Black Salve as an Alternative Cancer Cure

Black Salve as an Alternative Cancer Cure
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Is black salve (a paste made from bloodroot) safe and effective for the treatment of skin cancer?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Despite warnings from the American Academy of Dermatology, and being listed as a ‘fake cancer cure’ by the FDA, [so-called] ‘black salve’ is still promoted on the internet through anecdot[al] and unsubstantiated claims as a natural alternative remedy for skin cancer.” It typically contains a caustic chemical, called zinc chloride, and bloodroot, a native herb that can be like poison ivy on steroids. It’s ironic that people seek it out as a “natural therapy” when it may mostly just be a stew of caustic chemicals that together form a “corrosive” paste that “indiscriminately damag[es] healthy and diseased tissue alike.”

But, that’s not what the claims on the internet say. Black salve is touted as a selective treatment, only killing off cancer cells and abnormal tissue, when, in fact, in some cases, the exact opposite is true. Some cancer cells resist the damaging effects better than normal cells. Normal skin cells can be more vulnerable to the toxic effects than cancer cells. When tissue samples are taken from black salve treatment lesions, the damage to normal tissue is readily apparent.

It can burn right through and leave you with like an extra nostril, or, even worse, one less nostril. This isn’t just “buyer beware,” but viewer beware, as some of these are graphic images like this, where he like burned half his nose off. Now, on the nose, you can just be left with cosmetic defects, but put it on the face, and it can eat all the way down through an artery. And, the irony of all this is that when asked why users decided to order it off the internet, they said it was because they were fearful of “pain [and] scarring” from “conventional” therapy. But then, you end up with these disfiguring deformities, whereas after conventional treatment, where skin cancers are just surgically removed, about nine out of 10 reported “satisfactory” cosmetic results.

About three-quarters of “black salve users [surveyed] were unaware of the potential [adverse] side effects of black salve treatment.” Yeah, but does it work? “Because of its escharotic [or tissue-sloughing] character, corrosive black salve products may destroy both cancerous and healthy skin to a degree that eradicates a local cancer.” So, who cares if it “leaves an esthetically unpleasing result”?

Well, the problem is that “without a biopsy, there can be no guarantee the cancer has been completely eliminated. If residual cancer cells persist, the risk of recurrence…or metastasis remain[s].” And, that’s probably the biggest concern. See, people think that if the mole or whatever goes away, that means the cancer’s gone, but that may not be the case. “Malignancy may persist under [a] black salve scar tissue and extend [under the skin].”

Here’s a good example to illustrate: a case study of a woman diagnosed with superficial spreading melanoma who decided to go against her dermatologist’s advice and, instead, treat the lesion with black salve. By the time she was seen again, a few years later, it had spread to her lymph nodes, lungs, and liver. Had she been treated earlier and had it removed, her prognosis would have been good: nearly a 90% 10-year disease-free survival. But, once she came back after it had spread, her survival prognosis may have dropped to about two and a half percent. From 90 to two and a half.

And, so, that’s the second irony. “[C]onventional allopathic medicine has [had] an extraordinary proven track record of successful treatment for skin cancer.” It’s one of the few cancers we’re really good at curing, because we can catch it so early because you can see it emerge, and, so, easily cut it out. So, like for basal cell carcinoma, the most common type of skin cancer, conventional surgery has up to a 99% cure rate, squamous cell carcinoma, about 95%, and the most common type of melanoma, up to 90%. “With escharotic therapies [like black salve], there is no scientifically documented proof of efficacy” period, since there have never been any clinical trials. So, all we’re left with are glorified anecdotes ranging from “patient satisfaction,” to “unacceptable scarring,” to “invasive recurrent tumors,” to “ulcer complications,” to “death.”

So, why do people use it? Well, why do cancer patients seek out alternative therapies in general? Yes, some of it is “misinformation.” They’re just duped by snake-oil salesmen. But, a lot of it may be “negative experiences” with the current medical system. Many of those who refused conventional therapies described their oncologists as “intimidating,” “cold,” “uncaring,” “unnecessarily harsh,” “thinking they were God,” who sometimes did “not even know… [their] names.” “Some reported…their physicians became adversarial when questioned about treatment recommendations.” Almost all the conventional-therapy-refusers “described the way they were treated as impersonal, and few believed their doctors were working in their best interests.” So, “they left conventional medicine in search of more caring practitioners.”

Looking back, many “said that had they had a better first experience with their physicians [it] might have made a difference in the treatment path they ultimately chose. They said they would have been more likely to accept conventional treatment earlier had they felt they had caring physicians who [treated them with respect].”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: National Cancer Institute via wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Despite warnings from the American Academy of Dermatology, and being listed as a ‘fake cancer cure’ by the FDA, [so-called] ‘black salve’ is still promoted on the internet through anecdot[al] and unsubstantiated claims as a natural alternative remedy for skin cancer.” It typically contains a caustic chemical, called zinc chloride, and bloodroot, a native herb that can be like poison ivy on steroids. It’s ironic that people seek it out as a “natural therapy” when it may mostly just be a stew of caustic chemicals that together form a “corrosive” paste that “indiscriminately damag[es] healthy and diseased tissue alike.”

But, that’s not what the claims on the internet say. Black salve is touted as a selective treatment, only killing off cancer cells and abnormal tissue, when, in fact, in some cases, the exact opposite is true. Some cancer cells resist the damaging effects better than normal cells. Normal skin cells can be more vulnerable to the toxic effects than cancer cells. When tissue samples are taken from black salve treatment lesions, the damage to normal tissue is readily apparent.

It can burn right through and leave you with like an extra nostril, or, even worse, one less nostril. This isn’t just “buyer beware,” but viewer beware, as some of these are graphic images like this, where he like burned half his nose off. Now, on the nose, you can just be left with cosmetic defects, but put it on the face, and it can eat all the way down through an artery. And, the irony of all this is that when asked why users decided to order it off the internet, they said it was because they were fearful of “pain [and] scarring” from “conventional” therapy. But then, you end up with these disfiguring deformities, whereas after conventional treatment, where skin cancers are just surgically removed, about nine out of 10 reported “satisfactory” cosmetic results.

About three-quarters of “black salve users [surveyed] were unaware of the potential [adverse] side effects of black salve treatment.” Yeah, but does it work? “Because of its escharotic [or tissue-sloughing] character, corrosive black salve products may destroy both cancerous and healthy skin to a degree that eradicates a local cancer.” So, who cares if it “leaves an esthetically unpleasing result”?

