Plant-Based Diets Recognized by Diabetes Associations

Plant-Based Diets Recognized by Diabetes Associations
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Plant-based diets as the single most important, yet underutilized, opportunity to reverse the pending obesity and diabetes-induced epidemic of disease and death.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Dr. Kim Williams, immediate past president of the American College of Cardiology, started out an editorial on plant-based diets with the classic Schopenhauer quote that “All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as…” Like duh, of course. In 2013, plant-based diets for diabetes were in the ridiculed stage in the official endocrinology practice guidelines, placed in the “Fad Diets” section. They acknowledge strictly plant-based diets “have been shown to reduce the risk for” type 2 diabetes and “improve management of” diabetes better than the American Diabetes Association recommendations, but then inexplicably go on to say that the evidence “does not support the use of one type of diet over another,” with respect to diabetes or in general. “The best approach for a healthy lifestyle is simply the ‘amelioration of unhealthy choices.'” Whatever the heck that means.

But by 2015, the clinical practice guidelines from the same professional associations explicitly endorsed as their general recommendation for diabetic patients: a plant-based diet. The times they are a-changin’.

The American Diabetes Association itself is also now on board, listing it as one of the dietary patterns acceptable for the management of the condition, but the Canadian Diabetes Association has really taken the lead. “Type 2 diabetes…is considered one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada, representing a serious public health concern.” So, they’re not messin’ around, recommending plant-based diets for disease management “because of their potential to improve body weight and [blood sugar control, as well as heart disease risk], in addition to reducing the need for diabetes medications.” They use the Kaiser Permanente definition: “a regimen that encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy…and eggs, as well as all refined and processed [junk].”

They recommend diabetes education centers in Canada “improve patients’ perceptions of plant-based diets by developing…[educational materials and] providing individualized counselling sessions” to address what barriers people have to eating plant-based. The biggest barrier identified was ignorance. Nearly 9 out of 10 patients interviewed had never even heard of using a plant-based diet to treat diabetes. Why is that? Maybe patient awareness of the benefits is being “influenced by the perception of the diabetes educators and clinicians.” See, most of the staff were aware, yet only about one in three were currently recommending it.

Why not? “One of the common reasons” given was that they didn’t think their patients would do it, so they didn’t even bring it up. But “[t]his notion is contrary to the patient survey results” they cite, in which most patients said they would be willing to at least give it a try. The researchers cite the PCRM Geico studies I did videos about, in which strictly plant-based diets were “well accepted with over 95 percent adherence rate,” presumably because they just felt so much better—increased energy, better digestion, better sleep, and satisfaction.

“A number of staff members also expressed their second reason for not recommending this diet…[ not being clear about the supportive scientific evidence. But it’s been shown to be “more effective than an [American Diabetes Association]-recommended diet at reducing the use of diabetes medication,” long-term blood sugar control, and cholesterol. “It is therefore possible that” the diabetes educators were simply behind the times, as there’s “a lag-time in dissemination” of new scientific findings from the literature, to the clinician, and finally to the patient. That’s one of the reasons I started NutritionFacts.org—to speed up the process!

As Dr. Williams put it, the evidence “for the benefits of plant-based nutrition continues to mount.” “This now includes lower rates of stroke, hypertension, diabetes…, obesity, [heart attacks, and cardiac death], as well as many non-cardiac issues that affect our patients in cardiology, ranging from cancer to a variety of inflammatory conditions.” The science we got. The bigger challenge is overcoming the “inertia, culture, habit and widespread marketing of unhealthy foods.” He concludes: “Reading the existing [scientific] literature and evaluating the impact of plant-based nutrition, it clearly represents the single most important yet underutilized opportunity  to reverse the pending obesity and diabetes-induced epidemic of disease and [death].”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Dr. Kim Williams, immediate past president of the American College of Cardiology, started out an editorial on plant-based diets with the classic Schopenhauer quote that “All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as…” Like duh, of course. In 2013, plant-based diets for diabetes were in the ridiculed stage in the official endocrinology practice guidelines, placed in the “Fad Diets” section. They acknowledge strictly plant-based diets “have been shown to reduce the risk for” type 2 diabetes and “improve management of” diabetes better than the American Diabetes Association recommendations, but then inexplicably go on to say that the evidence “does not support the use of one type of diet over another,” with respect to diabetes or in general. “The best approach for a healthy lifestyle is simply the ‘amelioration of unhealthy choices.'” Whatever the heck that means.

But by 2015, the clinical practice guidelines from the same professional associations explicitly endorsed as their general recommendation for diabetic patients: a plant-based diet. The times they are a-changin’.

The American Diabetes Association itself is also now on board, listing it as one of the dietary patterns acceptable for the management of the condition, but the Canadian Diabetes Association has really taken the lead. “Type 2 diabetes…is considered one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada, representing a serious public health concern.” So, they’re not messin’ around, recommending plant-based diets for disease management “because of their potential to improve body weight and [blood sugar control, as well as heart disease risk], in addition to reducing the need for diabetes medications.” They use the Kaiser Permanente definition: “a regimen that encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy…and eggs, as well as all refined and processed [junk].”

