Are Aluminum Pots, Bottles, and Foil Safe?

Are Aluminum Pots, Bottles, and Foil Safe?
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DNA damage is assessed in users of aluminum cookware.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Over the last decades, the toxicity of aluminum for humans has been heavily discussed and is still not completely clarified.” Those occupationally exposed to aluminum in, like, smelter plants suffer from oxidative stress (free radicals) that can damage their DNA. But what about just using aluminum cookware? Articles like this, suggesting an “unrecognized public health risk,” were limited to the developing world, where “cookware is made in informal shops by casting liquid aluminum melted from a collection of scrap metal,” including the likes of lead batteries, which is how you can get so much lead leaching into people’s food.

But then this study was published, suggesting the aluminum itself may be harmful. Most of our aluminum exposure comes from processed junk that contains aluminum-containing food additives, including those within some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen dough, and pancake mixes. But approximately 20 percent of the daily intake of aluminum may come from aluminum cooking utensils, such as pans, pots, kettles, and trays. To see if this may be causing a problem, they took blood from consumers who used aluminum cookware versus those who did not, and found that not only were the aluminum users walking around with twice the level of aluminum in their blood, but they had more free radical damage of their body fats and proteins. And the total antioxidant capacity of their bloodstream was compromised; so, no surprise, they suffered significantly more DNA damage. And indeed, those with the highest levels of aluminum in their blood tended to suffer significantly more damage to their DNA. No surprise, since aluminum is considered to be a pro-oxidant agent.

These folks weren’t just casually using aluminum pots, though, but specifically using them daily to cook and store acidic foods, like yogurt and tomato sauce, which can leach out more aluminum. But even just a week using like camping dishes, which tend to be aluminum since it’s so light, if you were incorporating something acidic, like marinating a fresh catch in lemon juice, could greatly exceed the tolerable weekly intake guidelines, especially for children. Once in a while is not going to make much of a difference, but this suggests that you may not want to be cooking in aluminum day-in and day-out.

What about aluminum drinking bottles? They’re nice and light, but children drinking two cups of tea, or juice, a day from them could exceed the tolerable aluminum exposure limit. So, out of an abundance of caution, safety authorities, like the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, “recommend that consumers avoid the use of aluminum pots or dishes for acidic or salted foodstuffs such as apple sauce, rhubarb, tomato puree, or salt herring” to avoid any “unnecessary ingestion” of aluminum.

What about aluminum foil? “It’s a common culinary practice to wrap food in aluminum foil and bake it.” The concern is that this could potentially present “a hazardous source of aluminum in the human diet.” When put to the test, yes, there was leakage from the foil to the food, but the amount was so small that it would be more of an issue for small children, or those suffering from diminished kidney function.

What about just wrapping a food in foil to store it in the fridge? Only marginal increases in aluminum are seen— unless the food is in contact with both the foil and, at the same time, certain other types of metal, for example stainless steel, which is largely iron. And so that sets up a battery, and can lead to tremendous food aluminum concentrations. For example, here are the aluminum levels in a ham before and after a day covered in foil. But take that same ham and that same day of foil on top of a steel tray or serving plate, and the aluminum levels in the ham shoot up.

And finally, you know how there’s sometimes a glossy side of aluminum foil and then a dull side? Which would be worse? Fish fillets were baked and grilled both ways, wrapped in the glossy side versus wrapped in the dull side and…no significant difference was found.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Over the last decades, the toxicity of aluminum for humans has been heavily discussed and is still not completely clarified.” Those occupationally exposed to aluminum in, like, smelter plants suffer from oxidative stress (free radicals) that can damage their DNA. But what about just using aluminum cookware? Articles like this, suggesting an “unrecognized public health risk,” were limited to the developing world, where “cookware is made in informal shops by casting liquid aluminum melted from a collection of scrap metal,” including the likes of lead batteries, which is how you can get so much lead leaching into people’s food.

But then this study was published, suggesting the aluminum itself may be harmful. Most of our aluminum exposure comes from processed junk that contains aluminum-containing food additives, including those within some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen dough, and pancake mixes. But approximately 20 percent of the daily intake of aluminum may come from aluminum cooking utensils, such as pans, pots, kettles, and trays. To see if this may be causing a problem, they took blood from consumers who used aluminum cookware versus those who did not, and found that not only were the aluminum users walking around with twice the level of aluminum in their blood, but they had more free radical damage of their body fats and proteins. And the total antioxidant capacity of their bloodstream was compromised; so, no surprise, they suffered significantly more DNA damage. And indeed, those with the highest levels of aluminum in their blood tended to suffer significantly more damage to their DNA. No surprise, since aluminum is considered to be a pro-oxidant agent.

