Stainless Steel or Cast Iron: Which Cookware Is Best? Is Teflon Safe?

Stainless Steel or Cast Iron: Which Cookware Is Best? Is Teflon Safe?
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What’s the best type of pots and pans to use?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my last video, I expressed concerns about the use of aluminum cookware. So, what’s the best type of pots and pans to use? Stainless steel is an excellent option––the metal chosen in applications where safety and hygiene are considered to be of the utmost importance, such as kitchenware. But what about studies showing stainless steel can leach nickel and chromium into foods during cooking? (That’s what keeps the iron in the stainless steel unstained by rust.) The leaching is really only when they’re brand new. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilizes after the sixth time you cook with it. Under more common day-to-day conditions, the use of stainless-steel pots is considered to be safe, even for most people who are acutely sensitive to those metals.

A little leaching metal can be a good thing in the case of straight iron, like a cast iron skillet, which can have the beneficial effect of helping to improve iron status, helping to potentially reduce the incidence of iron deficiency anemia among reproductive-age women and children. The only caveat is that you don’t want to be frying in cast iron. Frying isn’t healthy regardless, but at hot temperatures, vegetable oil can react with the iron to create trans fats.

What about using nonstick pans? Teflon, also known as polytetrafluoroethylene, is used as an inner coating material in nonstick cookware. Teflon’s dark history was the subject of a recent movie called Dark Waters, starring Mark Ruffalo and Anne Hathaway. Employees in DuPont’s Teflon division started giving birth to deformed babies before DuPont “removed all female staff” from the unit. Of course, they buried it all, hiding it from regulators and the public. Despite this significant history of industry knowledge about how toxic some of the chemicals used to make Teflon were, they were able to keep it all hidden. But eventually they were forced to settle for over a half a billion dollars after one of the chemicals was linked to kidney and testicular cancers, pregnancy-induced hypertension, ulcerative colitis, and high cholesterol.

“At normal cooking temperatures, [Teflon]-coated cookware releases various gases and chemicals that present mild to severe toxicity.” Here’s some of the different gases that are released at different temperatures, and the toxic effects that have been documented. You’ve heard of canaries in a coal mine? This is more like canaries in the kitchen, as cooking with Teflon cookware is well known to kill pet birds in the house; or Teflon-coated heat lamp bulbs wiping out half a chicken flock.

“Apart from the gases released during heating the cooking pans, the coating itself starts damaging after a certain period. It is normally advised to use slow heating when cooking in Teflon-coated pans,” but you can imagine how consumers might ignore that. And some of the Teflon can start chipping off if you’re not careful, and make its way into the food, though the effects of ingestion are unknown.

This is the only study I could find looking at the potential human health effects of cooking with nonstick pots and pans, and the use of nonstick cookware was associated with about a 50 percent increased risk of colorectal cancer. But that may be because of what they were cooking. Nonstick cookware is used in hazardous high-heat cooking methods, like broiling, frying, grilling, or barbecuing, mainly for meat, poultry, or fish, in which carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are formed from the animal protein. And then, the animal fat can produce another class of carcinogens, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons––though it’s possible it was the Teflon itself, which contains suspected carcinogens like that C8 compound from the movie, also known as PFAO, perfluorooctanoic acid.

“Due to toxicity concerns, this chemical has been replaced with other chemicals such as GenX, but these new alternatives are also suspected to have similar toxicity.” But we’ve already so contaminated the Earth with it that now we can get it prepackaged in food before it’s even cooked––particularly in fish, dairy products, and meat, which is now the main source of human exposure to these toxic pollutants. Of those, seafood is the worst. In a study of diets from around the world, fish and seafood were major contributors of the perfluoroalkyl substances, as expected, given that everything eventually flows into the sea. Though the aquatic food chain is the primary transfer mechanism for these toxins into the human diet, “food stored or prepared in greaseproof packaging materials,” like microwave popcorn, may also be a source.

And in 2019, Oral-B Glide dental floss was tested. 6 out of 18 dental floss products they tested showed evidence of Teflon-type compounds. Here’s the list. So, did those who used those kinds of floss end up with higher levels in their bloodstream? Yes, apparently so. Higher levels of perfluorohexanesulfonic acid were found in Oral-B Glide flossers. There’s lots of environmental exposures in the modern world we can’t avoid, but we shouldn’t be making things worse by adding it to consumer products. But hey, at least it gives us some power to lower our personal exposure to these harmful chemicals.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my last video, I expressed concerns about the use of aluminum cookware. So, what’s the best type of pots and pans to use? Stainless steel is an excellent option––the metal chosen in applications where safety and hygiene are considered to be of the utmost importance, such as kitchenware. But what about studies showing stainless steel can leach nickel and chromium into foods during cooking? (That’s what keeps the iron in the stainless steel unstained by rust.) The leaching is really only when they’re brand new. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilizes after the sixth time you cook with it. Under more common day-to-day conditions, the use of stainless-steel pots is considered to be safe, even for most people who are acutely sensitive to those metals.

A little leaching metal can be a good thing in the case of straight iron, like a cast iron skillet, which can have the beneficial effect of helping to improve iron status, helping to potentially reduce the incidence of iron deficiency anemia among reproductive-age women and children. The only caveat is that you don’t want to be frying in cast iron. Frying isn’t healthy regardless, but at hot temperatures, vegetable oil can react with the iron to create trans fats.

What about using nonstick pans? Teflon, also known as polytetrafluoroethylene, is used as an inner coating material in nonstick cookware. Teflon’s dark history was the subject of a recent movie called Dark Waters, starring Mark Ruffalo and Anne Hathaway. Employees in DuPont’s Teflon division started giving birth to deformed babies before DuPont “removed all female staff” from the unit. Of course, they buried it all, hiding it from regulators and the public. Despite this significant history of industry knowledge about how toxic some of the chemicals used to make Teflon were, they were able to keep it all hidden. But eventually they were forced to settle for over a half a billion dollars after one of the chemicals was linked to kidney and testicular cancers, pregnancy-induced hypertension, ulcerative colitis, and high cholesterol.

“At normal cooking temperatures, [Teflon]-coated cookware releases various gases and chemicals that present mild to severe toxicity.” Here’s some of the different gases that are released at different temperatures, and the toxic effects that have been documented. You’ve heard of canaries in a coal mine? This is more like canaries in the kitchen, as cooking with Teflon cookware is well known to kill pet birds in the house; or Teflon-coated heat lamp bulbs wiping out half a chicken flock.

“Apart from the gases released during heating the cooking pans, the coating itself starts damaging after a certain period. It is normally advised to use slow heating when cooking in Teflon-coated pans,” but you can imagine how consumers might ignore that. And some of the Teflon can start chipping off if you’re not careful, and make its way into the food, though the effects of ingestion are unknown.

This is the only study I could find looking at the potential human health effects of cooking with nonstick pots and pans, and the use of nonstick cookware was associated with about a 50 percent increased risk of colorectal cancer. But that may be because of what they were cooking. Nonstick cookware is used in hazardous high-heat cooking methods, like broiling, frying, grilling, or barbecuing, mainly for meat, poultry, or fish, in which carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are formed from the animal protein. And then, the animal fat can produce another class of carcinogens, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons––though it’s possible it was the Teflon itself, which contains suspected carcinogens like that C8 compound from the movie, also known as PFAO, perfluorooctanoic acid.

