Fighting Autism Brain Inflammation with Food

Fighting Autism Brain Inflammation with Food
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One food may be able to combat all four purported causal factors of autism: synaptic dysfunction, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Harvard neurologist Martha Herbert, in a keynote address at an autism conference, said “we need to conduct research as if we know this is an emergency.” Already, up to one and a half percent of American children have autism, and it appears to be on the rise. Well, what about fever’s dramatic effect? This “dramatic relief of autistic behavior [during a fever] continues to tantalize parents and practitioners.” From a research standpoint, “what could be more revealing than a common event that virtually ‘normalizes’ autistic behavior for a time?” “There’s so much going on during fever,” though; where do you even begin?

Well, once it became understood that one cause of autism may reside in the synapses—the so-called “soul of the brain,” the nerve-to-nerve junctions where information is transmitted—attention turned to HSPs, heat shock proteins, released by the brain when you have a fever, that can improve synaptic transmission, and thus, may be “capable of improving long-range [brain] connectivity which is depressed in [autism].” ASD stands for autism spectrum disorder. And, there’s this compound, sulforaphane, that “upregulates” those heat shock proteins. So, you could potentially get the benefits without the fever. What drug company makes it? What do I ask for at the pharmacy? Nope, wrong aisle.

Sulforaphane is not made in chemical plant; it’s made by a plant. Sulforaphane is made by broccoli, kale, cabbage, collards, and cauliflower—in other words, cruciferous vegetables. So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will make things better by boosting the heat shock proteins.

But, synaptic dysfunction is not the only contributing cause of autism. There’s also oxidative stress. “The brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress” because lots of free radicals are forged in the brain, which has few “antioxidant defense capacities.” And, indeed, “[t]here is a long history of studies showing that [autism] is associated with oxidative stress and diminished antioxidant capacity.” Nrf2 levels cut nearly in half, which is what triggers our body’s “antioxidant response.” If only there was a way we could boost Nrf2 with foods—boom, there it is! Sulforaphane just so happens to be perhaps “the most potent natural…inducer…of Nrf2” on the planet.

What’s this Nrf2 thing again? It’s “considered to be a master regulator of” our body’s response to environmental stressors. Under any kind of stress—oxidative stress, inflammatory stress—Nrf2 triggers our “antioxidant response elements,” activating all sorts of cell-protective genes that balance out and detoxify the free radicals, and facilitate protein and DNA repair.

So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will also make things better by triggering Nrf2, which activates those antioxidant response elements. And then, there’s the mitochondrial dysfunction. “[C]hildren with autism [are] more likely to” suffer from dysfunctional mitochondria, the little power plants within our cells where metabolism takes place. If only there was some food that could improve mitochondrial function. And, there is. “A diet rich in cruciferous vegetables effectively retunes our metabolism by…restoring metabolic [balance].” Power plants for our cellular power plants.

Not only can sulforaphane boost the gene expression of heat shock proteins as much as six-fold within six hours, it can double the mass of mitochondria in human cells growing in a petri dish. So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will also make things better by relieving some of that mitochondrial dysfunction that is creating even more free radicals. Okay. So, can we try giving some kids some broccoli already? First, one final factor: neuroinflammation—brain inflammation, another causal factor in autism. If, at autopsy, you look at brain tissue of those with autism, you can see inflammation throughout the white matter.  And, if you do a spinal tap, up to 200 times the levels of inflammatory mediators, like interferon, bathing their brains. 

What’s causing all that inflammation? Well, the master regulator of the inflammatory cascade is a protein called NF-kappa-beta, which induces inflammation and, if overexpressed, like in autism, can lead to “chronic or excessive inflammation.” If only there was a food. Wait—broccoli does that, too? In fact, it’s the major anti-inflammatory mechanism for sulforaphane, inhibiting NF-kappa-beta.

Well, then; that completes the picture. Give someone with autism broccoli, and heat shock proteins are released to boost synaptic transmission, Nrf2 is activated to wipe out the free radicals, mitochondrial function is restored, and we suppress the inflammation triggered by NF-kappa-beta. One food to counter all four purported causal factors. That’s one of the differences between foods and drugs. Drugs tend to have single effects. But, autism spectrum disorder, ASD, “is multi-factorial”—no wonder there’s no drugs that work. But, “strategies using multi-functional phytochemicals [like sulforaphane] or even [better] the [whole] plants [themselves],…are highly attractive”—in theory. But, you don’t know, until you put it to the test, which I promise we’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Kate Maldjian, Artem Kovyazin, Basti Steinhaur, Duda Araujo, and Basti Steinhauer from The Noun Project.

Image credit: National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Harvard neurologist Martha Herbert, in a keynote address at an autism conference, said “we need to conduct research as if we know this is an emergency.” Already, up to one and a half percent of American children have autism, and it appears to be on the rise. Well, what about fever’s dramatic effect? This “dramatic relief of autistic behavior [during a fever] continues to tantalize parents and practitioners.” From a research standpoint, “what could be more revealing than a common event that virtually ‘normalizes’ autistic behavior for a time?” “There’s so much going on during fever,” though; where do you even begin?

Well, once it became understood that one cause of autism may reside in the synapses—the so-called “soul of the brain,” the nerve-to-nerve junctions where information is transmitted—attention turned to HSPs, heat shock proteins, released by the brain when you have a fever, that can improve synaptic transmission, and thus, may be “capable of improving long-range [brain] connectivity which is depressed in [autism].” ASD stands for autism spectrum disorder. And, there’s this compound, sulforaphane, that “upregulates” those heat shock proteins. So, you could potentially get the benefits without the fever. What drug company makes it? What do I ask for at the pharmacy? Nope, wrong aisle.

Sulforaphane is not made in chemical plant; it’s made by a plant. Sulforaphane is made by broccoli, kale, cabbage, collards, and cauliflower—in other words, cruciferous vegetables. So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will make things better by boosting the heat shock proteins.

But, synaptic dysfunction is not the only contributing cause of autism. There’s also oxidative stress. “The brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress” because lots of free radicals are forged in the brain, which has few “antioxidant defense capacities.” And, indeed, “[t]here is a long history of studies showing that [autism] is associated with oxidative stress and diminished antioxidant capacity.” Nrf2 levels cut nearly in half, which is what triggers our body’s “antioxidant response.” If only there was a way we could boost Nrf2 with foods—boom, there it is! Sulforaphane just so happens to be perhaps “the most potent natural…inducer…of Nrf2” on the planet.

What’s this Nrf2 thing again? It’s “considered to be a master regulator of” our body’s response to environmental stressors. Under any kind of stress—oxidative stress, inflammatory stress—Nrf2 triggers our “antioxidant response elements,” activating all sorts of cell-protective genes that balance out and detoxify the free radicals, and facilitate protein and DNA repair.

So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will also make things better by triggering Nrf2, which activates those antioxidant response elements. And then, there’s the mitochondrial dysfunction. “[C]hildren with autism [are] more likely to” suffer from dysfunctional mitochondria, the little power plants within our cells where metabolism takes place. If only there was some food that could improve mitochondrial function. And, there is. “A diet rich in cruciferous vegetables effectively retunes our metabolism by…restoring metabolic [balance].” Power plants for our cellular power plants.

Not only can sulforaphane boost the gene expression of heat shock proteins as much as six-fold within six hours, it can double the mass of mitochondria in human cells growing in a petri dish. So, maybe if we give some broccoli to those with autism, it will also make things better by relieving some of that mitochondrial dysfunction that is creating even more free radicals. Okay. So, can we try giving some kids some broccoli already? First, one final factor: neuroinflammation—brain inflammation, another causal factor in autism. If, at autopsy, you look at brain tissue of those with autism, you can see inflammation throughout the white matter.  And, if you do a spinal tap, up to 200 times the levels of inflammatory mediators, like interferon, bathing their brains. 

What’s causing all that inflammation? Well, the master regulator of the inflammatory cascade is a protein called NF-kappa-beta, which induces inflammation and, if overexpressed, like in autism, can lead to “chronic or excessive inflammation.” If only there was a food. Wait—broccoli does that, too? In fact, it’s the major anti-inflammatory mechanism for sulforaphane, inhibiting NF-kappa-beta.

Well, then; that completes the picture. Give someone with autism broccoli, and heat shock proteins are released to boost synaptic transmission, Nrf2 is activated to wipe out the free radicals, mitochondrial function is restored, and we suppress the inflammation triggered by NF-kappa-beta. One food to counter all four purported causal factors. That’s one of the differences between foods and drugs. Drugs tend to have single effects. But, autism spectrum disorder, ASD, “is multi-factorial”—no wonder there’s no drugs that work. But, “strategies using multi-functional phytochemicals [like sulforaphane] or even [better] the [whole] plants [themselves],…are highly attractive”—in theory. But, you don’t know, until you put it to the test, which I promise we’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Kate Maldjian, Artem Kovyazin, Basti Steinhaur, Duda Araujo, and Basti Steinhauer from The Noun Project.

