Modern Meat Not Ahead of the Game

Modern Meat Not Ahead of the Game
4.6 (92%) 5 votes

Since chronic inflammation underlines many disease processes, and saturated fat appears to facilitate the endotoxic inflammatory reaction to animal products, researchers have looked to wild animals for less unhealthy meat options.

Comenta
Comparte

“There is evidence of a link between a form of low-grade systemic inflammation and several chronic diseases. This subclass of inflammation has been labelled ‘metaflammation,’…’paraflammation’, or ‘smouldering’ inflammation.”

“Obesity, is known to be associated with this form of inflammation,” though this recent paper argues that obesity may be more of a canary in the coal mine. Well, if this inflammation is now known to underlie most, if not all, forms of chronic disease, what are some inducers of this inflammation?

Well, that coal mine might actually be one—air pollution and rising CO2 levels. But also secondhand smoke, inactivity, too much activity—like marathon runners actually may be stressing their bodies too much, excessive alcohol, calories, fast food, the Western diet, saturated and trans fats, not enough fiber, and too much sugar, meat, and salt. Note, though, they specify domestic meat. Might wild game be healthier?

One study comparing the meat of both captive and wild pheasants, for example, found significantly more saturated fat in the domesticated birds, which is one of the components blamed for helping trigger that meat-induced postprandial—or “after-meal”—inflammatory response, given the potent inflammatory effects of saturated fats. So, wild animals would seem to be the least unhealthy meat option. But it wasn’t until recently when we got any real evidence one way or the other.

This group of Australian researchers compared the amount of inflammation triggered by modern meat, domesticated animal meat, compared to that triggered by kangaroo meat. They looked at three different inflammatory markers: tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and C-reactive protein. Here’s the regular meat; big spike in inflammation one hour, two hours after eating meat. No surprise, that’s what animal fat does. But here’s the kangaroo. Sure, still causes that smoldering meta-inflammation, but not as much as store-bought meat.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Donkey shot via Wikimedia Commons; Heike Katthagen; and Robert tdc via flickr.

“There is evidence of a link between a form of low-grade systemic inflammation and several chronic diseases. This subclass of inflammation has been labelled ‘metaflammation,’…’paraflammation’, or ‘smouldering’ inflammation.”

“Obesity, is known to be associated with this form of inflammation,” though this recent paper argues that obesity may be more of a canary in the coal mine. Well, if this inflammation is now known to underlie most, if not all, forms of chronic disease, what are some inducers of this inflammation?

Well, that coal mine might actually be one—air pollution and rising CO2 levels. But also secondhand smoke, inactivity, too much activity—like marathon runners actually may be stressing their bodies too much, excessive alcohol, calories, fast food, the Western diet, saturated and trans fats, not enough fiber, and too much sugar, meat, and salt. Note, though, they specify domestic meat. Might wild game be healthier?

One study comparing the meat of both captive and wild pheasants, for example, found significantly more saturated fat in the domesticated birds, which is one of the components blamed for helping trigger that meat-induced postprandial—or “after-meal”—inflammatory response, given the potent inflammatory effects of saturated fats. So, wild animals would seem to be the least unhealthy meat option. But it wasn’t until recently when we got any real evidence one way or the other.

This group of Australian researchers compared the amount of inflammation triggered by modern meat, domesticated animal meat, compared to that triggered by kangaroo meat. They looked at three different inflammatory markers: tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and C-reactive protein. Here’s the regular meat; big spike in inflammation one hour, two hours after eating meat. No surprise, that’s what animal fat does. But here’s the kangaroo. Sure, still causes that smoldering meta-inflammation, but not as much as store-bought meat.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Donkey shot via Wikimedia Commons; Heike Katthagen; and Robert tdc via flickr.

Nota del Doctor

The meat-induced spike in inflammation within hours of consumption is explored in my three-part video series The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause InflammationThe Exogenous Endotoxin Theory; and Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia. It’s also discussed briefly in my full-length 2012 presentation, Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death. Other videos on inflammation include Anti-Inflammatory AntioxidantsFighting Inflammation With Food SynergyGarden Variety Anti-InflammationAnti-Inflammatory Effects of Purple PotatoesFighting Inflammation in a Nut Shell; and Dietary Treatment of Crohn’s Disease. Given this new data suggesting that the consumption of flesh from wild animals causes less inflammation, might those who continue to eat meat benefit from switching to something like venison? That’s our subject tomorrow in Filled Full of Lead.

For more context, check out my associated blog post, Lead Poisoning Risk From Venison.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This