Flashback Friday: Carcinogen-Blocking Effects of Turmeric Curcumin

Flashback Friday: Carcinogen-Blocking Effects of Turmeric Curcumin
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Less than a teaspoon a day of turmeric appears to significantly lower the DNA-mutating ability of cancer-causing substances.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“We are increasingly aware [of] plant-derived substances [that act] as chemopreventive agents”—substances that help prevent cancer, as opposed to chemotherapy, substances aimed at treating cancer). “These substances are not only inexpensive, they are also [easily] available, and have no or limited toxicity.”

“Since 1987, the National Cancer Institute…has tested more than 1,000 different potential agents for chemopreventive activity, of which only [a few dozen] were moved to clinical trials. Curcumin, present in the Indian spice [turmeric, which is used in curry powder], is 1 such agent that is currently under clinical investigation for cancer chemoprevention.”

“According to their mode of action, chemopreventive agents are classified into different subgroups: [there’s the] antiproliferatives, antioxidants, or carcinogen-[blockers]. Curcumin belongs to all 3…, given its multiple mechanisms of action.”

Curcumin appears to play a role helping to block every stage of cancer transformation, proliferation, and invasion. It may even help before carcinogens even get to our cells. A study back in ’87 investigated the effects of curcumin on the mutagenicity—the DNA-mutating ability— of several toxins. And, they found that curcumin was “an effective antimutagen against several environmental and standard [mutagenic and cancer-causing substances].”

But, this was in vitro, from the Latin meaning “in glass,” meaning in a test tube or petri dish. What about in people? Well, it’s not like you can take a group of people, and expose them to some nasty carcinogen just so you can give half of them turmeric, and see what happens. Well, you could wait until some toxic waste spill happens, or a nuclear accident. But, otherwise, you’re not going to find people who would voluntarily expose themselves to carcinogens, unless—smokers! We can just test it on smokers. They’ve got carcinogens coursing through their veins every day.

If you take some smokers, and have them pee on some bacteria, this is the number of DNA mutations that arise. Remember, all life is encoded by DNA—whether bacteria, banana, or bunny rabbit. It’s easier though, when measuring urinary mutagens, to just pee on some bacteria.

The urine of nonsmokers caused far fewer DNA mutations. That makes sense; they have fewer chemicals running through their system. And if you have the nonsmokers eat turmeric for a month, nothing really happens. What if you do the same for smokers, though? Fifteen days later, they’re down to here, and 30 days, they’re down to here.

And, this is not some concentrated curcumin supplement. It was just plain turmeric, like you’d buy at the store. And, less than a teaspoon a day—indicating that dietary turmeric is an effective antimutagen. You’ll note though, on this graph, there’s an even more effective antimutagen—not smoking. Even eating turmeric for a month, the DNA-damaging power of smoker pee exceeded that of nonsmokers.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

alicja neumiler / Adobe Stock. This image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“We are increasingly aware [of] plant-derived substances [that act] as chemopreventive agents”—substances that help prevent cancer, as opposed to chemotherapy, substances aimed at treating cancer). “These substances are not only inexpensive, they are also [easily] available, and have no or limited toxicity.”

“Since 1987, the National Cancer Institute…has tested more than 1,000 different potential agents for chemopreventive activity, of which only [a few dozen] were moved to clinical trials. Curcumin, present in the Indian spice [turmeric, which is used in curry powder], is 1 such agent that is currently under clinical investigation for cancer chemoprevention.”

“According to their mode of action, chemopreventive agents are classified into different subgroups: [there’s the] antiproliferatives, antioxidants, or carcinogen-[blockers]. Curcumin belongs to all 3…, given its multiple mechanisms of action.”

Curcumin appears to play a role helping to block every stage of cancer transformation, proliferation, and invasion. It may even help before carcinogens even get to our cells. A study back in ’87 investigated the effects of curcumin on the mutagenicity—the DNA-mutating ability— of several toxins. And, they found that curcumin was “an effective antimutagen against several environmental and standard [mutagenic and cancer-causing substances].”

But, this was in vitro, from the Latin meaning “in glass,” meaning in a test tube or petri dish. What about in people? Well, it’s not like you can take a group of people, and expose them to some nasty carcinogen just so you can give half of them turmeric, and see what happens. Well, you could wait until some toxic waste spill happens, or a nuclear accident. But, otherwise, you’re not going to find people who would voluntarily expose themselves to carcinogens, unless—smokers! We can just test it on smokers. They’ve got carcinogens coursing through their veins every day.