They recommend diabetes education centers in Canada “improve patients’ perceptions of plant-based diets by developing…[educational materials and] providing individualized counselling sessions” to address what barriers people have to eating plant-based. The biggest barrier identified was ignorance. Nearly 9 out of 10 patients interviewed had never even heard of using a plant-based diet to treat diabetes. Why is that? Maybe patient awareness of the benefits is being “influenced by the perception of the diabetes educators and clinicians.” See, most of the staff were aware, yet only about one in three were currently recommending it.

Why not? “One of the common reasons” given was that they didn’t think their patients would do it, so they didn’t even bring it up. But “[t]his notion is contrary to the patient survey results” they cite, in which most patients said they would be willing to at least give it a try. The researchers cite the PCRM Geico studies I did videos about, in which strictly plant-based diets were “well accepted with over 95 percent adherence rate,” presumably because they just felt so much better—increased energy, better digestion, better sleep, and satisfaction.

“A number of staff members also expressed their second reason for not recommending this diet…[ not being clear about the supportive scientific evidence. But it’s been shown to be “more effective than an [American Diabetes Association]-recommended diet at reducing the use of diabetes medication,” long-term blood sugar control, and cholesterol. “It is therefore possible that” the diabetes educators were simply behind the times, as there’s “a lag-time in dissemination” of new scientific findings from the literature, to the clinician, and finally to the patient. That’s one of the reasons I started NutritionFacts.org—to speed up the process!

As Dr. Williams put it, the evidence “for the benefits of plant-based nutrition continues to mount.” “This now includes lower rates of stroke, hypertension, diabetes…, obesity, [heart attacks, and cardiac death], as well as many non-cardiac issues that affect our patients in cardiology, ranging from cancer to a variety of inflammatory conditions.” The science we got. The bigger challenge is overcoming the “inertia, culture, habit and widespread marketing of unhealthy foods.” He concludes: “Reading the existing [scientific] literature and evaluating the impact of plant-based nutrition, it clearly represents the single most important yet underutilized opportunity  to reverse the pending obesity and diabetes-induced epidemic of disease and [death].”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

92 responses to “Plant-Based Diets Recognized by Diabetes Associations

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  1. Hopefully the public won’t interpret “plant-based diet” as potato chips and beer. I fear that the food industry will “jump on board” with a lot of ostensibly vegan junk food, as they did with “low-fat”. Perhaps adding “whole food” would help stave this off. Couldn’t hurt.

    1. Plant_this_thought_,

      That’s what I ate at a family party this weekend!! Because there was just about nothing else to eat. There was a fruit platter, and a veggie platter — but even the salads had pieces of meat in them (which I picked out). Everything else had meat and cheese, and who knows what else. I’m learning to take my own food.

      But it’s depressing. The hostess, a wonderful woman, let me know that she’d recently had a heart attack. She said that she’s “eating healthier,” but I’ve no idea what she means by that.

      1. This has long been the problem. Folks who have survived heart attacks and all the care that ensues, yet have -NO IDEA- what healthy food is. Society has too long been brainwashed by commercialism, and this will continue-as it serves the soulless corporate entities that try to rule the planet.

        Maybe soon things begin to improve. Maybe soon we see some dips in the rates of our fatal diseases of lifestyle.

        1. Well, yes industry is much to blame, but what about the Atkins, Taubes, Mercolas and assorted low/carb/keto/paleo promoters out there?

          Don’t they share some of the responsibility?

          1. “Well, yes industry is much to blame, but what about the Atkins, Taubes, Mercolas and assorted low/carb/keto/paleo promoters out there?

            Don’t they share some of the responsibility?”
            I guess it somewhat depends on who you ask: ” In a 12-month trial, adults with elevated HbA1c and body weight assigned to an LCK diet had greater reductions in HbA1c, lost more weight, and reduced more medications than those instructed to follow an MCCR diet.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5865541/

            “CONCLUSIONS:

            Both diets achieved substantial weight loss and reduced HbA1c and fasting glucose. The LC diet, which was high in unsaturated fat and low in saturated fat, achieved greater improvements in the lipid profile, blood glucose stability, and reductions in diabetes medication requirements, suggesting an effective strategy for the optimization of T2D management. This trial was registered at http://www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12612000369820.”
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26224300

      2. I hear you! My uncle, whom I love dearly, has survived quadruple bipass surgery and various other cardiac troubles, as well as pulmonary embolisms. My sister has several autoimmune conditions, along with lung and heart conditions. I’m currently (sadly) watching both of them slowly spiral downward, health-wise. She continues to bombard herself with a TON of dairy products daily, because several of her doctors told her she needs a whole lot of extra calcium to keep her osteopenia from turning into osteoporosis. He eats not only dairy, but meat and processed meats as well. Meanwhile, both of their doctors keep throwing more and more meds at them. I’ve tried to gently turn them towards resources, but neither of them want to hear it — they trust their doctors implicitly. It makes me terribly sad, but “you can lead a horse to water” is what I keep on repeat in my head.

        1. Jen,

          They believe what their doctors and the media have told them for all these years. That isn’t really their fault.

          Dr. Lisle uses a few studies and most people do just do what the authority figure says. They were trained to from birth and as our society became more “professional” and “expert” and “specialist” oriented, the logic for just obeying becomes even stronger, particularly because they don’t understand the complicated medical terms and the “alternative” resources argue in every possible direction on the internet.

