Can Green Tea Help Prevent Cancer?

Can Green Tea Help Prevent Cancer?
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Within 40 minutes of green tea consumption we get a boost in antioxidant power of our bloodstream and within 60 an upregulation of DNA repair.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“[T]ea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of [heart disease], stroke,” and premature death in general, with each additional cup of green tea a day associated with a 4% lower mortality risk. So, maybe, “drinking several cups of tea daily can keep the doctor away”—as well as the mortician. But, what about cancer?

“There is growing evidence from laboratory, [population], and human intervention[al] studies that tea can exert beneficial disease-preventive effects,” and further, may actually “slow cancer progression.” Let’s review some of that evidence.

Not only do those who drink a lot of tea appear to live years longer than those who drink less; drinking lots of tea may delay the onset of cancer. Now, these are in Japanese tea cups, which only contain half a cup; so, the highest category here is greater than or equal to five full cups of tea, not ten. The women that did get cancer appeared to get it seven years later if they had been drinking lots of tea compared to those who consumed less, whereas men had a three-year delay, the difference male versus female due, potentially, to their smoking habits.

Green tea may be able to interfere with each of the stages of cancer formation: the initiation of the first cancer cell, promotion into a tumor, and then, the subsequent progression and spread. Cancer is often initiated when a free radical oxidizes our DNA, causing a mutation. But within 40 minutes of drinking green tea, you can get a nice “spike” in the antioxidant power of your bloodstream. “This increase…, in turn, [may] lower oxidative damage to DNA and so decrease [the] risk of cancer.”

Furthermore, in terms of “genoprotective effects”—protecting our genes—”pre-existing oxidation-induced DNA damage was…lower” after drinking green tea, suggesting that it can boost DNA repair as well. But, we didn’t know for sure, until now.

There’s a DNA-repair enzyme in our body called OGG1, and within one hour of drinking a single cup of green tea, we can boost its activity—though after a week of tea drinking, we can boost it even higher. So, “regular intake of green tea [may have] additional benefits in the prevention and/or repair of DNA damage.” Tea is so DNA-protective, it can be used for sperm storage for fresh samples until they can be properly refrigerated.

And so anti-inflammatory, it can be used for pain control as a mouthwash after wisdom tooth surgery. And, in terms of controlling cancer growth, at a dose of green tea compounds that would make it into someone’s organs after drinking six cups of tea, it can cause cancer cells to commit suicide—apoptosis (programmed cell death)—while leaving normal cells alone.

There’s lots of chemo agents that can kill cancer through brute force. But, that can make normal cells vulnerable too. So, “green tea appears to be potentially an ideal agent” for cancer prevention: “little or no adverse side effects,” efficacious for multiple cancers “at achievable dose levels,” and can be taken orally.

We have a sense of how it works: by stopping cancer cells from growing and causing them to off themselves. It’s cheap and has a history of safe, acceptable use. But this was all based on in vitro studies in a test tube. It needs to be evaluated in human trials: give people with cancer green tea to see if it helps—which we’ll explore, next. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Humusak via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“[T]ea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of [heart disease], stroke,” and premature death in general, with each additional cup of green tea a day associated with a 4% lower mortality risk. So, maybe, “drinking several cups of tea daily can keep the doctor away”—as well as the mortician. But, what about cancer?

“There is growing evidence from laboratory, [population], and human intervention[al] studies that tea can exert beneficial disease-preventive effects,” and further, may actually “slow cancer progression.” Let’s review some of that evidence.

Not only do those who drink a lot of tea appear to live years longer than those who drink less; drinking lots of tea may delay the onset of cancer. Now, these are in Japanese tea cups, which only contain half a cup; so, the highest category here is greater than or equal to five full cups of tea, not ten. The women that did get cancer appeared to get it seven years later if they had been drinking lots of tea compared to those who consumed less, whereas men had a three-year delay, the difference male versus female due, potentially, to their smoking habits.

