Flashback Friday: Plant-Based Diets for Diabetes

Flashback Friday: Plant-Based Diets for Diabetes
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When placed head-to-head against the American Diabetes Association diet, how do plant-based diets fare in terms of not only blood sugar, body weight, and cholesterol control, but also mood and quality of life?

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I’ve talked about the role meat may play in increasing the risk of diabetes, and the potential protective role of healthy plant foods. But plant-based diets not only appear to guard against getting diabetes in the first place, they may successfully treat the disease better than the diabetic diets patients are typically placed on, controlling weight and cholesterol.

Diets based on whole plant foods can result in significant weight loss without any limits on portion size or calorie counting, because plant foods tend to be so calorically dilute. Here’s a 100 calories of broccoli, tomatoes, strawberries, compared to a 100 calories of chicken, cheese, or fish. People just can’t seem to eat enough to compensate for the calorie deficit.

And, most importantly, it works better. A plant-based diet beat out the conventional American Diabetes Association diet in a head-to-head randomized controlled clinical trial, without restricting portions, no calorie or carb counting. A review of all such studies found that individuals following plant-based diets experience improved reductions in blood sugars, body weight, and cardiovascular risk, compared with those following diets that included animal products.

And, cardiovascular risk is what kills diabetics. More likely to get strokes, more likely heart failure. In fact, diabetes has been proposed as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent, which means diabetic patients without a history of coronary disease have an equivalent risk to that of non-diabetic individuals with confirmed heart disease.

A newer study used a technique to actually measure insulin sensitivity. Improved on both diets in the first three months, but then the veg diet pulled ahead. And, look at their LDL cholesterol. That’s what we see when people are put on plant-based diets; cholesterol comes down so much it can actually reverse the atherosclerosis progression, reverse the progression of heart disease.

We know about the beneficial effect of a vegetarian diet on controlling weight, blood sugars, cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress compared to conventional diabetic diets, but what about quality of life, mood. How did people feel after making such a dramatic change in their diets? In this randomized controlled trial, study subjects were assigned either to a plant-based diet group or control group. Vegetables, grains, beans, fruits, and nuts with animal products limited to a maximum of one daily portion of low-fat yogurt, and the control group got the official diabetes diet.

Quality of life improved on both diets in the first three months, but within six months, the plant-based group clearly pulled ahead. Same thing with depression scores. Dropped in both groups in the first three months, but started to rebound in the control group.

Bottomline, the more plant-based diet led to a greater improvement in quality of life and mood. Patients consuming a vegetarian diet also felt less constrained than those consuming the conventional diet. People actually felt the conventional diabetic diet was more restrictive than the plant-based diet. Disinhibition decreased with a vegetarian diet, meaning those eating vegetarian were less likely to binge, and the veg group folks tended to feel less hungry, all of which helps with sustainability in the long term. So, not only do plant-based diets appear to work better, but they may be easier to stick to. And, with the improvement in mood, patients may exhibit desired improvements not only in physical, but also in mental health.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to lightsource via Depositphotos.

I’ve talked about the role meat may play in increasing the risk of diabetes, and the potential protective role of healthy plant foods. But plant-based diets not only appear to guard against getting diabetes in the first place, they may successfully treat the disease better than the diabetic diets patients are typically placed on, controlling weight and cholesterol.

Diets based on whole plant foods can result in significant weight loss without any limits on portion size or calorie counting, because plant foods tend to be so calorically dilute. Here’s a 100 calories of broccoli, tomatoes, strawberries, compared to a 100 calories of chicken, cheese, or fish. People just can’t seem to eat enough to compensate for the calorie deficit.

And, most importantly, it works better. A plant-based diet beat out the conventional American Diabetes Association diet in a head-to-head randomized controlled clinical trial, without restricting portions, no calorie or carb counting. A review of all such studies found that individuals following plant-based diets experience improved reductions in blood sugars, body weight, and cardiovascular risk, compared with those following diets that included animal products.

