Cow’s Milk Casomorphin & Crib Death

Cow’s Milk Casomorphin & Crib Death
4.33 (86.67%) 6 votes

Bovine casomorphin from cow’s milk is suspected to increase the risk of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome, or crib death) based on the elevated blood levels in babies suffering acute life-threatening events, and their relative inability to clear it from their systems.

Discuss
Republish

This report on cow’s milk-induced infant apnea, thought due to the opiate-like effects of bovine casomorphin in milk, was just a single case report. It was so provocative, though, researchers immediately started testing other kids. SIDS, sudden infant death syndrome, also known as crib death, is the leading cause of death for healthy infants after one month of age. One in every 2,000 American babies die this way. Every day, six babies stop crying, and six parents start.

“Most susceptible…are infants exposed to several postnatal factors: sleep[ing on their stomach, secondhand smoke], and high sleep-room temperature. [But] it is supposed that in some cases of SIDS, it is cow’s milk that may play a certain role. It is also suspected that β-casomorphins hold a direct responsibility for that situation.”

“[Beta casomorphins] are biologically active,” with, as its name suggests, “effects similar to that of morphine. Penetration of β-casomorphins into the infant’s immature central nervous system may inhibit the respiratory centre in the brainstem leading to abnormal ventilatory responses, hypercapnia [which means too much carbon dioxide], hypoxia [not enough oxygen], apnea and death.”

So, what they did was study infants who had recurrent life-threatening episodes—meaning apnea, where they stop breathing, or turn blue, or become limp, etc. These are the kinds of events that place babies at high risk for SIDS.

The blood levels of bovine casomorphin in the babies with acute life-threatening events averaged three times higher than healthy babies. Why? Well, there’s an enzyme that gets rid of casomorphin, and the activity of that enzyme in the affected group was only half that of the healthy kids. So, some babies may just not be able to clear it out of their systems fast enough, and are placed at risk for death.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

This report on cow’s milk-induced infant apnea, thought due to the opiate-like effects of bovine casomorphin in milk, was just a single case report. It was so provocative, though, researchers immediately started testing other kids. SIDS, sudden infant death syndrome, also known as crib death, is the leading cause of death for healthy infants after one month of age. One in every 2,000 American babies die this way. Every day, six babies stop crying, and six parents start.

“Most susceptible…are infants exposed to several postnatal factors: sleep[ing on their stomach, secondhand smoke], and high sleep-room temperature. [But] it is supposed that in some cases of SIDS, it is cow’s milk that may play a certain role. It is also suspected that β-casomorphins hold a direct responsibility for that situation.”

“[Beta casomorphins] are biologically active,” with, as its name suggests, “effects similar to that of morphine. Penetration of β-casomorphins into the infant’s immature central nervous system may inhibit the respiratory centre in the brainstem leading to abnormal ventilatory responses, hypercapnia [which means too much carbon dioxide], hypoxia [not enough oxygen], apnea and death.”

So, what they did was study infants who had recurrent life-threatening episodes—meaning apnea, where they stop breathing, or turn blue, or become limp, etc. These are the kinds of events that place babies at high risk for SIDS.

The blood levels of bovine casomorphin in the babies with acute life-threatening events averaged three times higher than healthy babies. Why? Well, there’s an enzyme that gets rid of casomorphin, and the activity of that enzyme in the affected group was only half that of the healthy kids. So, some babies may just not be able to clear it out of their systems fast enough, and are placed at risk for death.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

For an introduction to bovine casomorphin, see Cow’s Milk-Induced Infant Apnea. This three-part video series on the so-called “milk-apnea effect” concludes with a discussion of the role this morphine-like compound may play in other conditions, including autism, in Cow’s Milk Casomorphin and Autism. Casomorphins are also mentioned in my video, Is Milk and Mucus A Myth? 

For additional context, check out my associated blog posts: Cow’s Milk Casomorphin, Crib Death, and Autism and Avoiding Dairy to Prevent Parkinson’s.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

11 responses to “Cow’s Milk Casomorphin & Crib Death

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

    1. I want to know when this is going to hit national news!!  I would love to see what the Dairy council would say.  Or will they just ignore it like all the other overwhelming negative research about their contaminated and infected, pus-filled products.




      1
  1. It sounds like this is not just direct exposure from dairy formula but the mother drinking/eating dairy and transferring the casomorphin to their child and putting them at risk. 2nd hand dairy. Scary stuff.




    0
    1. I can’t wrap my head around this. There’s casomorphine in human milk as well, so I don’t see the connection to bovine milk. Is it so simple that the mother consume so much casomorphine that the amount is too much for kids to handle?




      1
      1. See the next video.  It distinguishes Human casomorphins from Bovine casomorphins.  The Bovine casomorphins are linked to autism whereas the Human casomorphins are not.




        1
  2. Does this apply to infants fed a diary-based formula?  Is there any effect suspected on breast-fed infants whose mother is consuming dairy




    0
    1.  It would apply to dairy based formula’s as well. Breast milk is best for newborns as far as antioxidants see… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/antioxidant-power-of-plant-foods-versus-animal-foods/ and less exposure to industrial pollutants although since they are fat soluble even infants fed on breast milk get some if their mothers are exposed see… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/industrial-pollutants-in-vegans/. I think given all studies on dairy… Dr. Greger has 58 video’s relating to dairy and I’m sure there will be more… I would advise all women to avoid dairy during pregnancy, while breast feeding and thereafter.




      1
  3. What about the MMR vaccine?? The Bovine Serum is in the vaccine? Is this the reason so many parents with children that have Autism have decided to go Cassein free?? My son has PDD. I do not give him dairy products.




    0
  4. Regarding this casomorphine protein possibly causing a variety of health problems, is it true that cows that are called A2 breeds produce a safer milk than the A1 breeds?




    0
    1. Hi Carina,

      Professor Stewart Truswell from University of Sydney wrote a paper looking at this issue. His conclusion was “The A1/A2 milk hypothesis was ingenious. If the scientific evidence had worked out it would have required huge adjustments in the world’s dairy industries. This review concludes, however, that there is no convincing or even probable evidence that the A1 beta-casein of cow milk has any adverse effect in humans.”

      My translation is that the adverse effects of A1 milk is identical to the adverse effects of A2 milk.

      Truswell, A. S. (2005) The A2 milk case: a critical review. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 59 (5), 623–631.




      0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This