Green tea may be able to interfere with each of the stages of cancer formation: the initiation of the first cancer cell, promotion into a tumor, and then, the subsequent progression and spread. Cancer is often initiated when a free radical oxidizes our DNA, causing a mutation. But within 40 minutes of drinking green tea, you can get a nice “spike” in the antioxidant power of your bloodstream. “This increase…, in turn, [may] lower oxidative damage to DNA and so decrease [the] risk of cancer.”

Furthermore, in terms of “genoprotective effects”—protecting our genes—”pre-existing oxidation-induced DNA damage was…lower” after drinking green tea, suggesting that it can boost DNA repair as well. But, we didn’t know for sure, until now.

There’s a DNA-repair enzyme in our body called OGG1, and within one hour of drinking a single cup of green tea, we can boost its activity—though after a week of tea drinking, we can boost it even higher. So, “regular intake of green tea [may have] additional benefits in the prevention and/or repair of DNA damage.” Tea is so DNA-protective, it can be used for sperm storage for fresh samples until they can be properly refrigerated.

And so anti-inflammatory, it can be used for pain control as a mouthwash after wisdom tooth surgery. And, in terms of controlling cancer growth, at a dose of green tea compounds that would make it into someone’s organs after drinking six cups of tea, it can cause cancer cells to commit suicide—apoptosis (programmed cell death)—while leaving normal cells alone.

There’s lots of chemo agents that can kill cancer through brute force. But, that can make normal cells vulnerable too. So, “green tea appears to be potentially an ideal agent” for cancer prevention: “little or no adverse side effects,” efficacious for multiple cancers “at achievable dose levels,” and can be taken orally.

We have a sense of how it works: by stopping cancer cells from growing and causing them to off themselves. It’s cheap and has a history of safe, acceptable use. But this was all based on in vitro studies in a test tube. It needs to be evaluated in human trials: give people with cancer green tea to see if it helps—which we’ll explore, next. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Humusak via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

Sorry about the cliffhanger! I just wanted to offer a good backgrounder on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Stay tuned for Can Green Tea Help Treat Cancer?

You don’t have to wait for info on prostate cancer, though. See my recent videos: Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea and Treating Prostate Cancer with Green Tea.

I also have a few older videos:

That wisdom tooth thing is so interesting. It can also just be used as an anticavity mouth rinse (see What’s the Best Mouthwash?).

Is Caffeinated Tea Dehydrating? Watch the video!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

89 responses to “Can Green Tea Help Prevent Cancer?

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  1. Now this is the kind of news I like to hear! I seem to recall that the recommended daily consumption is 3 cups. Since cup sizes vary I assume that is equivalent to 3 tea bags a day. The tea bags I have been buying contain 1.5 grams. Does that daily dosage sound about right? Is there an upper limit where it may become toxic? Thanks again to the Dr and his team for all the good work presented on this website!




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    1. Green tea contains fluoride, so excessive green tea drinking could cause fluoride poisoning. Also, depending on the origin, green tea could contain lead. (Chinese green tea is said to have the highest levels of lead.)




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                1. Well Darryl, tell that to the wind patterns, as the boys cannot get a handle on stopping the outflow of radiation. Here in Nova Scotia, the winds change minute by minute. Unmani Hyde, a teacher of nonduality, exhorts us to become comfortable in not-knowing. As I approach 70, having survived prostate cancer and more radiation than I care to share, hahaha I’ve developed the sense that humanity as it is currently framed, is absurdly trying to control the environment. Nature bats last. Good luck, or as our francophones tell it: Bonne chance!




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                  1. Most of the onshore contamination occurred during two days immediately after the building explosions (themselves caused by venting reactor hydrogen to the unventilated buildings), during a onshore wind and rainfall. This accounted for the roughly 50 km long, 10 km wide fallout extending NW of the reactor site seen in radiation surveys. Since the incident, there’s been a marked decline in the onshore area with radiation appreciably above natural background, basically now restricted to the exclusion zone.