          I will tell you that if someone looks up vegan nowadays, it is “Why I left Vegan” that they see and it becomes so confusing.

          I had a woman who dialed a wrong number and I spoke to her about Dr. Barnard for her Diabetes and she had already been told not to go that way by her doctor. She was told not to listen to that logic and that it was impossible to reverse Diabetes with diet. All of her doctors pushed her away from alternative and dietary improvements and she is a simple-minded elderly woman who can barely see and she doesn’t have the internet.

          She dialed a wrong number who told her which audiobooks to listen to.

          1. Deb,

            That’s why I don’t like to say I’m vegan.

            Instead, I say, I’m basically vegan, but really, I eat plant based whole food, which means I avoid all animal products and processed food. It’s a mouthful.

            1. Dr. J.,

              Yes. I have a long, polite answer, which doesn’t focus too much on the fact that I am pretty much vegan most of the time, too.

              There might be a trace amount of milk in my rye crisps and eggs in the slices of cake, which I eat 4 times per year, and that makes it that I am only almost vegan anyway, except my own birthday cake will be vegan, and they can handle that and it has softened them all to what I am doing.

            2. I think textbook vegan-ism is supposed to have a three-pronged agenda. True vegans

              1. object to the cruel and abusive conditions used to house animals in factory farms
              2. object to the wanton damage to the environment due to disposing of animal waste
              3. seek to adopt a more healthy plant-based lifestyle for physical well-being.

              I used to tell people that I’m an “almost-vegan.” If I carried a PETA and Sierra Club membership cards in my non-leather wallet, I’d be a true vegan. While I’m sympathetic, I just can’t go quite that far.

              But I like the phrase “WFPB.”

              1. Dr Cobalt

                That’s not what I understand veganism to be. The Vegan Society says this

                ‘Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.’
                https://www.vegansociety.com/go-vegan/definition-veganism

                Similarly, the IVU defines it this way:

                ‘Vegan: excludes any use of any animal products for any purpose, including animal flesh (meat, poultry, fish and seafood), animal products (eggs, dairy, honey); the wearing and use of animal products (leather, silk, wool, lanolin, gelatin); also excludes animal use in entertainment, sport, research etc. ‘
                https://ivu.org/definitions.html

                1. In other words, it is not just a diet. Vegans eat a (strict) vegatarian diet. but not everyobody who eats a strict vegetarian diet is a vegan (even if that is what they call themselves).

        2. Jen_B

          When my brother had his triple bypass surgery I tried to gently coax him into considering a more plant-based and less animal-based diet… to no avail. I selected a few compelling videos from NF.org for him to evaluate, but it didn’t take. A week after his surgery he took his family out to a pizza restaurant for a thick slice of goo, some unguinous bread sticks, and icky soda pop. And so it goes today.

          I think it’s not only the “inertia” mentioned in the video, but also the addictive properties of certain additives that food processors exploit to grow quarterly profits. Stuff like sugar, oil, and salt – all quite heavy, addictive, and expedient for maximizing profits, since processed products are mostly sold by weight.

          Yes! I said “Unguinous”! =]

    2. Hi Dr. Greger,

      What do you think about the emphasis on eating only lectins free foods as Dr. Stephen Gundry insists? Is his focus supported by empirical evidence or he exaggerates in his claims?

      I look forward to hearing from you.

  2. Great clip full of info on the science of nutrition and how to prevent and reverse Type II Diabetes using a whole food, plant based diet. Everybody needs to (gently) spread the word to friends a family and prevent them from becoming another cash cow for the processed food and pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Tru dat, Mr Wade. My experience is a little dated in that I passed the eighth anniversary of my massive heart attack just last week.

    I got a stent & first rate medications, but scant lifestyle counseling. I’d had my heart attack on The South Beach diet. The only lifestyle counseling I got from my cardiologist was to walk along the beach more. He left the bulk of the lifestyle advice to the cardio rehab program. When they found out I was a green-vegetarian instead of a beige-vegetarian, they kinda said “well, that box is checked”, and I mainly got my arse on the stationary bike and lifting weights. Lost 30 pounds.

    It was my GP who’d read The China Study who suggested I think about going the rest of the way from vegetarian to vegan to reverse my cardiovascular disease (CVD). I initially dismissed her suggestion because of my prejudice against “teh vegan” as I *loved* my cheese, eggs, milk & cream so. But, about a year later I went vegan cuz I stopped lying to myse’f about how much suffering my love of eggs and dairy caused hens, chicks, cows, and calves.

    As I stumbled into the world of Greger, McDougall, Ornish, Barnard et all, another 35 pounds melted off but now my blood pressure and cholesterol dropped through the floor to the point I’m off every med except the ubiquitous 81 mg of aspirin and a low-dose of a betablocker needed due to the magnitude of the damage to my heart.

    I eventually fired my cardiologist when he enthusiastically counseled me on how I could keep cheese in my diet by microplaning hard cheeses. I had to beat the bushes hard but found a vegan cardiologist at the Adventist hospital in East L.A.. I’m working on my GP who says I’m her poster child to get her to practice what she preached to me and go whole-food vegan by I’m so healthy now I rarely see her.