“Due to toxicity concerns, this chemical has been replaced with other chemicals such as GenX, but these new alternatives are also suspected to have similar toxicity.” But we’ve already so contaminated the Earth with it that now we can get it prepackaged in food before it’s even cooked––particularly in fish, dairy products, and meat, which is now the main source of human exposure to these toxic pollutants. Of those, seafood is the worst. In a study of diets from around the world, fish and seafood were major contributors of the perfluoroalkyl substances, as expected, given that everything eventually flows into the sea. Though the aquatic food chain is the primary transfer mechanism for these toxins into the human diet, “food stored or prepared in greaseproof packaging materials,” like microwave popcorn, may also be a source.

And in 2019, Oral-B Glide dental floss was tested. 6 out of 18 dental floss products they tested showed evidence of Teflon-type compounds. Here’s the list. So, did those who used those kinds of floss end up with higher levels in their bloodstream? Yes, apparently so. Higher levels of perfluorohexanesulfonic acid were found in Oral-B Glide flossers. There’s lots of environmental exposures in the modern world we can’t avoid, but we shouldn’t be making things worse by adding it to consumer products. But hey, at least it gives us some power to lower our personal exposure to these harmful chemicals.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the second in a three-video series on cookware. The first was Are Aluminum Pots, Bottles, and Foil Safe?, and the next is Are Melamine Dishes and Polyamide Plastic Utensils Safe?

What about pressure cooking? I covered that in Does Pressure Cooking Preserve Nutrients?

So what is the safest way to prepare meat? See Carcinogens in Meat.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

154 responses to “Stainless Steel or Cast Iron: Which Cookware Is Best? Is Teflon Safe?

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  1. Given that your addressing PFOA–a molecule that involves fluoride–maybe it’s time to readdress water fluoridation? Recent studies have found neuro-toxic effects from water fluoridation, doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.1729 When will you reconsider your support for this practice?

    1. I was using a high fluoride toothpaste because I developed tons of cavities late in life. My hair started to fall out after about a year of it. Didn’t realized until I stopped it to test and within 3 days, my hair stopped falling out.

      1. I had tooth problems all my life including the sixteen years I ate a crappy Americanized vegan diet. Switched to a WFPB diet and no more teeth problems. I don’t even need to get them cleaned anymore despite eating blueberries, cranberries and coffee daily.

        1. Thanks. My diet has been WFPB for many years and sugar free for longer. I developed MCAS in my 50s and for the first time in my life started to have a problem with tooth decay. Apparently related. Wish diet helped it. It certainly helps the MCAS.

          Sent from Mail for Windows 10

      2. I believe in ginger not in anyone this poison chemically approved by pharmacy Note :use only natural cleaning teeth and gum

    2. Yes please, we would all like to see more studies about water fluoridation and fluoride toothpaste. I’ve read how cities are not allowed to opt out of this. And convenient that it’s an industrial byproduct making billions of dollars for some huge corporations. Excess fluoride turned my teeth brownish as a child.

      1. Hi, LisaLynn! In this interview: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-interview-with-gianna-simone/, Dr. Greger stated his views on consuming fluoride as follows: “It’s not necessary, but from a public health standpoint—rich people can go to the dentist and afford all sorts of gizmos, ultrasonic gizmos for their teeth—but from a public health scale, I mean that’s how you reach impoverished populations which may not have the dental care that you have, and so if you have a dental problem, no big deal, go to the dentist, right? But if they have a dental problem, they could lose their teeth, which means losing a lot of their nutrition or being in chronic pain. And certainly from a public health standpoint fluoridated water is—in fact, according to the Center for Disease Control, one of the greatest public health innovations over the last century.” Yes, too much fluoride in childhood can cause the dental discoloration you experienced, and that risk may be exacerbated by drinking tea. You can find everything on this site related to fluoride here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/fluoride/ I hope that helps!

      1. This is the most valuable comment!!!!!
        Ceramic coating must be addressed in another video!!!!!
        Also, please publish the ranking [best to worst] cocking surfaces.

          1. Not if the enamel is only on the outside. I only have a Le Creuset skillet so don’t know whether the Dutch oven lids have enamel on the underside. Lately on some inexpensive cast iron pans I have seen a black coating on the inside that looks baked on, but It is unclear what it is.

    3. In the past I’ve asked Dr Gregor to debate/discuss the issue of fluoride in the water supply with Dr Paul Connett from fluoridealert.org which has not happened yet.

      While I agree with Dr Gregor on a lot of issues on that one he is clearly wrong. There is no benefit to putting fluoride in the water supply. He is just plain wrong on that one.

      1. All available well founded, unbiased evidence supports the benefits of fluoridated water. I personally know many of the researchers. They are regular unbiased docs without any hidden agenda that are only interested in the truth. There is nothing to debate. You’re welcome to believe whatever you like.

  2. Off topic— Have you found anything about diet and Meniere’s disease? I’ve been using Google Scholar to look at articles, but have not been successful. My husband can be feeling just fine, and then be bedridden within minutes. We’ll try anything! He’s give up caffeine, salt, alcohol, and his beloved animal products.

    1. I learned from an otolaryngologist that the sodium from salt is a lessor culprit in menieres than other sources, especially sodium benzoate. They even put that in Sprite/7-UP/etc, drinks that people who are having an attack often consume trying to stay hydrated from the excessive vomiting. Read all labels and avoid the sodium based preservatives.

      Coconut water makes a good rehydration drink during an attack as it does not burn like sports drinks on a sore throat from being sick.

      1. sodium benzoate turns into benzene in your body when it encounters vitamin C. Benzene is an amazingly toxic chemical. If you have no vitamin C in your body, you have even more problems!

    2. Five years ago,I also was diagnosed with Meniere’s Disease and had debilitating vertigo attacks as well as maddening tinnitus. I lost most of my hearing in my right ear and had the sensation of fullness in both ears all the time. I have not had a vertigo attack in over three years and have greatly reduced the incidence of tinnitus by avoiding foods to which I have food sensitivities. I had a blood test done for allergies, which showed I have sensitivities to white potatoes, almonds, Brazil nuts and eggs. Since eliminating these from my mostly whole foods plant-based diet, I feel terrific. Best of luck to you and your husband as you navigate the hell that is Meniere’s.

    3. Meniere’s disease?

      I think I have it, Doctors didn´t find yet. Initially, they thought were problems in my eyes. They said you have to use special glasses with prism lenses. Therefore I´ve been using the glasses and still looking for my normal balance! I don´t smoke, I don´t drink alcohol, I don´t drink coffee, salt, and animal flesh.
      I´m doing as much as I can to have a new style of life. Fortunately, my wife works in a kitchen of a Local Caffe/Bar she´s with me cooking similar vegan food.
      I use to have high blood pressure. Since some time ago I´ve tried to have garlic cut in pieces daily for more than two weeks or so. Today I´m in a position to say my high blood pressure is over. The result of start being vegan a to have the garlic I don´t need to have TENORMIN´MITE daily. Stop having it for a couple of days. Anyway I would need to consult my Cardiologist and maybe make a Echocardiogram. Thanks a lot for your Support.