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                    1. Also, that’s not to say all produce from Fukushima prefecture is safe. Drainage and plant absorption has caused radiation to fall about twice as fast as expected from radionuclide half-lives. In particular, I’d avoid wild gathered mushrooms, which tend to bioaccumulate Cs-137, indeed, some 25 years after Chernobyl, wild boar (who are as fond of truffles as their domesticated brethren) are still considered too toxic to eat in Germany. This isn’t an issue for cultivated mushrooms like shiitake, which are grown on blocks of sawdust and grains.




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                1. Harriet, I suppose the larger issue which while encompassing the ‘clarity’ of green tea, also surrounds the issue of air born particulate of all stripes. Lead, mercury and arsenic are fallouts from the burning of coal. Even glyphosate, the main metal chelator chemical in Roundup – all have been found in the atmosphere, encircling our planet and inevitably reform on the ground in both yours and my organic vegetable garden. We know also from this site and elsewhere that they dump in our oceans and are taken up in that fat of aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates of all kinds. Such is the unawakened slumber of the human as a species. This is the extent to which the larger issue of pollution affects all of us. Groan!




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          1. George: I’ll have to let others answer this question. I’m usually just proud of myself for drinking green tea. I haven’t taken the time to worry about the source.

            FYI: The Stash brand is one of my favorites. And one of my favorite flavors from Stash is Green Morrocan Mint (green tea with mint added). After seeing your question, I did some research on the Stash website. I found the information helpful and at least somewhat comforting: https://www.stashtea.com/blogs/education/85696323-about-our-teas




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      1. Regarding green tea and China, I read that China produces 80% of the world’s tea. And as for Japanese green tea…well, Japan has proven itself to be a very polluted country and still dumping horrendous amounts of radio-active toxicity into the Pacific Ocean daily, years later after the Fukushima disaster. It’s still going on, and the other nations of the world are turning a blind eye because after all, Japan is a G-7 nation don’t ya know




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    1. hi kkalajan, after glancing at your link, I would think its unnecessary for Dr Greger to respond to the comments made by Salim Yusuf. If you read closely, the comments have ALREADY been addressed by some of the best.. including Dr Kim Williams, president of the American College og Cardiology (a vegan, promoting wfpb eating ) The link below is one of many on youtube where Dr Williams discusses the causes of heart disease and other chronic disease. I encourage you to also check out the work of Dr Kahn (on of the other respondents on your link)

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=q1oB569xq88




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  2. Great video!
    Would love to have a video covering the pros/cons of Essiac tea and Sir Jason Winters Tea for cancer patients and survivors.
    How do you feel about taking green tea extract versus drinking brewed green tea? Is there research to compare the efficacy of these two methods of consumption?




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    1. Dr Greger does NOT recommend green tea extract due to dozens of reported cases of liver toxicity linked to their use (How Not to Die page 388).




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    2. HI Sharlene B. Thanks for your question. I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. There hasn’t been a whole lot of studies to date on green tea extract, so comparing effectiveness of green tea with its extract isn’t yet available. However, due to the case reports of liver toxicity I’m not sure if we will see more research on this, but time will tell. As for your interest about other teas, although Dr. G hasn’t done a video on these yet, keep your eyes peeled on the website. As you know he is continually reviewing the literature and posting interesting research results.




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  3. I’m just a poor country boy with a limited stomach capacity. How am I going to drink 5 cups of green tea each day along with the same amount of hibiscus tea, rooibos tea (which I read is an AMPK activator) and my green and fruit smoothie? Would it be okay to just add the contents of 5 tea bags, a few hibiscus petals into my smoothie along with rooibos tea instead of water or soy milk?