Well, the problem is that “without a biopsy, there can be no guarantee the cancer has been completely eliminated. If residual cancer cells persist, the risk of recurrence…or metastasis remain[s].” And, that’s probably the biggest concern. See, people think that if the mole or whatever goes away, that means the cancer’s gone, but that may not be the case. “Malignancy may persist under [a] black salve scar tissue and extend [under the skin].”

Here’s a good example to illustrate: a case study of a woman diagnosed with superficial spreading melanoma who decided to go against her dermatologist’s advice and, instead, treat the lesion with black salve. By the time she was seen again, a few years later, it had spread to her lymph nodes, lungs, and liver. Had she been treated earlier and had it removed, her prognosis would have been good: nearly a 90% 10-year disease-free survival. But, once she came back after it had spread, her survival prognosis may have dropped to about two and a half percent. From 90 to two and a half.

And, so, that’s the second irony. “[C]onventional allopathic medicine has [had] an extraordinary proven track record of successful treatment for skin cancer.” It’s one of the few cancers we’re really good at curing, because we can catch it so early because you can see it emerge, and, so, easily cut it out. So, like for basal cell carcinoma, the most common type of skin cancer, conventional surgery has up to a 99% cure rate, squamous cell carcinoma, about 95%, and the most common type of melanoma, up to 90%. “With escharotic therapies [like black salve], there is no scientifically documented proof of efficacy” period, since there have never been any clinical trials. So, all we’re left with are glorified anecdotes ranging from “patient satisfaction,” to “unacceptable scarring,” to “invasive recurrent tumors,” to “ulcer complications,” to “death.”

So, why do people use it? Well, why do cancer patients seek out alternative therapies in general? Yes, some of it is “misinformation.” They’re just duped by snake-oil salesmen. But, a lot of it may be “negative experiences” with the current medical system. Many of those who refused conventional therapies described their oncologists as “intimidating,” “cold,” “uncaring,” “unnecessarily harsh,” “thinking they were God,” who sometimes did “not even know… [their] names.” “Some reported…their physicians became adversarial when questioned about treatment recommendations.” Almost all the conventional-therapy-refusers “described the way they were treated as impersonal, and few believed their doctors were working in their best interests.” So, “they left conventional medicine in search of more caring practitioners.”

Looking back, many “said that had they had a better first experience with their physicians [it] might have made a difference in the treatment path they ultimately chose. They said they would have been more likely to accept conventional treatment earlier had they felt they had caring physicians who [treated them with respect].”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: National Cancer Institute via wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

I wish I had more skin cancer videos. The Viagra & Cancer one was about melanoma, also touched on in The Best Way to Get Vitamin D: Sun, Supplements, or Salons?

Black salve reminds me of the shark cartilage story: The Risks of Shark Cartilage Supplements and Shark Cartilage Supplements Put to the Test to Cure Cancer.

I also have some videos coming out about amygdalin/laetrile/”vitamin B17.” Stay tuned!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

98 responses to “Black Salve as an Alternative Cancer Cure

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  1. This is, I think particularly important. My first thoughts as I was viewing this was to think, “I’m not stupid enough to do that.” But as I kept viewing I realized that the real problem I lack of professionalism in the medical profession which would stimulate many to seek a snake oil solution. Yes there are always going to be some who will seek such things but those doctors who think that MD stands for “medical deity” need to get some serious reeducation and quit pushing the gullible into life threatening avenues.

    But then, failure to listen and communicate sometimes seems to be a hallmark of the profession.

    1. A good friend sent this video to me. Certainly worth my time. But…

      Dr. Greger certainly draws from plenty of research reports, as usual. With cancer treatments accounting for hundreds of billions of dollars annually, and the sequelae of that toxic warfare putting more hundreds of billions in the pockets of the pharmacosurgical industry, I would be shocked if there were no reports criticizing every form of competition.

      I looked at one of the studies the Dr. Greger references. https://www.derm101.com/dpc/july-2014-volume-4-no.3/application-of-black-salve-to-a-thin-melanoma-that-subsequently-progressed-to-metastatic-melanoma-a-case-study/ It is noteworthy that the subject’s father died of metastatic melanoma at age 80, and her son at 23, and that she was biopsied at the beginning of this event. Biopsies have themselves been widely linked to “seeding complications”; that is, metastasis. [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015162/] Even with these strikes against her, she lived to at least 84. Here are a couple of exerpts from the study:

      “Conclusions

      “One other case of black salve being used to treat melanoma has been reported in the literature. The male patient in that case treated a nodule on the right chest wall with the application of black salve. Because the lesion continued to grow and ulcerate, he presented to a hospital emergency department eight months following the initial black salve application. Biopsy of the lesion at that time confirmed melanoma. A CT scan showed a nodule in the lung, but metastatic melanoma was not confirmed histologically in that case study [1].

      “The exact composition of black salve varies but common ingredients are zinc chloride and powdered bloodroot from the bloodroot plant, Sanguinaria canadensis [2]. During the 1930’s to 1950’s a similar compound was used by Dr. Fred Mohs to fix tissue prior to surgical excision but this method has subsequently been replaced by fresh tissue excision [2]. Mohs’ original formula included zinc chloride, bloodroot and antimony sulphide [3]. The ingredient zinc chloride is a strong escharotic and has been used for the debridement of chronic leg ulcers and for chemo-surgical debridement of osteolytic bone [4 Jellinek N. Escharotic and other botanical agents for the treatment of skin cancer: A review. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;53:487-95.].

      “The other major ingredient Sanguinaria canadensis is a perennial flowering plant native to North Eastern America and the ingredient is known colloquially as bloodroot, Indian Paint and redroot [2]. When the root is harvested and cut, a red liquid drains which thickens to a paste. This paste is also a strong escharotic and has been used by indigenous Americans to treat warts, polyps and moles [2]. The active ingredient in the bloodroot rhizome is a benzyl isoquinolone alkaloid [BIA]. BIA’s are a diverse group of specialized plant metabolites that includes approximately 2,500 known structures including the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Sanguinarine contains antimicrobial properties [5], and in-vitro studies show that it also contains potent anti-cancer properties [6]. A recently published research article has shown that sanguinariine is a rapid inducer of melanoma caspase-dependent cell death that is mediated by oxidative stress [7].

      .”..arguable molecular rationale for the topical application of these natural compounds”

      I note with disappointment that Dr. Greger fails to take 5 seconds to make it clear that “cure rate” in medical cancer treatment is defined as “5 year survival.” That is not what most humans consider a “cure”, is it? For goodness sake, by medical standards, the woman in this study was “cured” by the black salve – symptom free for 7 years!

