Mothers Overestimate Dietary Quality

Mothers Overestimate Dietary Quality
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Mothers have been found to dramatically overestimate the quality of their preschoolers’ diets.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One reason kids may not be eating healthier is that maybe their parents overestimate the quality of their child’s diet. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. I mean, if they think their kids are already eating well, then there’s no reason to change.

For the first time ever, this theory was actually tested. The mothers of 2,000 preschoolers were interviewed. What percentage of moms insisted that their child’s diet was good? The vast majority. What percentage of their kids’ diets were actually good? Now, note, this is in accordance with the USDA Healthy Eating guidelines, which aren’t exactly strict. But let’s look.

Only 0.2 percent—1 in every 500 kids! The vast majority of mothers overestimate the quality of their child’s diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Joe Shlabotnik via Flickr.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One reason kids may not be eating healthier is that maybe their parents overestimate the quality of their child’s diet. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. I mean, if they think their kids are already eating well, then there’s no reason to change.

For the first time ever, this theory was actually tested. The mothers of 2,000 preschoolers were interviewed. What percentage of moms insisted that their child’s diet was good? The vast majority. What percentage of their kids’ diets were actually good? Now, note, this is in accordance with the USDA Healthy Eating guidelines, which aren’t exactly strict. But let’s look.

Only 0.2 percent—1 in every 500 kids! The vast majority of mothers overestimate the quality of their child’s diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Joe Shlabotnik via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

Check out these videos on our dietary quality:
Higher Quality May Mean Higher Risk
What Percent of Americans Lead Healthy Lifestyles?

For further context, also see my associated blog post: Protecting Our Babies From Pollutants.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

9 responses to “Mothers Overestimate Dietary Quality

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  1. Is there any another study to estimate how European mothers do? Do they know more about healthy eating towards their child’s diet that american mothers?

    Would be interesting to know.
    John from Malta

  2. They should add cooking, sewing, cleaning house, cleaning yourself, how to clean baby & how to manage bills type of classes that have to be taken before or while food stamps are given out.

  3. How old infants (and toddlers) can eat which ingredients of the Daily Dozen? (I mean introducing solids to the breastfed babies) According to WHO, infants should be fully breastfed (or fed wit formula) up to 6 months (and then they start eat solid food while they are still breastfed). But what after the age of six months? What is the way between fully breastfed baby and the child fully eating the Daily Dozen? (For example – how old infant can eat flax seeds or beans?)
    Sorry for my English :-)

  4. Hello. Pavlina, many thanks for your comments.

    Actually, after the first year of age, a child can eat basically anything. Obviously we are talking about nutrient dense food, so for your question I’d say that he can eat any of the food listed on the daily dozen. Remember that you can also feed him foods traditionally known for their allergenic potential, as early introduction of these foods can actually help him prevent allergies as he grows. WHO also recommends that if you’re breastfeeding your baby you can do it until the 2 years of age.

    I’d only recommend you to pay attention to foods that might have a risk in choking him, for example, don’t give to him nuts or beans, but ratter peanut butter or mashed beans, until you make sure he chews well his foods.

    You can find more info about complementary feeding on WHO guidelines: http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/complementary_feeding/en/

    Hope this helps!

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