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    1. I mix different kinds of teas together into one drink (or smoothie) quite often. When making a mixed tea, it does have a unique taste, but I like it so it’s probably what one gets used to. I have no idea of the synergistic effect that the combination might have. It has been shown that mixing some fruits (and vegetables) together in a single meal can have a positive effect. But in some cases I imagine it might have a negative effect. The permutations and combinations are much too enormous to study them all!




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    2. You can certainly eat the whole tea leaf—that’s what matcha drinkers do, essentially. Whole plant foods confer the greatest benefits, and tea is no different. Dr. Greger does mention putting tea leaves in smoothies in one of the earlier videos, though I can’t remember which one. Matcha would be convenient since it’s already in powder form.




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    3. If you are going to eat green tea leaves, make sure that it is Japanese grown tea. Tea grown in China can have have high levels of lead and other heavy metals. From what I’ve read, Japanese tea is mostly free of these heavy metals. If you buy ‘Japanese matcha’, make sure that it is actually grown in Japan. A lot of matcha on the market is grown in China ‘to Japanese specifications’.

      Dr. Greger has a video about heavy metals in tea:
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/lead-contamination-of-tea/




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    4. I don’t think you need to eat 5 full bags of tea leaves, since tea leaves contain more poly nutrients than tea water. I would think that a serving of Japanese matcha (ground up tea leaves) would provide similar benefits to 5 cups of tea.

      A good place to order matcha:
      http://www.ippodo-tea.co.jp/en/




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    5. Hi Richard,
      I am also a below average income individual. I highly recommend learning to identify and eat weeds, such as dandelions. You can make tea out of many of them. If you have a yard (most country boys do) grow fruit and vegetables. It is almost unbelievable how much good, organic food you can grow if you do this. Super healthy too. Experiment and you can make delicious healthy meals almost for free.
      John S




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  4. So maybe it’s time to combine the hibiscus and the green tea together! I wonder if we can make it the same way letting it seep in the fridge overnight. Anyone have an easy way to make this in bulk?




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    1. Sure you can throw green tea in with your hibiscus petals and let it steep overnight either at room temp or in the fridge. Dr. Greger brews his green tea by this cold steep method. (HNTD pg 387)




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    2. I do it all the time, and since I live in FL, I always make sun tea in a gallon jar, and throw in some hibiscus calyces picked fresh (it gets called “Florida cranberry” here) and also some cut up citrus for extra flavor and nutrients. I bought one of those sun tea jars with the convenient spigot on it for just this purpose, but I ended up using it to make continuous brew kombucha instead! One of these days I may remember to get another. BTW, the combo of green tea and hibiscus makes an awesome kombucha, pretty too!




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  5. Wonderful video, can’t wait for next video. Since matcha green tea is 10x more powerful than green tea wouldn’t matcha a few times per day be the best? Also green tea causes teeth to turn green as I recall from some reading, how to prevent this greening of teeth if this is true? Does consumption of green tea cause mind to go into ALPHA state as well.
    Thanks Jon




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    1. I believe that matcha is so much more potent because when we drink it, we’re consuming the whole (powdered) leaf rather than just an infusion of it. So yeah, I would imagine that less matcha would have the same effect. How much less, I’m not sure, but half as much seems reasonable. Okay, that’s not very scientific! But maybe someone else knows better. What I do know is that I have been drinking lots of green tea, including matcha, for many years, and my teeth have never turned even a little bit green.




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    2. Jon, I’ve been drinking green tea for decades, and it hasn’t turned my teeth green. Also, I’m not exactly sure what you mean by causing the mind to go into an ALPHA state. I drink it to relax, and often I prepare and drink it in silence after long periods of very deep meditation (2-3 hours or more of meditation). It helps me hold the meditation energy.




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    3. Jon, within minutes of consuming green tea our minds go into the same relaxed alpha state as it would after 90 minutes of meditation. (HNTD page 386) Green tea definitely helps us relax!




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    4. Hi Jon!
      Thanks for your question! Yes, you are right, Dr Gregor has a few articles on videos on matcha and mentions that it is probably the best form of green tea.