If you take some smokers, and have them pee on some bacteria, this is the number of DNA mutations that arise. Remember, all life is encoded by DNA—whether bacteria, banana, or bunny rabbit. It’s easier though, when measuring urinary mutagens, to just pee on some bacteria.

The urine of nonsmokers caused far fewer DNA mutations. That makes sense; they have fewer chemicals running through their system. And if you have the nonsmokers eat turmeric for a month, nothing really happens. What if you do the same for smokers, though? Fifteen days later, they’re down to here, and 30 days, they’re down to here.

And, this is not some concentrated curcumin supplement. It was just plain turmeric, like you’d buy at the store. And, less than a teaspoon a day—indicating that dietary turmeric is an effective antimutagen. You’ll note though, on this graph, there’s an even more effective antimutagen—not smoking. Even eating turmeric for a month, the DNA-damaging power of smoker pee exceeded that of nonsmokers.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

alicja neumiler / Adobe Stock. This image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

This is second of a three-part video series on turmeric curcumin and its relationship to cancer. To find out more, check out the prequel, Back to Our Roots: Curry & Cancer, and the last video in the series, Turmeric Curcumin Reprogramming Cancer Cell Death.

Smokers are common research subjects for carcinogen studies. For example, see what happens to carcinogen levels when those eating processed meat start eating vegetarian in Heterocyclic Amines in Eggs, Cheese, & Creatine?

Other foods that may protect DNA include kiwifruit (see Kiwifruit & DNA Repair), cruciferous vegetables (see DNA Protection from Broccoli), leafy vegetables (see Eating Green to Prevent Cancer), garlic (see Cancer, Interrupted: Garlic & Flavonoids), and green tea (see Cancer, Interrupted: Green Tea. But, which is better? See Antimutagenic Activity of Green vs. White Tea). And, to learn about the DNA-protective power of plants in general, see Repairing DNA Damage.

More information on cancer prevention, treatment, and reversal can be found in my annual presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death and More Than an Apple a Day: Combating Common Diseases.

And all of my turmeric videos can be found here.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

111 responses to “Flashback Friday: Carcinogen-Blocking Effects of Turmeric Curcumin

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    1. I’m almost positive Dr. G has a video (somewhere) about black pepper potentiating the effectiveness of curcumin. The chart shown at t=1:27 in the YouTube video you shared looks very familiar…

    2. But this video then goes on the say it does work when you use the root, add black pepper and consume with a fat. Did you actually watch that video?

      1. Helen,
        Yes, I did watch the video. I just passed on a ploy used by creators of videos to snag viewers on YouTube. The turmeric video I posted, containing Dr. Greger explaining the benefits of turmeric, is titled, “Why turmeric doesn’t work.” The catch is turmeric doesn’t work as well without pepper or oil or being within the food. My apology for passing on this dastardly advertising snare.

  1. Dan C,

    There are several videos about turmeric on this site; you can find them by searching under “turmeric.”

    Here’s one example:

    “even curcumin-free turmeric exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities.” https://nutritionfacts.org/video/turmeric-curcumin-plants-vs-pills/

    I looked at your video; it presents very little data, and it’s limited to curcumin absorption; I didn’t see a list of the reference(s) discussed. And since when is coconut — oil, I presume, given the context — considered a “healthy fat?”

    1. Dr. J,
      The coconut stumped me also. Maybe avacado? Pepper seems to jack turmeric absorbtion through the roof–why add oil? I’ve put turmeric in chai tea (chai tea being a bit peppery). No more than one teaspoon of turmeric a day seems to be a good amount.

      1. Dan: black pepper doesn’t increase the absorption of curcumin. It increases the half life of curcumin in blood, by inhibiting an enzyme that participates in phase-II detoxification. I personally don’t think that’s a good compromise.

        1. George,
          My read is that the liver won’t take it without the pepper but lymph glands will when turmeric is in food. Strangely, the Wiki read is that turmeric has no benefit for disease saying there are no proven studies. But Wikipedia is like that sometimes depending on who did the editing.

          I personally don’t think that’s a good compromise.

          I can see why you say that because of the oxalate.