These folks weren’t just casually using aluminum pots, though, but specifically using them daily to cook and store acidic foods, like yogurt and tomato sauce, which can leach out more aluminum. But even just a week using like camping dishes, which tend to be aluminum since it’s so light, if you were incorporating something acidic, like marinating a fresh catch in lemon juice, could greatly exceed the tolerable weekly intake guidelines, especially for children. Once in a while is not going to make much of a difference, but this suggests that you may not want to be cooking in aluminum day-in and day-out.

What about aluminum drinking bottles? They’re nice and light, but children drinking two cups of tea, or juice, a day from them could exceed the tolerable aluminum exposure limit. So, out of an abundance of caution, safety authorities, like the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, “recommend that consumers avoid the use of aluminum pots or dishes for acidic or salted foodstuffs such as apple sauce, rhubarb, tomato puree, or salt herring” to avoid any “unnecessary ingestion” of aluminum.

What about aluminum foil? “It’s a common culinary practice to wrap food in aluminum foil and bake it.” The concern is that this could potentially present “a hazardous source of aluminum in the human diet.” When put to the test, yes, there was leakage from the foil to the food, but the amount was so small that it would be more of an issue for small children, or those suffering from diminished kidney function.

What about just wrapping a food in foil to store it in the fridge? Only marginal increases in aluminum are seen— unless the food is in contact with both the foil and, at the same time, certain other types of metal, for example stainless steel, which is largely iron. And so that sets up a battery, and can lead to tremendous food aluminum concentrations. For example, here are the aluminum levels in a ham before and after a day covered in foil. But take that same ham and that same day of foil on top of a steel tray or serving plate, and the aluminum levels in the ham shoot up.

And finally, you know how there’s sometimes a glossy side of aluminum foil and then a dull side? Which would be worse? Fish fillets were baked and grilled both ways, wrapped in the glossy side versus wrapped in the dull side and…no significant difference was found.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the first in a series of three videos on cookware. Stay tuned for Stainless Steel or Cast Iron: Which Cookware Is Best? Is Teflon Safe? and Are Melamine Dishes and Polyamide Plastic Utensils Safe?

I’ve previously discussed aluminum…

In antiperspirants: Antiperspirants & Breast Cancer

In food: How to Avoid Phosphate Additives

In medications: Are Acid-Blocking Drugs Safe?

And in tea: Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

131 responses to “Are Aluminum Pots, Bottles, and Foil Safe?

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    1. Spell Check: cannibalism

      Aluminum: After watching this video, I am not concerned for myself. I use a large, aluminum stock pot to cook my beans and veggies weekly. I cook on low heat and store the food in plastic containers.
      As Dr. Greger mentioned there is aluminum in processed food products. I eat WFPB where this is not as much of a problem. So, dare I say it, “you can’t foil me.”

      1. Dan, you can get stainless steel stock pots on sale at large hardware/home stores for around $50 or less. Don’t buy one too large just because it’s on sale either!

        Every time I can avoid a bit of aluminum, it’s a plus, so I use silpat mat to bake on, and store cooked food in glass containers with plastic lids.

          1. I also make sure I get enough Boron. In botany classes I learned that boron is added to the soil to prevent Aluminum toxicity to plants.
            Looking at the periodic table you can see Boron is in the same group as Aluminum. I looked to see if there are any studies done in people seeing if sufficient Boron will block Aluminum adsorption in people also. Couldn’t find any.

            There are areas in the world where Boron content in soil is low. In those places arthritis is common. Where Boron is plentiful, arthritis is rarer. Just another reason to make sure to get Boron.

            1. Marilyn,

              That is fascinating.

              Aluminum is a big one for me.

              The fact that it was silica water that got rid of my hallucinations and night terrors and other brain symptoms, I take the avoid aluminum advice pretty seriously.

              But what I do know is that I still had a metal drinking cup, until Christmas, and I don’t know what it is made of. The tea study just shot me between the eyes. I never liked cleaning the metal anyway. I ended up getting Starbucks ceramic mug. The mugs fit into my car cup holder nicely. It has silicone on the bottom and a cover just like a take-out cover. My favorite travel mug ever. My favorite mug, period. Being able to cover a mug while walking down the stairs makes my floors at work so happy.