Image credit: National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Dramatic relief of autistic behavior during a fever? If you missed it, check out my last video: Fever Benefits for Autism in a Food. Stay tuned for the thrilling conclusion in Best Foods for Autism.

While you’re waiting, what else can broccoli’s magic do?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

151 responses to “Fighting Autism Brain Inflammation with Food

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  1. Have you considered that maybe the inflammation is a symptom of something the body is
    doing that is actually necessary to heal? Yeah, maybe the inflammation is a burden to us,
    but is the body naturally trying to heal itself?….resulting in some inflammation. Sort of like
    getting a cut….blister….scab, it’s healing! And, what is causing this issue in the first
    place, let’s look at that, then no one even has to concern themselves with this broccoli issue.




    2
    1. Right, inflammation can indeed be necessary as an acute response. However, as anyone with arthritis, SLE, IBS, psoriasis, et al, can tell you, chronic inflammation is another mater and is a major (I’m prone to say monumental) problem. So reducing the source is a great idea. Countering that source and symptom with food is fantastic idea.




      36
      1. The inflammation is chronic because the causes are chronicly ingested, wrong foods/others factors and it could be some so called healthy foods also like starchy foods.




        0
        1. Great point Julot. Indeed there are always a multiplicity of factors to consider. Eliminating the factor or factors causing the inflammatory response is obviously extremely important.

          When I developed psoriatic arthritis I went to an ND who had some “magic pills” that were expensive and would work if I took them and paid him for may years. Instead I went to another ND who printed a chapter from a text book which showed that studies had shown that sufferers of this auto immune condition could be impacted by many things including wheat, night shade, even citrus et al. OK I have a sister with celiac so I tried eliminating gluten and it worked. However, I remained very sensitive to any contamination and continued to have swelling in my toes. But at least the pain was gone.

          So I kept looking at diet and found this web site and started noting the plethora of inflammatory factors in animal products in general. So I went completely plant based.

          In a few weeks the swelling in the toes disappeared and over time I realized that occasional contamination of food with gluten was not causing a problem. This had been a problem for years. So,,, after about 6 months I decided to have a slice of whole grain bread as a test. I broke out in a sweat in anticipation of the pain but I did it anyway. But the pain never came and there was never a resurgence of symptoms. So yes my gluten sensitivity was and probably is still here but it is so minor that eliminating all the inflammatory factors in animal rendered that sensitivity irrelevant.

          OK put that into other contexts, whole grain whole food starchy diets are overwhelmingly the basis of long life in the blue zones. Though I can’t find the source now, there was one study here showing a complete remission of auto immune symptoms in 50% of the subjects who eliminated all animal from their diets. All in all 95% showed improvement with 50% having complete remission. Now that is incredible. Beats hell out of the methotrexateth my rheumatologist wanted to prescribe.

          So, for the rest who were not cured, there is likely some plant based food source of problem and you are absolutely right, that should be eliminated. I like to think of the peanut. A really healthy food but if it provokes anaphylactic shock, you don’t wanna go near it. My sister with celiac should never go near wheat. For the rest of us whole grains starch and greens will likely mean a longer healthier life.




          1
          1. Should be carefull about oils/nuts also and of course mid to high fat diet especially from nuts but possibly any high fat foods, gluten obviously, non celiac gluten sensitivity doest exist and seems to be more common than what it seems.




            0
      1. Vegan and people eating a SAD diet, have the same rate of autism, which can be caused by something else, such as pesticides or mercury contamination.

        And it is not because you are a vegan that you will consume more foods with Sulforaphane if you don’t eat properly.

        Dr Mercola said that folate can prevent pesticide contamination from causing autism. Dr G also said foods that regulate the mitochondrial, will help. Nobody knows exactly what foods or phytonutrients can help improving autism condition. We just have to try them all.




        5
        1. “Vegan and people eating a SAD diet, have the same rate of autism, which can be caused by something else, such as pesticides or mercury contamination.”

          Actually, I’d argue the case for microwave exposure, which has pretty much increased in sync with unprecedented increases of autism.

          The industry has argued that any exposure that does not cause cooking seems harmless – and therefore any exposure below that level seems safe. Many research studies have disproved this, demonstrating effects at microwaves well below the level needed for heating, but the industry has stuck to this position and their lobbyists have made sure that out government policy makers have as well. This despite the recent U.S government National Toxicology Program study demonstrating that microwaves at cell phone frequencies at very low exposure levels CAN cause cancer. See this article: https://www.wsj.com/articles/debate-renews-over-health-risks-from-cellphone-use-1467829289 that came out 7/7/16 in the Wall Street Journal, of all places, and makes exactly the point I made after the NTP study came out – that I had not seen brought up in any media reports, viz, that the NTP study has confirmed that microwaves can have non-thermal toxicological effects, that this DOES open the proverbial can of worms, with respect to all of the safety studies the microwave industry has NOT done, while exponentially increasing human exposure to microwaves at a wide variety of new and untested frequencies year after year.

          As far as “the potential for more subtle, but potentially much more damaging health effects” goes I’d look to Salford’s replicated results, showing leakage in the blood-brain barrier of rats two weeks after only ONE 2 hour exposure to 915 MHz: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19345073

          A lecture on EMF’s/microwaves by Dr. Martin L. Pall (a Professor Emeritus in Biochemistry and Medical Sciences from Washington State University) in which he summarizes relevant research: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8ATQF8omdI

          Though he goes quite a bit farther than I would, He crossed his t’s and dotted his i’s. I found his EMF/Microwave pathology thesis unfortunately both plausible and well-supported by scientific research. A lecture worth watching.

          Why has the release of this information taken so long? If the tobacco industry had the equivalent of a trillion plus dollars to play with back in the 50’s, and as many inroads into government policy as the microwave industry has today (including microwave tower protection laws), and the allegiance of professional politicians, how many extra decades would it have taken for the dangers of tobacco smoking have become evident? Would cigarette packages have warning labels on them, even today?

          .




          6
          1. Doctor, I got rid of my microwave oven a long time ago. Microwaving will denaturalize protein and destroy nutrients in a subtle way more than any form of cooking. So we are now facing with an avalanche of factors that can affect our health, from pollutants to our foods having less nutrition due to how it is processed or cooked, and therefore we have less chance of countering the pollutants.

            I read an article the other day which says that more CO2 emission will not only cause global warming, but also plant foods that are bigger but with less nutrition, in particular protein.

            http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/02/540650904/carbon-dioxide-may-rob-crops-of-nutrition-leaving-millions-at-risk

            https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/does-global-warming-make-food-less-nutritious/




            4
            1. These days, as far as personal exposure goes, microwave ovens seem pretty much irrelevant. Or bodies and brains get the vast majority of exposure from our cell phones, routers, cordless phones, and laptops. And more and more “smart devices” emitting microwaves find their way into out homes every day.

              Unfortunately cell phones have markedly increased their output over the years several fold, so that now, even if you use one on speaker mode, you get more microwave exposure to your head than you used to get – say ten years ago – when you held an older model cell phone directly against your ear. And of course any areas of your body near the cell phone – or an IPAD, etc., get a full dose. I’d recommend using landline phones as much as possible, until – or IF – research ever sorts the actual risks out, and to use cell phones when unavoidable only, and even then only for only as long as necessary, not for long social conversations.

              Incidentally, I calculated that an SAR of 0.12 mW/kg, where Salford began to detect leakage in the blood-brain barrier in rats, corresponds to about 15,000 microwatts/meter squared, well below the range of levels of exposure one would get in close proximity to most cell phones.

              I feel less than confident about the complete and truthful results on the NTP research ever becoming publicly available. Give the long time-delay between the completion of the NTP study, and its projected publication, the priorities of the current administration, and the clout of the cell phone industry, I think an edited and “spun” version seems much more likely.

              And yes, different frequencies may have different effects, just as different chemicals have different effects. A study showing that one frequency – say 3.5 Ghz, does not have a particular effect does not say anything about whether another microwave frequency, say 5 GHz, will. Each needs to undergo testing separately.

              Does light cause sunburn and DNA breakage? Well, while infrared light does not, ultraviolet light does. Whether “light” does depends on the frequency used and the intensity of exposure. The same applies to microwaves.