And, cardiovascular risk is what kills diabetics. More likely to get strokes, more likely heart failure. In fact, diabetes has been proposed as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent, which means diabetic patients without a history of coronary disease have an equivalent risk to that of non-diabetic individuals with confirmed heart disease.

A newer study used a technique to actually measure insulin sensitivity. Improved on both diets in the first three months, but then the veg diet pulled ahead. And, look at their LDL cholesterol. That’s what we see when people are put on plant-based diets; cholesterol comes down so much it can actually reverse the atherosclerosis progression, reverse the progression of heart disease.

We know about the beneficial effect of a vegetarian diet on controlling weight, blood sugars, cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress compared to conventional diabetic diets, but what about quality of life, mood. How did people feel after making such a dramatic change in their diets? In this randomized controlled trial, study subjects were assigned either to a plant-based diet group or control group. Vegetables, grains, beans, fruits, and nuts with animal products limited to a maximum of one daily portion of low-fat yogurt, and the control group got the official diabetes diet.

Quality of life improved on both diets in the first three months, but within six months, the plant-based group clearly pulled ahead. Same thing with depression scores. Dropped in both groups in the first three months, but started to rebound in the control group.

Bottomline, the more plant-based diet led to a greater improvement in quality of life and mood. Patients consuming a vegetarian diet also felt less constrained than those consuming the conventional diet. People actually felt the conventional diabetic diet was more restrictive than the plant-based diet. Disinhibition decreased with a vegetarian diet, meaning those eating vegetarian were less likely to binge, and the veg group folks tended to feel less hungry, all of which helps with sustainability in the long term. So, not only do plant-based diets appear to work better, but they may be easier to stick to. And, with the improvement in mood, patients may exhibit desired improvements not only in physical, but also in mental health.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to lightsource via Depositphotos.

Doctor's Note

The three diabetes videos I mentioned are:

For those seeking a deeper understanding of what diabetes really is and what causes it, check out How Not to Die from Diabetes, and this series of videos:

Thankfully, not only can diabetes be reversed, but so can some of its complications. See Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed? and, for diabetic neuropathy, my live annual review From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food.

Of course, preventing it is better:

There are some foods that may increase the risk:

And others that may help:

And check out my recent video: Plant-Based Diets Recognized by Diabetes Associations.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

85 responses to “Flashback Friday: Plant-Based Diets for Diabetes

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  1. To the fat man in the ill-fitting suit who is wondering if he should take a flying leap off the kale (asparagus?) stalk:

    JUMP! JUMP! *_^

    1. YR, I think he’s trying to do a balancing act and make his way over to the wonderful world of plants! But I’m wondering why all the veggies are green except for the two blueberries? Where’s all the red cherries, orange sweet potatoes, red/orange sweet peppers, etc.?

        1. Knowing as many artists as I do, I can pretty much guarantee that they probably did put in colors, but colors steal the show and it is the man who is the focus.

          In film editing and back when I took humanities in school and they showed what people look at in advertising, they always talked about the order of what grabs your attention. Motion, color, position on screen, etc. Plus, we studied how to “read” a piece of art and you tend to read it the same way you read writing.

          What I notice when I look at this one is that the burger pile looks like you threw a bunch of burgers in the trash. The misty haze makes it more removed. Go over to the other side and someone made such a beautiful green apple with such a GORGEOUS shine, and they did such a good job with all of that detail of the broccoli and the kale and the two tender blueberries. The sky in the background is so beautiful. Puffy clouds and a delicate blue sky, which is interesting to me. Photographers often emphasize the blueberries. I have almost never seen someone emphasize how pretty green is in a photograph, but this artist captured green so well.

          The man himself just needs a hat. (IMO) But the tightrope or balance beam walk is one of those classic, breath-holding balancing acts, which many of us grew up watching.

        2. I love the photo, I think the contrast between the deep-fried-brown and the gorgeous greens is stunning. It looks like he’s crossing over into a lush jungle of health.

  2. The father of my niece’s fiancée has type 2 diabetes, and almost a year ago had a foot amputated. The good news is that he is getting used to his prosthesis, according to his son.