    2. Thanks for the link Dan. I enjoy their videos. The links to the studies cited in the video is supplied in tne video description. Many times she will use Dr Greger’s and give him credit.
      She said nuts, seeds, avocado or coconut which I thought was fine. Dr Greger has an old video on whole coconut around here that shows it as a green light food unlike the coconut oil. I don’t use coconut oil oil, or coconut milk ( in curries for example), but I wouldnt mind a small piece of fresh coconut once in a while as a rare treat. Much prefer it over chocolate.

      I have to check this videos studies, but in previous studies I recall them using amounts closer to 1/4 tsp /day. I use 1/8 tsp per day since I cook with spices often too. Don’t want to add more because I could be adding more metals too. Turmeric root is nice if I can get it.

        1. Dan C and Barb,

          Your comments about fresh coconut remind me of a college friend, who like to buy whole coconuts, drink the water, then eat the flesh. One time, he complained that the coconut water tasted terrible! But he continued to drink it and finished it. Then, when he cut open the coconut, he discovered that it was moldy!! He did not eat that moldy coconut, though I guess he drank the moldy water — unwittingly.

          So my take-home lesson was: always cut open the coconut before you drink the water. Or at least if the water tastes off.

          1. Your friend was ignorant that there are bad coconuts and learned the hard way. Most people know it happens and to not wait too long before eating coconuts they purchase.

      1. [Turmeric root is nice if I can get it.]

        I’m wondering which is a better source of curcumin: turmeric powder in a jar or real turmeric root. I can get both in my local grocery. Using real root is a nice touch, but the orange stain is next to impossible to remove if it gets embedded in a cutting board or on a dish towel, or in the little zester tool I use to grate the root. Still, I’m willing to use real for the sake of any advantage.

        1. Anyone who has used actual fresh turmeric root knows IT STAINS EVERYTHING IT TOUCHES. The dried powder is much easier to work with.

          Also turmeric root is in most supermarket produce sections now but most people walk right by it not knowing what it even looks like.

          1. Anyone who has used actual fresh turmeric root knows IT STAINS EVERYTHING IT TOUCHES. The dried powder is much easier to work with.

            Also turmeric root is in most supermarket produce sections now but most people walk right by it not knowing what it even looks like.
            ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
            We people are really dumb. ‘-(

            1. Lonie,
              I’ve not noticed turmeric root available where I shop. There is ginger root most of the time. I buy turmeric powder from the spice rack.

              1. buy turmeric powder from the spice rack.
                ——————————————————-
                Same here Dan. I buy it both by the capsule and in bulk. Bulk for cooking and caps for taking when I’m not cooking.

                Speaking of cooking, that usually means opening a can of soup in a small ceramic coated iron pan for heating on my magnetic induction hot plate. The turmeric does stain the ceramic, but if I ever am bothered by the stain I can use some bleach or even some hydrogen peroxide to get rid of it.

                But mostly, I just view the stain as a sort of protective coating for the little sauce pan. ‘-)

                Speaking of ginger root, I recently found some in a sealed plastic container on the door of my fridge. I vaguely remember buying that back in the early 2000s. ‘-)

                It appeared to still be o.k. to use. Haven’t tried it ’cause I’ve got bulk ginger and even some capsules of that.

                1. But mostly, I just view the stain as a sort of protective coating for the little sauce pan. ‘-)

                  Lonie,
                  Now you’re talk’in!

              1. U don’t want hand get stain with tumeric root. u can frozen tumeric grated u hand never going to be stain
                ————————————————————————————————————————-
                Sounds like a work-around for turmeric graters… another one that might work would be to coat one’s hands with coconut oil and then wipe it off with a paper towel when done.

        2. Tempered glass cutting boards aren’t subject to staining. They are also more hygienic generally.

          They are more likely to dull/blunt your knives though. Not a problem for me since I just use cheap knives with them and sharpen the knives regularly.

  2. Ugh, the turmeric fad again. Learn to cook then turmeric would be part of your life normally especially if you REALLY are eating WFPB since many recipes are Indian cuisine based.

    1. Ugh, the turmeric fad again. Learn to cook then turmeric would be part of your life normally especially if you REALLY are eating WFPB since many recipes are Indian cuisine based.
      ————————————————————————————————-
      O.K., now you’re just piling on us non-cookers.

  3. dr cobalt, I don’t know how the different forms would compare tbh. In studies I noticed they often use extracts mostly for consistency and because studies are often performed by pharmaceutical companies hoping to create a product they can sell in pill form.