      My own experience includes sequential self applications of 2 varieties of black salve to my asymptomatic, delicate skin – with no escharotic effects whatsoever. In fact, leaving a thick patch of the salve on my upper breast overnight left only the faintest pinkness which rapidly resolved after the salve was washed off in the morning. Dr Greger is aware that with nearly all drugs, toxicity depends on the dosage. The published black salve recipes that I have seen specify concentrations of zinc chloride and blood root are so slight that they cannot, of themselves, cause scabbing or scarring. The black salve is not, in itself, really escharotic at all. Like the ligand nanoparticles materials below, being developed to target chemotherapies, it appears that black salve simply identifies cancer cells.

      The difference is that, with black salve, the body is enabled to recognize previously “camouflaged” cancerous tissues and go to work with its own natural anti-cancer immunities. That normal biological immunity is, without question, often painful and escharotic – for good and valuable reasons in both cases.

      That certainly seems consistent with my own numerous applications of Cansema black salve over the past decade.

      Black salve is not a 100% effective silver bullet. It is not risk-free – nothing about cancer is risk free. I have to say that Dr. Greger’s criticism in this case is not convincing. I’ll bet my life on black salve rather than pharmacosurgical business practices. I think the odds are better. Medicine is, according to peer reviewed medical journals, the #1 killer in North America – far ahead of heart disease or cancer, and probably both combined.

      Thanks for all you do.

      1. SOURCE: “Like the ligand nanoparticles below, being developed to target chemotherapies, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120109155946.htmm it appears that black salve simply identifies cancer cells.”

        Getting cancer cells to swallow poison

        Date: January 10, 2012
        Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital
        Summary: Researchers created a drug delivery system that is able to effectively deliver a tremendous amount of chemotherapeutic drugs to prostate cancer cells.

        “The difference is that, with black salve, the body is enabled to recognize previously “camouflaged” cancerous tissues and go to work with its own natural anti-cancer immunities.”

        1. Jonathan,

          Thank you for your research. Like you, I didn’t find this report by Dr G to be convincing, based on my own experience with Cansema. It doesn’t do anything to a precancerous condition, but if it’s cancer, it takes it out!
          On my shoulder, a few days after the original scab formed, two little scabs formed half an inch or so away from the original site. The Cansema found two new tiny cancer sites even though they weren’t visible to the eye.

          I do appreciate Dr G and the work he does, but for me, this one didn’t hit it out of the park!

  2. Black Salve! It sounds like the “Black Pill” in MASH. I’ve heard of all kinds of alternative treatments like the “black salve,” “turpentine and sugar” and “monatomic gold” cures, and I wondered who would be desperate enough to try stuff like this, and I believe that you’ve hit the nail on the head. It is sick people who’ve lost faith in the medical profession due to bad experiences that they’ve had. Of course the credibility of the medical profession is still suffering from the endorsement of Camel cigarettes so there’s that…

    1. I was desperate enough to try it – and it seemed to work for me.
      …without health insurance for a long period of time, and a history of squamous cell lesions that had required surgery in past (Moh’s procedure), led me to try this as a means to help manage a situation I could otherwise not afford to get treated at that time.
      The process is not fun – it’s somewhat lengthy and painful at segments – but it seems to have eradicated open, likely pre-cancerous lesions on my face that I am quite familiar with from my past.

      1. I have used it also over 15 years ago and it worked perfect. The stuff I used was said to be an indian preparation or medicine. . I”m not positive if it is the same but the name is the same. I lived in Reno at the time and purchased it out of Las Vegas. I know they were very secretive and I don’t remember the name of the person or persons I got it from. That said, I remember well how fast and how thorough it worked. 10 days to two weeks and when I took the bandaid off the cancer came with it. Hasn’t returned. I wish I could remember so I could order more. I even have a witness as my daughter observed the whole thing. She was against it at first.

        1. The extensive photo-supported anecdotal evidence on altcancer.com, and my own as well, are consistent with Patric Van Meter’s comments above. In my own case, a basal cell carcinoma that had been expanding painlessly for over 10 years reacted to the black salve within 5 minutes with marked stinging. Realizing that I had no photograph of the untreated lesion, I immediately washed off the salve and found a yellow pustule nearly 4 mm in diameter! Nothing of the sort had ever happened before.

          The stinging and pus production continued for several days, with the subjective pain penetrating 10-15 mm (~1/2 inch) below the surface at times. The previous 6 mm flat lesion became an 8 mm crater, which healed over rather nicely with slight induration in the epidermis itself.

          Being a minimalist by nature and training, I delayed reapplication for several months, hoping that the induration would spontaneously resolve. Repeated applications over the past several years have reacted more or less the same, although in fact significantly less in the last 3 years.

          We have applied the salve to several other skin lesions over these years. Most do not react at all, except for a very slight and temporary pink skin. Others react with what one would expect with the body attacking foreign proteins – inflammation, pus, and some moderate pain. My wife and I have each had one instance where the inflammation apparently penetrated deep into the underlying dermis or even muscle. It was quite painful, and guided us to apply along the route of pain, with further deep, painful inflammatory results. Both of these treatments resolved with quite visible scarring. In my wife’s case it looks like keloid scar. I have repeated applications to the deep reaction sites with no further reactions.

          We have very intelligent friends who have applied medically prescribed topicals to some lesions, and black salve to others. Their reports to us are that the black salve healed cosmetically better than the prescription.

          The internet will in the near future make “controlled, double blind studies” passe. Hundreds and thousands, and soon millions of personal anecdotal accounts will replace the politically and financially manipulated research industry – for the great betterment of health on planet earth.

        2. That was my similar experience in Texas Our family uses it on things that we want gone because medical drs dismiss or just Rx steroid creams for … it’s a serious salve to be used with caution, not sure I’d treat breastfeeding cancer or brain cancer with it, but odd moles or spots and bumps it’s like magic killing off

      2. I glad that it worked our for you. With a name like Black Salve, I imagine that it could be formulated a number of ways. Perhaps there formulations that are better than others.

      3. It took me 40 years to get medical coverage. You’re right, Andy. OTC remedies is sometimes all people can afford. Thabks for your insight.

  3. Thank you. The presentation is compelling. Previously, I had wondered about this one based on a bunch of internet posts of users proclaiming personal success. They didn’t include anyone with an extra hole in their nose. This is why my 6-year practice of studying lifestyle medicine is to read broadly with a healthy skepticism, but apply selectively. This data IMO is conclusive.