            2. Yes, yes, and yes. I switched out my wife’s aluminum cookie sheets and pots for steel. We bought and made those beeswax cloth wraps for food. I almost jump back when I see people cooking food in the microwave with plastic.

              We have low boron soils, and I eat a ton of food from my garden. I did a test, added boron, and I got some trees to flower and fruit that didn’t before. I “used to have arthritis’. I guess I don’t anymore.

              I have been following Dr. Greger for years. This is the exact kind of video I love the most. Thanks Dr. Greger.

        1. HI there! So are we saying stainless steel is the best cookware? I cook daily and have found cast iron pans to be a pain to clean and maintain and mostly use stainless steel. So am I good?

          1. Hanni,

            Probably.

            Unless you have a nickel allergy.

            But there can be an inner layer of aluminum and pots and pans can get beat up in the dishwasher and end up exposing the inner layers.

            I have had that happen.

          2. Many doctors have said that ceramic is even better than steel. May be more expensive though. Either is a huge step up from aluminum.

        2. Barb,
          Thanks. I’ve stared at the $50 stainless pots at Walmart a few times. Maybe next time.

          I asked about masks there yesterday and they had none. About half of the people there were wearing masks, including myself. My masks are really old and cheap. I stopped at Walgreens and stood inside the door looking at an empty store until I saw what looked like the manager on a ladder stocking a shelf. She may have been mid 60’s and was wearing a mask and looked exhausted. I asked her if she thought there was anything to wearing a mask and if she thought customers should be wearing masks. She looked concerned and said yes. They had masks to sell. I got a box of 50 for around $25 after a $5 senior discount.

            1. RB,
              Masks are good. I’m starting to hear that cleaning all surfaces is not necessary. I suspected early on that amount of cleaning was not necessary and detrimental to stress levels.

      1. Jazz bass,

        Are you using those authentic gut bass strings on the bass viol with analog tube amplification for a nutritionally
        stomach churning stand the test of time sound?

  1. I’m sure for those on the SAD, there is more risk in what is being cooked in the pot than the pot itself! That said, why take any risk when there are other choices like cast iron and stainless steel?

    1. Cast iron is a poor choice particularly if you’re a man or a post menopausal woman. The extra iron that leaches from the pot makes us more vulnerable to cancer and heart disease. We get enough iron from food.

      1. Linda, the only vegans I’ve found that test high for iron are those with hemochromatosis. Have had some post-menopausal women with extremely low ferritin levels.
        I do recommend getting that test done, at least once, to see where you are.
        Neither too high nor too low iron is good.
        Right now we are finding that people with high ferritin levels, even children, have worse outcomes with Covid.
        But, too low, no energy, hair starts falling out, etc.

      2. Linda, I am going to re-purchase a cast iron pan since I regularly test anemic . (yes I am post menopausal). I would prefer using the pan regularly to taking iron supplements that are prescribed. I eat the daily dozen, so we don’t always get enough nutrients from what we eat.

        1. Barb, I am a male that uses cast iron that eats WFPB. Still needed an iron supplement. Avoid the ferrous sulfate as it tears up most peoples stomachs. I take the ‘Raw Iron’ product from Garden of Life. It is a whole food iron that does not mess with my stomach. Worked well in the followup lab tests.

            1. I was anemic years ago when I was omnivorous and premenopausal. By adding lots of beans and tomatoes (the vitamin c helps w iron absorption ) my iron levels returned to normal. I don’t understand how someone can be anemic if eating over a cup a day of beans, unless they’re B 12 deficient or eating tons of oxalates.

  2. I really think a video like this needs to contextualize the hazard of aluminum in cookware. I get how the first study shows greater DNA damage (however they quantified it) in folks who used a lot of aluminum in food preparation, but how significant is that? I realize there may not be long-term studies, but what’s the level of aluminum in the blood for those who use aluminum pots for cooking compared to the level in workers who smelt or mine aluminum? Dr. Greger is always presenting these interesting studies, but without the right context, people end up spending a lot of money to follow his recommendations, whether it be buying new cookware from this video or avoiding rice (which tends to be cheap) in favor of other grains from the arsenic/rice series.

    I was surprised that beverage cans lead to increased exposure since it’s my understanding that there’s a plastic lining in every can.