    People at my church want the weight loss I’ve had and my improved health but won’t go whole-food vegan. For a year and a half, I showed them that even SOS-free Vegan can be delicious as I prepared a full salad-to-dessert buffet which they eat heartily, but they eagerly flock to the “All-American Breakfast” Sundays with the eggs, bacon & cheese that implies. The allure of bacon and cheese is hard to break. I think things are going to have to get a lot worse before they get better

    1. Ralph,
      In Dean Ornish’s recent book ‘Undo It’, he writes of a patient that adopted his dietary guidelines in order to strengthen is heart sufficiently to facilitate a heart transplant. His heart recovered to the extent that he no longer needed the heart transplant. Apparently, the heart is a muscle that can heal.

      1. CAN HEART CELLS REPLICATE? IF SO, CAN THEY REGENERATE??

        B’Healthy said, “… Apparently, the heart is a muscle that can heal.”
        ————————————————————————————
        Research establishes a human body cell refresh rate of approximately 90-120 days, inferred to mean every cell is no older. However, recently I came across a reference which stated, flatly, cardiac cells are irreplaceable.

        Of course, if neurons are limited in ability to replicate, the cardiac statement is probably understood in relative context, too.

        Can anyone confirm that cardiac cells do replicate in the body, and form healing cardiac tissue replacement? Do cardiac cells repair/replace at the same rate– ie. after injury, do the cardiac cells of the injury site make a “special effort” to heal faster? This Scientific American article from 2001 provides tantalizing hints that stem cells hold the key to cardiac muscle rehabilitation and recovery.

    2. Eight year anniversary. Congratulations. My nephew had 3 stents inserted about 8 years ago. We buried him this past January. I Know he ate something green at least once a week. Changing diet was unthinkable. Now it is impossible.

      I was working in a call center as my transition to retirement. My eating patterns were a real bother to the other team members. So one day after many explanations on the details of why I would not eat something, I was asked “why are you afraid of dying?” I responded, “I’m not afraid of dying, I just don’t want it to be my fault.”. (Thank you Kim Williams for that line.) It did provoke what I perceived to be silent thought. Detail after detail does start to make a difference. It will likely never make a difference to those individuals but imperceptibly the resistance will break down.

      Most cannot distinguish evidence based advocacy from cultural preference advocacy. We now have a weight of evidence based advocacy that is so strong that it will be harder and harder to resist. The cost for the economy as a whole demands this happen.

      1. Stewart E,

        I like your response. I’ve never been asked that question. But if I was, I might reply: Oh, it’s not death that I fear so much, it’s dying before my time. And even worse, being disabled and ill and in pain for years before that. I want to enjoy as much as possible the life that I have, before it ends.

  4. Three years ago I had a conversation with a military doctor in an airport USO lounge. Told the doctor at the age of 74 and being pre diabetic for over 15 years my a1c was 7.2. The doc wrote down two items: (1) NutritionFacts.org and (2) How Not to Die. I ordered the book, read the bog and adopted a more plant based diet. Went vegan/vegetarian about 5-6 days a week and four months later my a1c was 5.8 and stayed there for over 2 years. Was in a nasty accident last year and was bed/home bound for 5 months and yes my eating changed and was diabetic again. Went back to the veggie based diet and my a1c went back to 5.8.

    Healthy eating works, beats pills and injections.

    1. A must see for anyone who eats plant based.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKnG9Y0owQ

      PlantPure Nation tells the story of three people on a quest to spread the message of one of the most important health breakthroughs of all time. After nutritional scientist and author Dr. T. Colin Campbell (from the China Study) speaks to the Kentucky legislature, his oldest son Nelson works with Kentucky State Representative Tom Riner to propose a pilot program documenting the health benefits of a plant-based diet. Through this well intentioned effort, they inadvertently set in motion a series of events that expose powerful forces opposed to the diet. After industry lobbyists kill the pilot program, Nelson decides to try his own grassroots approach in his hometown of Mebane, North Carolina, before circling back to Kentucky for a dramatic ending.

      A growing number of celebrities, athletes, TV hosts, and nutrition experts have promoted the plant-based diet in the past few years, and tens of thousands of people have documented their personal success stories. But as more doctors and public officials become aware of the healing power of plant-based nutrition the question arises: Why don’t they share the information with the public? Tragically, there have been few official medical or state-sponsored efforts in the nation to support the life sustaining benefits of a whole foods plant-based diet.

      1. Thanks for spreading the word, Jimbo.

        These documentaries are the most effective things there are.

        People can’t change until they hear the message.

        What I noticed with it is that it was less hard to get the cattle farmer and business owner and church leadership to hear the message than it was to get the government to be part of promoting the message.

    2. Dr J
      I really think your point is very very strong. And since we are on the question of diabetes it is even stronger. It applies in so many ways but I do have a particular one that may be of interest. Many doctors are doing everything they can to have diabetic patients avoid hypoglycemic episodes because they can kill you or they “cause Alzheimer’s”. The latter was announced to me by my Endocrinologist about a year and half ago. Having T1 diabetes for 49 year I take this very seriously so I have read the research. I asked for supporting evidence (which I had never seen) and she said indignantly “it’s not proven.” I’m still looking and I still haven’t seen any evidence. There is however very good evidence that the advanced glycation end products resulting from chronic hyperglycemia does raise the odds of Alzheimer’s, blindness, nephropathy, etcetera etcetera,,, So if the hypoglycemic episode kills me, I regard that as a much better option than the monumental comorbidities.