      As for staining teeth, this is caused by tannins in the tea, and green tea has relatively few in comparison to black tea. This toothpaste company has some useful tips on how to combat staining though!




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  6. I drink several cups of black tea per day however add approx. 2 tbsp. of unsweetened soy milk. Does the addition of the soy negate all the beneficial effects of the tea or just bind with the antioxidants? Also when eating oatmeal with blueberries, cinnamon , etc is it advisable to not be drinking tea with milk at the same time? Thanks




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  7. I no longer drink caffeine as it makes me too jittery and impacts my sleep quality. Does decaf green tea provide the same health benefits? Thanks as always Dr. Gregor!




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    1. Hi Cheryl. I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. The decaffeination process unfortunately also removes much of the catechins in green tea, the active ingredients that we attribute its health benefits to. On a personal note, I can relate your caffeine sensitivity and have long since stopped drinking all caffeinated beverages except for green tea which is naturally lower in caffeine than black tea or coffee. As long as I get my 2-3 cups in before early afternoon it doesn’t interefere with my sleep. Hope this helps!




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  8. I avoid caffeine due to its impact on the bones and osteoporosis, so drink green rooibos – do you know of this has the same effect?




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    1. Hello Catherine Marvell. I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. You’ve asked an interesting question. While green rooibos tea is from a different plant than green tea is, both seem to have antioxidant powers. Dr. G did an interesting video on herbal teas, and rooibos ranked in the top 5. You can access this video here: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-healthiest-herbal-tea/. Hope this helps!




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    1. When I think about the pesticides in tea, I think about the bottom line of Dr. Greger’s reported research: one’s life is prolonged drinking tea. Also, is the pesticide found on tea any worse than the pesticides on every other growing thing?




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      1. Hi Liisa,
        Yes it is true we got to be more conscious of the soil and where the food is coming from. I think what we can do check the source of the tea and if possible buy organic.




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    2. wow Ioannis! thanks for posting the links.. I am throwing out my box of Uncle Lee’s tea right away. It is the organic white Legends of China, but still, the one they list had over 20 pesticides.




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  9. Hiromi Shinya (who wrote The Enzyme Factor) is the man who invented the colonoscopy and has probably examined the stomachs and colons of more people than anyone else in the world – more than 300,000. He is the Chief of the Surgical Endoscopy Unit at Beth Israel Medical Center. He says that when he has used an endoscope to examine the stomachs of people who drink a lot of tea (including green tea) the mucous lining is literally wasting away from the tannic acid. He says that if you really do want to drink tea, to limit it to 2 or 3 cups a day and have it after a meal.
    Would love to know your thoughts on this.




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    1. Hi Amanda, The website you referred regarding tannic acid and its danger to mucus lining also advise you to use organically grown tea leaves, drink it after meals instead of on an empty stomach to avoid excess stress on your stomach lining, and limit it to about 2-3 cups per day. I think that is a good advice for drinking tea.
      Enzymes and Your Health continued




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    2. I have read that drinking anything after a meal, especially tea and alcohol, can cause the stomach to empty quicker than normal. That causes incomplete digestion, which results in lowered absorption of nutrients, as well as food putrefaction in the intestinal digestive track, resulting in damaging chemicals released into the blood stream.

      So it may be best to drink teas between meals when the stomach is empty, and limit the tea intake. As always, this suggests that variety is the spice of life, and we should seek a variety of antioxidants from different sources, rather than focus on just a few.




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  10. I LOVE green tea but have to limit it as I am very sensitive to caffein. (I drink only high-quality, organic, loose-leaf tea.)




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  11. Thank you so much for your DIRECT information. When I KNOW the answer to something I am anxious to get more information and follow through. This is a great way to do your info sharing. THANK YOU.




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    1. Anne, Yes you get the same (maybe even better) benefits with matcha tea powder, whether added to a smoothie or plain water. Dr. Greger discusses this in How Not to Die (page 388).