    1. I was wondering about beverage cans. Should there be any concern regarding the aluminum or the lining of the can? I ask because I am a sparkling water fiend, and I usually purchase it in aluminum cans.

  3. What about anodized aluminum cookware? “Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts.”

      1. According to another doctor on the internet:
        Anodized aluminum is sealed so that the metal cannot leach into food or react with acidic foods. Unlike ordinary, lightweight aluminum pots and pans, which are highly reactive with acidic foods (like tomatoes), anodized aluminum cookware is safe.

    1. But is TEFAL just branding for Teflon coated aluminium, or the coating still contains aluminium?

      I have been putting off getting a frypan as the only ones in my price range are all aluminium, with and without various coatings. Yet to do more research on the coatings too as there have been red flags about Teflon and also the “stone” coating stuff as far as I recall.

      1. you will find cast iron and ss cookware at resale shops and thrift stores at good prices. No reason to buy them new; they lose their shine very quickly. I find second or third hand works just as well and often better.

      2. madeincookware.com has some decent deals on blue carbon steel frying pans that patina and get nonstick better than cast iron. $89 bucks for the 12″.

    1. LGalina,

      I believe it.

      I did the 12 weeks of Fiji Water to get the aluminum out of my brain process and it stopped my hallucinations and night terrors.

      Best brain hack ever.

    1. I have the same question because the water bottle I carry with me is aluminum.

      I eliminated the aluminum pots from kitchen use and replaced them with stainless steel. Food storage containers are Pyrex glass bowls with plastic lids or plastic containers by Rubbermaid that claims they are BPA free. I no longer use Tupperware since I learned it contains BPA. I have some of these items that I haven’t thrown into the garbage or recycled, because I don’t want to pass on the danger to others.

      Am I the only one who feels that Dr. Greger is get a bit carried away with his delivery on videos? Check the old ones where he talked and didn’t bounce up and down.

      1. Janis,

        Your water bottle could be “acceptable” but not ideal. Typical water will have a limited pH range and remain neutral, which means little or no leaching of the aluminum…..assuming the temperature is stable and not elevated. If your adding juices or other products that would make the pH either side of neutral and would increase aluminum concentration into the liquid. For those of you wanting to really explore the chemistry issues in real life with aluminum, see this article: http://www.electrochemsci.org/papers/vol6/6126424.pdf

        Best option ditch the aluminum into the recycle center and consider either glass or a stainless container.

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

        1. Thanks for the helpful information. I decided to check the water bottle online. It’s actually stainless steel, not aluminum as I had thought. Whew! That’s a relief.

  4. Those who have been paying attention have known for more than 3 decades that aluminum is a really poor choice for cooking.
    Many foods are acidic liberating aluminum into food, heating speeds all reactions in chemisty.

    Some realize that the addition of aluminum adjuvants to vaccines is taking stupidity to a whole new level.
    Still they are touted as safe and effective and now mandatory in many states.

    I suppose there is use in rehashing this, though there is little if anything new…

    1. That is interesting to me.

      When did they start adding aluminum to the vaccines?

      Also, I am immediately wondering how much of an effect it has.

      Though, since I haven’t had a vaccination in many decades, if I do get a COVID-19 one, I will be drinking down some Fiji Water for the next several weeks.

        1. BULL, the jury on vaccines has NEVER been out. The antivax Darwin award contenders are pulling the same argument the anti climate people try to use, that there is not a scientific concensous when there has been from all of the CREDIBLE sources for over 90 years!

          An adjuvant is an ingredient used in some vaccines that helps create a stronger immune response in people receiving the vaccine. In other words, adjuvants help vaccines work better. Some vaccines that are made from weakened or killed germs contain naturally occurring adjuvants and help the body produce a strong protective immune response. However, most vaccines developed today include just small components of germs, such as their proteins, rather than the entire virus or bacteria.

          Aluminum salts, such as aluminum hydroxide, aluminum phosphate, and aluminum potassium sulfate have been used safely in vaccines for more than 70 years. Aluminum salts were initially used in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s with diphtheria and tetanus vaccines after it was found they strengthened the body’s immune response to these vaccines.

          Newer adjuvants have been developed to target specific components of the body’s immune response, so that protection against disease is stronger and lasts longer. Many do not contain any aluminum.

          In all cases, vaccines containing adjuvants are tested for safety and effectiveness in clinical trials before they are licensed for use in the United States, and they are continuously monitored by CDC and FDA once they are approved.