  4. Patients don’t get respect? The insurance company is paying the bill so they get the doctors limited time and attention. Power of the purse, no malfeasance required.

    1. Many doctors and even nurses have been very disrespectful to patients. That’s not really true about time, a good doctor uses their appointment to actually talk to patients. There are a lot of cases where patients are needlessly treated like crap and demeaned. I don’t think it’s fair to suggest that the doctors who take patient care seriously and work with patients and treat them like people, simply have more time than the others. I know of some doctors and nurses who are some of the busiest people I know of who are more attentive to patients than even the average decent doctor.

  5. Hi there, I’d love to know where the first disfigured nose image came from? from 10 years experience with black salve it seems a little questionable so I would love to get more information on the case/sourcertified-gerson-practitioners of this image?

    1. Cartilaginous tissue (nose, ear) and also lips do not grow back when burned through. I have a friend who did not read the instructions that generally come with black salve that tell you never to use on those areas. She did in fact burn away most of one nostril. It required 3 plastic surgeries, with multiple days in hospital for each, to build her a passable semblance of a nose. Needless to say, she was better looking before all that!

  6. Apparently, there is more than one concoction called black salve. The one I use to get rid of minor skin problems like boils and warts contains a mixture of herbs that doesn’t include bloodroot, unless it’s known by some other name, in a base of wax. Nor does it contain zinc chloride. (An aqueous solution of zinc chloride is acidic, which may be the reason why the black salve Dr. Greger is referring to burn the skin.)

    1. Indeed, the original treated horses. My etsy purchase of black salve contained bloodroot: it did nothing to my skin. Was testing an iffy mole and later had derm confirm it was normal.
      Apparently, black salve alters membrane proteins of DNA damaged cells so that our immune system can recognize them.

      Reading research papers is vital but this time, a couple purchases by Dr G’s team would have shown that the hysteria of the medical establishment over black salve is more self-serving than relevant.

  7. “Apparently, there is more than one concoction called black salve.”

    Yes, it’s called Ichthammol ointment. It’s old time drawing salve for boils and splinters.. Smells like a petroleum product. My mom used it all the time.. As for the other stuff it sounds nasty… Sometimes home remades don’t help, they hurt…
    mitch

    1. Yes, I was thinking the same thing. We use it on equines to draw out what insects leave behind when the fly season is bad. Scared me at first to see the images, but realized it is a different black salve.

  8. I’m confused. Help someone. Is Christophers Black Salve harmful? I have been using Christophers Ointment for decades.
    I need answers. There’s no bloodroot or any other unfamiliar ingredients. Is it okay????????

    1. Mary:
      That’s exactly what I’ve been using, like you, for a long time successfully to get rid of minor skin problems. (I have no extra holes in my body.)

    2. In the 1970s I heard Dr Christopher speak at a conference a few years before he passed away. He mentioned that he was the only person allowed to practice herbal medicine in the US Navy. He had herbal cures for what he referred to as jungle rot, and there must have been many men affected after fighting and/or being held as POWs in the Pacific during WWII. I have his book and believe he was most sincere and honest. I would trust his remedies, if they remain true to the ones he formulated.

      After learning it would take months to even SEE a dermatologist after my ND saw the cancer, I cured a basal cell carcinoma using a concoction called Cansema, a black salve, but made from herbal ingredients with nothing caustic. I bought it from a company that is now in Ecuador, Alpha Omega Labs. However, they warn on their website that there are phony salves, knock-offs of their ointment. I bought mine years ago and I think they have changed its’ name. It only took one application and worked perfectly. In fact, they tell you it won’t do anything on a mole or precancerous condition. If it isn’t cancer, it does nothing.

      Their website had many testimonials, with photographs, showing the progression of the cancer going through the healing process. I documented my cure with daily photographs. I cannot find a scar showing where the cancer was located.

      Ecuador, by the way, is the only country in the world, I have been told, that honors, in its’ constitution, the right to use any form of medicine, including herbal, shamanic, naturopathic, allopathic – anything you choose.

      I later lent my salve to a friend who lives in a retirement home and she cured her cancer and gave it to several others who also cured theirs.

      1. This is what we use. We have used for over 20 years and there is no scarring or holes! This article sounds like hysteria! Ours is cansema from Equador. Dr. Greger needs to do more research on this because we wouldn’t be without it. Disagree with the information in this videos. I have seen these videos with the disfigurement before and it is BS. In all the years we have used the salve it has never caused disfigurement!

        1. Brenda, Dr. Greger is known for presenting real evidence, but if you don’t believe the cases presented in the video, there are other case reports out there. Someone in the comments below posted about an Australian woman undergoing alternative cancer treatment by a man using black salve on her, she ended up dying due to lack of real treatment but the black salve resulted in horrible injuries to her skin before she eventually passed. According to the article, it’s actually illegal in Australia but easy to get off the internet.
          The issue with the black solve referred to is that it obliterates ALL cells and sometimes the cancer cells are able to withstand it while the healthy cells are not.

            1. Black salve herbal remedies have been around for many, many years – much longer than the internet. But the problem seems to be there is no single formulation, and while some are healing, others are damaging.

  9. Thank you Dr G for waking people up. When doing internet searches, people must realize “Buyer Beware!” The claims to point out on Black Salve I’m sure are true but I have used a Black Salve 3 times & have gotten very good results. Mind you tho, I followed the protocol to the T! AND had great customer support from the company I bought it from. I asked many questions & did exactly what I was told. Mother Nature is an awesome entity, but She to is not to be taken lightly or frivolously, there are rules to follow.
    I hope more studies can be funded & this alternative can still be readily available…with the support of a doctor that knows how to use it, of coarse.
    Thank you again for everything you & your team does! You continue to inspired me.

    1. Val, what were the ingredients to yours, if you don’t mind sharing? Apparently there are other black salves that are not the same thing – at least that’s what I’m reading from other commenters.

    1. Jana, there is a great Facebook group on BEC5. I successfully healed two lesions on my face, one Basal Cell Carcinoma and one Actinic Keratosis. Both times, I first went to a Dermatologist to get it properly diagnosed and then afterwards I went back to confirm it was healed. Years ago, I had a BCC on my chin and rushed into having the Mohs surgery without proper research. That was mistake. BEC5 leaves no scarring.

  10. **Refusers said… a better first experience,,, might have made a difference in the treatment path they chose.**

    I don’ t think you should blame your dermatologist if you buy snake oil online and find out later it was ineffective or even pathogenic. We should be responsible for our own decisions. Just sayin’.