      Kim Williams also pointed out that there are “two kinds of cardiologists, vegans and those who have not read the data.” I will assert that the same should be said of endocrinologists.

  5. ADA guidelines say all kinds of things, including “research indicates that low-carbohydrate eating plans may result in improved glycemia and have the potential to reduce antihyperglycemic medications for individuals with type 2 diabetes” I would love it if Dr Greger would critique this & this research.

    1. Gaia,

      Dr. Greger wrote a book against Atkins and has a series on Keto coming out.

      In reality, though, I have friends and relatives who don’t eat fruits and vegetables who have gone Keto and it does make it easier controlling their A1C versus the refined carbs and sugars they used to eat with their meats.

      Fats don’t spike sugar is why that can help Diabetes. Keto helps them get off of junk food and processed foods and refined carbs.

      These people aren’t going to go Whole Food Plant-Based and have so much trouble controlling their sugar.

      The question for the people I am thinking about is whether it was healthier eating cupcakes and cookies and ice cream and pizza every day or whether Keto is healther.

      1. Trust me, I am not pro-Atkins or pro-Keto, but, for instance, I have one poor friend who has autoimmune, which seems to be made worse by nightshades and grains and probably meats, but the steroids they keep her on spiked her blood sugar and she is close to 400 pounds. Her son is Diabetic and has epilepsy and her daughter also is close to 400 pounds and, honestly, all of them have blood sugar issues and they can’t afford vegetables and fruit all that much at all, and it is Keto, which can help her son’s epilepsy and it can keep all of their blood sugar stable and can help them get off of junk food and processed food and can help them lose weight.

        When they say they can’t afford fruits and vegetables, I know that it is literally true. They can’t do Paleo. I can’t afford Paleo and their medical bills are so high and she misses so much work with her health conditions that they almost go homeless every month and I often end up buying their food the last week of the month or a church gives them things like boxes of cereal and Hamburger Helper and other processed foods from their food pantry, but none of the food is plant food.

        I am going to call that reality of life.

        They can go to soup kitchens, but I have worked at those and those foods aren’t vegan at all and aren’t any healthier.

        Life is hard for some people. Really hard.

        1. I am not making excuses for them.

          Poverty from medical bills and working part-time jobs with low wages, no benefits and not getting paid for sick days is real life for so many people now.

          McDonald’s still sells double cheeseburgers for $1 and that is what a lot of them eat. Take off the roll and ask for no ketchup is how they get to Keto.

          1. I am going to say that they usually still can’t afford insurance and can’t afford Diabetes meds and I have another friend who lost her career job and she can’t find another and she already had to drop the Diabetes meds, which were working for her and her husband. His business went bankrupt and they can’t stay afloat either and what I will say is that neither of them like vegetables and Keto got both of them off of soda and Reeses Peanut Butter cups and refined carbs.

            I would love to have this pie-in-the-sky WFPB reality, but poor people often do make impossible decisions and a greater portion of people are in that part of society and I know that it is hard for the professional, white-collar part of society to even understand.

            The average 2 people working family of 5 makes $52,000 and half of those people end up divorced in 2 struggling single-working-person households, with both working parents making closer to half of that. The stress on these people is so ridiculously high.

            That isn’t even the drop-out end of society, where people who were ever arrested can’t find any job anywhere or they have mental health problems, autism, mental retardation, high school drop-outs, gamblers, drug addicts, alcoholics, etc.

            1. People on disability and social security is another reality. My grandmother’s social security was $8000 per year. Her property taxes, including elderly discount, was over $2000. I do know people who ended up on disability for things like MS and they were young enough that they had only really worked retail jobs, probably never full-time. I know a schizophrenic young man who had spent a year in jail for pot and time in institutions and when they let him out, he made just enough to pay his rent in a place, which was pretty sleazy. He couldn’t get a job and, yes, fell back into the institution after 6 months of struggling. They can get some food, but food stamps don’t pay for toothpaste or shampoo or deodorant or laundry detergent or garbage bags or toilet paper and it also doesn’t pay for much food and the level goes down the minute you get a job. He had basically worked as a waiter for a few years before his mental health issues kicked in and now will likely live off of a teenagers salary for the rest of his life.

              1. .
                AMERICAN MEDICAL CARE CARRIES WORLD’S WORST PRICE TAG

                Deb said, “(for) People on disability and social security, (medical care) is another reality.”

                Clearly enough, for most Americans, what passes for a national medical care system is broken– only the wealthiest can afford the patchwork of private practitioners in what is sardonically called the “best medical care in the world”.

                In the name of medical care, we have instead a shark feeding frenzy of greed and profiteering. In place of medical care, we get the most convoluted system of specialists and medical billing centers ever devised. Its principal achievement is to charge us more than twice over for the same (or worse) medical care than the rest of the industrialized nations receive.

                Human beings have the right to proper medical care– regardless of political system. Yet, in the United States, providing adequate medical care for every citizen seems an afterthought, or the result of sheer indifference.

                Does this national malfunction concern the party of the wealthiest? Not at all, since its members in congress get swollen campaign chests from medical associations for their next election. It is not that they cannot hear us– they simply prefer not to listen.