          Lastly, why is it the conspiracists always try to call themselves a ‘doctor’ on internet medical discussion boards when clearly they are not? No physician calls themselves a doctor or physician on internet comment boards as strangers approaching for free health care is not how actual physicians want to waste time and risk their livelihood. And the way this website is not moderated, I have no doubt there are people posting comments under one name then responding to themselves under other profiles to try to imply their whack-a-doodle conspiracy theories are viable discussion.

          1. Well Reality Bites… I am a registered nurse working in endocrinology with a board certified endocrinologist and board certified lifestyle medicine physician…. 20 years ago I did oncology nursing and I have also worked with pharmaceutical companies. My husband passed in October of 2018, he was an orthopaedic surgeon… At one point we ate the Standard American Diet like most and developed lot of health issues like high blood pressure and high cholesterol… I also was diagnosed with Lupus in the mid 90s… Our middle child had severe asthma, allergies and was diagnosed with failure to thrive by age 7… we changed our lives after adopting a plant based lifestyle… I am now Lupus free, normal BP, normal lipids and my child’s asthma was under control under 4 months on a plant based diet… do you know how many people thought this was crazy???? So we have an autistic niece and decided to delay our last child’s vaccines… my middle child had all the regular vaccines, his healthy slowly took a nose dive… as we pulled studies on vaccines we were surprised to learn that vaccines are NOT regulated like other medication… when mercury was removed from vaccines it was replaced with aluminum, and it is a neurotoxin… I am pro vaccine… as all three of my children are fully vaccinated.. but now I am pro SAFE vaccine. It is obvious that you have not done your research… if you had, you would know that not one childhood vaccine has been studied using a placebo control using saline… you mention the CDC… seriously!!! The CDC is suppose to oversee our safety but is also suppose to push vaccines, it’s a conflict of interest… FDA, how about the amount of glyphosate on our food??? Anytime there is money to be made you should try to uncover the truth… and there is a lot of money to be made with vaccines… My husband and I couldn’t even believe we followed this blindly for as long as we had… why did we give our children Hep B anyway? I don’t have it, my husband didn’t have it… my newborn wouldn’t be a drug user or sexually active at birth… but we did, without question… shame on us and shame on anyone who blindly believes the FDA and CDC protects from harm…. If they were so great Dr. Greger wouldn’t have a job doing what he does… So please Reality Bites please send me just one safety study that uses a double blind placebo controlled randomized trail (saline placebo), just one.

            1. 1jshapiro and Reality Bites, most people don’t understand the vaccine issue. They class anyone who criticizes a ‘conspiracy theorist’.
              When all most people want is to have truly safe and effective vaccines. They should always be tested by third parties for contaminants.
              I am surprised that people still trust the drug companies implicitly. Time after time they have been shown to be willing to put a drug with serious side-effects on the market. Upper management carefully calculates whether after the lawsuits they will still have made money.
              But say that vaccines should be made safer and some people go ballistic. Don’t know why this can’t be a rational discussion.

  5. I’m interested to know about beverages in aluminium cans. Coca-Cola or beer for example. Is there any research for this?

    1. The cans are lined with PBA, the chemical that was removed from baby bottles, and yes, I called Coke and asked them.

  6. I recently read in an old health book at my Grandmas house that you should never store any vitamin C or cook with it in aluminium as it destroys its goodness along with phytonutrients (the book called these Vitamin P). I then tried to research if this was the link between brain disorders like Alzheimer’s so it wasn’t for example the the aluminium caused the conditions but that it was the fact that it took the nutrients away from people) I couldn’t find any recent studies though looking at this which I was very surprised about. It has been common knowledge in north of England/UK that you shouldn’t cook with any aluminium as it creates brain disorders. When I moved South I had to check all my in-laws pots and pans as they didn’t know this.

    1. There is a recent book out by a doctor couple called “The Alzheimer’s Solution” that calls the standard western diet the primary cause of the disease. Dr. Dean Ornish is currently conducting clinical trails to reverse Alzheimer’s through dietary intervention with a WFPB diet.

    1. I bake my sweet potatoes on a cookie sheet (if I want them dryish) or in a covered glass casserole (nice and moist. No need for foil.

    2. Yes Johnathan, there is a better way.
      You can use the foil, but first, wrap your potato in unbleached natural brown baking paper.
      These often can be reused 1-2 times, as well as reusing the foil.