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  12. Great video, Dr. G. I’m hoping the next video will have good news as well. I’m a big green & white tea drinker but not a big fan of tea bags. I prefer to steep and drink it the way the Chinese do – floating loose tea in a cup with a lid. My favorite right now is Dr. Lee’s green tea. I love the flavor, very fresh tasting, beautiful color. Dharjeeling green tea comes in a close second. I drink about 3-4 cups a day between meals to keep those anti-oxidants flowing!




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  13. Does anyone know if black tea has the same effect? I drink a cup or two of green tea every day, but I love black tea and drink more of it.




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    1. Hello Isolda. I’m a Registered Dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. Unfortunately the answer to your question is no. Although green and black tea come from the same plant, camellia senensis, black tea is more processed (fermented) which deactivates the catechins in the tea leaves. The catechins are responsible for the health benefits associated with green tea. A general target of 3 cups of green tea has been suggested, so maybe if you try to drink one more cup of green and one less of black tea you will have a good balance. Also, it is important to steep the green tea for 8-10 minutes to get maximum of the catechins. Hope this helps!




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  14. i have been affected by the Dupuytren’s contracture (also known as Dupuytren’s disease, or by the slang term “Viking disease”) is a flexion contracture of the hand due to a palmar fibromatosis, in which the fingers bend towards the palm and cannot be fully extended (straightened).
    i was wondering if there are any suggestions on how to treat it and live with this disease. i would love a video about it.
    thanks




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    1. I have that too! My left pinkie was surgically corrected about 15 years ago and my right pinkie and ring finger were surgically corrected last July. I know of no homeopathic remedies and the injection process did not work for me. My hand surgeon last July cleaned out the scar tissue from the palm of my hand and he also grafted skin from my thigh into the palm to replace the existing tissue. He explained the spontaneous scar growth occurs in the palm (and very rarely on the sole of foot) and never the side of the thigh. His rationale was that the odds of a recurrence (which unfortunately happens often) is greatly reduced by removal of the suspect tissue and it’s genetic trait to scar. My right pinkie was fully contracted into the palm and my ring finger about 90 degrees contracted. My ring finger can now be fully straightened and pinkie still has about 40 degrees contraction. It was successful as I can now wear gloves on both hands and put both hands into jeans pockets.




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    2. A Dupuytren’s contracture can be very debilitating and there’s so much not known about why they form in some people. Since it consists of scar tissue like any fibrosis in the body once it is there it can only be surgically removed. Scar tissue primarily forms in areas of chronic inflammation so the best way to avoid further formations is to adhere to as much of an anti-inflammatory lifestyle / eating as possible.




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  15. Just read on internet British researchers couldn’t understand why black tea didn’t have similar benefits as green.
    So they went to the Netherlands and did a study – there, black tea did have similar benefits as green.
    ?
    Answer is, British put milk in their black tea and in Netherlands they don’t.

    Yet another reason I don’t do cow’s milk.




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  16. Can anyone tell me whether I need to worry about metallized film packaging made with aluminum? I’m concerned because of aluminum’s relationship to Alzheimer’s. The last orders of amla and nutritional yeast both came in it. Thank you.




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  17. I buy organic Japanese tea and find it very flavorful, especially if steeped in water that is 140 F. (not boiling). However, as some people mentioned, the caffeine in green tea can be a problem. If I drink strong green tea in the afternoon, I cannot sleep well. Matcha green tea is very high in caffeine so I totally avoid it.




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  18. If we switch from soy milk to almond, cashew or coconut milk in our tea will we get the benefits of the tea? I’m not a great fan of black tea without milk.




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    1. Thanks for your question Jill.

      That is a better choice because as the vascular effects of green tea may be suppressed by soy milk (see Dr Greger’s video here). Therefore, as far my knowledge goes, other alternatives of plant based milk may be better. However, keep in mind that coconut milk is high in saturated fat.