                Meanwhile, those unable to afford treatment cannot buy insurance, and must mortgage the home (if they can afford to own one) even to be admitted for treatment. Hospitals are no longer charitable organizations, but “health management centers”, and expansion of treatment modalities a hospital offers is based in great part on projections of profitability.

                In contrast, what the American people favor is straightforward and simple– a medical system which works for everybody. A series of polls by major public opinion professionals for the past several years has found most favor “Medicare for All”, commonly understood as a single-payer system.

                Opponents say it cannot be done, but it has been done, already. Medical savings derived from a Medicare-type administration vastly simply and reduce cost of patient billing, treatment and pharmaceuticals. Today, Medicare is widely admired for its efficiency and low-cost of administration.

                The American people cannot wait for a broken system to deliver. The current, chaotic and grossly overpriced regime of private care is based on swelling profits, not patient need and affordability, and never will serve the patient.

                1. “Opponents say it cannot be done, but it has been done, already. Medical savings derived from a Medicare-type administration vastly (“simply”) simplify and reduce cost of patient billing, treatment and pharmaceuticals.

                2. What I will say is that the “market-based” system out-priced the blue-collar workers and retail workers and migrant workers and fixed-income elderly and disabled and mentally ill people.

                  Whoever quadrupled the price of college and insurance and medical did an unsustainable act and it is tearing the fabric of society.

                  You end up with an underclass and an outcast class and part of society is getting the absolute best care and there is such a big group of people who are losing their houses and who are losing their credit rating and who can’t afford their medicines or medical supplies or any of it.

                  On top of that, when I look at insurance companies, they don’t do tenure because the market can’t pay the wages of their workers. Some of the companies lay off workers twice a year and I am going to say that the workers get an amount of money double or triple or quadruple what I make, but I can’t name people who made it to retirement working for the insurance companies. Quite often, the firing literally happens your 50th year. It happens so often that when I see people reaching near 50, I brace myself for them losing their career job and becoming a driver for Amazon.

                  How ridiculous to run a business and have the whole philosophy of overpaying people and giving them job instability.

                  Education is another place, which did it. The cost to go to college at the university I attended has gone up by 8 times and what I will tell you is that because I am on the side of the economy, which has to compete globally, with huge soul-less companies, which use labor from China and India and Mexico, I am in this silent middle class where our salaries stagnated back then and we watched the insurance go up 10 times what it was and our deductables now are closer to $12,000 for a family. And the “cheap” not ranked very small hospital nearby, which used to be $500 to go to the ER, now cost $5000 when my sister-in-law ended up there recently for pneumonia. She didn’t get admitted.

                  It just is not sustainable because the very people who are uneducated and who can’t afford the internet and who will be people who never heard this message are gonna need bigger tent cities.

                  My friend was making a lot of money for the insurance company and now she is in a situation where she is going to owe over $10,000 just for the surgery, plus she has no way to pay her mortgage before the surgery.

                  I see it everywhere.

            2. Deb, I don’t understand this “not being able to” thing.

              A bag of brown rice and a bag of beans–when rice and beans are cooked with a modest amount of vegetables, what could be less expensive?

        2. Deb,
          “When they say they can’t afford fruits and vegetables, I know that it is literally true.” Wow, very sad. I know that when i quit buying expensive meat products, my grocery bill dropped by over 1/3rd which made eating well very affordable. Has your friend applied for SNAP benefits? Sure reads as though they may qualify.

          1. I just tried to look up the SNAP eligibility requirements, but they don’t give a clear answer.

            B’Healthy, they would make $13,000 a year working at 2 jobs, then get on food stamps and qualify for medical for a while, then get a 3rd job and make a little bit more and lose food stamps and lose medical. They have been homeless a few times and have had their lights shut off way more often than that. They can’t walk far enough to get to bus stops and can’t afford Uber and can’t afford to get cars repaired. My friend won junky old cars twice when hers have died, but there aren’t really charities to help with cars. We looked and most of them were no longer doing it.

            They don’t have low-income housing because there is a 10-year waiting list.

            Rent goes up every year and it is over $1000 per month and they can’t afford any of it.

            Honestly, by the end, I know that it is vegetables and fruits, which I can’t afford and I will just end up eating beans and rice and potatoes and oats eventually,

            Car insurance, health insurance, doctor co-pay, gas, utilities, rent or mortgage (and house insurance and property taxes) is so high that only people with careers are making it. That is just reality.

            1. I already choose to eat rice, beans, potatoes and oats plus cheap green leafy and root vegetables. And affordable fruits. what’s wrong with that?

            1. My friend who lost her career job just had her husband get admitted to the hospital for Diabetes-related surgery.

              Right now.

              Hospital stays and surgery with no insurance is terrifying around here.

              I am devastated for them.

              He is SAD trying unsuccessfully to go Keto with his wife, but he finds it so hard to change his diet.

              1. I ended up telling my friend that the difference between now and when her father went through this was that back then, they didn’t know what they could accomplish with diet and that he could be healed and off meds in weeks if he went Whole Food Plant-Based or he could also lower his A-1C going Keto or he could do the ADA diet and improve his numbers that way.

                9 out of 10 people have never heard the message and I am going to say this.

                Where I live, it was 10 out of 10 and the doctors push against dietary solutions and actively recommend foods which aren’t WFPB.