  7. 2 things.

    Ive heard toothpaste has aluminum. Any truth to that?

    And secondly, I’m a huge consumer of coffee (I know but I also drink lost of green tea!) and my maker of choice is the european version Moka Pot (Bialetti). Its a “pressure” style coffee maker and it reminded me that most pressure cookers are aluminum too, I presume.

    So, here’s the second question: Is pressure a factor in increased aluminum leaching into foods/beverages?

    1. jazzBass,

      Yes, standard brands of toothpaste often have aluminum in them. There are aluminum-free brands of toothpaste.

      I saw studies that said that temperature cooking and cooking time and things like salting foods does affect it, but I didn’t see one with pressure.

      I found one on turmeric that is interesting to me looks like if you have turmeric with your food, maybe that is better?

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19616038/

      I already know that I can’t risk it and that I cooked with a lot of acids. Tomato products and Lemon would be two things I use often.

      I used to also salt things, but I still use Miso and that is salty. I wonder if the soy protects against aluminum, too.

    2. jazzBand,

      When I researched moka pots, I discovered that stainless steel ones are available. But I didn’t buy one; I bought an AeroPress instead. It’s cheaper and much more versatile, and I bought it originally to make fresh brewed ice coffee during the summer. Plus, it uses a paper filter, so the coffee should have fewer of the chemicals that increase cholesterol levels. And it makes a reportedly lower acidity coffee; I find that I don’t get heartburn from the coffee.

      I don’t think most pressure cookers are aluminum; the ones I’m familiar with are made of stainless steel. I use an electric pressure cooker (mine is an Instant Pot), and the interior pan — where the food is cooked — is food grade stainless steel. There are different types of food grade stainless steel, and this one was a fairly good quality one, as I recall.

      Finally, I’m not sure if pressure is a factor in aluminum leaching into food or liquids, but pH (acidity) is. Increased temperature probably also increases the leaching.

      1. I’m familiar with all the other ways to make coffee, thanks. Still wondering if pressure is part of the equation, and at this point, also if coffee is as acidic as tomatoes, AND if the short time in the Moka Pot reduces my aluminum exposure?

  8. I’m glad to see this video on aluminum. I recently messaged Nutrition Facts wondering if they were going to look into aluminum in vaccines. Safety limit for an adult is 5mcg per/kg, but Hep B and HPV contain 225mcg per shot. I was really hoping Dr. Greger would look into the vaccine safety studies. It appears that vaccines are not under the same regulations like other medicine. To date not one childhood vaccine has a study with a saline placebo controlled trial to assess safety. Some of the vaccines have polysorbate-80 which binds to aluminum and allows for passage through the blood brain barrier. The number of children with autism, not to mention other developmental delays is rapidly increasing. Marie from Nutrition Facts state Dr. Greger has not done a review of vaccination studies. I hope Dr. Greger takes a look into safety studies of vaccines before additional reviews of mammograms or dental x-rays.

  9. There was a study done on the brains of alzheimer patients, all had high levels of aluminum. Therefore, I stopped using aluminum cookware and foil, stainless steel and cast iron only. Teflon is a known carcinogen so I stopped using those coated pans years ago. I have had my stainless steel pans since 1965, so they were a very good Investment. One cast iron pan was old when I found it and I’ve had it about 50 years now.

  10. It was unfortunate when Dr. Greger talked about aluminum drinking bottles. The report in the background stated “unlined” but Dr. Greger did not specify that. Unless one was reading the report rather than watching and listening to Dr. Greger, they would have understood that it was all aluminum drinking bottles being discussed.

  11. I know that Dr Greger recommends stainless steel but I’m confused about this. Because I can’t find a single stainless steel set that doesn’t feature aluminum at some part (inside the core for example).

    Can someone from NutritionFacts please tell me if these are still safe to use? And if so, why? Is it because if the fact that it’s not pure aluminum?

  12. There are a lot of drinks sold in aluminum cans like beer, soda, tea, etc. What is the risk in drinking from aluminum cans?

  13. I am wondering about the micrograms of AL in some vaccines now, cumulatively, and in combination. Did you find any safety studies of those adjuvants?

  14. Are we almost to the pandemic webinar?

    I have been trying to follow the math of whether the lockdown was useless.