              3
              1. Hi Scott –

                This website provides a very flawed and inaccurate summary, especially with respect to my my main point. It states: “A number of anti-microwave websites claim that athermal effects are “not presently measurable.” Pardon me for asking the obvious but if these athermal effects are not measurable, how do we know they exist?”

                I’ve never seen any anti-microwave websites making the claim that “athermal effects are “not presently measurable.”,” because the scientific literature has dozens of studies – published in credible peer-reviewed scientific journals – demonstrating that such athermal effects do indeed exist. Furthermore, the just completed 25 million dollar study by our own countries National Toxicology Program not only demonstrated that athermal levels of microwaves caused an increase in brain cancer in rats, but also demonstrated that this exposure caused DNA breaks.

                See: http://microwavenews.com/news-center/ntp-comet-assay

                September 6, 2016
                Last updated
                September 8, 2016
                “In May, the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) announced that male rats exposed to cell phone radiation developed higher rates of cancer. Soon, the NTP will explain how that might have happened.

                The same RF/microwave radiation that led male rats to develop brain tumors also caused DNA breaks in their brains. Female rats —which did not have significant elevated tumor counts— had fewer DNA breaks.”




                1
        2. Jerry. You wrote “Vegan and people eating a SAD diet, have the same rate of autism, “.

          Do you have any evidence for this statement? It sounds reasonable but I have not seen any data on this topic. Of course many people eating vegetarian diets eat a diet that is just as much of a junk food diet as the SAD so it wouldn’t surprise me if you are right. But then you often make claims about supposed facts that turn out to be completely wrong. Consequently, it is a very sensible precaution to always ask for evidence before accepting any of your claims

          There appear to be a range of genetic and environmental factors involved. Also, there may be different “causes” just as some cancers are associated with or perhaps caused by certain viruses or smoking or alcohol or saturated fat consumption etc.

          Maternal (and paternal ) health and diet may also be a factor. For example, I have read that
          “The mechanisms by which maternal diet and metabolic profile shape the perinatal environment remain largely unknown, but recent research has found that increases in inflammatory cytokines, nutrients (glucose and fatty acids), and hormones (insulin and leptin) affect the environment of the developing offspring. Offspring exposed to maternal obesity and high fat diet consumption during development are more susceptible to developing mental health and behavioral disorders such as anxiety, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. Recent evidence suggests that this increased risk for behavioral disorders is driven by modifications in the development of neural pathways involved in behavioral regulation. In particular, research indicates that the development of the serotonergic system is impacted by exposure to maternal obesity and high fat diet consumption, and this disruption may underlie many of the behavioral disturbances observed in these offspring. ”
          https://nutritionfacts.org/video/fighting-autism-brain-inflammation-with-food/

          This would suggest that people eating a low fat whole food plant based diet would be less likely to have autistic children. However, I have not seen any data on this and other factors would remain relevant eg parents’ age, air pollution, contaminated food etc




          10
            1. “We have been encouraged to eat more plants and less animals. Various writers have suggested it is healthier for our bodies and our planet. I have no objections to a mostly plant-based diet as long as attention is paid to protein requirements and micronutrition. However, since little things in animal products (some essential like B12, some that can be created in our bodies but perhaps not in the amounts we need, such as creatine) seem to be very important for the brain, it’s interesting to look at the literature on vegetarian diets and mental health. Here is the latest (and the best) observational study: Vegetarian diet and mental disorders: results from a representative community survey.”

              https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1479-5868-9-67




              1
              1. Uh, even the abstract indicates that adoption of a vegetarian diet seemed to follow not precede the mental health problems. That would suggest there’s nothing to see here.




                3
          1. If autism is caused by pesticide contamination as Dr Mercola alleges then vegans and meat eaters are equally affected,

            But let’s dispel the notion of meat eaters versus vegans, because today’s meat eaters eat WFPB just like vegans, or even more, except that they also eat animal foods (myself included). I don’t know of anyone who just eat animal foods. People who eat a SAD diet are excluded.

            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/09/25/folate-may-mitigate-pesticide-related-autism.aspx




            1
          2. Sorry – wrong source pasted. Here is the actual source
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3594403/

            and another quote from that article that might be relevant is this (HFD = high fat diet, ASD = autism spectrum disorder)
            “Recent evidence indicates that exposure to maternal obesity and HFD consumption during fetal development may also increase the risk of developing ASD. Rising rates of ASD are matched with the high frequency of adult obesity in North America [70]. Moreover, maternal metabolic states such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension have been recently shown to be associated with greater risk of ASD in offspring [69]. A proposed mechanism is the role of leptin: leptin is released in proportion to body fat, and high levels of leptin observed in obesity are associated with placental dysfunction that disrupts normal neurological development [71, 72]. When compared with controls, children with ASD have higher plasma levels of leptin [18]. Further research will need to examine the strength of the relationship between these factors.”




            5
          3. Hi there,

            Thanks for this video. I’ll certainly try increasing my broccoli intake. I’m a female in her thirties and I was diagnosed with autism level 1 (Aspergers) a year ago. I was born and raised Vegan, to two Vegan parents. My symptoms of autism were hellishly worse as I was growing up, but in various ways I have been able to now live a life in which at least I experience happiness, which I didn’t really, for the first few decades. After my diagnosis, my dad’s behaviour throughout my entire life began to make sense – he now believes he has Aspergers too. The literature I’ve read, such as by one of the most renowned autism specialists in the world, Simon Baron-Cohen, says that autism has a strong genetic basis. I now know other adults with autism, and many of them say they were only diagnosed after their children were diagnosed, and that now, now only do they see it in themselves, but their parents, and grandparents, etc. So part of me really questions the idea that rates are going up. Aspergers itself was only really discussed in the 1980s, and most mental health professionals and doctors don’t seem to recognise it today, let alone in the past.

            On the other hand, I feel very uncomfortable, because I see a lot of my Vegan friends exhibiting signs of Aspergers Syndrome – more than amongst my non-Vegan friends and colleagues etc. I can’t say I’ve met hundreds of Vegans, but I know 6 that are either diagnosed or I suspect of having Aspergers (2 of them either have it in the family, or are also suspected by relatives who work in the field of autism). I say suspect, because many of these individuals just don’t want to pursue a diagnosis. Amongst non-Vegans, I’d say I know 3. But I’ve met thousands of non-Vegans.

            One thing I know is that growing up my parents did not know anything about Omega oils and I’d say my childhood was entirely deficient in them. I also don’t ever remember taking a B12 supplement as a child, and because we survived (on fortified foods), I honestly believed until I was diagnosed with autism that humans didn’t need it afterrall. I know so many Vegans who don’t supplement with omega oils or B12 and recently I’ve met two Vegan children who show signs of more severe autism, including damaged mental capacities and lack of speech, and I had to persuade the parents of one of them to at least take B12, as they too thought they didn’t need it. Considering that both nutrients are cited by doctors as some of the most effective methods of alleviating autism symptoms, it really worries me that unless they supplement (which many Vegans don’t, and don’t know to eat flaxseed), they could be running the risk of causing severe damage to their children.

            I don’t know if my fears are justified. If anyone can share any thoughts, I’d be grateful.




            0
        3. Please PLEASE stop using the word vegan to describe plant based eaters. Veganism is NOT a diet. It is an ethical and moral stance against the exploitation of non-human sentient animals.

          Being vegan doesn’t mean you eat a whole food plant based (WFPB) diet. Nutrition wise, it simply means you don’t consume any animal parts and any of their secretions.

          Of course, it is best to eat WFPB, but you don’t have to be vegan to do that. You’ll feel better if you are though :-)




          9
    2. Then explain why indigenous Indians have exorbitantly low rates of chronic disease? They consume loads of curcumin, an anti-inflammatory, compound (that doubles as a nootropic). Inflammation for the most part, is bad.




      0
  2. If this is your first video, or first week of Nutrition Facts exposure, please do read the doctor’s notes and note all the supporting/relevant videos he lists there. Also note that the archive is fully searchable and that all sources are listed for YOU to be able to read the reports yourself and answer many of your other questions.

    There is no prohibition against discussion of dissenting ideas and positions but please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research, and OFTEN these things will be somewhat different from mainstream and popular belief and thoughts. Also that facts are subject to change depending upon findings, and that nutritional research is a difficult task for many reasons.

    Most common questions and conflicts on very many subjects have been previously addressed and can be found, along with the supporting studies and discussion if one will simply take a few minutes to look for them.

    We are glad to have you here with open mind and ready palate. WFPB works for so many of us, and works well! We hope to support your transition and create a tide of change. Thanks for stopping in.