    4. If you tried diet and it does not work and you want to try a medical route try the House Ear Clinic in Los Angeles. They have been studying Meniere’s since sometime around WW2 and are up to date on all the latest research. My husband went there in 1993 because his doctor thought he had Meniere’s and we were very impressed with how well they diagnosed the problem and explained everything to us. He did not have Meniere’s and they guessed he had a type of dementia that was affecting the balance center of his brain.

  3. Didn’t know floss contains Teflon type compounds. How do we make sure we buy floss which doesn’t contain a Teflon type coating? Does it list it on the packaging label?

      1. Barb,

        I think you mean free of synthetic chemicals? Because all materials consist of chemicals.

        Two of the flosses described are reportedly coated with beeswax, while the third is coated with a “vegan wax” — whatever that means — and is made of nylon. But they are all apparently free of teflon coatings.

        1. Dr J, yes, I said ‘ chemical coatings’ refering to the teflon substance used on some floss. I have no problem with beeswax. This page may help you more: https://umbelorganics.com/pfas-free-dental-floss/
          Review and ingredients list of coatings-free floss plus a list of those products you should toss if you are using them currently.
          The health food store floss products are over priced. Just sayin’ .

    1. Or you can skip string flossing and use a water flosser. I’ve always hated flossing and had to use the Glide types because of my tight teeth. One day I walked past Waterpics on sale at Costco and bought one on impulse. I use it every night and haven’t used string floss for three years now. My teeth are cleaner than they were with string floss. The dental hygienist has almost nothing to do.

      1. Thanks but I’m confused — the table is called “Presence or Absence of Fluorine…”. How do we know that the tests aren’t just showing that fluoride was applied to the flosses like a lot of dental products, as opposed to potentially toxic teflon elements?

        1. Hi, Joe! That is a great question. Thanks for asking. You can read the full research article here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41370-018-0109-y The sources cited in NutritionFacts videos are always available by clicking the “Sources Cited” link beneath the video window. This particular article, entitled, “Serum concentrations of PFASs and exposure-related behaviors in African American and non-Hispanic white women,” concluded that, “Flossing with Oral-B Glide, having stain-resistant carpet or furniture, and living in a city served by a PFAS-contaminated water supply were also associated with higher levels of some PFASs.” The “F” in PFAS is flourine. The study links exposures with PFAS concentrations in the body. I hope that helps!

  4. This was useful to me.

    For one, I have new stainless steel that I still haven’t used yet.

    Can I boil water 6 times and stop the leaching that way? (Yes, that is what I am going to do.)

    Silly, probably, but I am so sensitive to chemicals and possibly heavy metals that I currently have a rash from Gloves in a Bottle and I still got irritated by the thing I bought the Gloves in a Bottle to protect me from. I know for sure both caused irritation because I put too much of the Gloves in a Bottle in my hands and ended up trying to use it as a moisturizer down my arm and later I had rashes all the way to my elbow, but I also had a different almost burning sense at the fingers I was using. Most gloves wouldn’t be any better and they have been harder to find. Our chemical gloves have been back-ordered.

    As far as cast iron goes, I have thought a lot about it but I have always wondered about pans that require oil seasoning. The concept that they can cause transfats, I would need very specific instructions to use them, so I will pass unless I test iron-deficient.

    1. Deb, the leaching is increased with acidic foods so might be a good idea to cook acidic foods like tomatoes or vinegar rather than water the first few times before you use the cookware to prepare foods for yourself.

    2. Curious if sautéing food in a cast iron turns fat into trans fat? I use olive oil, coconut oil and ghee and butter. I sauté a lot of greens with mushrooms, garlic and onions.

    3. Deb, IDK, but boil with water and a little white vinegar. Maybe do the last boil with salt water. Salt has such a cleansing affect. I’m just guessing here.

    4. The other problem with cast iron is that it is very heavy. I would not be able to use a big one safely these days because I’m in my 60s and my arm strength will not keep me safe, especially in the evening when I am likely to be tired.

  5. Dr. Greger stated: “you don’t want to be frying in cast iron. Frying isn’t healthy regardless, but at hot temperatures, vegetable oil can react with the iron to create trans fats.”

    I’m assuming that this is true of sauteeing with oil in cast iron cookware as well? I’ve been switching to sauteeing dry or with a bit of added water or broth, but In my stainless steel cookware, and not in my cast iron frying pans. I’m concerned that they would rust. Does anyone have experience with dry sauteeing in cast iron cookware?

    1. It is primarily 18:3 that converts to trans. In the industry, the presence of 18:3 trans is one indicator of overheated product. So frying with oils that have less 18:3 will reduce the trans increase effect. Good luck finding an oil that doesn’t have some unseemly aspect when used for frying. Olive oil or peanut oil are probably the healthiest as they have low 18:3, and also are more stable than high polyunsaturated oils as they have less polyunsaturated fat. And they have less saturated fat with their high monounsaturad fat levels. This will make them more stable than high polyunsaturated oils yet not so bad for saturated fat intake. Just the act of heating polyunsaturated fat to high temperatures as with frying will create unhealthy substances. Fully saturated fats like palm oil will be fairly stable and have little or no 18:3…but they are all saturated fat and have poor taste and mouthfeel. The classic tempura oil, sesame oil, is similar to olive and peanut but is expensive. All the monounsaturated oils will not be highly stable so temperatures should be monitored and heating times should be minimized and no oil reused. VERY wasteful practices.

    2. If your cast iron is enamelled (staub, le creuset or similar) then broth alone, wine sauces or water is ok just don’t let it boil dry. Always use on a low heat source (correct size for base) to heat up slowly and don’t dry fry to preserve the enamel layer.

      If normal cast iron, cooking with broth is fine. After wash, dry it well and if necessary (if it’s lost its oiled sheen), recoat with a minimum of oil to prevent rust. If you ever see some rust develop, just scrub it off wash dry oil.

      I usually heat up a new oil layer, (ie.cook it on, without food), then give it a quick wash before using it next time.

      I never cook in it using oil. I assume the tiny residue of oil on the surface of the pan isn’t a problem as there’s no quantity of oil there to eat. If I dry heat food like corn cakes on it there’s no trace of oil. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong

      1. Whizz,

        Thank you for that information.

        Don’t dry fry.

        When I have been cooking since WFPB, I have been cooking in water and letting the water run out and then a minute or two dry frying.

        You have given me something to think about.

  6. I am *enjoying* seeing Dr. Gregor in the videos now. He has such a nice voice and it’s entertaining to watch his gestures. He is definitely not boring!!

      1. I just find him a distraction from the journal articles, graphs, etc. Nothing personal Dr. Greger!! You’re a sweetie!

        Sent from Mail for Windows 10

  7. What about the Scanpan made in Denmark? I heard about these from Dr. John McDougall. Does the Scanpan use just another type of teflon or is it OK to use?

    1. Hi, Jane! That topic has not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts, possibly because it has not yet been adequately put to the test. I am interested in the answer also, because I occasionally use Scanpan myself. The coating is ceramic titanium, which is different from Teflon. Hopefully it is safer, but we don’t have a definitive answer right now. I mostly use stainless steel and enamelled cast iron for cooking. I hope that helps!

    1. I just got an enamel Dutch oven, and there’s a layer of glass over the cast iron. I can’t imagine glass would be bad to cook in? But curious what Dr Greger says about glass. Also ceramic coatings.