    That’s the good news??!

    I asked about his diet, but was promptly shut down. For some reason, eating plant based whole foods is considered extreme…but having a foot amputated isn’t?

    How can the message about the importance of diet to preventing diabetes, or slowing, stopping, or even reversing diabetes, be more effectively communicated?

    btw, I ordered and received 10 copies of the eating guide and 25 outreach cards, and I intend to start using them right away. They seem like a great idea!!

    1. Shh!

      You’ll let the cat out of the bag and put millions out of work

      https://www.imarcgroup.com/US-diabetes-market
      https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/diabetic-food-market
      https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/diabetes-devices-market.html
      https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/diabetes-drugs-market

      And that’s just the downstream diabetes industry. The upstream nidustry that increases rates of diabetes is even bigger – all the obesogenic high calories, high fat, high sugar food industries for one thing.

  3. They do sound like a great idea Dr J! Our friends have heard in detail about wfpb eating lol and some are interested, some not so much. I overheard one of the resistant ones, a massage therapist, telling a young man at the gym yesterday how she has not eaten animal products in over 30 days… and she feels great! I just smiled to myself and kept my mouth shut.

    And my other friend who I walk with daily got a high five from her doctor and the dietician for taking her blood glucose from over 12 to 4.8 in 3 months. She is doing so great.

  4. I have a question: it seems to me that Dr. Greger implies diabetic vegans can eat as much fruit as they want. However, fruit, in general, and certain fruit in particular, have a lot of sugar. If someone eats grapes, bananas and other sweet fruit, wouldn’t that affect their blood sugar level?

    My friend pre-diabetic and his doctor told him not to eat certain fruit because of their sugar content. I would appreciate some clarification on the issue.

    1. I don’t put that much trust in general prescriptions as they deal with populations not individuals. Your friend might do very well on fruit in line with the studies Dr. Greger cites. But she might also be an exception like my prediabetic wife, who is also sensitive to typical servings of whole grains and many kinds of fruit including berries. It might also depend on the time of day (my wife is less insulin sensitive in the morning). My wife has checked various foods to be sure they are ok for her. Then she constructed her diet based on those results. Much better than listening to “cookie cutter” advice, in my opinion.

      1. I should add so as not to invite a misunderstanding that I am a firm believer in the general prescription that a WFPB diet is, without a doubt, best diet in almost every circumstance. It’s a question of the details.

        1. I am also a firm believer in a WFPB diet and have seen good results from it. But have found with my patients that to control their blood sugar, they have to test foods. I have one who gets really high sugars eating even a small amount of rice, but is fine on barley for instance. One can eat oranges, but not apples. Huh? Why? Don’t know, but each person is different.
          In general, most people are more insulin resistant in the morning, but others handle carbs better in the morning and have high blood sugar levels the next day if they eat more carbs at their evening meal.
          I tell them, test, test, test until you know what meals are healthy for You! And, in general, the more fiber in your diet the better.

          Exercise is very necessary so muscles use the glucose and it gets removed from the blood. Don’t neglect that!

          Also, be aware that what many Endocrinologists tell diabetics is good as far as test results are not.
          Why are diabetics told that anything up to HgA1c of 7 is ok? Normal is 5.5 or less according to these same doctors, and 5.6-5.9 is considered pre-diabetic, i.e. not normal..
          And, of course, you can get a good A1c by going too high, then too low. Studies show that results in more complications also.
          Diabetics need to shoot for normal numbers to avoid typical diabetic complications that start to be common in patients with A1c’s of 6 and over.
          Truly normal numbers are no more than 125 after a meal, and fasting numbers between meals and in the morning of 92 or less. A healthy non-diabetic will always hover around 85 between meals.

          1. Marilyn,
            Thanks for the additional, specific information. I was hoping you would also comment. It was your comments that led me to investigate this topic and it was quite an eye opener.

          2. Marilyn,

            I am going to add Dr. Greger’s Ketogenic Diet and Diabetes video because there are things like whether people are eating oil, butter, animal products, which will make their insulin resistance and blood sugar spikes go so much higher.