    9
    1. I totally agree. That’s why I tell people about this site with the disclaimer, ” subject to change without notice” (lol). The research is constantly changing.




      6
      1. Dot Plogger
        I have found it totally opposite to you . The research presented seems to be consistent , namely whole foods from plants get the best results .
        It is most likely that it is me not consistent , as a week ago we were cooking broccoli everyday and then everyone started complaining “too much broccoli !”
        ,so now tonight I am steaming a big batch and turning this video on so everyone can watch how good broccoli is for them as they eat it . lol




        12
  3. The pedagogical techniques used in this video are tremendous. It pretty much guarantees I will not have much free time today as I will by reviewing the sources and factors introduced in this video to try to really get a grip on this.

    I do not have nor do I currently know anyone with ASD, but sulforaphane is so central to so many important aids to health that this just adds tremendously to our understanding and using it effectively. e.g. Yesterday I spent time with a friend with Parkinson’s. My brother has it as well and sulforaphane is also suggested as beneficial for that. I also have a cousin with newly discovered esophageal cancer and a niece with newly diagnosed brain cancer. Again sulforaphane is potentially beneficial.

    Looks like I’ve gotta start drinking kale smoothies and get systematic about sprouting broccoli. Eating it daily is probably not enough.




    12
    1. I agree. This video is incredible. I have a family member on the spectrum and what strikes me as astounding is one simple fact: this family member is constantly in the sauna, in the steam room, in the bathroom with the hot shower running for 45 minutes. As his internal body temperature rises, I suspect he simply feels better. Wow. Heat shock proteins….. Hmmmmm….. I look forward to the next study! (And I am thinking, how can we make broccoli crunchy without altering the important phytochemicals? Hmmmm…. ) Crunchy cabbage coleslaw? Wow!




      9
      1. Unlikely. The MCFs in coconut oil increase intestinal permeability (1, 2, 3), including to endotoxins (4). In animal models, autism-like disorders can be induced by prenatal/neonatal exposure to endotoxins (5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11), and immune cells from autistic children have more proinflammatory responses to these proinflammatory bacterial compounds (12, 13).

        An aside worth mentioning, the animal studies make a case that maternal supplementation with zinc (known to reduce intestinal permeability) may help prevent this mechanism (14, 15, 16).




        14
        1. Hi Darryl, I have not got the time to reply to you regarding the intestinal permeability issue, but it is caused by a combination of inflammation by not consuming Omega 3 fat and then consume saturated fat, but saturated fat alone is not the cause. It is a long article that I posted the other day, and you have to read the entire article and not just the conclusion. Reread the entire article again.




          2
          1. I responded here. The Mani et al. paper you linked, which I’ve read shared many times on this and other forums, is one of many which have found a variety of dietary fats, saturated or not, cause postprandial metabolic endotoxemia. The Mani et al. paper along with this human trial suggest coconut oil is no different.

            Intestinal inflammation may contribute to permeability by disrupting the mucosal layer and tight-barrier. However as we know LPS “stows away” in the chylomicrons that distribute digested fats in normal metabolism, it doesn’t seem a necessary precondition. Moreover, there’s a substantial body of evidence that some fats themselves contribute to intestinal inflammation (for example, milk fat increasing Bilophila wadsworthia and hydrogen sulfide production).




            11
        2. Daryl, Totally impressed by your posts with all the references plus the neat and tidy summations of the relevant points.

          Your comment at the end that zinc may change the outcome of the more narrow research is golden. It shows that we should not concentrate on data from single minded research outcomes and allow for the possibility of something else being introduced can alter an outcome to be better (or worse.)

          I’ve advocated for holistic style research for years (in a long dead blog) and believe we would be much further along with good health practices had we continued single-minded studies by adding other things after their completion to see how the outcomes are changed.




          2
    2. Even the healthiest foods have both benefits and risks.

      Cruciferous vegetables seem rich in two different goitrogenic compounds that for all of the other positive effects they have, can also suppress thyroid function, isothiocyanates and thiocyanates. https://www.verywell.com/all-about-goitrogens-3233164

      A lot of people these days although not clinically hypothyroid have marginal thyroid functioning – and eating too many of these foods can impair thyroid functioning to the point where symptoms – such as cold sensitivity and fatigue appear, and this can also show up in a TSH blood test. I have a friend who had normal but on the hypo end of thyroid function – who after eating cruciferous vegetables every day for a few months noticed a marked cold sensitivity, and when the blood tests came in, his doctor even wanted him to start taking synthroid! He backed off on the cruciferous vegetables and his thyroid returned to normal, as reflected by the disappearance of cold sensitivity and the blood test results.

      I also knew an energetic and healthy couple who to boost their health even further began to mainline green smoothies, which often included a lot of kale. After a month of this they could hardly move, and they had to back off.

      More does not necessarily mean better.




      1
      1. This is a theoretical concern, for most. Most cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, have negligible impact on iodine uptake, but if I were prone to hypothyroidism, I might consider limiting intake of rutabaga (1) and bamboo shoots (2).




        11
        1. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/endocrine-diseases/hypothyroidism

          “About 4.6 percent of the U.S. population ages 12 and older has hypothyroidism, although most cases are mild.1 That’s almost 5 people out of 100.”

          The U.S has about 326 million people, so 4.6% = 15 million people, not an insignificant number. And this does not count “pre-hypothyroid” people with high – but still within the accepted normal range – of TSH numbers.

          And even if someone in that healthy range starts mainlining cruciferous vegetables, especially if they eat them raw, I’d feel willing to bet that many of them might not remain normal for long.




          0
      2. Cruciferous vegetables contain natural chemicals called goitrogens (goiter producers) that can interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis. So you need to eat foods with iodine at the same time, and you need iodine anyway for other purposes. But I believe that broccoli sprout does not contain as much goitrogens, or none. Also the goal is to consume sulforaphane which the sprout has 10X the broccoli itself, and so you can eat less.




        2
  4. Could somebody provide a list with sulforaphane content of the different cruciferous vegetables? I seem not being able to find a credible source with figures.
    Thank you!




    4
        1. I think I read that in the case of broccoli seed, it is more potent than the sprouts–though it tastes bitter. Just got a Vitamix–I’ll put it to the test Haha!




          2
        2. Glycosinolate (which the table does show in mg per amounts of vegies listed) is the precursor to sulforaphane. I meant to say broccoli sprouts * tops the list, brussels second up, ty. You will see further explanation just below that table under the heading “Sources and Catabolism of Sulforaphane”




          0
          1. You need to watch some of the previous videos. The amount of sulfurophane present can vary HUGELY depending on how it’s obtained and cooked. Both the precursor and sulfurophane are resistant to heat degradation, but the enzyme that does the conversion is not. Also, they’re in the same compartment – meaning, the broccoli by itself does not produce sulfurophane – it’s a defensive compound produced when a bug chews on it, which breaks open the separate compartments containing the enzyme and precursor. Then the precursor is converted INTO sulfurophane.

            If raw, it has to be chopped and let to sit for 20-30 minutes to allow the enzyme time to convert the precursor mentioned above into sulfurophane. In the alternative – if you get it frozen, like most of us, the enzyme has been destroyed.

            There is, however, a quick and easy fix. Ground mustard spice contains the enzyme, so sprinkling that onto your steamed broccoli or other cruciferous vegetables will perform the conversion of the precursor into sulfurophane, the active compound described above.




            12
            1. GAEngineer: As you say, the enzyme that does the conversion (myrosinase) is deactivated by heat. Therefor, steaming, boiling, and blanching are out.




              0
        3. You have to actually read the article.

          “In broccoli, sulforaphane is found in the following quantities:

          Brocolli: 44-171mg/100g dry weight2
          Brocolli sprouts: 1153mg/100g dry weight2”




          2
    1. Broccoli sprouts are the richest food source of glucoraphanin, the precursor to sulforaphane.

      It is possible to increase the sulforaphane yield from a given quantity of broccoli sprouts 4-5 times by heating them in 70 C (158 F) water for 10 minutes. This paper, “Heating decreases epithiospecifier protein activity and increases sulforaphane formation in broccoli”, describes how this works.

      http://ucanr.edu/datastoreFiles/608-451.pdf

      Glucoraphanin is converted to sulforaphane by the enzyme myrosinase. However, in the presence of the cofactor ESP, most of the substrate in converted to other, non-useful products. Heating the sprouts deactivates the cofactor without affecting the myrosinase, causing virtually all of the glucoraphanin to be converted into sulforaphane. After blending (required to release the glucoraphanin), let the mixture sit for a few minutes before consuming.