    I think they added in all of the deaths prevented because of the lockdown and then they compared to the worst flu season and didn’t account for the fact that when they adjust the flu season numbers at the end of the flu season, they add on so many cases. With COVID-19, they weren’t allowing people to even come to the hospital unless they were on death’s door and didn’t count the people dying at home, plus, didn’t test people. Plus, someone said they don’t count ones unless the doctors name them properly, so COVID-19 would count, but if they called Coronavirus, it wouldn’t count yet.

    The Stanford guy said that Israel has a negative number of extra deaths. Obviously, they wouldn’t have had a negative number of deaths if society hadn’t locked down, but there would be those deaths, plus extra COVID-19 deaths if they hadn’t locked down.

    Instead, they are just saying that there isn’t much difference.

    I want him to add in the societal normal deaths, and then add COVID-19 deaths onto those numbers.

    He also blamed a mild flu season and the CDC said that we were near record flu season, so I just haven’t gained trust for his process yet.

    1. It just seems that using the negative deaths caused by lockdown to prove that there was no benefit to the lockdown seems disingenuous somehow.

      But it might be that I don’t understand the statistical process.

      1. It just bothers me that the man, who I will acknowledge as a man with distinction, didn’t have that category of “deaths saved by having a lockdown” and “deaths that might have happened if we hadn’t locked down” all should be categories.

        He used them to erase COVID-19 and then compared them only to the worst flu season.

        1. I think I want the normal CDC person who decides the flu number at the end because that skyrockets after the seasons are over every year.

          So I want to hear that person do the logic so that we line up with what we normally do.

          1. I look and what I don’t understand is that we already have 94,677 deaths for COVID-19 even with a lockdown in every state. That already is almost 30,000 more deaths than the highest flu season. It seems likely the deaths would have been much higher if we hadn’t locked down.

            The fact that there were extra benefits in lives spared by locking down should be added to the “lockdown benefit” position, not to the “anti-lockdown” position. Money is on the other side and things like suicides. I feel like when it is the math geek who does too superficial a process, we don’t get a true perspective and it just makes the arguments weaker.

  15. What about aluminum foil used to cover a dish while it bakes, without actually touching the food? Is there any leaching in that situation?

    1. Inge
      See his article on antiperspirants listed above. That has answers for you. Just touch it and it takes you to the very useful information.

  16. Inge
    See his article on antiperspirants listed above. That has answers for you. Just touch it and it takes you to the very useful information.

  17. When I was in boarding school almost 50 years ago, we were served lemon cordial in glass jugs every night. We always drank it but it had a funny smell. We always complained but were ignored.

    We all did washing-up duty on a roster and one day when I was on duty I took a drink from one of the jugs on the head table. I tasted so good. I was outraged that the warden and staff were being served good cordial while we had some inferior rubbish. I immediately challenged the cooks, who insisted it was the same. I did not believe them, but they finally showed me the saches of powder from which they made up the cordial. It was simply a matter of emptying a bunch of saches into large aluminium pots and adding water. I then asked how they prepared the drink for the warden’s table. They told me they put the saches directly into their glass jugs. I immediately knew what the issue was; acid and aluminium. From that point forth we had pleasant lemon cordial every night, but generations of kids had this poison inflicted on them for as long as five years. I drank it for about a year. I wonder what damage was done, especially to those who were exposed for longer.

    1. Terry, had an incident here where a worker in a large daycare mixed Kool-Aid for the kids in an aluminum container.
      21 kids ended up sick, some had to be taken to the hospital.
      Kool-Aid is incredibly nasty stuff, and very acidic.

    1. UVC exposure is unlikely to cause acute or long-term damage to the skin but can cause severe acute damage to the eye and should not be permitted at all from any device.

      Already UV-C purification systems are in use in public transit systems especially in China and Europe. The systems used not only use UV-C light that kills any virus or bacteria it touches, the light itself generates ozone that is then turned into hydroxyls. Hydroxyls are safe to breathe where ozone is not.

  18. Dr Greger, what about the lining inside juicebox containers in which plant-based milks come, do they behave the same as the aluminum foils discussed in this video? Are they a cause of concern (I would think that soy or almond milk is more alkaline than the apple juice and teabag tea used in the study, which would presumably reduce the risk)? Thank you.

    1. BB2,

      All I found was AlmondBreeze saying that the aluminum doesn’t leach through the plastic.

      It would have been more comforting to have someone else saying it.

    1. YR,

      I am certain there was some photoshopping going on.

      I was thinking the same thing for his suit color. It is perfect for his hair color and skin tone.