            Meaning, when people ask if they can eat a banana, my first question is what else are you eating?

            My friend who did buy WFPB doctors’ books is an example. She is reading from both directions and is eating cheese and butter balls with everything but the bagel salted spice on it. She cannot have the same carbs as someone who is truly eating low fat all the time.

            I think the graph was about 55 seconds in.

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-a-ketogenic-diet-help-diabetes-or-make-it-worse/

            1. Marilyn,

              Do you tell your patients to note whether they had even one high-fat meal around the time they ate the orange?

              The fact that people often hold onto cooking oils or veganaise or vegan butter, it would seem like that maybe something people are stumbling over.

              If any of your patients are vegan keto, I would LOVE to hear if THAT affects blood sugar spikes when they eat carbs.

            2. Deb, I looked at the keto diet video, and read all the sources listed. None of them support the idea that any fats other than saturated are relevant to diabetes control. Does that mean I recommend a high fat diet? No.
              I recommend a balanced -high fiber- diet of vegetable source proteins, lots of lower glycemic Load vegetables, fruits and grains -as tolerated-, and some healthy fats.
              Only one of these studies used a higher carb diet to lower insulin meds. And it was stated that this was a high Fiber diet. Fiber is important.
              But there were no details about the control diet, nor details on what HgA1c’s or fasting glucose levels resulted. Did these men achieve normal blood sugars? That is what I want my patients to have so they don’t end up with heart attacks, kidney damage etc. The curve on those things rises quite sharply at an A1c of 6.

              1. Marilyn, What’s your definition of a high fat diet on the assumption the diet is 100% WFP with no oils and the person is slim and athletic, so weight loss is inappropriate.

                1. Gengo, as in my response to Deb, I don’t recommend a ‘high fat’ diet. Just a diet with sufficient healthy fats, preferably essential fats, to prevent weight loss and to produce satiety.
                  That is after the person is consuming as many healthy carbs as they tolerate and an appropriate protein content. Nuts are good added to salads, for example, providing the extra calories some need, and helping absorption of nutrients. Avocados can be added also.
                  Black soybeans are another example of a food I like, high in fiber, protein and fat, low in carbs.
                  For those who crave foods like pastas, there are available blackbean spaghetti, (25gm. of protein per serving), or pasta made from red lentils. TruRoots brand has only lentils in it.
                  If adding a small amount of olive oil to broccoli, for example gets them to eat it, fine.

                  I deal with individuals not a disease. My goal is to provide information and encouragement, so their meals are satisfying and enjoyable as well as healing.

                  1. Thanks, Marilyn.

                    I asked because many would say my wife’s no oil WFPB diet is (very) high fat at at least 35% of calories from nuts/seeds, but she has trouble keeping her weight up, and grains, beans and most fruit cause BS spikes.
                    This routine along with postprandial intervals on an exercise bike keep her BS well within the normal range.

              2. Deb, btw, several studies have shown that the addition of high quality olive oil, or walnuts in a diabetic diet does slow the absorption of carbohydrates and keeps blood sugar lower.
                Most studies of type 2 diabetes assume that all are overweight. Body fat alone seems to cause insulin resistance, as does fatty liver disease.
                But fully 20% of adult diabetics are lean. Most of them as shown by C peptide tests just do not make enough insulin genetically to eat a high carbohydrate diet. So you cannot fix their diabetes by loading them with carbs.
                Also you have to be careful that they don’t lose too much weight. So since too much protein is a problem, and also raises blood sugar, they have to add some healthy fats.
                I do not agree that a no oil, no nut diet is for everyone. For those with active heart disease, yes, but that’s not the subject here.

                1. “But fully 20% of adult diabetics are lean. Most of them as shown by C peptide tests just do not make enough insulin genetically to eat a high carbohydrate diet. ”

                  Doesn’t that suggest that they might be people with Type 1.5 diabetes otherwise known as LADA?