      As cheap as broccoli sprouts are to grow, who wouldn’t want to get more bang for his/her buck, especially considering the enormous value of sulforaphane and the ease of this simple heating process?

      Thanks to Dr. Rhonda Patrick for teaching me about this amazing trick.




      8
        1. Heat a quart of water in a sauce pan to 158 F testing with a kitchen thermometer. Set your cook top to low. When temp is stable, drop in the sprouts (I eat about 250g per day!). Vary the heat so as to maintain a stable temp, as necessary. (Do not allow the temperature to go much above 158 F, or you will deactivate the myrosinase, too!) After 10 minutes, cool the sprouts in a cold tap water bath for a few seconds (myrosinase works best at a lower temperature), drain and blend. For 250g I blend with about 3/4 cup of water. I let it sit for about 5 minutes. (I’m not sure if this is necessary, but it seems reasonable to give the enzyme a bit more time to do its thing.)

          Cheers and happy sulforaphane-ing!




          2
            1. Mustard seed is loaded with myrosinase, as someone mentioned above. I add a tablespoon to my blend to give an additional boost to the enzyme.




              3
            1. I soak the seeds for 8 hours, drain, and then rinse 3 times a day (every 8 hours), and harvest at 5 days. There are automatic misting machines that mist every 20 minutes, and the sprouts grow like crazy. I think it is hard to over-water them, as long as they are well drained.

              I have looked but found no definitive information about perfectly optimal growing/harvesting parameters. They are not sensitive to light/dark cycles, so I keep them under a fluorescent 24/7 and they green up nicely. In my experience they like the open air and so do better in uncovered containers rather than in the jars one usually sees sprouts grown in and which I formerly used.

              Sorry–I love to talk about sprouting!




              2
    2. Like this? Sulforophane can be found in significant amounts in broccoli, red cabbage, and collards, other cruciferous vegetables have little. My table lacks values for broccoli sprouts or seeds, which have an order of magnitude more (in fact, if one doesn’t like sprouting, would could theoretically puree the seeds in water to obtain more than from the sprouts).

      Thanks for the reminder to add data (if I can find it) for arugula/rocket, which is evidently the erucin champion.




      4
      1. Re: if one doesn’t like sprouting, would could theoretically puree the seeds in water to obtain more than from the sprouts).

        Darryl. according to what I read, the amount of Sulforaphane is maximized 3 days after the broccoli has sprouted. If you wait longer or less (i.e. eat the seed), there is less. In total, the amount of time that you sprout is about one week. After this, you put the sprout in the refrigerator to stop the growth.




        1
  5. How about homemade sauerkraut and other fermented cruciferous veggies, eaten raw for the healthy bacteria? It’s been a few years since I spent time reading about autism, but I recall that gut bacteria is deranged in autism, and this has a huge effect on the brain, since the gut and brain are closely linked through communication of gut bacteria.

    If this is an important component of autism, and some babies are autistic very early on, that is because babies get their gut bacteria from mom as they go through the birth canal. If mom’s gut bacteria is out of balance from antibiotics or another reason, or they are C-Section babies, they would be starting life with compromised, or unbalanced gut bacteria. I understand some doctors are now giving newborn C-Section babies some of mom’s vaginal secretions orally as soon as they’re born, to mimic what they would get through a natural birth.

    I know people tend to avoid fermented foods because they are salty. Salt is used to prevent bacteria from starting to rot the cabbage and other veggies before enough lactic acid is formed to do that job. Sauerkraut and kimchi that I’ve made had less salt than I’ve seen in some recipes. A huge bowl of shredded cabbage, which made a half gallon of fermented kraut or kimchi, had a tablespoon. That is a lot to someone who doesn’t add salt to food at all. I’m wondering if the salty brine could be rinsed off the kraut before eating, and if the sauerkraut would still contain the healthy bacteria. Does anybody know the answer to this?




    8
  6. As one of the people who wasn’t happy with the semantics and general sound of the last video, I feel compelled to tell you that I really appreciate THIS video. Thank you! I look forward to watching tomorrow’s video. And, I did get a few florets of broccoli down my autistic four year old last night:). He’s got a few more florets in his lunch today. We will see how that goes. I made sure that his smoothie had more greens in it, too. Usually, I give the kids very little, because one common thread with autism is pickiness–and boy oh boy, is my kid ever picky! This is not the place Chinese you see in neuro typical kids, it’s a whole different beast. So I’m doing my best and working hard to educate him along the way!




    3
    1. HM, Dr G mentioned the possibility of mitochondrial damage that can cause autism and a host of other very serious diseases including cancer, CHD, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, etc. Sulforaphane can fix this damage but the number 1 nutrient for mitochondrial health is Coenzyme CoQ10. CoQ10 is created by the body through foods but as we age starting at a young age of 25, the body produces less and less, and so we have to supplement. The supplement is created from fermented foods but it is a complicated process that I know of only one company that can make an effective CoQ10 supplement, and it is covered by a Japanese patent, and so nobody can make the same one for a while until the patent expires, and then they still have to learn the secret recipe.

      This brand of supplement is sold at Costco and they often have $7 discount. But if you cannot wait, just spend an extra $7 and get one bottle for now, and I guarantee you that 95% it will do magic. And you need to use even for yourself, because as we age then CoQ10 is not produced anymore and the number 1 cause of aging and diseases comes from mitochondrial and DNA damages.

      https://www.costco.com/Qunol-Liquid-CoQ10-100-mg.%2C-20-Ounces.product.11678293.html

      So here is my theory. Sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables helps regulate the mitochondrial. But it may only work for healthy people. What happens if it does not work for some people? And the symptoms can range from autism to something more serious like cancer? So my theory is that while you eat foods that give you the Sulforaphane, you also supplement with CoQ10. Your kids health is on the line, and it’s only $30 to try out a solution. If you want to see the effect for yourself, take the supplement and you will see immediately a boost in energy, and your BP will drop if it is high, etc. I wish I live nearby you and I can “donate” you a bottle of the Qunol CoQ10 supplement. You will see magic, trust me.




      3
        1. Jerry since you raised the issue what are your thoughts on ubiquinone vs. ubiquinol? Dr. Sinatra who is a renowned cardiologist suggests using only the ubiquinol form.




          0
        2. Hi Lee, the Quinol brand has 2 supplements, one contain Ubiquinol and one contains Ubiquinone. One is more “natural” and is closer to the form that the body will use. The pill has that while the liquid has the other form which has to be converted. But I find that the liquid works better for me although your mileage may vary. I recommend people to use the liquid form simply because I want them to see results quickly. The liquid form is more expensive and has to be refrigerated. I use both, in the morning I take the liquid and in the evening, I take the pill. Or I take the pill when I travel because it does not need refrigeration. Just take the liquid form first because you will see results quicker if your body is the same as mine. Then try the pill later after you see results with the liquid and then you can compare.

          Let say that you jog 5 miles every day and you start to get out of breath at 5 miles. Now after taking CoQ10, you don’t feel tired after 5 miles. I can jog forever without tiring but I stop at 5 miles because I don’t want to injure myself. To see the effect of CoQ10, use your exercise as measurement, or you can look at your BP, sleep, etc.

          https://www.qunol.com/ubiquinone-vs-ubiquinol/

          http://www.q10qh.com/ubiquinone-or-ubiquinol-does-it-really-matter




          3
          1. So watching this, I feel like Jerry may be onto something. I live in a northern climate and have been Noah used with a d deficiency numerous times. I have to supplement my d a lot. And I get plenty of outdoor time! So…I know this is a different end of the light spectrum, but perhaps is still an issue? Definitely something I’ll bring up with the doctor.




            1
        1. Jerry Lewis is the last person that anyone should take advice from around here.

          I would avoid giving children unregulated supplements, since you have no idea what might be in them. If you lived in Germany, where they are regulated like drugs, you’d be fine, but if you’re in America, you might be pouring lead, mercury, cadmium, and banned pharmaceuticals down your child’s throat.

          CoQ10 supplements are a waste of money. Speaking from expensive personal experience I can say they don’t work, and based on my understanding of the research, they are only good at one thing: making supplement companies rich.

          Some people claim to experience improvement in fatigue symptoms when taking it, but it is probably due to contamination with amphetamines or simply due to the good old placebo effect. If you’re going to take CoQ10, I strongly recommend you have each bottle tested by an independent lab. I only learned years after I quit that I was likely taking a cocktail of dangerous drugs and heavy metals due to the unregulated American supplement market.




          14
          1. Re: unregulated supplements

            LOL, it’s the FDA approved drugs that kill you.

            And by the way, the Qunol brand has been used clinically.