    1. The point was to decrease bad experiences like this. Many of us have had doctors like those they mentioned. To decrease incidences like this, more doctors could be open, reasonable, calm, and considering natural treatments instead of saying they will all kill you, etc. Also people could try to realize that there are bad doctors out there and they have to work harder to find a more holistic one.
      John S

    2. Well, this is the same medical profession that doesn’t bother to tell people that our number one killer, cardio, is caused by and completely reversible through diet. Same with type 2, obesity, some cancers and many if not most of our other current disease of excess, if you believe in the research presented on this website. Not to mention the connection between dairy consumption and acne. I’d say “buyer beware” when it comes to contemporary western medicine.

      1. Blair – very well said – and even if your doctor is good and you like him or her, specialists aren’t always available in a timely fashion, or without travel to another – perhaps distant – city. This alone can be difficult for many, especially older people who live alone.

      2. Blair

        Cardiovascular disease isn’t always caused by and completely reversible by diet. There are other causes including smoking, alcohol, drug use, pollution, viruses and and genetic defects. Even things like night shift working and loud noise/music can increase risk for cardiovascular disease. And even doctors like Essestyn and McDougall recognise that drugs and surgery are sometimes necessary when it comes to treatment..

        As for not telling people abut diet and lifestyle, this just isn’t true. The medical establishment has been saying for many years that eg

        “Maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle offers the greatest potential of all known approaches to reduce CVD risk in the general public. This is still true in spite of major advances in clinical medicine. The recommendations contained in the document provide a foundation for a public health approach to CVD risk reduction through healthy eating habits and other lifestyle factors.”
        http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/26/10/2186

        Competent doctors who practise medicine in accordance with the latest official guidelines know this and counsel their patients accordingly. Condemning an entire profession because of it contains a proportion of ill-informed and less competent members may not be helpful. It drives people into the arms of charlatans and crackpots on the internet who are only too willing to relieve them of their money in exchange for sensational ‘cures’ and pills and potions.

        But yes I fully agree with you on ‘buyer beware’. But let’s apply that motto to the claims of celebrity doctors and alternative health practitioners also. That’s why self-education is so important in helping us separate the wheat from the chaff.

        1. Although a “healthy diet and lifestyle” are recommended and acknowledged, the idea of a healthy diet isn’t quite caught up with the science. “Lean meats” are still recommended, dairy for calcium, eggs, etc. When it comes to nutritional science, it’s important to educate ourselves. I love that Dr. Greger gives us a reliable source to do so, and at the same time reveals that the alternative health side of the spectrum can be just as ill-informed and actually dangerous, reminding us that it’s a business.

    3. dr cobalt, that wasn’t his point; the point was that patient concerns weren’t being taken seriously and left patients feeling alone and like it was up to them to look for the best possible treatment and do exactly what you suggested, be responsible for their own decisions. But when they tried to speak to those who are in a trusted position and those that the patients pay to guide them in things like this, they were left feeling on their own and unguided as a result. It’s actually very sad. When you go into a career to help others, that is a great responsibility and one that sadly not every doctor or medical professional takes as serious as they should.

  11. Has anyone ever used fresh Garlic and turmeric on a skin lesion? I did this with a spot on my arm and it appears to be great. The spot looks so good, I almost can’t see it and was going to repeat this on my leg, but after watching the video it might not be a good idea. I would hate to bury a skin cancer under a scar.

    So this spot about the size of a dime I covered with garlic tumeric paste for about 3 hours and later when I showered it was like pulling off a scab. Then the skin turned reddish like a bruise. After about 2 weeks the skin flakes off. Looks good as new now.

      1. Shaylen ,

        Yep thanks. I used both garlic and turmeric in my mix. The problem I have with turmeric is keeping it on the effected area and not staining everything in the house. Turmeric mixes in with the garlic well, but like you said will burn the garlic skin. So use with discretion. Don’t think I would use garlic on my nose. I wish I could show pictures of before and after. Really looks good now, but heck it’s only been a few weeks so time will tell.

        The one on my ankle I may do before and after pics on my Facebook. Since I somewhat know what to expect.

  12. There are so many problems with the current medical system, but one of the main issues is the hierarchy system and over education. This in turn leads to salaries of excess, and arrogance… with some the head grow like the summer melon the more it is educated. Under normal circumstances a person would go into the the healing profession because they have a natural love to help others. There are a few Doctors still like that, but many do it for the prestige or money. Then owing to their nature, they climb the hierarchical ranks and make a mess of the whole medical system.

    Many may even start off normal, but after being exposed to these lifeless blood suckers they become infected (you might say). In reality this happens in many professions, so the real question is how to retain one’s sanity in an insane world?

    1. 2500 years ago the Buddha taught that people were motivated by three things: greed, aversion, and ignorance. Greed for wealth, power, fame, etc etc etc. No, it hasn’t changed.

    2. I remember years ago in Australia that a leading paper did a story on the students who’d achieved the top scores in the university entrance examinations. When asked, the great majority of those students said that they wanted to study medicine at university because it was the best-paid occupation in Australia. It still is apparently – the top 3 best paid occupations are surgeon, anaesthetist and internal medicine specialist.

      On the other hand, let’s not be too harsh. They are caught between Mammon and morality. That may be why it is also apparently the profession with the highest suicide rate -more than twice that of the general population. I thin the trick is to find a good one and also check out the national guidelines for th conditions you are interested in. The standard advice is also to seek a second or third opinion when you can.

  13. I’m not averse to using alternative medicine treatments for some minor problems (taking White Willow Bark supplements instead of aspirin for instance), but my real aim is using alternative medicine/supplementation as prevention.

  14. Oregano oil is what got rid of a large (and continually growing) cluster of growths on my lower leg. I had this growth for about 16 years, and my dermatologist could suggest nothing. (She did try freezing it off but that only left 4 dark spots where she zapped, and those took about 6 months to fade.) I tried wart remover, peroxide, campho phenique, tea tree oil and cortisone cream, all to no avail. Got ahold of some oregano oil after reading a super obscure blog post, and although I was a little alarmed after the first application, I kept applying it on and off for about 5 days. (The area looked like raw hamburger meat!) I then did nothing, and then a scab formed. In about 3 weeks after the scab had naturally fallen off, I couldn’t even tell where the original growth had been! I have since let two other people use the oil, and they both have reported the same results with their skin issues. (One was a skin tag, and the other was a basal cell.)

