Plant-Based Diets: Oral Health

Plant-Based Diets: Oral Health
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Plant-based diets may help protect against oral cancer and periodontal (gum) disease, a leading cause of tooth loss.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Two studies were recently published on plant-based diets and oral health. What do you think they found? Well, for periodontal disease, affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, like gingivitis (gum disease), one of the leading causes of tooth loss, plant-based diets should be protective.

After all, inflammation “is now recognized as one of the key underlying [causal] factors in periodontal disease.” And, we know saturated fats “produce an inflammatory response.” And so, no surprise, this recent study found that “High dietary [saturated fat intake] was significantly associated with a greater number of periodontal disease events.” Saturated fat, which comes primarily, in the American diet, from basically, dairy, donuts, and chicken. 

The same diet that leads to high cholesterol may also contribute to periodontitis, as bad cholesterol levels may be a risk factor for both. People with periodontal disease also suffer from arterial dysfunction. Wait a second: inflammation, high cholesterol, and arterial dysfunction; is it any wonder there may be an “Association Between Chronic Periodontitis and…Erectile Dysfunction?”  

By looking in your mouth, your dentist may learn more about you than you realize. We know we can reverse impotence with a plant-based diet—what about periodontal disease? A new study found that “higher intake of high-fiber foods, especially fruits, [may at least help slow] periodontal disease progression…” 

For oral cancer, it’s a no-brainer. According to the latest review in the Journal of the American Dental Association, “Evidence supports a recommendation of a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables as part of a whole-foods, plant-based diet.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Two studies were recently published on plant-based diets and oral health. What do you think they found? Well, for periodontal disease, affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, like gingivitis (gum disease), one of the leading causes of tooth loss, plant-based diets should be protective.

After all, inflammation “is now recognized as one of the key underlying [causal] factors in periodontal disease.” And, we know saturated fats “produce an inflammatory response.” And so, no surprise, this recent study found that “High dietary [saturated fat intake] was significantly associated with a greater number of periodontal disease events.” Saturated fat, which comes primarily, in the American diet, from basically, dairy, donuts, and chicken. 

The same diet that leads to high cholesterol may also contribute to periodontitis, as bad cholesterol levels may be a risk factor for both. People with periodontal disease also suffer from arterial dysfunction. Wait a second: inflammation, high cholesterol, and arterial dysfunction; is it any wonder there may be an “Association Between Chronic Periodontitis and…Erectile Dysfunction?”  

By looking in your mouth, your dentist may learn more about you than you realize. We know we can reverse impotence with a plant-based diet—what about periodontal disease? A new study found that “higher intake of high-fiber foods, especially fruits, [may at least help slow] periodontal disease progression…” 

For oral cancer, it’s a no-brainer. According to the latest review in the Journal of the American Dental Association, “Evidence supports a recommendation of a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables as part of a whole-foods, plant-based diet.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to corridorkidsdentistry

Nota del Doctor

Cholesterol buildup, oxidation, and inflammation are the three harbingers of Arterial Acne, the leading cause of the death in the United States. In celebration of National Heart Health Month, watch my video series that begins with Blocking the First Step of Heart Disease.

So, what is a safe intake for cholesterol and saturated fat? See Trans Fat, Saturated Fat, and Cholesterol: Tolerable Upper Intake of Zero. Why is saturated fat intake associated with inflammation? See my three-part series:

  1. The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause Inflammation
  2. The Exogenous Endotoxin Theory
  3. Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia

For more on the relationship between our diet and sexual function, see:

For more on oral health, see:

But wait—what did those two recent studies on plant-based diets have to say? Find out in Plant-Based Diets: Dental Health.

And, be sure to check out my associated blog post for more context:  Do Vegans Get More Cavities?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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