      1. Hi, LisaLynn! Join the club! You are just one of many viewers requesting coverage of this topic. I regularly use enamelled cast iron pans myself, because I believe they are safe, and I will continue to do so until I hear otherwise. I have passed along the request to cover this topic in the future. Because we receive many requests to cover topics, and it takes time to research them all and to produce videos, it may be awhile before you see it here.

    2. Hi, Kacie! That topic has not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts, possibly because it has not yet been sufficiently put to the test. I will pass along your request to cover it in the future. We receive many requests to cover topics, and it takes time to address them all, so it may take awhile for you to see it here. That said, I use enamelled cast iron pots regularly, and I think they are probably safe to use. I will keep using them until I hear otherwise. I hope that helps!

  8. My SS pressure cookers (I have one 4 qt and one 6 qt) are over 20 years old. I easily steam veggies lightly by placing basket that sits above the bubbling water, then lift the basket out in its entirety. They are perfect. I only use the sealing lid for cooking soaked dried beans. After seeing this, I’ll hang on to my pressure cookers from now on. They last that long with a rare occasion of getting a new sealing ring. I even travel with the small one and a hot plate—by auto. I know about the instapot but prefer my reliable tried and true pressure cookers.

    1. Ruthie, my pots are Kuhn-Rikon and I use both regular and pressure lids on them. I have three sizes, two large saucepans, a wide 5 qt. Dutch oven style, and a deep big soup pot. They are what I use for everyday cooking, and my quick pressure cooking. I bought the first one more than twenty years ago and just kept expanding instead of buying ordinary pots. They are so well made!

      I do use my Instantpot for beans, stews, and soups that take a while because I can throw things in and walk away.

  9. Enjoy the Memorial Day weekend! I’ll post this message here and on the second Lp(a) article.

    On the recent very helpful subject of Lipoprotein a (Lp(a), I had the $49 test done by “Lab Tests Online,” rather than wait till the end of July and have my Medicare insurance cover the cost before I see my cardiologist and my family physician for periodic health appointments. I have been a healthy-eating vegan since 2003, at age 67, after participating in Dr. McDougall’s 10-day “TOTAL HEALTH SOLUTION CLINIC”. At age 79, I had a stent put in the widow-maker heart artery. at age 83 (March 2019) I got trapped into a four bypass heart operation. I am doing OK now, but wondered if I had high Lp(a) running in the family genes!

    Test Name Result Flag Reference Range

    LIPOPROTEIN (a) 159 HIGH <75 nmol/L

    Reference Range Risk:
    Optimal 125

    Dr. Greger’s two Lp(a) articles did not find significant help from particular foods in lowering this risk factor. Many comments from viewers were very helpful regarding gooseberries, oxalates, and the drug Repatha. That drug is a real ripoff! My gathering of info and my comments are as follows:

    ###################
    “What Is Repatha®?
    = evolocumab
    For adults with heart disease, Repatha® is a treatment that dramatically lowers LDL bad cholesterol and [ NOT DRAMATICALLY: ] reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. If you’re taking a statin, but you are still struggling to lower your LDL, it’s time for a different approach.”

    =============
    [ Insert by WJK: Risk of heart attack:

    (4.6% – 3.4%) / 4.6% = 26% relative risk reduction

    4.6 – 3.4 = 1.2 % absolute risk reduction

    Also, I think that I read somewhere that “all-cause mortality” did not go down for patients that took REPATHA? Meaning “No increase in lifespan.”

    COST:
    “The list price for Repatha is $450 per month. Most patients do not pay the list price. Your actual cost will vary and will depend on your insurance coverage.”
    ===========
    “Repatha
    Repatha® helps the liver clear LDL bad cholesterol by limiting the actions of a protein called PCSK9—and less PCSK9 means less LDL in your blood.

    Statins
    Statins help stop your liver from making as much cholesterol, including LDL.
    They also increase the liver’s ability to break down cholesterol that’s already in your blood.

    Dramatically Lower LDL
    Taken together, Repatha® with a statin is proven to dramatically lower your LDL.

    – – – – – – [ Give me a break! K. ]
    Take Every Two Weeks
    SureClick® Autoinjector
    Single-use prefilled autoinjector*
    15-second at-home self-injection with hand-held device

    – – – – – [ Give me a break! K. ]
    Take Once a Month
    Pushtronex® System
    Single-use on-body infusor with prefilled cartridge†
    9-minute at-home self-injection with hands-free device

    – – – – – – –
    Repatha® Side Effects
    In clinical trials with more than 26,000 patients, Repatha® demonstrated a consistent safety profile.
    Repatha® can cause serious side effects, including serious allergic reactions. Stop taking Repatha® and call your healthcare provider or seek emergency help right away if you have any of these symptoms: trouble breathing or swallowing, raised bumps (hives), rash or itching, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat or arms.

    The most common side effects of Repatha® include
    Runny nose
    Sore throat
    Symptoms of the common cold
    Flu or flu-like symptoms
    Back pain
    High blood sugar levels (diabetes)
    Redness, pain, or bruising at the injection site

    Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.
    These are not all the possible side effects of Repatha®. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

    27% Reduced risk of Heart Attack
    In a study, patients not treated with Repatha® had more heart attacks (4.6%) compared to those treated with Repatha® (3.4%). 
 In adults with heart disease 


    [ 4.6 – 3.4 = 1.2 % absolute risk reduction.
    BUT NO INCREASE IN LIFESPAN? ]

    63% Reduction in LDL Cholesterol 
 By adding Repatha® to a statin, patients are able to achieve a 63% mean reduction in LDL-C levels at week 12. 


    [ a? – b? = c? % absolute reduction ? ]

    21% Reduced risk of Stroke 
 In a study, patients not treated with Repatha® had more strokes (1.9%) compared to those treated with Repatha® (1.5%). 


    [ 1.9 – 1.5 = 0.4 % absolute risk reduction. WOOHOO!! ]

    Worked within 4 weeks:
 Most people experienced their greatest drop in LDL bad cholesterol with Repatha® in as little as 4 weeks; this drop was maintained with treatment.
    [ For the rest of your life! WJK ]

    Reduces certain types of heart surgery:
    Repatha® is also proven to reduce the need for a stent or open-heart bypass surgery.

    ###################
    As you can tell, I reject this Repatha drug completely!

    What I do take is a baby aspirin, finally – after the CABG event in March 2019 – I take a 40 mg Crestor statin (I asked to go to this water-based statin rather than the lipid-based Lipitor that the cardiologist started me on), and 300 mg Co-Enzyme Q10. I periodically take an iron pill and a B-12 pill. The statin dropped my forever-230-ish total cholesterol down to the 124 level. I hear that you may gain four or five days more life from statins! Woohoo!!

    I’ll post this on the Lp(a) video comments, too.

    Bill Kleinbauer https://TinyURL.com/HealthyLifestyle-Ks-Mar2020 & https://TinyURL.com/HealthiestNutrition/course-2019

    1. I have genetically high LDL VLDL. I wanted to stay off of statins. Even WFPB diet didn’t work well. Added 6 capsules a day of Red Yeast Rice (and you have to take Ubiquinol with it just like you do with statins to prevent a low CoQ10 level and the problems associated with that); that has worked better than any other supplement or dietary change.