                  But fully 20% of adult diabetics are lean. Most of them as shown by C peptide tests just do not make enough insulin genetically to eat a high carbohydrate diet.

      2. I totally agree gengo gakusha, and as I said above, people really need to consult with their own medical team. My friend is not wfpb… she eats some salmon and eggs too. She lost 25 lb in the 3 months. Her doctor is terrific – got her in to see a dietician, podiatrist and opthamologist right away, and continues to learn from the dietician and podiatrist at monthly sessions. I do not advise her ! I encourage her and we do our walks daily.

        I am not diabetic but have noticed I feel better eating 3 small meals with no snacks for the last month. I eat fruit with meals now.

    2. Carolina,

      There is a site called, “Mastering Diabetes” and they have a lot of answers in their blog and in their success stories.

      It may depend on whether the person is doing low fat and low to no animal product.

      Fruit juice is NOT good. Whole fruit gives a different response, but if the person isn’t Whole Food Plant-Based, they tend to not be able to just take one food item and expect a Whole Food Plant-Based response.

      When I read the testimonials on that site, people do amazingly well and often it is by going up in intake of fruits and vegetables, but another factor is their C-Peptide level because that is the determining factor on whether people can control Diabetes with diet alone.

      1. When I look at their site, there are multiple success stories which say things like: “”I lost 26 pounds in 5 months. I lowered my A1c to a 6 in 3 months. I never realized I could eat unlimited amounts of fruit.”

        1. One of them switched to fruit for breakfast and said

          “I’m shocked and delighted…on my first day of fruit for breakfast and two hours later 110! It is a number I don’t usually see since I’m usually 250 or higher!

  5. I have been primarily meat and dairy free for months, but I still find myself craving heavier foods. Does anyone else experience this? I can get full on my veggie/grains meals but still not feel satisfied. Any advice?
    Thanks

    1. Janhla,

      Are you eating beans and lentils?

      For me, things like lentil loaf and chili are meals, which really help. Bean burritos. Vegan lasagna. Adding chickpeas, black beans, edamame to a salad.

      Jack fruit and tofu are things that can have the texture of meat.

      Mushrooms are excellent. You can do mushroom burgers or add a package of mushrooms to a salad.

      1. Years ago I had a great recipe for lentil loaf. I wish I could find it, I really liked it. It had a tomato/ketchup(?) topping, as I remember. Onions, grated carrots and other veggies. Maybe toasted bread crumbs of some sort. Yeah, it was work, but so good!

        Deb, do you have a good recipe? I’m sure if I go online I could find a bunch of them too.

            1. YR. when you don’t have fresh celery, I use a sprinkle of celery seeds. It still gives the expected flavor. Don’t overdo, as it is a very prominent celery taste. It’s good to keep on hand.

              1. Thanks, Ruthie, but I don’t have any celery seeds on hand either. :-(

                I also remember putting chopped walnuts in the lentil loaf I used to make. Maybe I’ll do some tweaking……

                (Are you both Ruthie and Ruth?)

              1. This too looks like a winner, Barb! Yes, chopped walnuts were definitely included. I don’t remember putting any fruits in the loaf, though. Maybe I’ll try it with a few raisins.

                “1/3 cup peeled and grated sweet apple
                1/3 cup dried cranberries (chopped) or raisins”

                1. I think I’ll start with the first recipe, after all. Looks easier, for one thing. :-) I’ll just sneak in a few chopped walnuts, maybe in lieu of oat flour. As I say, do a bit of tweaking.

                  Didn’t our great-grandmas use their own judgment about what to throw in? A lot of them never followed recipes.

                  1. Yes, my grandmother and great-grandmother both just used their own judgment about what to throw in.

                    I think time periods in history like the Depression and the rationing of WWII made that necessary so often.

                  2. Agreed YR, the first one looks easier, and I may attempt that one also next week. A few walnuts would be nice for texture. For oat flour, I throw rolled oats in the blender and blend away for a minute or less.

