Doctor's Note

If you missed the beginning of this series, start with the experiments described in Doping with beet juice and replicated in yesterday’s video. In Monday's video-of-the-day,  I'll use beeturia to illustrate an important point about phytonutrients and return to the nitric oxide story on Tuesday. Have a great weekend, and feel free to spend it watching hundreds of my other videos on more than a thousand subjects :) For the asparagus lovers out there, check out my videos #1 Anticancer Vegetable and Best Cooking Method.

For some context, please check out my associated blog posts: Using Greens to Improve Athletic Performance and Increasing Muscle Strength with Fenugreek

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    If you missed the beginning of this series, start with the experiments described in Doping with beet juice and replicated in yesterday’s video. In Monday’s video-of-the-day, I’ll use beeturia to illustrate an important point about phytonutrients and return to the nitric oxide story on Tuesday. Have a great weekend, and feel free to spend it watching hundreds of my other videos on more than a thousand subjects :) For the asparagus lovers out there, check out my videos #1 Anticancer Vegetable and Best Cooking Method.

  • Veguyan

    Dr. Greger,

    I’m 63 now, and I’ve been a vegan for about 40 years. I recently learned that I have kidney stones; one of them is one centimeter, sitting in my right kidney (saw it inadvertently in an x-ray). (I wish I knew what to do about it. I’m scared of the doctors. Should I get them blasted and have Cat Scans, etc.) Admittedly, I eat a lot of kale along with many fruits and vegetables. Not as often, I’ll eat some steamed beets, and when I do, I have beetstoolia. And sharing further, in keeping with the humorous aspect of this episode of the series, if I eat a can of vegetarian chili ( I won’t name the popular vegetarian brand), I have chilistoolia, so much so, that the odor is the same as when I freshly open the can the night before.

    Seriously though, What to do about the stones? Is doing nothing an option?

    • paulvah

      Hi this is the first time i have replied.. dont know how this works… you said “admittedly i eat a lot of
      kale” but that makes me wonder… because the info i find on kale is that it is low oxalate… nothing like
      spinach or beets. please advise

  • Veguyan

    Alright, then, I think the most information I’m going to get on this thread is for kidney stones, cut down on the beets.

    Thank you.

    • Tia

      Veguyan & Dr Greger…thanks for this site – I am a nutritionfacts fan, and vegan. Yes and I have similar questions not just about beets but about other high oxalate foods and kidney function. I would be interested in a response from the Doc in relation to any results from research done in the field of oxalates & the kidneys, intestinal flora and oxalate absorption and low oxalate plant foods that can replace the higher oxalate ones in a vegan diet. It would be so great if the Doc could do a series on vegan food substitutions for things like low oxalate vegan diet and also a gluten free diet as I know a number of people who’s food sensitivities and ailments have made their food choices already limited but who would love to choose a vegan diet. In these cases would it also be wise to seek the advice of a plant based dietician?

  • ghulstyle

    i just read your Durian story in one of your Q&A
    and was wondering if there is anything similiar with the smell of Durian
    me and my partner were driving back home after i bought some durian. Funny enough i am only able to detect a slight smell while my partner wanted to leave the car and take the bus! :D

  • Suzie Kyootie

    I recently read or heard that beeturia, etc., is caused by a shortage of hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

  • ccc

    This video is completely useless…

    • Mike Byrne

      It is entertaining, and I learned a new word, so not useless.