precise, hemorrhagic stroke

    2. sllllllllllloooooooowwwwllllyyyy
      ———————————————–
      Sent this off to a guy I know who knows a guy who knows a girl with access to a Quantum Computer. It of course cracked the code quarkly and spit out the following interpretation: slohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhly.

      See? No such thing as an uncrackable code. ‘-)

  6. Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people
    ——————————————————————-
    Alright, that tears it! From now on, I’m gonna set aside a room with an ionizer running so I can go in there at mealtime and eat air food. I think if I keep the air clean enough, I should be able to ward off any and all diseases. And when I’m through eating air, I think I’ll play a little air banjo for relaxation.

    Boy, I hope those manufactured foods hurry up and get mainstream… maybe they will come sans germs.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/asfm-pmb061719.php

  7. Hi! Does anyone in the Nordic countries of the EU buy Amla online? I’m not sure about the Swedish customs (tull) when ordering from Amazon (.de .co.uk or .com?) & the only amla powder sold online on a secure website (https) is for 22 dollars for 200grams! (no local Indian stores unfortunately sells it where I live) The price difference is shocking ! (Can’t get it when abroad ,as powders aren’t allowed in hand luggage) No health food stores in Sweden carry it,1 supplement that had it was discontinued.
    Thanks! =)

    1. If you order amla powder from another EU country there shouldn’t be any issues with customs as it’s a single market. If you order it outside of the EU it will have to pass through customs and there is a chance it would be rejected.

  8. Finding Amla, not sure what price you were expecting to pay. I pay about the same, give or take a dollar or two, and I am in Canada. I won’t buy it again though because there are other fruit, veg and teas that are high antioxidant for a lot less money.

      1. Yes, well, I have never seen it sold cheaply here. This company advertises $10 for 200 gm but it is twice that in stores. https://www.organictraditions.com/pages/faq#section4 They say they are starting an eu online company, so that might be helpful to you. Also, triphala contains 30% amla if that is available.

        I did try the amla for lowering cholesterol. Did absolutely nothing, and I had blood testing before and after. I may try earl grey tea as mentioned by Marilyn, (above, in this thread). Tea is cheaper than buying bergamot supplements.

        1. Tea is cheaper than buying bergamot supplements.
          ———————————————————————-
          If you are going to drink tea anyway, might as well be Earl Grey.

          But if you are interested in turning any tea including green tea into an Earl Grey (i.e., adding bergamot) you may want to consider my solution, figuratively and literally. That is, I mix some bergamot essential oil with pure water, put it into a shaker bottle, and shake a few drops into my cups of tea.

          I’ve had this one ounce bottle of the essential oil for a number of years now and I doubt I’ve used 1/4 of it so far. Been so long I can’t remember the cost, but if it was ultra expensive, I’m sure I would have remembered. ‘-)

          1. Ah, I finally figured out your little ‘-) Look at it from a certain angle and we see a one-eyed critter with a big grin.

            Am highly impressed with your creativity. *_^

            1. Am highly impressed with your creativity. *_^
              —————————————————————-
              Right back atcha! ‘-)

    1. SPAM
      ——–
      Thought you were mainly WFPB? Are they making spam from plants now? Beyond meat? Impossible burger? Tyson chick’n spam filets? ‘-)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This