      Great pose. Love the buttons on the sleeves.

      He gets out-staged by the aluminum pot, but his glasses tie things together to have it feel like he is contemplating the safety of aluminum.

      I am currently contemplating what the heck the CDC means by the hard to get it from surfaces. The baseball announcers think it means that it is safe to spit on their hands before pitching. Yes, that was the discussion today and they think it would be ridiculous to not let them do that.

      Does it mean that we don’t really have to do all the hand sanitizing and handwashing unless we were in direct contact with people?

      1. Does it mean that we don’t really have to worry about whether we touched our face at all even if we handled our masks as long as we didn’t get too close at the grocery store?

        1. It seems like they threw a “comfort bomb” without enough information.

          People will stop cleaning their door handles and will not worry about washing their hands or touching their face or touching their masks or cell phones or remote controls and stores can stop cleaning the carts, etc.

          It just undoes everything except 6 feet away.

          1. I am not saying those things to be an instigator.

            1) People are spending money on UVC lights. NY just put them in their buses and subways, but it is probably a waste of money, is what I think the CDC is saying.

            2) People like the Native Americans – 30 to 40% don’t have running water, and the water they carry back is for drinking and for the cattle. They don’t have money to do a “Happy Birthday” handwashing process. They might not wash their hands at all. This study would tell me that they should keep drinking their water and not waste it on hands maybe.

            3) People like doctors and nurses are coming home and their infant sticks their fingers in their own mouths and then into the parents mouths or siblings mouths and then the spouse eats french fries with their fingers and they lick their fingers and steal fries from their spouse and the kids want to try one of what the parents have.

            I liked the logic before today better. Washing hands and washing door handles and wiping off the carts at supermarkets and cleaning surfaces and taking the masks off by the straps all felt safe.

            They are taking away the simple to figure out safety net and maybe there is a real placebo-controlled study? But they aren’t presenting it that way.

            I think they said that today was the world record of new cases and that most of them are in the USA and I feel like contacting the CDC and saying, “Why did you have to do that today?” People are going to be less careful.

            1. 4) On the business end:

              Stores are having people stand and wipe carts down. Stores are closing earlier to sanitize the surfaces.

              People like me who work in a greasy-old shop are walking around with things like Lysol and Clorox and other cleaning products and those are still not available. And maybe we don’t need to spend money on them or time using them?

                  1. I read that most of the states haven’t been reporting their nursing home deaths. Those may not even be added in yet.

                    Experts are analyzing the data while we are intentionally hiding it.

                1. My cousin ended up in the hospital today. Blood sugar 700.

                  Now it will be Hospital and decide about rehab again.

                  The rehab he was in has a lot more empty beds now. Last I checked about 30 people had died. That was a while back.

                  1. End of April, 25% of people in 25% of nursing homes tested positive for COVID and 1 out of every 10 patients in 10% of nursing homes had died in something I read.

                    1. That should be immortalized as a math word problem. It is so eloquent that I ended up doing the math in my head for 100 nursing homes.

            2. 5)

              Today, clothes stores opened and they were discussing whether it is safe to let them try clothing on.

              If it is true, then it changes everything for businesses.

  19. Aluminum is one of those subjects media and advertising brow beat us with. Finally a star in the sky for better sailing.

    Thanks to everyone who did this research!

  20. Seeing that SODIUM or salt is not part of the daily dozen besides that from whole foods and some from MISO, how much MISO are we exactly supposed to consume on a daily basis?

    A diet solely of whole plant based foods would make us deficient in sodium. So MISO is obligatory. But how much? 1 teaspoon per day? 1 tablespoon?

    Man, this stuff should be part of the daily dozen, I’m getting sick of always needing to research this basic human need stuff. Can we get this diet presented in a little more of a professional manner? Hire a dietitian or something. This stuff is important. Moderator…, how much please?

    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-dangers-of-sodium-restriction

    1. Dr Greger has done many videos on the topic of sodium as you can see at this link, here:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/sodium/

      Miso is not obligatory – I have never eaten it, though I have enjoyed wfpb eating for more than a decade.
      A well-planned wfpb diet like the daily dozen supplies
      approximately 650 mg sodium is my understanding. Programs (free) like cronometer can track your sodium intake if you have concerns.

  21. I’ve recently started replacing all my cookware with carbon steel pans from Solidtekniks.(no rivets or joins) They also make nickel free stainless worth looking at.

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