    2. Dear Sir = May 2020
      I read again and again how people have so many problems with their health ,
      My wife passed away 11 years ago , and my diet was really not too good , but I had an early
      lesson in life , that your health IS YOUR GREATEST WEALTH !!!!!!!!!!!!!
      About a dozen Years ago , I received a set of 5 DVDs from Dr. Fuhrman , then my next lesson was from
      the DVD = Forks Over Knives , Dr. Gregor has a website NutrtionFacts.org , use that site !!!! There are over 2,000 films !!
      I download the films and save them on an external Hard-Drive , I am still learning , I am now 83 , and take a Blood-Pressure tablet ,
      of course I am Vegan for about 11 Years !! I try to watch Films about People what they have to say who are at least 95 + !!!
      All this is free on YouTube – for free downloads get real Player !!
      Read about Dr. Gregor’s Grandmother !!!
      Maybe I can help someone , have a nice day
      Steffen Kampe

    1. What about …ceramic pots and pans…?
      —————————————————-
      I think even ceramics from China and India, produced years ago, could leach something dangerous. But even at that time properly made ceramics were considered safe. My main cooking pot is a ceramic covered iron saucepan (for use on a magnetic induction hot plate.)

      Almost all my cooking is low temp or at least a short spurt of roiling boil before going low temp.

      When needed as a second pan, I also use a well-worn stainless steel one, so old the handle is broken off. Was glad to hear that these types of stainless steel may be safe to use (at least for low temp cooking) as there are fewer dangerous metals left to leach out.

    2. Hi, Donna Scher! That topic has not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts. It may be that it has not yet been adequately put to the test, or it may simply be that Dr. Greger has not gotten to it yet. Several people have asked this question, and I have passed along the request to cover it in the future. Because we receive may requests to cover new topics, and it takes time to research them all and produce videos, it may take awhile before you see it covered here.

  10. Didn’t like the way the sound was treated in this video.

    It sounded attenuated to the point of muffling the sound to perhaps remove some part that was distracting. About half way through, there was an obvious change to the script as an over-dub. The word PFOA was dubbed in at ~ 4 minutes and was much clearer than the surrounding audio.

    It is often said that sound quality is more important than video quality. Since I scroll down below the video and just listen when it is playing, that certainly is the case for me.

  11. You can still get pyroceram (Corningware and Visions) made in France. You need a stove type that will work with these though. Otherwise, maybe “enamelled” cast iron and stainless are best.
    BUT STAINLESS HAS A PROBLEM. Affordable stainless made outside the US often has a compromised interior stainless layer. The inner stainless later is sanded through to the aluminum in the tri-ply or even impact bonded. This isn’t visible upon purchase but quickly shows when the pot has been used. If you watch a video of how tri-ply is made then you sill see why this happens. The posts have a sanding operation after the layers are bonded together. The inner layer is very this. The process can be by machine or by a very poorly treated human with sandpaper applied to a pot spinning in a machine.The result is a pot that is worse than aluminum as it has bot aluminum and steel so will have galvanic action. I have never observed this problem with US made All-Clad. Staub is probably the least risky enamelled ware but as with All-Clad, break out the pocketbook.

    1. Just buy straight up stainless steel, they last forever.

      Tri-ply is marketed as a better solution to help heat distribution. If you’re buying a cheap product for a supposedly superior cooking result then you should expect problems anyway. Just buy plain stainless steel.

      1. But where to get plain stainless. You can get cheap Indian thin stainless but I haven’t seen plain stainless anywhere outside restaurant supply and that is getting rare.

        1. Try your local department store or look around a shopping centre or best of all these days, search online. Kitchen stores online offer some great deals on good products, usually with good service too and lately some manufacturers are offering direct sales with discounts

          1. Thanks whiz. As you may have noticed, my posts are not really personal queries regarding some personal inability. I mentioned Staub, All-Clad and pyroceram which are all good options. It is always good (for everyone) to have less expensive choices. If you actually look at those options you mentioned you may find that everything is aluminum, impact bonded or multi ply. Just plain stainless is rapidly disappearing. You can still get large stock pots in plain stainless but 3 liter saucepans are all complicated by multi layers or impact bonding. Everyone has farmed out to China for impact bonded which works better with electric but I have seen impact bonded with the sanded through problem while trolling thrift shops where I have obtained a rather extensive collection of pyroceram. So my posts were to highlight what may be a serious health issue to consider …sanded through bottoms where aluminum and steel are in contact with food. And trying to share solutions that are safe rather than seeking a suggestion to look on the internet.
            But if anyone knows where to get full lines of only stainless that are high quality I would like to know as that may help provide more options for myself and others. I really think the quality and health issues with inexpensive stainless these days are not given any attention. Even All-Clad D3 is questionable in their stock pots as the aluminum layer is exposed at the rim. All-clad says don’t worry about it but their D5 line has the rim flared so no reflux from rim back to food. 235 dollars for a 3 qt puts D5 out of many people’s range. SO some affordable option that actually works would likely help the few that may have noticed the problem with many aluminum layered products.

            1. We have been using two All Clad skillets with lids for several years. Construction is thick enough that their bottoms don’t seem to warp of buckle at all, and sit on our electric burners flatter than any other pans we use. Also, that thickness makes for enough weight to help them sit flat, even if empty, which is a problem for cheaper thin constructions that only sit flat when full, and before they eventually buckle, which they always do, whether aluminum, thin stainless, or aluminum with teflon or ceramic coatings.

              My son bought the All Clads online, probably on Amazon, and probably for a competitive price, but they are indeed expensive when I’ve come across them for sale online. I also bought a large skillet in a store, with a Martha Stewart brand, that came with a warning about salty and acidic foods eroding the stainless steel. It’s a well made pan that was only about $35 new, probably from China, and with both a bottom thicker than the sides (not sandwiched that I’m aware) and a copper coating on the outside bottom and part way up the sides for better heat transfer. I haven’t used it much, not comfortable with the erosion warning I guess, but might be a good value instead of All Clad.

              We have several ceramic-coated aluminum pans that have stood up fairly well for up to 5 years. They are remarkably non-stick at first, but gradually lose that quality even with good care. I have read that using non-stick cooking spray kills their non-stickness, and that seems to match our experience with newer ceramic coatings that never see sprays. Newer ceramic coated frying pans are available with thicker aluminum or induction capable sandwiched bottoms that are unlikely to buckle. One has a textured pattern in the inside that probably was intended to improve heat transfer but mostly just leaves food like eggs stuck in the valleys after the spatula scraped off the hilltops. Not a showstopper but eggs just slide of the smooth ceramic pans, even if cooked in a dry ungreased pan. Also, a couple of saucepans with glass lids and ceramic coating on thin aluminum are holding up well and easy to clean. These and a huge 12-quart stockpot I bought of similar construction are unlikely to buckle because they are not likely to reach temperatures much above boiling point, unless used for browning food before wet cooking.

              We have heard rumors that ceramic coatings can leach cadmium or other heavy metals, but I have not been able to find reliable evidence of that.