                He went to the hospital today and is going to be out of work for a month and they fed him fettuccini alfredo, apple sauce, ginger cookies and I think some sort of juice and my friend was so upset.

          2. How can people not afford potatoes and cabbage? Are things really so different in the US? I have heard about food deserts but are things really that bad that basic staples like those are unaffordable or unavailable?

            I say potatoes and cabbage because that was what most people lived on in my street when I was growing up. perhaps it’s rice and beans where you live but most basic staples are affordable.

            Shampoos and toothpastes are unnecessary anyway since in my experience soap and salt do a better job at a lower price

            1. Potatoes and rice and beans and tomatoes are what people can afford.

              I am not sure about cabbage. They don’t sell it everywhere.

              I have looked for purple cabbage and really struggle to find it.

              They do have green cabbage and bags of coleslaw. It isn’t popular around here.

              Potatoes are popular.

              1. But I think they tried to ban white potatoes from schools. I know that Dr McDougall did defend the potato.

                I would really love it if my friends would try Starch Solution. They do like potatoes and pasta. I think it would be the easiest transition and the cheapest.

    2. Gaia

      That’s quite correct. However, it’s merely a comment about symptom management. The guidelines don’t say that such eating styles will reverse T2D or prevent it.. However, the guidelines do note that plant based diets will reduce the risk of T2D, improve T2D management and reduce the risk of heart attacks etc (very common in diabetics).

      Hyperglycaemia is just one symtom of T2D. Just as pain is one symptom of cancer and cancer treatment guidelines will recommend use of pain medications. That doesn’t impy that painkillers will prevent cancer or reverse/slow disease progression. Ditto re low carb diets and T2D.
      Cancer guidelines etc will recommend lifestyle and dietary changes to prevent cancer risk and improve disease managment, just as diabetes guidelines do eg

      https://www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer/cancer-prevention-recommendations

      There is no therefore contradiction between those statements in the ADA guidelines

      1. Mr. Fumblefingers,

        My brother was diagnosed with T2 diabetes about 15 years ago; he was on several meds, including for his diabetes, but not insulin, I think. Anyway, he was also overweight and out of shape. He read about his future, and changed his life: he started eating plant based foods (eventually whole food) and started exercising. He eventually lost 70 lbs, and went off all his meds, including for diabetes. Now he takes no drugs, eats plant based mostly whole food, and continues to exercise. He’s 70.

        So I don’t know if T2 diabetes can be cured by lifestyle, but it sounds as though it can be reversed. At least in some cases.

        Also, since my brother is 70, it seems that you can teach old dogs new tricks.

        1. Yes I have heard similar stories.

          Unfortunately, I have also come across some diabetes nurse educators who push patients to adopt low carb diets because they reduce blood sugar levels. The guidelines mean nothing to them because they know The Truth.

    3. Gaia L Kile,
      In upcoming episodes he does show, I think definitively, why that recommendation is dangerous. So stay tuned.

      I’ll try to give a summary and my own perspective. First the real issue with hyperglycemia is with advanced glycation end products. The acronym AGEs is great in that they produce much of what we associate with aging including stiffness in various tissues and greater inflammation. So “anything which reduces endogenous AGEs must be good”. Well not necessarily. The issue is total serum AGEs. There are the endogenous AGE that we produce with hyperglycemia and the exogenous AGEs that we consume. i.e. dietary AGEs. Both contribute to serum AGEs

      Processed food in general has lot of AGEs and does contribute to our serum AGEs because of the cooking process. This would apply to things like chips and crackers et al. However, it particularly applies to animal products. Even a baked apple has a little AGE but fried chicken wings are off the charts. A big issue is that one of the early things to happen with diabetics is diabetic nephropathy or kidney disease. With the development of nephropathy, the ability of the kidneys to remove some of the dietary AGEs begins to disappear and everything else in terms of comorbidities accelerates. (I have had doctors who have not read the research in the last 20 years tell me that dietary AGEs are not important because the kidneys eliminate them. Some, yes, but these dietary AGEs still contribute very significantly to the total serum AGEs and it becomes overwhelming when kidney impairment begins.)

      Ok I can best illustrate why this is a problem with the example of a nurse checking me in to my endocrinologist. She is T2. She was and is overweight and had an A1c of 8.5. She went keto and her weight has dropped thirty lbs and her A1c has dropped to 6.5. Phantastic success!! Right!! Well maybe not so much, and here’s why:
      On the good side:
      1. her cholesterol has dropped. Great but that will stop when she ceases weight loss. (unless she keeps losing weight until she disappears)
      2. Her A1c has dropped. Also great. However there are two problems here. First, her A1c is still high, if reduced, and with the dietary AGEs she is continuing to have an assault on her system. She is just less aware of it. And that assault includes TMA (on which Dr Greger has done great videos) which is monumentally problematic along with many other factors. Again I would suggest that she is unaware of this assault.
      3. Because of her weight loss she also might be experiencing less intramuscular extrusion of saturated fats which contributes to insulin resistance. On the down side she is likely replacing this with dietary fats.

      (Spoiler alert here!!! The following is totally unsurprising but the first I’ve seen of it is in an upcoming NF video.) Along with the dietary AGEs of which the keto advocates are unaware, there is the fact that the acetone produced with ketoacidosis is a precursor to methylglyoxal which is a very powerful progenitor of AGEs that are so productive in the development of diabetic comorbidities. (The upcoming video has a nice diagram of this.)