    I use organic powders often in cooking and in morning ‘shots’ , but wouldn’t mind using whole in smoothies for example. They all stain, including countertops, clothing, some dishes, floors… be warned! The advantage to using whole food turmeric is that it can’t be adulterated with added metals etc.

  4. If I take turmeric/curcumin as a supplement, isn’t that a more highly concentrated form that may increase the side effects of it than if I just eat the raw form? I saw a video on the web where the narrator showed how much actual dried turmeric powder from raw form equaled the amount that is concentrated in a capsule. Apparently the capsule supplement consists of only the most potent part of the curcumin as opposed to taking a piece of dried turmeric in its natural form and grinding the whole root up to reach the equivalent of the potent form in the capsule. In other words, taking 500 mg of turmeric/curcumin would equal about 8-10 teaspoons of actual dried turmeric root ground up into powder. How much raw turmeric equals a teaspoon of powder? If I buy turmeric as a condiment in a spice bottle, is that the potent source of curcumin or the entire root ground up? I want to use turmeric and get its benefits, but I don’t want to wind up with side effects. Is there a video from Dr. Greger on how to take turmeric and in which form?

    1. Would love to know this information as well! I was taking 500mg every day (post-menopause) and the side effects were not good. Sore, tender chest, etc. Once I stopped, everything returned to normal. I have read that turmeric/curcumin can act as an estrogen so maybe I was overdoing it with the supplement.

  5. I’m confused. I was diagnosed with T-Cell Large Granular Lymphoctye Leukemia May 5, 2014. I became a vegan and added turmeric and black pepper to my diet. I have no idea whether either of these things are what changed my life, but within a couple months my blood cell health had turned around and was heading in a healthy direction. By one year, my blood was as healthy as twelve years previous to diagnosis. Smoking is not the only carcinogen-causing agent in our environment and I’m confused by Dr. Greger’s comment about how the effects of curcumin use by the non-smoking group did nothing. What? I’ve read many studies that point to the powerful anti-cancer capabilities of taking curcumin. I don’t think Dr. Greger meant to suggest that curcumin only helps minimize the damage to smokers while accomplishing nothing for non-smokers. Any thoughts?

    1. Congratulations, Brian!

      Dr Greger has videos where it did help with cancer. See his topic videos.

      But he is giving the study results.

  6. Can you get a benefit from using essential oils from some of these substances.? Such as Tumeric essential oil with Black Pepper essential oil, or Ginger oil?

  7. I am in the middle of a COVID logic problem.

    If your loved one needed to go to a rehab and the place he liked last time had the most deaths in the state with close to 25% of the patients dying, do you avoid it or go there because their staff and patients probably has already had it?

    Yes, I looked up the place and it really had close to 25% deaths and less than half the total beds I had estimated because I was expecting 10%.

    My poor relative will have to make that decision soon.

    1. I talked to a fiend tonight and her friend lost her mother by sending her to a rehab.

      The other option would be to have them go home with people coming in but those people travel around and I honestly think the one where so many people have already died or recovered might be safer.

  8. I found one with zero percent deaths but it is where he almost died from blood sugar.

    There are homes where 61% of the people tested positive.

    All around the world people are making these decisions.

    1. Deb (and Dr. Greger’s generous Staff),

      Often I appreciate your (Deb’s) comments when “on-topic” — you’ve a great memory as well as an ability to research various topics. Thank you.

      I’m confused today. Am I missing something?
      How does this current topic directly relate with your numerous replies/comments concerning COVID-19 and “rehab” facilities,etc.? Where’s the turmeric connection? One or two brief off-topic comments are often terrific within this site. However, I feel that reading through your longer comments, seeking, say in this case, turmeric replies and directly related information/experience/opinions, usually wastes my time when I realize the on-topic subject is not even indirectly mentioned.

      Forgive me if I’ve misread or even worse, missed a turmeric comment—such that would’ve tied your seemingly off-topic comments to indeed turmeric.

      Perhaps Dr. Greger’s kind staff might create a free-for-all, current events input nutrition/health related section. Such would be great for both evidence-based information discovered and also the “Gregerites” (I like this label that perhaps I’ve coined? (lol)) personal experiences may prove at least interesting to many who choose to explore off-topic subjects of interest.

      Stay well all and thanks for reading MY off-topic comment/reply!