              We got rid of a set of Corning Visions glass pans after reading that they have been known to shatter from rapid temperature changes or just spontaneously during use, though they are worry-free with regard to toxins and novel in that they are transparent from top to bottom. They are probably OK if used gently at modest temperatures, and are not scratched which might initiate cracking. A Pyrex baking pan we’ve used for decades has performed well, but the oven is fairly gentle compared to the stovetop, and it worked well in a large microwave we had for a while. It’s surprisingly non-stick or at least easy to clean, and it’s helpful to look through the bottom to make sure a cake of casserole is not scorching. It’s just not ideal frying pan or saucepan material, unfortunately.

              The imported enameled cast iron cookware is pretty in its rainbow of colors, but the only purpose of enamel on a pan that I can see is to prevent rust. I have had frying pans with enamel or some similar fused glass coating on the inside, and it was the most miserable surface from which to try to scrape fried eggs or anything not actually quite wet. I do have a thick-bottomed cast iron bean pot that is enameled inside and out except the outside bottom, and it works well for low-temp work like braising, beans, and pot roast, but stuff wants to stick as soon as I stop stirring and it’s hard to clean. Thick bottom seems to distribute heat well and with care is good for acidic food like tomato sauce which I’d rather not cook in any metal.

              We stopped cooking food in aluminum years ago, partly due to rumors that it promoted Alzheimer’s or dementia, which we have not been able to confirm. Dr. Greger doesn’t seem to condemn it too badly for toxicity, and I have read that we get it from food anyway, but it just seems too soft and soluble to use for food. I’ve seen teenagers learning to cook in aluminum pots on an open fire scrape visible metal shavings off the inside of good quality aluminum pots. It’s all restaurants seem to use for frying pans, saucepans, and stockpots, though, so we figure we get our Daily Allowance of aluminum from restaurants and take-out like the marinara sauce always on the back burner in a big aluminum pot in probably every pizza joint in the world.

    2. Hi Jack1, I’m just wondering whether there are any other brands besides All Clad you would give the green light for stainless steel cookware. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

      1. Simon,

        Unfortunately, the exposed rim is also found on my Calphalon SS set. However I did find one brand that was different…..NanoBond Stainless Steel 5-Piece Cookware Set by Hestan. The Italian-made pieces have ultra-strong titanium bonded to stainless steel, making them super durable. and yes the price is reflective of the different setup and their claim: Sealed rims are coated in stainless steel to prevent delamination.

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

      2. I’m sure there are others. I have noticed the problem with the interior of bonded and tri ply pans LESS when the pan is shallow and wide. Though I have seen inclusions that have popped out (tiny 1mm pits) in cheap Chinese pans before sale at the store. Most frying pans have a flared rim so my all-clad d3 frying pan is fine and many others may be. “Made In” brand looks interesting but I haven’t seen the product in the flesh. There is still some US made Vollrath in plain stainless but it is tapered non-induction if that appeals to you. Old Tremontina was Chinese and had issues. I don’t know about the recent Brazilian made Tremontina. I just wish the problem were generally recognized and addressed in the market by customers as it seems a low effort to fix yet a high risk problem.

    1. I have the same question as Brandon. There are so many nonstick pans. I wonder if there have been studies of them yet, since they are so new.

      1. Hi, Laurel! That topic has not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts. It may be that it has not yet been adequately put to the test, or it may simply be that Dr. Greger has not gotten to it yet. You are one of several people who have asked this question, and I have passed along the request to cover it in the future. Because we receive may requests to cover new topics, and it takes time to research them all and produce videos, it may take awhile before you see it covered here.

    2. Hi, Brandon! That topic has not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts. It may be that it has not yet been adequately put to the test, or it may simply be that Dr. Greger has not gotten to it yet. You are one of several people who have asked this question, and I have passed along the request to cover it in the future. Because we receive may requests to cover new topics, and it takes time to research them all and produce videos, it may take awhile before you see it covered here.

  12. This is a great endorsement for moving to waterpik waterflossing instead of string flossing. I moved to it years ago and based on dental checkups its doing a better job and now to hear that doing so eliminates exposure to toxins that use of string floss produces i don’t see any reason why i’d every go back to the outdated string based process to dental hygiene.

    1. Thank you for your comment !

      I did not even know that was even existing such a thing !

      I asked 2 dentists, and they told me that waterpik can not replace floss, but I will definitely try it.

      Thank you again

      1. Waterpiks are completely useless in the prevention and treatment of periodontitis (unless a potent dilute bleach solution is used as outlined in several clinical studies.) Despite throwing a lot of money into research, waterpik has zero published studies that demonstrate a clinically meaningful reduction in gingival inflammation alone and certainly not anything near the reduction seen with the use of floss or interproximal brushes. You only need to floss the teeth you want to keep. Other than interproximal brushes, there are no shortcuts around floss…certainly not a waterpik. Its great for removing food from in between your teeth, but food does not cause periodontitis. Bacterial biofilms do, and they thrive in water. Water does not wash them off, and you won’t know you have periodontitis until its too late, unless your dentist is taking and recording full mouth probing depths and signs of inflammation at least once per year. Someone looking in your mouth (dental professional or not) and simply saying “oh you look great” is not a true clinical assessment.

        1. Hello, Dr. Ben,

          Thank you for your reply.
          Very valuable information (as always) which prompted me to check waterpik more thoroughly before buying it.

          So, I have found some convincing information (at least for my mind) that support waterpik

          For example:
          – Consumers for the first time can use a powered interdental cleaner that carries the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
          The ADA Council On Scientific Affairs awarded the ADA Seal of Acceptance to five Waterpik based on its finding that they are safe and have shown efficacy for removing plaque along the gumline and between teeth and for helping to prevent and reduce gingivitis.
          To earn the Seal, Water Pik, Inc. demonstrated, through providing scientific data, clinical studies and results of laboratory tests, that it meets ADA requirements for product safety and efficacy in the ADA Seal Program’s Powered Interdental Cleaners category.
          The Water Flosser product lines that earned the Seal are the Waterpik Aquarius Professional, the Waterpik Aquarius Professional Designer Series, the Waterpik Ultra, the Waterpik Nano and the Waterpik Traveler.
          https://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2017-archive/february/waterpik-water-flosser-first-in-its-class-to-earn-ada-seal

          – Whether you use floss or another interdental cleaner is a personal preference, but it’s very important to understand the proper technique for each tool so that it is effective
          https://www.ada.org/en/press-room/news-releases/2016-archive/august/statement-from-the-american-dental-association-about-interdental-cleaners

          – To date there are a total of five clinical studies that compare the Water Flosser to string floss, consistently demonstrating that water flossing is more effective than string flossing for better oral health
          https://www.nature.com/articles/sj.bdj.2016.653

          – The Waterpik Water Flosser and manual toothbrush is significantly more effective than a manual brush and string floss in removing plaque from tooth surfaces
          https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24282867/

          – oral irrigation with water has therapeutic benefits in periodontitis
          https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10703660/

          – There are 70 published research articles that unequivocally show it is safe and effective to use
          https://www.oralhealthgroup.com/features/what-to-do-when-the-evidence-is-lacking/

          – When it comes to safety, the water flosser is supported by more than 60 clinical trials and five decades of use by the public. (8) A 2015 review of the safety profile on the water flosser found significant evidence to dispel the myth that water flossing may harm tissues
          https://www.dentistryiq.com/products/hygiene/article/16352912/skeptical-about-recommending-a-water-flosser-you-are-not-alone

          – The American Dental Association says water flossers with the ADA Seal of Acceptance can get rid of plaque
          https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-waterpik#1