            And if you go to any good MD, they will tell you to take CoQ10 as you age or if you take statin drug because it decimates the CoQ10 in your body.

            You are simply jealous rather than learning the facts.




            4
            1. Jerry. You wrote “You are simply jealous rather than learning the facts.”

              You have a bad habit of stating your personal opinions as established facts even when the science clearly shows that you are wrong. Consequently you seem to equate “learning the facts” with simply uncritically accepting everything you say. Not everybody believes that you are omniscient.

              Unfortunately, you also have a tendency to make personal attacks like this when people point out that your statements are not always correct or consistent with what the science shows.




              12
              1. Lonie I think that your comment says something about your judgement but the point is that it is prudent to fact-check unsupported claims, especially those made by individuals who have been shown to make incorrect statements in the past.
                Obviously you don’t agree. You aren’t alone of course. There seems to be something in human psychology that attracts us to people who appear to be utterly certain about, well, whatever. I think Nietsche said that there are two types of people in the world: those who want to know and those who want to believe. I want to know – so show me the evidence if you claim that this or that is true.And I am not even from Missouri. If you want to believe Jerry whenever he states something as a fact, that’s your choice. But I would argue that it is not a wise one.




                5
                1. Hey Tom, it is obvious we have different levels of what is acceptable information.

                  If I read you correctly, you are more if not totally focused on the scientific approach and consumption of evidential data. I don’t read Jerry’s links (or anyone else’s for the most part) and base my acceptance of the knowledge presented on my intuition + science based leanings.

                  Admittedly, much of what I assimilate from him and others are concepts that seem compatible with things I already know. I feel justified in the ratings I handed out between yours and Jerry’s posts based SOLELY ON MY PERSONAL OPINION… other’s mileage may vary.

                  Oh, and nothing personal… just a statement of my position. ‘-)




                  1
                  1. Tom,

                    Another thought came to mind in the difference in how you approach knowledge and how Jerry does. As an observer of you both, it seems you trust others to convince you what is the best way to proceed (healthwise) and you put your faith in their judgement.

                    Jerry on the other hand takes a hands-on approach to the data presented and is more open to having that data presented by a wider range of “experts.”

                    Not saying which approach is better… just saying I agree more with Jerry’s approach.




                    1
                    1. Lonie, not that I can answer for TG, & in fact I think he’s moved on to the next video. But my observation about TG’s approach is that he does NOT trust others to convince him as you & Jerry do. Rather, he puts his trust in the data and the data only. It makes no difference who is presenting it. The scientific data speaks for itself.

                      You gave Jerry some good advice a few videos back about dialing it down a bit. It’s a shame he didn’t take it.

                      Hope you have a lovely evening.




                      0
                    2. Nancy, Jerry is enthusiastic in his response. I submit that maybe some of the root of his, at times, over-aggressive approach may stem from how others have responded to him. That’s how arms races get started.

                      And I think he is a valuable asset to this forum if one just looks at his willingness to help. Personally I’m impressed at how well-studied he is.

                      But in re: your take on Tom’s approach, it appears to me that he will only accept research from researchers with multiple titles and degrees. I think he may miss out on some lesser titled researcher’s findings that he may not see as elite, but that I consider practical in their approach to knowledge.

                      And thank you for the wishes for a lovely evening. Hope the same for you.
                      ‘-)

                      Oh, and that lovely evening you speak of involves continuing the edit of a personal project… a great-nephew’s wedding I recently shot. To me, editing is second only to screenwriting for playing doG (pardon my lex-Disia.)




                      1
                    3. Yes, Lonie, the bar is raised much higher here than most other websites, that’s why I come here & no longer visit the others because they no longer support my needs. I need to see the facts first before I’ll subscribe & not just hear a theory that sounds good.

                      As for how Jerry is treated, he brings it on himself every time he posts a link to a study that supports the exact opposite of what he’s claiming, etc. It doesn’t fly here, and he should know that. He does seem well studied on what’s all over the internet, & I understand how that might resonate with you, but that doesn’t fly here, either. He & some others have this idea that we’re in a bubble & aren’t aware of outside information. The fact is, many of us have been there, done that, & some of us even bought the t-shirt. And we’ve moved on because it no longer supports our criteria. So although Jerry thinks he may be spreading light, we’re looking for a different light source. He’s like a bad salesman, who keeps pushing & pushing long after people have told him multiple times they’re not interested, & even after they’ve explained to him why they’re not interested. You’ve never done that. As I’ve said before, I respect your criteria even though it’s different from mine.

                      Your evening sounded like fun – very creative & artistic. Mine was musical.




                      3
                    4. Nancy, in reading your comment above the one thing that kept popping out to me was your use of the word “we” as though you were speaking for the entire forum.

                      And while I do acknowledge you have a posse of followers, that is, people who agree with you, there is evidence there are some who aren’t in the “posse” and who actually benefit from a different angle. Many of them do not post (possibly from not wanting to get into a “discussion” with a true believer) but I’ve seen some who engage Jerry as a normal human being rather than some outlaw radical.

                      And I’m sure you are aware I prefer supplementation to the expense of buying or even growing all the foods one needs to meet all our requirements. Not only the expense, but the time required to process and cook them.

                      I do have an expensive supplement habit, but at least I save time.

                      Not meaning to sound as though I am defending Jerry, he can do that for himself.

                      What I am trying to point out is that he and others like him drop an acorn or two now and then… and many of the blind squirrels on the forum refuse to accept that anything contrary to what they believe to be an acorn… is just litter.




                      1
                    5. Lonie: It’s clear to me, having spent years reading every comment on this forum, that Nancy did a very good job of speaking for the vast majority of the people on this forum. If Jerry actually dropped the occasional acorn which brought new and legitimate information, you would not be having this discussion. Trash: 99.9999% Acorn: 0.0001% Given the volume of his posts, the ratio is a problem. I know that *you* see all sorts of acorns there. The point Nancy made so well was that we can tell by the vast majority of responses that almost no one agrees with you. We have even seen multiple people who have never commented before, but who have read the forum quietly, commenting now about how worthless and disruptive those comments have been.

                      No matter how often you state otherwise, this problem has nothing to do with repressing contrary opinions. You are entitled to your contrary opinions, which you have expressed freely here without interference for a long time. That has nothing to do with the issues regarding our resident comedian nor the high standards most of us try to use for evaluating data and which we promote for this discussion area. ,-)




                      0
                  2. I wrote “What I am trying to point out is that he and others like him drop an acorn or two now and then… and many of the blind squirrels on the forum refuse to accept that anything contrary to what they believe to be an acorn… is just litter.”

                    When I meant to write “What I am trying to point out is that he and others like him drop an acorn or two now and then… and many of the blind squirrels on the forum seem to believe that anything contrary to what they believe to be an acorn… is is just litter.”




                    1
                    1. blind squirrels – Lonie, that’s precisely what I’m trying to point out. We’re not blind. We know what’s out there. The point of this website & the research behind it is to wade through all the noise and junk science about nutrition that’s out there on the internet & get to the bare facts by showing the data. So when someone like Jerry tries to bring the noise & junk back in, he gets pushed back. Many people see this site as a breath of fresh air, and that’s why people often refer to Jerry’s comments to as ‘pollution.’

                      Also, is it possible that your desire to take so many supplements is driven by your unwillingness to cook, and that you cast a blind eye to what the actual science says about it in favor of what you want to hear on the subject & then call it intuition? It’s reminding me of what T. Colin Cambell said about people wanting to hear good news about their bad habits.

                      In all honesty, I’m not saying this to be snarky or negative. I’m bringing it up because I’m interested and I care.

                      Thea, as always, thanks for your support. And I hope both of you have a beautiful day!




                      1
                    2. Nancy wrote: The point of this website & the research behind it is to wade through all the noise and junk science about nutrition that’s out there on the internet & get to the bare facts by showing the data. So when someone like Jerry tries to bring the noise & junk back in, he gets pushed back. Many people see this site as a breath of fresh air, and that’s why people often refer to Jerry’s comments to as ‘pollution.’

                      Where I think we disagree is 1. What is junk science? 2. Why is referencing different science “noise?” 3. Where you see this site as fresh air, I see it as an attractive nuisance… that is, people come here because they are attracted to the possibilities and don’t necessarily drink the kool-aid. and 4. Who are these people who come here? Have you noticed some of them are disciples of gurus that you accuse of junk science, just because their guru doesn’t always agree with your guru? The pushback you reference from your guru’s disciples is often countered by the pushback from their guru’s disciples. ‘-)

                      Nancy also wrote: Also, is it possible that your desire to take so many supplements is driven by your unwillingness to cook, and that you cast a blind eye to what the actual science says about it in favor of what you want to hear on the subject & then call it intuition? It’s reminding me of what T. Colin Cambell said about people wanting to hear good news about their bad habits.