      On the other hand, I should tell you that green tea is healthier than black tea (watch this video and this video to see why).

      Hope this answer helps.




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  19. What do you think about taking curcumin and drinking green tea? Do they interact or cancel each other out? Is there a way to time taking them so as to avoid conflict? All this in context of non Hodgkin lymphoma.




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  20. HI Anne. Great question. I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. I’m not aware of studies looking at your specific question between the interaction between curcumin and the phytonutrients in green tea. When we reflect on all of the health promoting nutrients and the food sources we find them in and that fact that we eat foods in various combinations at meals, the best answer I can give you is to feel confident that by enjoying various nutrient rich plant foods throughout the day, you are doing your best to maximize the absorption and utilization of these nutrients to support your body and overall health. Hope this helps a bit!




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  21. Thanks for the info in this video.

    Unfortunately, green tea makes me feel bad. I’ve tried several brands and I get the same icky feeling after about 10 or 15 minutes. I don’t get this bad feeling from brown, Oolong, or white teas.

    After seeing your video (years ago) about the antioxidant capacity of various types of tea, I have been drinking white tea (the best antioxidant) most of the time, and occasionally brown tea (for variety).

    Are there studies about cancer prevention and other health benefits from drinking the other teas that are not green?

    Thanks.




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  22. Could someone please answer this question? What about someone who’s extremely (maximally) sensitive to caffeine? AFAIK, even green tea has some. Thanks so much for your reply.




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    1. Hi Aniya, I am a volunteer moderator on the website. About your question that you are sensitive to Caffeine I would suggest avoidance of caffeinated food and drinks for some time. Reintroducing the caffeinated food in small dosage to see if your body can tolerate some amount of caffeinated food and drink. Dr Greger has indicated in his videos about Hibiscus tea with great antioxidant power that I assume you could use instead of green tea, also I found this below video that give you suggestions about food to eat for health protection.

      Review article: the aetiology, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence for food intolerance.

      Antioxidant-Rich Foods with Every Meal




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  23. Ken,

    Yes, indeed other teas, such as the white tea that you tolerate, can be a helpful form of cancer prevention. See this interesting review by the researchers at Oregon State Univerity back in 2000 (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/04/000410084553.htm) and you will find more protection with the white tea (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/antimutagenic-activity-of-green-versus-white-tea/) when brewed longer….. Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




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  24. Jill,

    I was able to find references to how cow’s milk will bind the polyphenols in the tea…… at: https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/28/2/219/2887513/Addition-of-milk-prevents-vascular-protective and http://nutritionfacts.org/video/tea-and-artery-function/

    \When it comes to the other milks, no caseins (milk proteins) are present and the literature that I was able to search included none of the similarities to the blocking effects of cow or soy milk. Lack of data and/or petri dish data is no assurance of the facts.

    However, the coconut content of polyphenols might be expected to increase the activity. Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




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  25. I keep hoping someone will do something about the wide volume swings in your videos. We never know what we’ll get. Sometimes it’s so low we can’t hear it and sometimes it knocks our socks off. We have to stop the video multiple time to adjust the sound to get it right. Often the beginning “noise” will just blast us out of the room, but then the voice is too low to hear, so we have to crank it up. Then at the end it blasts us out of the room again! Ugh!!! Surely it can’t be that hard to use a standard volume throughout.

    Thanks for reading this.
    Mark




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    1. Mark: I’ve been told that the volume problems will be fixed in the next volume. Since we just started this volume, that several months away, but at least it’s should be happening. Hang in there.




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  26. I am confused. If you are not low in iron, can you still drink tea with meals? I drink water all day to get in those requirements so enjoy decaf tea with meals; not always herbal or green tea. Or is definitely never?




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    1. Dear Christine,

      it’s not the best idea to drink tea with meals as it can inhibtin mineral absorbtion. This is with teas made from tea plant, herbal teas should be okay.

      Does that answer your question?

      Moderator Adam P.




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