  15. I am currently using many natural treatments and preventions. Some are just vegetables and herbs. I have checked all of them out with holistic MD’s, ostepaths, or naturopaths. None have had any side effects, as opposed to pharma, which kills thousands every year, screws up your gut microbiome, and is very expensive. I agree that not checking supplements out is crazy.
    John S

  16. You have just touched my heart.

    Thank you so much.

    I am so blessed.

    Normally, I would be giving you a sitting at my computer ovation, but you caused my eyes to well with tears of gratitude instead.

    Thank you.

    I came here second to researching the difference between VEGF and bFGF and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)

    I think I’ve got VEGF on the ropes. Working on understanding the other two.

    We conclude that NO is a downstream imperative of VEGF-, but not bFGF-induced angiogenesis, and propose that the NO synthase/guanylate cyclase pathway is a potential target for controlling tumor angiogenesis in response to VEGF. Our studies support recent evidence that VEGF and bFGF induce angiogenesis by different mechanistic pathways using the alphavbeta5 and alphavbeta3 integrins, respectively.

    1. I found a few holistic vets who have healed dogs of the Cancer that my dog has and I ordered a product to help stop his internal bleeding.

      He has to hold on a few more days, and I have to keep this stupid cancer out of his heart.

      25% of the bleeding cases already had it enter the heart when the condition became apparent.

      That means I have a 75% chance that I might have started pummeling the tumor with superfoods soon enough.

      I can manage the internal bleeding, but it sounds like the heart filling up with blood is the point of no return.

      This is a nail biter.

      1. Honestly, I love my vet, but I wish he was the one who had all of this information and that I hadn’t wasted a week and a half already.

        It should have been him handing me the product to stop the internal bleeding and the products to shrink the tumors.

        Not putting him down, because I am interacting with another woman with another pet whose vet is also not telling her anything.

        If I was a vet, I would have already started talking about the mushrooms and turmeric and wormwood when he reached the age it happens.

  17. Turns out Puremedy sells this product: http://www.puremedy.com, and stands by it! And Amazon, with over 30 different company’s selling this fake solution. Amazing!
    Perhaps a few letters to these companies would help convince them not to place profit over people.
    David

  18. Something that bothers me about this video is the fails from using this remedy. For all we know those grotesque pics were caused by people who overused the product. It is possible the remedy works if used properly. Reminds me of those pics of people who chew tobacco. I know people who chew tobacco and dip snuff that do not look like the scary pics that doing so will cause.

    I’m not advocating chewing tobacco or dipping snuff… I’m just comparing the warning scare pics with the ones in the video. I’m also not advocating for or against using Black Salve.

    My own prevention regimen is to add powdered Niacin to distilled, hydrogenated water. I spray my entire body with this daily. Then every couple of days I apply a concoction of fluid composed of a dried guava leaf cold brewed in distilled, hydrogenated water. After this application, I can roll off exfoliated skin from my entire body.

    This regimen of skin care has gradually caused my skin to become thicker, smoother, and less wrinkly. Plus, if I’m outside I tend to not sunburn or even tan.

  19. Back in 2009 my mare developed a huge sarcoid between her front legs and our vet prescribed a product called XXTerra (bloodroot and zinc oxide). She said that many times the surgery will not get the roots and the sarcoid will come back even bigger. So I applied the XXTerra for three days and lo and behold the sarcoid fell off (left a large hole that filled in quickly) and never returned. Didn’t even leave a scar. Would I put it on my face? Probably not. But it does seem to work in some cases…at least it did for us (and only cost $20).

  20. The doctor’s well-meaning support of our medical model leaves a lot of readers in the cold. Millions of us out here do not have health insurance and even if we did, would not go to an American doctor, health clinic or hospital. His sweeping ‘scientific’ statements may be preaching to the choir; but are grating to me.

    I wish he would go practice in a Danish hospital for a month to witness the profound difference in the way he practices versus people with hearts first instead of facts, fee schedules and opinions. The people forced to practice in our hospitals, let alone the patients, are slowly dying from the inhumanity too.

  21. I feel concern about the picture this video paints about the dermatological community and the implication that Mohs does no harm. I have heard that the “digging out” of skin cancers can push cancerous cells into the bloodstream, where they can actually do greater harm, whereas surface-oriented treatments, such as acid solutions and whatnot are better for preventing these types of risks. In fact, this MD suggests that Mohs be used judiciously http://www.dermatologytimes.com/dermatology/first-do-no-mohs-harm. However, I have found through my parent’s (in their 80s) experience with skin care that Mohs is their “go-to” procedure. I do not believe that dermatologists are exempt from the over-prescribing of surgery that exists in seemingly every other area of medicine. Personally, I have used C-Herb, which looks like black salve, with good success. https://www.webnat.com/proddetail.asp?prod=cherb1. This website states these ingredients: Water, fiber, black walnut, burdock, white oak bark and mineral salts. Because the instructions say not to use it on the face, I have not. However, I have removed several moles on my body with good success. All the removals have resulted in cheloids, but my body does that with all scars. 20 years later, now, the cheloids have disappeared. In general, I feel sadness that the medical community is so fixated on surgery and Rx that we will not allow or even consider exploring some of the more successful herbal remedies for handling these kinds of things and more. Less invasive is better. And lastly, as much as I appreciate you, Dr. Gregor, and the research you share and your project, I was shocked to hear you use the word “cure” in relation to Mohs. Surgery, as I have learned from all of you advanced doctors, does not address the underlying causes of illness.

    1. Lynn, I feel your pain. My daughter has a cyst on her wrist. Dermatologist recommended a Dr. I went to see him and he looks at it and ask me why I didn’t break it. I told him I wasn’t a dr. He said well he can do surgery on it. I told him we didn’t want surgery but what else could he do? Basically he said surgery was all he would do? So I asked him about people saying they’ve used syringe to remove the fluid, or people breaking them. He said they could but it would PROBABLY come back, but didn’t offer to do anything but surgery. I was a bit miffed and won’t be back to see that dr ever. That’s why people stop going to Dr’s.

    2. LynnK, have you seen Dr. Greger’s video on topical use of turmeric? If you haven’t, I highly reccomended it.
      I think Dr. Greger addressed the underlying cause of disease extraordinarily well, myself. This video seems to be a much needed warning about this salve being promoted and sold, not necessarily a video on how to treat skin cancer.

    3. I’ve used c-herb as well, on my face, with great success. Not for cancer, though, just a mole. I need to get some more….I have a couple more I’d like to deal with.