                      In all honesty, I’m not saying this to be snarky or negative. I’m bringing it up because I’m interested and I care.

                      I take you at your word that you are not being snarky… that is more the manner of your co-echo Thea. ‘-) (No offense Thea… just an observation… oh, and I gave you a thumbs up for your smiley response. ‘-)

                      Look, I understand it is difficult for us to analyze ourselves objectively. But by the same token, it is also difficult to analyze a stranger without all the facts. (something I plead guilty of doing from time to time.)

                      So here are some facts as I see them so you can get a better picture to analyze.

                      First of all, I love to cook. I don’t do much of it in the summer because it heats up the house… my un-air-conditioned house in a warm summer climate. I will return to creating one-pot dishes as the weather gets cooler… dishes that no two of are alike, as I don’t follow recipes. (Pardon the crudeness, but some of those attempts are shit and some are not. That is, some of them I throw out they taste so bad so they never become shit. The good tasting ones do become shit.)

                      Secondly, my supplement intake is based on cutting edge science. Much more so than what is posted here, for the most part… and most of it from reputable institutions and researchers. They don’t get much attention in the scientific journals for the most part, for whatever reason.

                      And REAL scientists, your kind of scientists, just gloss over their findings because they simply aren’t complicated enough so they can’t be real science, i.e., there’s no way you can repair failing organs in an older body just by transfusing with a young persons plasma they say, but I’m betting it can be done as I have participated in a study and I am finally feeling like I’m seeing some improvement in my health, now six months after getting the 7 unit of plasma treatment.

                      I had no failing organs at the time and that may be why it has taken so long to notice a general improvement.

                      Oh, and as for bad habits? I have none. If I did I would change them. ‘-)




                      1
      1. I checked out Kaneka as I use Natural Factors Ubiquinol as after 40yrs old this active form is already converted and more easily absorbed and found this data on suppliers of their product. https://ubiquinol.org/brands I was happy to find the brand listed here and feel confident in using it.




        1
        1. Liisa, I know that Dr G always talks about eating foods rather than taking supplements. I agree in most cases but I don’t agree that it can apply for for all cases. Just google for “Body cannot produce CoQ10 as we age” and you will find a truckload of articles. This is a well documented fact. And scary enough, aging starts at 25 year young.

          But it is up to every individual decision at the end of the day.




          2
      2. Jerry Lewis, It is usually inadvisable to take supplements of individual ingredients since many times they are ineffective or can even do harm. The chemistry of the human body is very complex and all the chemical reactions are interrelated. For example, regarding CoQ10, the Mayo clinic has a whole list of warnings for CoQ10 on their website. They end the list with this final warning:

        “CoQ10 may also cause abnormal breathing, back pain, bronchitis, changes in attention, changes in sperm motility, cholesterol, chest pain, constipation, coughing, diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, falling, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, fungal skin infection, gas, head pressure, hearing loss, heart attack, heartburn, heart dysfunction, indigestion, insomnia, irritability, light sensitivity, loss of appetite, low energy, lung inflammation, muscle pain, night sweats, reduced g-force tolerance, respiratory tract infection, runny nose, sinus inflammation, sore throat, stomach pain, trembling, urinary infection, and viral infection.”

        One may say, “Well, try it for a while and see if you notice any bad effects.” With a list of possible side effects like the above, it may be a daunting task for someone to determine if CoQ10 is the culprit or is it something else. Is it really wise to experiment on one’s body with something with those possible side effects.




        12
        1. “CoQ10 may also cause abnormal breathing, back pain, bronchitis, changes in attention, changes in sperm motility, cholesterol, chest pain, constipation, coughing, diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, falling, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, fungal skin infection, gas, head pressure, hearing loss, heart attack, heartburn, heart dysfunction, indigestion, insomnia, irritability, light sensitivity, loss of appetite, low energy, lung inflammation, muscle pain, night sweats, reduced g-force tolerance, respiratory tract infection, runny nose, sinus inflammation, sore throat, stomach pain, trembling, urinary infection, and viral infection.”

          Poppycock!




          2
  7. You skipped something? Increase the bodies basic antioxidant?

    http://www.raysahelian.com/glutathione.html

    Eur J Nutr. 2014. Randomized controlled trial of oral glutathione supplementation on body stores of glutathione. Glutathione, the most abundant endogenous antioxidant, is a critical regulator of oxidative stress and immune function. While oral GSH has been shown to be bioavailable in laboratory animal models, its efficacy in humans has not been established. Our objective was to determine the long-term effectiveness of oral GSH supplementation on body stores of GSH in healthy adults. A 6-month randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of oral GSH (250 or 1,000 mg / day) on GSH levels in blood, erythrocytes, plasma, lymphocytes and exfoliated buccal mucosal cells was conducted in 54 non-smoking adults. Secondary outcomes on a subset of subjects included a battery of immune markers. GSH levels in blood increased after 1, 3 and 6 months versus baseline at both doses. At 6 months, mean GSH levels increased 30-35 % in erythrocytes, plasma and lymphocytes and 260 % in buccal cells in the high-dose group. GSH levels increased 17 and 29 % in blood and erythrocytes, respectively, in the low-dose group. In most cases, the increases were dose and time dependent, and levels returned to baseline after a 1-month washout period. A reduction in oxidative stress in both GSH dose groups was indicated by decreases in the oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio in whole blood after 6 months. Natural killer cytotoxicity increased >twofold in the high-dose group versus placebo at 3 months. These findings show, for the first time, that daily consumption of GSH supplements was effective at increasing body compartment stores of GSH.
    This study was supported by Kyowa Hakko USA, Inc. and Kyowa Hakko Bio. Ltd. ** Setria Glutathione can be found in select supplement manufacturers.




    0
    1. GSH is broken down in digestion, so GSH supplements amount to an expensive cysteine & glycine supplement, both of which also increase GSH status (glutamate is unlikely to be limiting). N-acetyl cysteine and glycine are cheap and offer limited profit potential, but GSH can be sold at considerable markup to those not versed in the biochemistry.

      In any case, I would prefer to increase the enzymes that are involved in GSH synthesis and maintainence in its reduced form, like glutathione reductase. This is precisely what Nrf2 regulates, and what many Nrf2 inducers, including sulforaphane from broccoli, accomplish.




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    1. A citation of snake oil Joe Mercola hardly enhances ones credibility. You might consider leaving that aside. He has quite thoroughly demonstrated himself to be little more than a carnival barker and snake oil salesman.




      1
      1. Why do you guys have to act like a j whenever Mercola is mentioned? Does Fuhrman sell supplements too and only organize health seminars for rich people at expensive resorts? And McDougall clients are also rich people from California.

        I am no follower of Mercola but he is nice enough to invite Dr G over his site to promote his book as well as mentioning him multiple times. You can search :Greger” at Mercola web site and you will see that he mentioned Greger at least a few dozens of times. His search engine is not good and so it shows more results that there are but still you have a few per page.

        http://search.mercola.com/results.aspx?q=greger

        https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/17/heart-healthy-foods.aspx

        https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/12/09/colonoscopy-pros-cons.aspx

        And by the way, the only difference between Dr Mercola and Dr G is that Dr Mercola includes animal foods for complete nutrition but he is promoting WFPB more often than Dr Greger because has like 4, 5 articles per day and most talk about plant foods. The few times when he talked about animal foods are about the sources of non contaminated foods to eat and the parts that are beneficial.

        And about the supplements that Mercola sells, you don’t have to buy from him because of his high price but every single one is needed for your optimal health. You are buried your head under the sand by ignoring them. I use the same supplements that Mercola sells but from different sources except for a few ones such as whey protein.




        2
          1. Lonie, you have a curious and unbiased mind and you like to learn new things. I am not a fan of Mercola or DrAxe or Chris Kresser, Pompei, etc. but I recommend you to read these doctors because you will learn a lot. I do read a lot of places beside just Dr G and my knowledge is still tiny compared to a lot of people who post at other sites. I don’t take anything at face value but always do some research before coming to a conclusion. Don’t be mistaken that these doctors only talk about animal foods but they talk more about plant foods and most of the time they talk about pollution in the environment such as:

            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/09/30/asbestos-health-risks.aspx

            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/07/13/sodium-lauryl-sulfate.aspx

            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/10/20/are-your-toothpaste-shampoo-and-body-wash-harming-your-health.aspx

            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/09/09/toxic-toothpaste-ingredients.aspx




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  8. Thanks for your updates on health isues.I do have a challenge with my boy aged 13 years and i have taken to a Hospital severally and was diagonised to be having a condition known as Muscle dystrophy which weakens muscle development.so my question is it possible for this condition to be corrected Nutritionally becouse they told me there is no cure for such condition? please essist me where possible thanks.




