Prolonged Liver-Function Enhancement from Broccoli

Prolonged Liver-Function Enhancement from Broccoli
5 (100%) 4 votes

The boost in detoxifying enzymes triggered by cruciferous vegetable consumption may last for weeks!

Comenta
Comparte

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This study on cooked meat and the risk of breast cancer in Long Island women added to “the accumulating evidence that consumption of meats cooked by methods that promote carcinogen formation may increase [the] risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.” But, it also offered a clue as to how we may be able to mediate that risk.

A “[m]odest increased risk was [found in older women eating] “the most grilled or barbecued and smoked meats over” their lifetime—about 47% increased odds of breast cancer. But, those same women, who also had a low fruit and vegetable intake, had a higher odds ratio of 1.74—74% greater odds. Now, low fruit and vegetable consumption may just be a marker for unhealthy habits in general, but maybe there’s something in fruits and vegetables that’s protective.

Check out this fascinating study. To review: ”The consumption of cooked meat appears to predispose individuals to…cancer,” whereas the “[c]onsumption of cruciferous vegetables is thought to protect against cancer.” If you remember, it’s because cabbage family vegetables boost the activity of the detoxifying enzymes in our livers.

For example, if you feed people broccoli and Brussels sprouts, they clear caffeine quicker—meaning, if you eat a lot of these healthy vegetables, you have to drink more coffee to get the same buzz, because your liver is so revved up. Same thing with cooked meat carcinogens. If you have a side of broccoli with your meat, you can significantly decrease carcinogen levels in your body.

What they did is they started out with study “subjects consuming cooked meat meals containing known amounts of these carcinogens,” and this is the amount of the carcinogens they were absorbing into their bloodstream, and then peeing out. In period two, they ate the same amount of meat, but added broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Notice there’s a significant drop in the amount of these meat mutagens circulating within their bodies—even though they ate the same amount of meat. Now, this wasn’t a surprise; I mean, that’s what cruciferous vegetables do, right?Boost our liver’s ability to clear chemicals from our bodies.

But, this is what blew them away. In period three—again, same amount of meat— but they took away the veggies. Yet their liver function appeared to remain enhanced, two weeks later. So, there appears to be a prolonged beneficial effect of cruciferous vegetable consumption.

So, you can eat broccoli days or even weeks before the big barbeque, and still retain a little protection. Though, of course, if you eat grilled veggie burgers instead,  it would be even better, at that barbecue, as apparently no matter how you cook plant-based foods—even if you deep fry them—no detectable heterocyclic amines are formed.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Dhaluza and David.Monniaux via Wikimedia, and [puamelia] via flickr

 

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This study on cooked meat and the risk of breast cancer in Long Island women added to “the accumulating evidence that consumption of meats cooked by methods that promote carcinogen formation may increase [the] risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.” But, it also offered a clue as to how we may be able to mediate that risk.

A “[m]odest increased risk was [found in older women eating] “the most grilled or barbecued and smoked meats over” their lifetime—about 47% increased odds of breast cancer. But, those same women, who also had a low fruit and vegetable intake, had a higher odds ratio of 1.74—74% greater odds. Now, low fruit and vegetable consumption may just be a marker for unhealthy habits in general, but maybe there’s something in fruits and vegetables that’s protective.

Check out this fascinating study. To review: ”The consumption of cooked meat appears to predispose individuals to…cancer,” whereas the “[c]onsumption of cruciferous vegetables is thought to protect against cancer.” If you remember, it’s because cabbage family vegetables boost the activity of the detoxifying enzymes in our livers.

For example, if you feed people broccoli and Brussels sprouts, they clear caffeine quicker—meaning, if you eat a lot of these healthy vegetables, you have to drink more coffee to get the same buzz, because your liver is so revved up. Same thing with cooked meat carcinogens. If you have a side of broccoli with your meat, you can significantly decrease carcinogen levels in your body.

What they did is they started out with study “subjects consuming cooked meat meals containing known amounts of these carcinogens,” and this is the amount of the carcinogens they were absorbing into their bloodstream, and then peeing out. In period two, they ate the same amount of meat, but added broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Notice there’s a significant drop in the amount of these meat mutagens circulating within their bodies—even though they ate the same amount of meat. Now, this wasn’t a surprise; I mean, that’s what cruciferous vegetables do, right?Boost our liver’s ability to clear chemicals from our bodies.

But, this is what blew them away. In period three—again, same amount of meat— but they took away the veggies. Yet their liver function appeared to remain enhanced, two weeks later. So, there appears to be a prolonged beneficial effect of cruciferous vegetable consumption.

So, you can eat broccoli days or even weeks before the big barbeque, and still retain a little protection. Though, of course, if you eat grilled veggie burgers instead,  it would be even better, at that barbecue, as apparently no matter how you cook plant-based foods—even if you deep fry them—no detectable heterocyclic amines are formed.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Dhaluza and David.Monniaux via Wikimedia, and [puamelia] via flickr

 

Nota del Doctor

To review what I covered previously about the remarkable detoxifying effect of cruciferous vegetables, see my videos The Best Detox, and Sometimes the Enzyme Myth is True. You can overdo it, but apparently only at extremely high doses—see Liver Toxicity Due to Broccoli Juice, Overdosing on Greens, and How Much Broccoli is Too Much?

Wasn’t the protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption against cancer called into question, though? See my video: EPIC Study.

What other foods may mediate the effects of the mutagenic compounds in cooked meat? See Cancer, Interrupted: Green Tea, and Cancer, Interrupted: Garlic & Flavonoids. What are these heterocyclic amines? You must have missed my four-part video series, starting with Estrogenic Cooked Meat Carcinogens.

What are the health effects of that caffeine buzz? See Coffee & Cancer, and What About the Caffeine?

More about the implications of frying veggie burgers in Carcinogens in the Smell of Frying Bacon, which I’ll update next in Meat Fumes: Dietary Secondhand Smoke—stay tuned!

For additional context, check out my associated blog post: Broccoli Boosts Liver Detox Enzymes.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This