      1. How does this current topic directly relate with your numerous replies/comments concerning COVID-19 and “rehab” facilities,etc.? Where’s the turmeric connection? One or two brief off-topic comments are often terrific within this site. However, I feel that reading through your longer comments, seeking, say in this case, turmeric replies and directly related information/experience/opinions, usually wastes my time when I realize the on-topic subject is not even indirectly mentioned.
        —————————————————————————————–
        Hey Jude, don’t make it bad
        Take a sad song (Co-Vid-19) and make it better
        Remember to let her (Deb) into your heart
        Then you can start to make it better ‘-)

          1. Lonie, some of us know Deb better than others do. :-)
            ———————————————————————————–
            Could be taken as pro Deb or Con Deb… I’m going to choose the pro Deb and agree. ‘-)

            Yes, Deb does sometimes enter into a stream of consciousness, which some people do not like because they come here with sideboards wanting to know only what the video subject is… and her stream of consciousness may deviate somewhat from that.

            Doesn’t make it invaluable.

            Usually these comments sections (IMO) have much of the information responses taken care of in the first ten or so. After that, unless an argument breaks out (or Deb adds to or even varies from, the subject) the video or blog post should just be left to die on the vine.

            I don’t know if others have noticed, but though self-deprecating as brain power deficient, she is highly intelligent and well read on top of that. Not only that, she has a family and personal history that I for one find fascinating. For me anyway, she reveals what so many are thinking in re: the trying times we are in. Sure, maybe NF.o can go back to being a boring old pulpit for the WFPB choir.

            But during times like these, I personally come here as often as I do for the Deb. ‘-)

  9. I found one where 80% of the nursing home patients tested positive.

    I wonder how long people are contagious?

    I also read that nursing homes don’t have to report deaths that occurred before May.

    That tells me that we are lying like crazy about our numbers.

  10. But how much tumeric every day? How much less than a teaspoon? Thanks for the reminder about turmeric. Been taking it, just not sure I’m taking the right amount.

  11. Hello! I’m currently reading “How Not To Die” and am in the chapter: Spices and Herbs. I have a question regarding how spices and herbs hold up when frozen? I typically make my smoothies for the week and freeze them so they last a few days. I add banana, mango, pineapple, spinach, kale, and flaxseed. I now want to add amla after reading about its antioxidants! If I freeze amla would it change any of it’s properties? Or any spice/herb for that matter? Thank you!!

    1. Good question Dana. There are courses offered in Food Safety in many countries, but looking at nutrional loss is also a consideration. Here is an article worth reading. Opened my eyes to a few facts I had forgotten about. https://www.dovemed.com/healthy-living/wellness-center/does-freezing-my-food-affect-its-nutritional-content/
      For years I have used my limited freezer space to store berries, grains, nuts or fish but avoided storing prepared meals – a habit which I’ll continue. Dr Greger did do a video on losing nutrition when you cut up fruit and veg in advance (even that large onion!). So with food safety and nutrition loss to consider, I think I would make smoothies fresh each time, and drink them less often if it proved too inconvenient.

      1. Barb, your link addressed freezing foods, but no mention of refrigeration.

        I have some powdered blackberries on the way (from Latvia) and am concerned about keeping their catechin levels high. In the picture, they don’t look so much like a powder as they do a ground dried berry… which might suggest some moisture in the product.

        I think I’ll try storing them in a jar in the fridge rather than freezing them. ‘-)

  12. I now want to add amla after reading about its antioxidants! If I freeze amla would it change any of it’s properties?
    ——————————————————————————————————————
    Interesting question Dana. I have no definitive answer for you but my intuition leads me to think that since the powdered Amla (I buy it by the bulk and store it in glass out on the counter) is incorporated into the liquid of the smoothie, it would likely retain its potency.

    You never know but I’m just guessing no one has ever done a measurement of before and after freezing… well, maybe in India where Amla is a staple.

      1. Deb, I too am curious about his virus test results. Hasn’t it been a couple of weeks or so since he had the nasal swab at his VA office or someplace?

        Maybe he made the whole thing up….he being a screenwriter ‘n all. :-)

        1. Maybe he made the whole thing up….he being a screenwriter ‘n all. :-)
          ———————————————————————————————–
          Or maybe I have it and in my delirium started telling everyone I’ve been tested but (somebody’s) the dog ate my paper. ‘-)

          Assuming the above is just more delirium, I did message the VA and told them I still haven’t heard my results from the hospital where I was swabbed.

          They said the would try to track down my test results. That was two days ago and I still haven’t heard from them. (Maybe a dog really did eat my results!)