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  9. I am very sorry to hear of Dr. Greger’s recent negative experience with a poisonous elderberry smoothie. He mentioned it in the Facebook stream from London yesterday. He seems to be in very good spirits though. I have never seen him laugh so hard as when he was describing this event. I presume that he will make a video about this at some point.




    3
    1. GreenSmoothieParty – can you give details? I was just contemplating buying dried elderberries for putting in my berry smoothies. I hope Dr Greger is fully recovered.




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      1. Dr. Greger said that he has a large elderberry bush in his backyard and he was anxiously waiting for the berries to ripen because he had heard some good things about elderberries. He put a fairly large amount of these berries in a smoothie. It tasted a bit unpleasant but he decided to drink it anyway. He quickly felt sick and vomited it completely out of his body. After googling elderberries, he realized that these berries are poisonous raw and they need to be cooked as they are in jam, pie and wine. Here is a link to a reposted portion of the stream – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4QTluyzpbg&t=26s




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        1. GreenSmoothieParty, thanks for bringing this to our attention! So very glad to hear that Dr Greger survived to tell the tale (and he looks great too!) I had NO idea about the elderberries – we have a tree in the back yard, and I may still have a container of berries in the freezer ! Thanks again




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  10. CoQ10 is made by chlorophyll (green plant pigment from leafy greens) and sunlight so eat your greens and be in the sun for a bit in the day… no need for supplements and you get the vitamins minerals and FIBER from greens. But that’s just my two cents




    6
    1. Just this day put some chlorophyll liquid in my raw organic cocoa powder/almond milk/goat whey protein concentrate/niacin powder/angostura bitters/and other things, drink.

      Thanks for the chlorophyll/co Q 10 link. I will start adding a dropperful of this greenery to my tea as well.




      1
  11. Dear Greger, in the video, one of the papers that you show early in this video references Glutathione as a key antioxidant protecting the brain. You have never written about food and glutathione formation, at least I do not find any references by searching here. It may be a worthwhile topic.




    1
  12. I am Dad to a 14 year old non verbal autistic son. I’ve never noticed any improvement when he has had a fever. Additionally he eats lots of broccoli and cauliflower so I’m a little skeptical. I will continue to feed him broccoli because we like it however.




    4
  13. It is hard enough to get non-autistic children to eat broccoli, but many autistic children have major restrictions around food and absolutely refuse to eat the very foods that may help them, such as broccoli. I presume there is no supplement that can replace the need to eat the actual vegetables themselves?




    4
    1. I drink broccoli sprout smoothies (with kale and other veg) and sometimes they are strong enough to be literally gag-inducing. I tried to make a ‘lite’ version for my daughter, who has attention and anxiety issues, and she would only drink it reluctantly if I paid her cash (she’s a teen so that’s a motivator). I gave up after a few days of watching her grimace; I thought the lite version was pretty good (but probably ineffective, anyway).

      A (safe) supplement would be great.

      On a side note, other interventions aimed at reducing inflammation could be helpful, but similarly difficult to implement. I’m thinking specifically of good oral hygiene, especially flossing.




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    2. Hey Yvette, thanks for writing! The clinical trial Dr. G mentions in his video DOES use a sulforaphane supplement – not broccoli sprouts themselves. These supplements ARE commercially available, but more evidence is needed before we recommend autistic kids swallow these…which would probably be just as hard as eating broccoli for the smaller kids. My recommendation is to try and make it taste good! Cover it with a Chinese-style ‘brown sauce” (tastes sweet and spice) or puree it into a banana bread recipe, where the taste might be disguised by the sweetness of the bananas. Good luck!




      0
    1. regard sulforaphane, here is table

      by user Darryl.

      content of sulforaphane( or glucoraphanine for that matter) from this table as well as from other sources, appears to indicate that broccoli excel by colossal margin, especially Broccoli sprout and Broccoli seeds(although data missed from this table). Red cabbage and Collards only to some extent.

      Have to mention, If you use frozen Broccoli, perhaps you need to add horse raddish, wasabi or mustard seed powder to compensate loss of myosin, which essential for conversion of glucoraphanine i believe.




      2
  14. Hi Tess, I am a nutritionist and part of the NF team. Yes the research might get the same results with any other cruciferous vegetables. But this specific study was done with broccoli.




    2
  15. Thats almost pretty sure, one of the major causes of autism is vaccinations, heavy metals, especially mercury and all the crazy toxins in vaccines.
    Amish peoples and others peoples who dont use vaccination much have almost none case of autism, there are few solid documentary on this topic~




    1
  16. The last sentence of the Fighting Autism Brain Inflammation with Food video was: “But, you don’t know, until you put it to the test, which I promise we’ll cover, next.”

    Promises, promises. That video came out Septmber 25th. The video that came out on September 26th was not, as promised, about a study off the effects of sulforaphane on autism, but on Brown Fat: Losing Weight Through Thermogenesis. And the last sentence of that video was, “But thankfully, for those of us who would rather not lay our bare legs on blocks of ice, our brown fat can also be activated by some food ingredients… such as those that we’ll cover in the next video.”

    Will you, really? Because when you promise to cover a topic I’m particularly interested in next, I really wish you’d keep your promises!




    0
    1. Pam Holt: Here’s how NutritionFacts works: Videos are released every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. So, the next *video* will be tomorrow. Blog posts/articles are released every Tuesday and Thursday and are on different topics compared to the video series. The video you saw on Monday the 25 will be followed by another video on the autism topic on Wednesday the 27th as promised. (Unless something really weird goes wrong…)

      Today, the 26th, we had a blog post on brown fat. Here’s the post: https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/09/26/brown-fat-losing-weight-through-thermogenesis/ . You mis-quoted the send of the blog post. The last sentence is: “Thankfully, for those of us who would rather not lay our bare legs on blocks of ice, our brown fat can also be activated by some food ingredients such as those that are covered in my Boosting Brown Fat Through Diet video.” The text does not say “next video”. The text is referring to an existing video what was released 2015. The text includes a link to that existing video, which I’ll repeat here for you: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-brown-fat-through-diet/

      I hope this clear up your confusion. Unless I’m missing something?




      7
  17. Really glad that Dr. Greger is touching upon the suggested benefits of nutrition in mental disorders. As a 27 year old who has dealt with an attention deficit his whole life and mild depression for almost a decade, I would love to hear more about different herbs, supplements, or foods that may benefit ADD especially. I would like to avoid taking methylphenidate or Adderall if possible.




    4
  18. Does anyone have ideas how to get kids with ASD – notoriously picky eaters – to consume sprouts? I’d be willing to recommend this to my parents of kids with ASD (I’m a speech therapist), if it was possible to sneak cruciferous vegetables into chicken nuggets!




    0
    1. Hi Caroline,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question. This is a good one, since many kids with ASD are picky eaters, as you mentioned.

      Check out this video from NF.org, to get some ideas for how to make foods more appealing to kids: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/tricks-to-get-kids-to-eat-healthier-at-home/

      If you can blend it up with other foods in the form of a sauce, soup, dressing, or smoothie, that may be a very easy way to hide the sprouts.

      Although the science may not be able to point directly at meat consumption for worsening ASD symptoms, meat does increase levels of IGF-1, which could theoretically counteract the benefits of the broccoli sprouts. Decreasing meat intake while increasing cruciferous vegetable intake may be the best of both worlds. However, if this is not doable, perhaps there would be ways to put the broccoli sprouts in ketchup, for example, that the chicken nuggets could be dipped in. Perhaps others on this site will be able to chip in ideas for how they get their children to eat healthy.

      I hope this helps, and best of luck!




      1
  19. I am wondering if cooking these cruciferous vegetables decreases their benefit to autism. Do they have to be raw? Thanks! Love your posts.




    0
    1. Thanks for the great question. I don’t think Dr. Greger has done anything specifically on autism and cooking cruciferous vegetables, but he does not discourage cooking vegetables in general. Here is a few videos I found you might like
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/second-strategy-to-cooking-broccoli/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-vegetable-binds-bile-best/

      This link has some nice information on cooking methods as well:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/cooking-methods/

      Kelly
      Nutritionfacts.org Moderator




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  20. I would like to know if Dr. G has done or intends to do a video on microbiota and autism / ADHD … the first studies are published but I would have liked to have the expertise of Dr. G’s
    tks




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