          – Research shows that the water flosser does not push bacteria into the periodontal pocket; in fact, the reverse is true
          https://www.aegisdentalnetwork.com/cced/2012/04/relevance-of-the-water-flosser-50-years-of-data

          – The Waterpik® Water Flosser is clinically proven significantly more effective in numerous independent and university-based studies.
          https://www.waterpik.ca/en/oral-health/pro/clinical-research/water-flosser/
          https://www.waterpik.ca/en/oral-health/pro/clinical-research/water-flosser/plaque-removal/

          – Over 50% More Effective than String Floss for Reducing Gingivitis
          https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/pro/clinical-research/dental-floss-vs-water-flosser-reducing-gingivitis-plaque-barnes-2005/
          – Twice as Effective as String Floss for Reducing Gingival Bleeding
          https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/pro/clinical-research/dental-floss-vs-water-flossing-reduce-gingival-bleeding-rosema-2011/
          – 29% more effective than string floss for overall plaque removal
          https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/pro/clinical-research/Goyal-Waterpik-vs-String-Floss-for-Plaque-Removal-2013/

  13. What about ceramic non-stick pans that are teflon-free? Also unsafe? Also, is there any safe dental floss? The only replacement I have right now is a waterpik.

    1. Hi, Jen! Ceramic nonstick pans have not yet been covered here on NutritionFacts. It may be that it has not yet been adequately put to the test, or it may simply be that Dr. Greger has not gotten to it yet. You are one of several people who have asked this question, and I have passed along the request to cover it in the future. Because we receive may requests to cover new topics, and it takes time to research them all and produce videos, it may take awhile before you see it covered here. With regard to your question about dental floss, I would think the safest ones would be the simplest, such as those that are unwaxed, uncoated, or coated with a natural plant-based wax. I hope that helps!

  14. Story: About metals:
    I had an 80+ yr. old residential customer who had been a WWII pilot, shot down and put in a camp. That alone is an interesting story. His wife was deceased and his son lived with him. Both were named Tom and both were practicing lawyers. Jr. had MS & Sr took care of him. This alone is another interesting story. Anyway, Tom Sr. was very frugal and purchased products with lifetime guarantees. Tom went on and on about his Teflon cooking pan he had purchased years previous. It came with a lifetime guarantee and Tom would get a new Teflon pan whenever the coating wore out. I do not know how many times he had it replaced but I gather it was at least a few.
    I was there pressure washing an aluminum shake roof that had gotten really dirty. It was one of the first roofs of its type installed and Tom got a discount and a lifetime guarantee on it. I could walk on the roof and pressure wash it without damage. I thought Tom made a good buy.

      1. My mind just did some calculations and it will depend on what you cook in it and how you cook in it.

        We already have the improves iron versus increases trans fats example.

        The food is still what makes you healthier.

  15. Dr Greger should remember to go to the toilet before recording his videos so he doesn’t have to bounce up and down on his toes and wave his hands erratically in such a distracting and annoying way.

    Love the content, love Dr Greger, put off by that unwatchable and unprofessional, wriggling figure format of video. It undermines the intent of NF. Show us the research papers clearly instead please.

    1. Just guessing but I suspect the DRs handlers (agent?) are behind the always-on-camera style. Maybe they are catering to a younger audience. Or possibly they’ve done some focus groups and learned they get more donations when presented in this style.

      But I’ll bet if they tested for comprehension and retention of this style vs the old style, the old style would win… if that be the goal. ‘-)

    2. Whizz,

      Please don’t put him down.

      Dr. Greger’s focus is on saving lives.

      He has heard the feedback and he will adjust.

      You don’t need to humiliate people to have them hear you.

      In fact, sometimes when you speak softly, your words carry a bigger stick because people who aren’t hurt don’t get offended and they tend to be more open to feedback.

    3. Yeah, it would be nice to be able to read the whole front page of the research papers shown, not just the highlighted paragraph and whatever isn’t behind the good doctor’s body parts. The angel is in the details.

      1. Dr. G always cites his references under the tab “Sources Cited” right below the video, so that you can look up the entire publication and read it yourself.

  16. I would have liked to hear your comments about pure ceramic and/or glass cookware.
    examples:
    Princess House Nouveau series
    Amber Visions Corning Glass Pyrex Cookware
    Xtrema 5-piece Versa 100% ceramic starter cookware set

    1. Nothing,

      I like that question because I have stored things in stainless and that is where I wondered if it eventually leaches, but the fact that it stops leaching while cooking, it probably isn’t an issue.

    2. When I worked at a chinese restaurant, all their prepped food was kept in stainless.
      The owner grew his own bean sprouts in stainless. He kept them in the basement. In the dark. Watered them every day.
      (in other words, the stainless pans he grew in, never got heated up)
      oh, and beer and wine are typically cooked, brewed, and stored in stainless. Are we all getting poisoned down at the local watering hole?
      I imagine a lot of restaurants do the same.
      Many if not all surfaces in a restaurant kitchen are stainless. This may be by law.

      I think there is a lot to be said about the “quality” of the stainless that is used.

      Oh, and what about copper? A lot of very expensive cookware use copper. Is it safe???
      Especially when the copper has been around for a while and develops that petina which so may love to see.

    3. I would avoid storing in any metal after cooking, but if I must, only in stainless or ceramic coated. It’s hard to beat glass for long-term storage. Ceramic seems good too, but only if certified to be free of lead and other heavy metals, which are an issue with older and even relatively recent ceramic especially if imported from large developing or less-than-scrupulous countries. Some plastics seem safe for cold storage and others that are identical are not, so we’re replacing our tupperware-like stuff with glass, which usually comes with plastic lids but I just use larger jars with screw-on lids.

    4. Some manufactures of stainless cookware say that you should not store food in the cookware.

      IKEA for example
      “It is designed exclusively for cooking,
      not for storing food. Food that is stored
      in the cookware for a longer period may
      affect the surface and take on the taste
      of metal.”

  17. I watched video on cast iron vs. stainless steel cooking and didn’t see anything on ceramic cookware (which I believe is superior to all of the above). Does Dr. Greger have any material on ceramic cookware ?

  18. I notice you often give a detailed discussion but the takeaways aren’t always clear. It would be helpful if you could provide a summary or conclusion at the end of every video and post, so people can take action and benefit.

  19. We are almost to the webinar

    Tonight, I was looking at Peru and I think the fact that so many essential workers are getting hard hit…. I guess I feel like the class disparities are so big and that is what the mathematical statistical analysts Leaves out. We do the deaths as if the people would have died anyway. The poor people are the ones who couldn’t shut down.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/05/25/americas/peru-covid-hotspot-why-intl/index.html

    1. There is more likelihood of A blood type to have difficulty with the virus. The indigenous people of the Americas were almost entirely type A which results in a larger proportion of A blood type in much of South America.

  20. Someone on another site challenged me on a comment about hand washing and poor people often don’t have running water or soap. They often don’t have refrigerators or stoves.

    People who make enough money to buy appliances don’t always understand that there is a large segment of society that doesn’t have money for a plumber or an appliance.

    I know so many people who have had their water turned off.

    1. The fact that Peru locked down but ended up with more cases just from people not having refrigerators and from having essential workers, things like that don’t show up in the equations of the people analyzing this virus yet.