      2. How are you feeling, by the way?
        ———————————————
        Chronic pain in lower extremities but has lessened to the point that sometimes I don’t notice it. Still weak in my legs to the point I go to looking for a place to either sit or lay down after being on my feet for ~ 10 minutes.

        Just noticed some more random red blotches on my skin… usually a dull color. I did notice one that is that telltale bright raspberry color. Taking a deep breath is getting easier and taste is getting much better, but smell is slower in returning.

        Thinking still remains clear, I think. On the other hand, the line between sanity and quarantine-itis is getting somewhat blurred. ‘-)

        I’m a little pissed-off at the notion I spent the winter planning projects to do once the weather got better… and now we are having reasonably good weather and I’m too weak to work. ‘-(

        1. Speaking of taste, occasionally my mouth starts to feel something akin to acidic. When that happens I’ve begun taking a 1/4 tsp of baking soda in water. Leaves the mouth coated and feeling smooth.

        2. “Still weak in my legs to the point I go to looking for a place to either sit or lay down after being on my feet for ~ 10 minutes.”
          – – – – – – –

          Lonie, what you might have is just-growing-old-itis. As a Piscean, my feet are supposedly my most vulnerable area. And I’ve noticed that I’m not as twinkly toes in the walking department anymore. :-(

          https://www.elitedaily.com/p/each-zodiac-sign-has-a-body-part-that-goes-with-their-sign-this-is-yours-8693442

          Just noticed some more random red blotches on my skin… usually a dull color. I did notice one that is that telltale bright raspberry color.
          – – – – – –

          Maybe you’re eating a lot of natural blood-thinning foods. Blood thinning meds can cause red spots on the skin. So can certain foods and supplements:

          https://www.healthyandnaturalworld.com/natural-blood-thinners/

          1. Lonie, what you might have is just-growing-old-itis.
            ———————————————————————
            Ummm… NO! I reject that hypothesis. (I’m serious… not just being flip.)

            I’ll know when that happens by judging my mental state. ATM, I’m close to my peak mentally.

            When I recover, I’ll make myself stronger than before. ‘-)

              1. Lonie. As most of us know, our negative or positive thoughts can affect our physical heath.
                —————————————————————————————-
                Agreed, as long as the positive thoughts are genuine.

                1. A positive thought can never BE a positive thought if it isn’t genuine. The real US knows whether we’re playing games with ourselves or not. “Hey, you’re trying to pretend your’re happy when “we” know otherwise!” The challenge is to learn how to switch Debbie Downer thoughts into Pollyanna ones.

                  When I’m finished with my morning yoga and etc., — ready to start the day — I always affirm: “At least three wonderful things are going to happen today.” And then at the end of the day I always look back, and b’god, at least three good things did happen. :-)

                  https://www.explorepsychology.com/positive-thinking-affect-health/

                  1. The real US knows whether we’re playing games with ourselves or not. “Hey, you’re trying to pretend you’re happy when “we” know otherwise!” The challenge is to learn how to switch Debbie Downer thoughts into Pollyanna ones.
                    ————————————————————————————————————————————————
                    Yeah, I’m more of a fan of changing one’s environment (like Norman Cousins curing himself of a disease simply by watching funny movies and laughing a lot) rather than just doing positive affirmations that are counter to one’s true beliefs. I’ve heard it said that before learning new tricks one has to unlearn the old ones, so to speak.

                    This is what I meant by being genuine in your beliefs. I’ve certainly grown into my current belief system through learning and believing in the outcome of what I’ve learned.

                    Much like you put your faith in things that others consider improbable, I’ve put my faith in an exponential explosion of discovery of ageing as a preventable disease.

                    Co-Vid-19 may lead to unfathomable amounts of data that lead to that end. Unfortunately, many lives will be lost as that data accumulates.

                    For now, the prevailing belief system is that a life is limited. I know many people who are o.k. with that and have little interest in immortality. I think about that and realize one can become bored with life.

                    Someday, one’s life or death may hinge on nothing more than their mindset. It may take a Stephen Hawking thirst for knowledge to stay viable after passing one’s normal use-by date.

                    1. “I think about that and realize one can become bored with life.”
                      – – – – –

                      Indeed so! Supposedly, our Higher Self/Subconscious does know when it’s our time to go, and by what means. I think I’ve pretty much covered all the things I wanted to, this time around. If we have unfinished work/challenges to take on, it’s not our time, is all. “We are spiritual beings having a physical experience.”