  22. This is such an important video, I love that you give a voice to the patients at the end of the video and hold doctors accountable for their treatment. I can understand how that can lead someone to look for alternative advice and I think we’ve all had some level of this type of experience or know someone close to us who has, with certain doctors.
    I also can’t understand how manufacturers and sellers of this flesh eating black goo can get away with it and it is idicitive of how flawed laws and regulations are.

    I do think the major deformities caused by this black goo are drastically underplayed though. Having your nose eaten off your face or a hole in your face isn’t just asthetically unpleasing, it’s emotionally and mentally tormenting. It leads to depression and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. To have your face taken from you is a HORRIFIC thing and I think many people would consider that as serious as death and I don’t consider those feelings superficial.

    As far as alternative treatments, I wish people would stop trying to find magical concoctions and one-fix-wonders and start looking into nutrition and the real science, as well as having more access to information on topical treatments actually proven to work, such as turmeric. If more doctors would learn about this stuff, it would help. And if people stepped out of the delusion that these things are isolated events that can be singled out and fixed by one thing, and would accept that our bodies are intricate systems and all things play a role in prevention and curing disease, then that too would help prevent the power these kinds of gimmicks have.

        1. Yes, obviously. When commenting on my phone auto-correct changes that and a million other words a thousand times (especially frustrating when you try to write out “whole foods” on this site via phone and it automatically capitalizes it as in the business!) and finally just leaves me frazzled and in a hurry to make the post, but I didn’t feel like blowing up comments with yet another correction since I figured people would get the point. An edit bottom would be lovely.

            1. :-D I don’t own one of those new-fangled contraptions. The desktop computer is fine enuf for me — as is the no-bells-or-whistles cell phone.

              1. Yeah I hate it too but it’s my obligation as a Millennial to be sucked into the vacuous world of unnecessary technological devices, though I do try to keep it to a minimum.

                1. My brother, who is well beyond the Millennial generation, wants nothing to do with even a desktop computer. Certainly not a smartphone. Guess we’d have to call him a Luddite. (I don’t own a Microwave oven; I like cooking from scratch, the old-fashioned way. What’s the bloody rush, anyway?)

            2. I don’t know. I would love an ‘edit bottom’ not to mention a few other places that could use some real-life photo-shopping.

    1. In the earliest known codified law system, they did hold doctors and vets accountable for the treatment they provided:

      “215. If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife and cure it, or if he open a tumor (over the eye) with an operating knife, and saves the eye, he shall receive ten shekels in money.

      216. If the patient be a freed man, he receives five shekels.

      217. If he be the slave of some one, his owner shall give the physician two shekels.

      218. If a physician make a large incision with the operating knife, and kill him, or open a tumor with the operating knife, and cut out the eye, his hands shall be cut off.

      219. If a physician make a large incision in the slave of a freed man, and kill him, he shall replace the slave with another slave.

      220. If he had opened a tumor with the operating knife, and put out his eye, he shall pay half his value.

      221. If a physician heal the broken bone or diseased soft part of a man, the patient shall pay the physician five shekels in money.

      222. If he were a freed man he shall pay three shekels.

      223. If he were a slave his owner shall pay the physician two shekels.

      224. If a veterinary surgeon perform a serious operation on an ass or an ox, and cure it, the owner shall pay the surgeon one-sixth of a shekel as a fee.

      225. If he perform a serious operation on an ass or ox, and kill it, he shall pay the owner one-fourth of its value.”
      http://avalon.law.yale.edu/ancient/hamframe.asp

      1. I think we can find some kind of a healthy balance between patients having no voice and removing the hands of physicians… Maybe just a bit more discussion on patient conduct in some cases.

      1. Disturbing article and important read. So tragic. Personally I think he should be charged with murder or something along those lines.

        I thought this was an important snippet of the article:

        “‘Things like black salve just kill everything, normal skin cells, abnormal skin cells, it doesn’t matter,’ said Dr Douglas Grose, president of the Cosmetic Physicians College of Australasia.

        ‘You can’t control it. All you’re doing is killing the full thickness of the skin and allowing it to scar up. It’s a ridiculous technique.’”

  23. Fact: I shrunk significantly a mole/tag sort of thing on my arm with turmeric. Beware, turmeric stains. I mixed it into a base of lanolin and covered. It got smaller and part of it fell off and the tiny bit left seems innocuous (has been stable for many months). Was amazing and reinforces what I have learned here about turmeric. Disclaimer: not a doctor and your experience may be different, but I see little harm in trying.

  24. OH Sorry, I see this video is not about salve at all, but about doctor/patient interaction.

    In my experience “Respect” is a most maligned/misused word in these modern times (it is -not- fear) and also seems to be in short supply. Shame on those who don’t have any respect for those whom they have vowed to help and pity on those who stand for such treatment from caregivers.

    1. I thought the video was about both to a degree, I think your turmeric experience is appropriately placed and could be helpful to readers.

  25. HOW is black salve any different than podophyllin and podofilox used to remove warts? Both cause extreme burning of both healthy and diseased flesh. Even Aldara causes damage to healthy tissue and is also prescribed for SKIN CANCER. All are applied by the patient and all have resulted in serious complications. Yet they are ‘prescribed’ so they get a free pass when they cause the same exact effect as black salve? I worked all through the 90’s in the natural product industry and this is the first time I recall ever hearing of ‘black salve’ or anything like it in any conversation. Not a single customer or company ever mentioned any such thing.

    1. I got the impression this particular product typically makes its way through the interment. Are there any reports of the products you mentioned having the same or similar results on people? Maybe because they’re under medical supervision when using those products, they’re more guided so adverse effects are less likely? But then it’s not like pharmaceutical prescriptions haven’t had horrible side effects and even resulted in death.

  26. I normally concur with Dr. Gregor. This is one time I will have to disagree. I first used a product called Cansema over 25 years ago. I had been to a dermatologist to have a basal cell carcinoma removed from my shoulder. Three times. Each time it came back. After deciding I did not want to support his annuity program I tried cansema black salve. It worked as advertised and has never come back. I have used it several times with success each time. I have even used it on two different spots on my face. No scarring or disfigurement. I have several friends who have used it successfully. One disclaimer; There are some imitations on the market that are not made of the same ingredients as what I have used. If you decide to go this route do your due diligence. Also, READ THE DIRECTIONS. It may not work for everyone, but I have had nothing but a positive result.

  27. Dr. Michael Greger and many reputed medical practitioners advocate plant-based whole-food diet as the most healthy diet for everyone, with or without cancer; however, I have just come across an article by the late Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez MD (https://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/dr-gonzalez-dismantles-ketogenic-diet-for-cancer/ The article is a bit long. You can search for “Weston A. Price” for the directly related paragraphs), which offers a very different view.