  21. Hmmm, so hard to avoid teflon in pressure cookers (which we do our beans in) and bread makers for our daily loaf. Not sure what we can do and how toxic that is….

  22. Dr. Greger – I am thoroughly transfixed by the information presented in your videos, but to be brutally honest, I enjoyed them more in the early stages, when you were not personally involved in the videos. You are so overly animated that it distracts me from the actual information, and your presence takes up so much of the space that could be used to show the printed words. I apologize that I feel that I have to say that to you, since I truly look forward to the weekly information you send out. I am constantly telling people about your videos/blogs and get many thanks from many who I tell. I myself bought and read your book, and because of it, plus the many videos, you have completely changed my dietary habits. I would not mind if you appeared occasionally, but not all the time. You seem to even talk in a more moderate tone when you are not in front of the camera, which seems to trigger your excitement about presenting the information. Love it. Hate it.

    1. I agree. I actually scan another page, while listening to the presentation. I can focus more on what is being said when I am not looking at all of the arm waving.

  23. Which cookware is best
    Is Teflon safe
    Dr., should I use Crest
    Should I pick my teeth with a rake
    Is there Teflon in my floss
    Does Teflon lose its coating
    All this is really making me cross
    I’m so concerned about bloating
    What about Dutch oven glass
    What about stainless
    Does this stuff come out my ass
    Will it be painless

      1. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/benefits-of-flax-seeds-for-inflammation/

        Lonie,
        Flax may help. Lots of sleep helps me. Semi-retirement does wonders.

        Off The Beaten Path
        I’ve found a way to just simply live
        I stare at the lake
        And make sure it doesn’t go anywhere
        I can wake up with nothing to do
        And be halfway done by evening
        I’ve appointed myself
        High Commissioner In Charge
        Of Sparkles On The Water
        I have a dog named Little Bit
        We walk
        There is comfort

        1. Semi-retirement sounds wonderful.

          I don’t think I will ever see it but I hear it is nice to have a life of leisure now and then.

          Even more amazing if it can happen in a house on a lake.

          1. Deb,
            Retirement is something that can sneak up on you whether one is ready for it or not. I’ve worked commercially for almost 50 years and still have some houses to paint in my future. It’s time to back off some though. I have a few things lined up that allow me to do that. My health is still on my side. I optimize my nutrition and exercise. If I get another good ten years, well then, I will go from there. If I have a fatal heart attack today, life has been good for me. I don’t expect a lot, I stay out of debt, I live frugally, I realize I have been fortunate and I am grateful.

            1. There seems to be a growing consensus that simply feeling grateful in life extends longevity and quality of living as much or more than anything else. It might even make poor health more manageable.

  24. Hello Dr. Greger, And your researchers, When you test non-stick cookware, try a few Swiss Diamond. I used them on propane and induction stove top and they are my best go to pans and pots. They clean up very easy. The company stands behind their products. Thank you very much for your research you do. Mike

  25. Yikes! I’ve been using a carcinogenic dental floss for years. I have an opened double package and I’m on my way to exchange it now.

  26. Hello,
    I am wondering what it means when it says: Cromargan 18/10 roestvrij staal (translated:
    Cromargan 18/10 stainless steel). And more imported if it is a save choice?
    I would like to hear from u!
    Kind regards,
    Jip

  27. This is a tough question. There are many different formulations of steel and stainless steel, and different countries have different names for the same alloys. There has been testing on many of them, but it can be very challenging to figure out so I don’t have an answer for you. Your best strategy would be to call the company that makes it and ask them what information they have on the safety of their product.

  28. Thank you for a great video!
    I have a question: is anodized aluminum pans safer than purely aluminum pans?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

  29. The cost externalities of corporations again appear higher than the profit gained. Ignoring the true costs of production is going to implode the current economic system. It’s inevitable.

  30. I was looking at buying a Zojirushi water boiler/warmer, but most of them have a non-stick interior. I would love the community to take a look at this email I received from Zojirushi when I asked about what material the non-stick coating is made from. They are very confident that it is safe and non-toxic.

    Hello,
    Thank you for contacting Zojirushi America. All of our water boiler liners are made of stainless steel with nonstick coating made of PTFE.It is a fluoropolymer, a material commonly used for nonstick coating in cookware for conventional kitchen use.  As long as the product is used under normal circumstances, it should not pose any problems for the consumer. PTFE, a fluoropolymer, has been the subject of extensive laboratory testing to examine its safety and durability. The results of this testing has been reviewed by such regulatory agencies as the FDA which has concluded that fluoropolymer non-stick coatings for cookware are safe for conventional kitchen use. Even in the unlikely event that a person accidentally ingested a flake of non-stick coating, the coating is non-toxic and would pass through the body without being absorbed. Due to the inert characteristics of the coating, studies indicate that there would be no health effects from the incidental ingestion of flakes of non-stick coating. Despite this extensive laboratory testing which has led regulatory agencies to conclude that our non-stick coating is safe, it is still important to use our non-stick coated products responsibly. If the product ever does exceed the recommended temperature the product will pose more immediate dangers than just having the non-stick coating deteriorate. We do not recommend using a temperature for our non-stick products that exceeds 500F. Since this temperature would exceed the recommended temperature of normal pan frying or roasting, this temperature would most probably never be reached with any of our products. Only if the non-stick cookware is accidentally heated above 660F, far above what water boiling preparation calls for, would the non-stick coating begin to deteriorate. But far before the temperature reaches this point, there would be more immediate dangers to deal with such as extensive smoke and burning. All materials used in our products have been deemed safe by the FDA. As we mentioned earlier, no toxicological risks have been found in the materials of our products. If you are concerned about PFOA, which is the ingredient in PTFE. It’s used to glue the nonstick coating to the cooking surface.  Everything is heated to a really high temperature to make the glue work, and at that point, PFOA burns off.  Because this nonstick coating comes into contact with food or beverage, we carefully screen and select all materials we use.  The nonstick coating used on our products may be safely used as components in food equipment and are safely designed to come into contact with food, in compliance with FDA regulation 21 CFR 177.1550 (perfluorocarbon resins). As a basic rule, the nonstick coating to be used on a product is tested before a new model is designed and manufactured.   When products are manufactured, either at our own factories or other overseas factories, our quality control personnel are there to inspect the process, and ensure that the appropriate materials and parts are used.  There are so many products out there with and without the nonstick coating. The rest is up to consumers. If purchasing a water boiler without the non-stick coating is an option you would like to consider, the following model is currently the only one: https://www.zojirushi.com/app/product/cdwhc
    Best Regards,
    *********
    Zojirushi America Corp.
    http://www.zojirushi.com

  31. Desiree,

    It appears that the only two approaches that would make the grade of “safest” are cast iron and glass.

    Not the stainless steel, until after multiple uses :( and aluminum is somewhat exposed on the edges of most firms’ offerings. I did find one brand that was different…..NanoBond Stainless Steel 5-Piece Cookware Set by Hestan. The Italian-made pieces have ultra-strong titanium bonded to stainless steel, making them super durable. And yes the price is reflective of the different setup and their claim: Sealed rims are coated in stainless steel to prevent delamination.

    Take a moment to look at this site for further info on what was actually tested and the results: https://naturalbabymama.com/leach-testing-cookware-heavy-metals/

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

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