                    1. I really gotta get with the program and buy a blender one of these days. So many good recipes seem to require one.

          1. Ummm, that looks like yet another winner, Barbie. I don’t have tahini, jalapeno or fennel seeds (found out I’m allergic to fennel seeds), and one or two other items.

            Will probably make a lentil loaf in a week or two, because wouldn’t you know! Before I got into the lentil spirit, I had already started soaking dried beans, and cooked them today. So I’ll probably knock that off first. Looking forward to the lentil loaf, though. :-)

      2. Dr. Greger has black bean burgers. Sometimes doing a meal in a form like a burger can add bulk.

        Though Kale is what really fills me up and that shocked me.

        I never felt full with salad until I switched from iceberg lettuce to kale. I am still doing salad almost every day and it still surprises me how filling it really is.

        Also, when people have food cravings, it is often related to a deficiency.

        Make sure that you are supplementing your B12 and D if you aren’t out in the sun a lot.

        I used to have chocolate cravings and would always say that I had a sweet tooth, but a doctor said that if you have a chocolate craving, you are probably low in magnesium and I bought some magnesium and the chocolate cravings went away and never came back.

      3. Soy products like black soy beans and tempeh are what I find help me to not be hungry. I seem to need the extra more complete protein that soy has. Just volume of food doesn’t work for me, it’s fiber and protein that does. Nuts help also.

    2. Janhala – Yes, I experience that craving at times and I’ve been WFPB a la Greger, McDougall, etc for over a decade. It just hits. And beans and lentils just don’t do it for me.
      So I eat a little seitan which helps me to feel satisfied. I make my own and there are a ton of recipes on the web. It is made from Vital Wheat Gluten and the directions are on the package. Seitan is also known as wheat meat and monks have been eating it for centuries. You can get fake meats made from seitan that taste like hot dogs, sausage, etc. Rip Esselstyn, Dr. Esselston’s son, also WFPB uses Gimme Lean which is a seitan product I believe.
      When I make my seitan, I add flavorings to it to give it a rich taste: onion and garlic powder, salt, pepper and, if I want it to taste like sausage, I put typical sausage spicing in it.
      I don’t eat these all the time. But when I get a craving I use them to help me to get through it. I feel the craving less and less but it has taken time. Another way I use the fake meats is to cut them up into small pieces and put them in a vegge dish. That way I feel the satisfaction without eating a lot of fake meat. I focus on the right things to eat but use very small amounts to keep me on track.

      Also – I had periods where my triglycerides spiked up on a WFPB diet. Going back to Fuhrman’s book Eat to Live, he addresses this by saying that if triglycerides rise on this diet to switch to more of a Beans-N-Greens diet and go light on the grains or eliminate them for a while. I also started eating my grains in the morning and none at night. That way I have all day to burn off the energy.

      Also – I do physical work out sessions to build muscle. Muscle burns more calories than fat so I do strength training to keep muscles strong and burn calories. As a prediabetic I use all these tricks to burn off calories and keep my blood sugar where I want it.
      Hope something I share might be helpful to you. Have a great day.

    3. Some people may need a certain amount or ratio of protein/non-protein calories to feel satisfied, although the science on this is unclear.

      Certainly though, some other primates appear to eat in a way that consistently delivers a particular ratio of calories (energy) from non-protein sources to calories from protein

      ‘ Our focus on a single subject over consecutive days allowed us to examine daily dietary regulation within an individual over time. While the amounts varied daily, our subject maintained a strikingly consistent balance of protein to non-protein (fat and carbohydrate) energy across the month.’
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3722187/

      As another primate, you too may require or be adapted to consuming a certain amount of protein in your diet, which you are currently not getting. As Deb suggests, upping your intake of high protein vegetarian foods like beans may cause your problem to go away. But don’t overdo it. The US National Academy of Science advises consuming no mote than 35% of our total calories as protein to decrease the risk of developing chronic diseases
      https://www.nap.edu/read/10490/chapter/12

              1. I had watched that one too, Darwin. Yep, another “awwwwie.”

                So, Fumbles…..why not change your mugshot to one of a cute, cuddly baby orangutan?