    In the late 1920s, Dr. Price spent seven years traveling the world evaluating isolated groups of people living and eating according to long-standing tradition, some more plant-based, but others animal-based. However different these diets might be, each of these groups, and the many other traditional peoples Price studied, enjoyed excellent enduring health, free from the diseases of civilization – cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension.

    For cancer, patients diagnosed with the typical solid tumors – cancers of the breast, lung, stomach, pancreas, colon, liver, uterus, ovary, prostate – did best adhering to a plant-based diet. Patients diagnosed with the immune based “blood cancers” like leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma, as well as the sarcomas, a type of connective tissue malignancy, required a lower carb, high animal fat, moderate animal protein diet. Other patients, usually with problems other than cancer, thrived on a more “balanced” diet, incorporating a variety of plant and animal foods.

    So, can we conclude:

    1. It is healthy to eat whatever (plant-base and/or meat, dairy, or eggs), as long as the foods are organic.

    2. For cancer patients, different cancers require different foods (blood cancers require animal foods).

    I will be grateful if anyone, especially Dr. Michael Greger, comment on this.

    Thank you very much,

    Shu

    1. Your reference is not actual peer-reviewed evidence. The voluminous amount of peer-reviewed evidence clear points to the fact that those that eat animal products have increased, not decreased, risk of ALL cancer. Keep in mind that eating animal products also increases the risk of death from heart disease which causes equal amounts of death as cancer.

      Dr. Ben

      1. Thank you, Dr. Ben. In those peer-reviewed evidence showing that animal products have increased risk of ALL cancer and heart disease, is there any study that showed *organic* animal products also increase risk of cancer and heart disease? If not, it would not be clear whether the animals theirselves are bad foods, or only what people are now feeding them (e.g., growth hormones and antibiotics) are bad for us.

    2. Hi I’m a health support volunteer. It is important to look at all the peer reviewed research and not just a single article to draw conclusions.
      YI’d recommend you read some of his work which is based on large meta analyses of all the research. Dr. Greger also looks at the consensus of research and not individual studies and articles.
      These topics have been addressed thoroughly by Dr. Garth Davis. I would recommend you look at some of his information.
      First of all, for some background on the dentist Western Price:
      https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/499628530058060
      https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/453034404717473

      The idea of animal foods for cancers is based on the idea that cancer cells need sugar to survive. But all cells need this. By doing a low carb, keto diet for cancer you are also starving all of your cells. This diet also robs your body of the antioxidants it needs to fight cancer and prevent new cancers as well as heart disease and other issues. All cancer cells also need methionine which is only found in high amounts in animal foods. That is why a plant based diet is thought to starve cancer cells of the methionine.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/starving-cancer-with-methionine-restriction/
      Dr. Davis gets asked these sorts of questions so much he has an entire chapter of his book Proteinaholic you can read for free. Again his work is based on the compilation of research and not a single study:
      http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/4/7/c/47cbc2420ba85e53/Proteinaholic_Chapter13.pdf?c_id=10141917&cs_id=10141917&expiration=1530366747&hwt=f4068c463260820d414203f8e717d168

      Hope that gives you some interesting reading.
      NurseKelly

  28. Great video! This is an important topic that needs to be discussed. It would be great also if you could do a video presenting the science on glykoalkaloids being used to treat certain skin cancers. There seems to be quite a few scientific papers investigating it, and it looks to be quite cancer-cell specific (at certain dosages anyway).

  29. ~Natural remedies like this that involve dangerous materials and/ or methods should NEVER be “”advertised, as on a simple web page or even a published magazine or manuscript. It should be performed by someone who has a great deal of knowledge and experience. Self administering in such cases (and there are plenty) are as foolish as supplementing jaggedly worn out butter knives for surgical scalpels! It is this sort of incompetent waste that dissuades the use of these types of remedies, but also gives its opposers their arguments. The one thing missing here, that is the most crucial, is not only its ‘misuse,’ but the ‘before and after’ regimen. Without this, it is like skipping vital steps in surgery. Again, it is never a ‘here, cured, and gone’ sort of thing. They are always instructed to return again later -and it is never without instructions on healthful living (that goes far beyond just diet and exercise). Most “DIY’ers” never go beyond the ‘removing the unsightly.’ In short, I would guess that NONE of them know what they are doing, not even those who type or publish their ‘cure all’ articles. If only by just one reason alone: You should never do these things YOURSELF! Any decent Medical Missionary would tell you this and a whole lot more. A word to the wise: Never use the failures of the foolish as evidence against the principle.

  30. I love Dr. Greger’s research videos, but this one misses it for me. For over 9 years my husband and I have used a blood root based liquid product (called Vitae Elixxir) blended with 9 other herbs that we’ve used on precancerous and cancerous spots even on our faces. I know many others that have treated their skin issues with the blend with great results including the crease area of the nose. In addition, I take the drops internally to reduce the possibility of cancerous polyps growing in my colon due to a defective gene. I have seen what blood root can do to kill cancer and not damage normal skin and it is remarkable and reproducible on others—even animals.

  31. I have read some of the comments which dispute the findings of these experiments, and /or offer alternative ways to use the formula above being examined. I have been using routinely a black OINTMENT from Dr. Christopher that predates many of the newer “herbal” preparations . It’s ingredients contain numerous known blood purifiers and drawing herbs, but no non herbal substances. I use this black ointment for everything from splinters to wasp stings (no cancers that I know of). It not only is an effective tool used longer term for mole removal, but shorter term for chiggers (I sometimes use it as a preventative when I’m working in tall grass under my arms or behind my knees.) Back in the 50’s I heard that a couple younger doctors promoted one of the main ingredients (chaparal) publicly as a cancer cure , but were promptly chastised by the powers that be and the findings retracted.

    My only complaint here is that some may throw out the baby with the bathwater and equate all black salves with the one studied in this video. -chaparral and plantain,

    1. sorry, the comment posted too quickly, but the ending thought was that the herbs in many commercial formulas often gravitate toward cheapest/easiest, most profitable, and abrasive chemicals often fit into that category, giving a bad name to legitimate herbal knowledge. When it comes to salves and ointments , a good rule of thumb is it should be edible (even if it’s not palatable.), and the ingredients in Dr. Christopher’s Black ointment are all used in other formulas internally to treat cancers and as blood purifiers.

      Dr Gregger is my hero for championing the vegan cause, but his information is often predated by the things I was learning as an herbalist 30+ years ago. Keep up the good work!!!

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