                      You are determined to figure out how to live until you’re whatever age…..110? Good luck with that! Maybe all those potions and supplements you take every day will do the job. Living around little kitties would definitely add on a few years for me.. :-)

                    2. You are determined to figure out how to live until you’re whatever age…..110? Good luck with that! Maybe all those potions and supplements you take every day will do the job.
                      ——————————————————————————–
                      See? That’s what I’m referring to when I refer to our belief system. Your 110 number suggests you accept a limit.

                      Jeanne Calment has already exceeded that number. And what if the Methuselah family longevity from the Old Testament was an actual fact? I think he was the longest living of his siblings but the others lived for centuries as well, or so I am told.

                      I’m reading research that combined could perhaps create a perfect storm of epigenetic methylation and/or gene deletions that could cause great leaps in longevity. If the Methuselah story turns out to be true, then there is a new attainable number of 800+ years.

                      As for the supplements I take, well, those are for the strict purpose of getting my natural self out as far as I can in hopes of catching the wave of healthy longevity that is surely to come.

                      As that becomes widely accepted any number of years are possible.

                      Oh, the cats are hear for rodent control… the live action antics of the kittens are just cat video gravy. ‘-)

                    3. Oh, the cats are *hear* for rodent control
                      ——————————————————-
                      Dagnabit!… here!!! HERE!

                    4. Lonie, you might enjoy the “Seth” video I posted (below) on just that subject. Sure….you can live to be whatever age you want — I just threw out the first number that came up in my mind.

                      Maybe I was picking my own age when I’ll be kicking off. 110 would be plenty long enough for me!

    1. That one is a must-see, in my opinion, because now it is fruit and mushroom plants and the post office closing mail sorting for whole states. We might have a ridiculously high spike 3 weeks from now.

      1. It feels like we are in “forced denial” and, in the Plant-Based community, we are waiting for Dr. Greger, but Dr. Lisle and Dr. Popper may not agree with him.

        What I pre-love is that Dr. Greger has his own mind.

    1. Magnus,

      That is interesting. They actually tell people to take turmeric as part of trying to help tinnitus as part of bringing down inflammation.

      Zinc, Magnesium and B-12 were the other nutritional things they say to look at.

      I don’t know if the things you mentioned effect the absorption of any of those.

      Are you taking B-12?

    2. Magnus,

      Excellent question. I did some research and the chemistries are indeed different however, I’m going to suggest that due to their similarities of influence on our inflammatory pathways that that may be the commonality causing your response.

      I’d be very curious if you find that your circulation is also affected, think cold fingers/toes, slow perfusion return in fingers after compression or have you noted a change in your B/P ? (well worth checking) It would be interesting but not necessarily a pleasant experience to try some beet juice with one of the ingredients and see if you still experience tinnitus.

      I’m making lots of assumptions in term of your medical history and question if you have noted any allergies, to foods or had a reaction to non-organic products, especially spices, if the reaction is dose related or……for information you could do a before and after cytokine panel (expensive and intended more for research but might be a real potential to find the pathway) https://testdirectory.questdiagnostics.com/test/test-detail/36611/cytokine-panel?cc=MASTER

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  13. I figured out the nursing home math and feel confident that I know how to help my relative.

    Over half of the nursing homes in the state have cases.

    I only need to know the number of active cases, but the one where 25% of the people died becomes interesting because it was described past tense a few weeks ago.

    Twenty five percent died. Likely more people got it and lived.

    It is also more likely that the staff was exposed 2 months ago – assuming the incubation, plus symptoms, plus death is closer to a 3 to 5 week process.

    He will be allowed to ask those questions, and I will contact his sister and help.

    Plus, that would have happened before the nursing homes would have had PPE’s.

    If

      1. There is some good news about the vaccines.

        https://www.google.com/amp/s/nypost.com/2020/05/22/coronavirus-vaccine-gets-positive-results-in-first-human-trial/amp/

        Positive results already.

        They still have to do trials but everything is fast-tracked so it sounds like good news.
        ——————————————————————————————————–
        That is good news Deb. However, my perfect solution would be getting a transfusion of a young person’s plasma that has anti-bodies to the virus and get protection from that.

        I don’t know if said anti-bodies would remain in the centrifuged plasma and thus be added to my blood so I doubt that will ever happen. Just seems a safer and yet fool-proof way to be protected.