                On the other hand, it wouldn’t fit you at all.

                  1. Lovely suggestion, Fumbles, but I don’t know how to post mugshots. Maybe I could change my name to “Latrine,” though. :-D (I think I posted here once that I was an extra in Robin Hood: Men in Tights.)

                    True, an overweight orangutan probably wouldn’t resemble you, so maybe you could use a smiling one instead?

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4AnwnvRaTk

              1. Nah, Clyde was authentic but most likely the car was a set up. But they are very strong, I am sure. Chimpanzees are much stringer than humans.

                  1. I mentioned chimps because I don’t know how strong orangutans are but they are bigger than chimps and I assume at least as strong. I wasn ‘t confusing the two, if that was the point of your url.

                1. Adorable video. Roscoe found himself a home, all right! It must be so much fun to work with the animals like that.

                  Roscoe and the orangutan (Syria?) must have known each other in prior lifetimes. Maybe they were both kitty cats that time around. :-)

                  The guy said orangutans are the most intelligent of primates and have great empathy. Hmmmm. (I see a video about “Peanuts” is coming up next.)

    4. If you are not overweight, you might try eating more nuts/seeds, which provide protein, fat and fiber along with vitamins and minerals. Nuts/seeds are not as fattening as many seem to think but if you have a weight problem, you can certainly overdo it.

  6. Janhla thanks for your question, Well done for working towards making your diet healthier. It would be a good ides to write a dairy of the food you are consuming and the foods and moods that develop after consuming a meal. Certain food have higher satisfaction for different individuals. As Deb kindly suggested adding mushroom, or beans and lentils as the components of a meal brings about a higher satisfaction.I hope these suggestions are useful to you.

  7. A bit off topic, but no surprise:

    “A surprising new study challenged decades of nutrition advice and gave consumers the green light to eat more red and processed meat. But what the study didn’t say is that its lead author has past research ties to the meat and food industry….

    [The lead author] Dr. Johnston also indicated on a disclosure form that he did not have any conflicts of interest to report during the past three years. But as recently as December 2016 he was the senior author on a similar study that tried to discredit international health guidelines advising people to eat less sugar. That study, which also appeared in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was paid for by the International Life Sciences Institute, or ILSI, an industry trade group largely supported by agribusiness, food and pharmaceutical companies and whose members have included McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and Cargill, one of the largest beef processors in North America. The industry group, founded by a top Coca-Cola executive four decades ago, has long been accused by the World Health Organization and others of trying to undermine public health recommendations to advance the interests of its corporate members.”

    (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/04/well/eat/scientist-who-discredited-meat-guidelines-didnt-report-past-food-industry-ties.html)

    I wonder what else there is to learn about the authors and/or the funding source. Note the tie-in between the “agribusiness, food and pharmaceutical companies.”

    1. Dr. J, thanks for checking on the industry ties. We all knew there had to be some. My first thought when I read those headlines was that the Pharmaceutical industry is afraid of losing customers. I read a lot of studies and books by clinicians in other countries that are not so tied to the drug culture. They do focus more on lifestyle. Thankfully some doctors here like Dr. Greger are doing that too, but it doesn’t seem to be mainstream yet.
      Unfortunately that article in a journal considered prestigious makes our jobs much more difficult. People are already too resistant to changing their habits. “ I’ll eat what I want and take a pill”.

    2. Good find, Dr. J. Those sneaky, greedy basturds (sic).

      I always considered the “findings” a bunch of bull, anyway, and not to be taken seriously.

  8. The new report by RethinkX about the production of healthy factory produced protein states 90% of beef and dairy farming will be redundant by 2035. If this is true will it remove the need to worry about meat, fish,poultry diets. Also there would be no need for pesticides or antibiotics to pollute our food!

  9. Lots of info on meat and diabetes, cancer, heart disease. What about the effect on autoimmune disease. I am interested in diietary intervention for vasculitis, particularly Wegener’ disease, supposed to be rare, but I know 2 people dear to me who have it. Any info? I’ve searched the videos and can’t find anything.

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