        But if I actually do have Co-Vid-19, I should have some of the anti-bodies already. It’s just that I remember reading that as we get older, the number of anti-bodies we manufacture is lower than in a young person. (IIRC, they identified some enzyme or such that is the cause of this.)

  14. “Discontinue salad bars and buffet type self-service.”
    – – – – – –
    https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2020/05/covid-19-can-the-restaurant-industry-step-up-to-the-plate/

    I guess that means no more eating at my favorite Indian restaurant. Will it have to close, go bankrupt? We’d try to be one of the first to arrive at the Curry House Tues. evening buffet so as to get things (fairly) fresh. It won’t be as much fun eating in ANY restaurant anymore We’ll have to take off our masks in order to stick the food in our mouth and bring along some virus germs from the air around us. And yet we never thought about surrounding germs prior to this.

    Will Life continue to be “fearful” from now on? :-(

    1. I don’t find myself fearful of life these days YR, but then I have resigned myself to the idea that most of us, if not all, will get this virus within the next 18 months or so….even if it’s from standing in a vaccine lineup. Coughing and sneezing from regular flu season this winter will just spread it all the faster.

      People that I have talked to here say they have lost all enthusiasm for shopping… any kind of shopping, including grocery shopping. They dont care what they eat which is my current mindset. The lack of interest has been good for losing a few pounds though, and that’s fine.

      1. Barb,
        A Mayes county health department (Okla) spokesperson said 80% of us will get the virus. Some of us will not know it; a percentage will become ill; some very ill.

        1. I refuse to put myself in such a mindset. As I posted before, I haven’t had a/the flu or even a bad cold since the winter of 2000. Can’t remember the last time I had a vaccine of any kind. Many years ago, is all I know.

          Fumbles will not be happy, but here are some “Seth” words:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqxr-TIXHTM

        2. https://coronavirus.health.ok.gov/

          Barb,
          The above link is from the Okla State Dept of Health (but not my county of Mayes). 80% infected with Covid-19 will have mild symptoms. The official from my county health dept. may have mispoke, if she said 80% will get the virus–or I read the statement wrong. I can’t find the paper I read it from. Three people may have died in my county. The infection rate may be half of a percent (if I read that right). I’m sorry if I reported the data wrong.

          1. No problem Dan, and thanks for the links. In population samples, infection rates have come in around 12 to 14 %. There are very few cases where I am at which is wonderful but as soon at borders and travel are opened up, it may all change again. It may keep on circulating for years like the flu and common cold does.

            Did you check out YR’s link? I remember Seth from the early 80’s and may still have a few of Jane Robert’s books buried in boxes. “Seth Speaks” was one, and another about creating your own reality. Jane Roberts was a troubled soul but I did enjoy the books at the time.

            1. i avoid the staining effect of turmeric by eating the whole organic herb. Usually chew it in the same mouthful with avocado. This will be with a meal which I supplement with 10 mg piperine.

    1. The concept that it could cause it to become defective, there aren’t researchers out there trying to cause it to mutate weaker and weaker.

  15. Normally I love when you go into detail about a study, but this is the first time I cringed a lot.

    The study where there’s the antimutagenic effect Is demonstrated by the mutagenic power of their urine seems so bad. The facts that the mutagenic content of the non smokers didn’t go down was already case closed for the method. If that doesn’t go down, either that method is nonsense (my guess) or turmeric has no antimutagenic effects. There’s no imaginable way of effect that should not help the body fight some carcinogens from polluted air or some fast food but Only smokers.

    Secondly for the smokers if there are less mutagenics coming out of polluted bodies, guess where they are staying? I think it’s plausible that turmeric can have “bad” effects on the body such as blocking the “cleaning” of the body in smokers but normally the anti-inflammatory component far outweighs the benefits.

    If you read this Dr. Greger please have another look into that study with your more educated eye for statistics and alternative causalities.

    1. There were some mistakes in my text such as “outweighs the negatives”, but I hope it’s understandable I wrote it on my phone..

  16. Hello Dr. G

    I would like to get my wife to eat about 1/4 piece of turmeric root each day; however she has had gallbladder attacks in the past because of gallstones. Is there a recommended dosage for people with gallbladder issues. I know that it’s the curcumin that causes the kinetic effect of the gallbladder but the root is only 2-5% curcumin right? Do you have any recommendations on the amount of root she might safely consume. The last thing I would want is to provoke a gallbladder attack for her.

    thanks, Jason

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