      So the dietary choices do not reduce the insulin resistance. Rather, they reduce the fuel load and hence the excess fuel that we could think of as spilling. Keto does nothing to improve our ability to use the normal fuel for our systems but there is the illusion of success because of less spillage. The end result is that there continues to be excess AGEs accumulating in our tissues causing; heart disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, immune impairment, autoimmune augmentation,,,, and everybody’s favorite, Alzheimer’s. The sources of the AGEs have just been modified and to a certain extent hidden.

      With keto “success” comes all the dietary AGEs and the generally unrecognized source of AGEs that is the ketogenic process itself. Keep watching this space for more and more “wonderful benefits” of the keto diet.

  6. This diet is very nice but I am type 1, with intestinal problems, I need to keep away from beans-gluten.Diarhea makes my sugar crazy. I do a lot of exercice. It is hard to know what my sugar will do. Usually I need to take a juice 25carbihydrat every 20minutes when I do a bike ride without stopping. This morning I went alone experiencing ; I was taking a break every 20 minutes for 30 minutes this way my sugar was going up ? I wonder why does my sugar goes up when I stop a exercice ? Do someone experience sugar going up and down as type 1 and making big efforts exercising.? Is there a coach for diabetic type 1 ?

  7. The fourth and maybe the biggest reason WFPBD is not promoted is collusion and bribery by big meat, fish, dairy, and eggs. As an MD at age 50, I had to have a almost zero survival possibility with the most malignant, locally invasive, node positive, and metastatic prostate cancer before I adopted a WFPBD that I learned about, not from a doctor or nutritionist, but a peer counselor who has survived a similar extensive prostate cancer. Over 20 years later at age 70, I am not only a survivor but play singles tennis, hike, and surf. Besides my LDL is 53, triglycerides dropped from over 2,000 to 160-180, and my HbA1c dropped from 7 to 5.3.

  8. mj, check out https://www.masteringdiabetes.org/. Cyrus and Robbie (the co-founders) are both Type 1 diabetics. By following a whole food, plant-based diet and eating tons of carbs they significantly reduced their need for insulin and have A1Cs in the normal range. They offer a lot of great free webinars and also have a coaching program. I’ve heard them answer questions similar to yours.

  9. Hurray for the Canadian Diabetes Association!

    My husband is a Cardiologist and we made a brochure for patients here in Alberta about the benefits of a WFPBD and now it is so great to see this official endorsement. We are not the norm in doing this so more support means so much to us. Dr. Greger’s evidence based website is our key support for our patients.

    We provide the brochure for patients to take to a dietician for how to start. As an RN I am not permitted to direct dietary counseling as it is beyond my scope of practice- so I just point them to the path to health.

    A proud and healthy monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org. ;)

    1. Bobbi – I am reminded of an old saying, “When the people lead, the leaders with follow.” So true in so many ways.
      I went WFPB, SOS over a decade ago. I couldn’t be happier.
      However, let me share with you and your husband, since you direct your patients how to move forward, that I learned something not talked about in the WFPB community. Despite my WFPB diet, my cholesterol and triglycerides kept rising which frustrated me to no end. I am post-menopausal. Finally, I decided to remove all alcohol from my diet. Bingo – my cholesterol at my next 6 month test had reduced from 243 to 185 and triglycerides went from 250 to 130. LDL from 130 to 111. I had been a regular, every day, consumer of my beloved glass (or more) of wine each day with dinner. And I was drinking more than the healthfully recommended amounts. I was clearly drinking too much and have made appropriate changes. I wanted to share this piece of information because I have seen posts on this site from post menopausal women who have had this same challenge – increasing cholesterol levels despite being WFPB. We women love our glass of wine and if our numbers are not where we would like them to be, we may need to look at our alcohol consumption. I wanted to share this with you in case you have patients in your practice who are not getting the results they would like to have.
      We have to be honest about these things, . . . . :-)

      1. Thank you for that feedback Ruth. I will sure keep it in mind in discussions with patients. I too am just finishing menopause and had increased (high of normal) LDL and triglycerides. For me it was the processed plant based foods- too refined. I don’t drink alcohol at all. I lost 15 pounds taking the processed food out and the LDL and triglycerides corrected themselves.

        Did your blood work happen with just the alcohol reduction or was weight loss also a factor?

  10. Hello, I love hearing of the benefits for diabetes and want to share this information w/my family. My aunt has type1 diabetes… I wonder why type 1 is never mentioned… Wouldn’t a plant based diet be as beneficial to her as a type 1 diabetic, too? I want to help her “see the light” but I feel it’s harder when all the research only ever speaks to type 2… Thoughts?

    1. Tisha – google your Type 1 topic and you’ll get some info. But, also, here is a link to some info from Forks Over Knives to get you started:
      https://www.forksoverknives.com/plant-based-diet-benefits-for-type-1-diabetes/#gs.shl69y

      I know there is a fellow out there with Type 1 – and I’m sorry I can’t remember his name – who manages his blood sugars with WFPB diet and takes no to very little insulin. That may or may not be possible with your family, but his information would be helpful I would think. Keep looking for him. Or maybe someone reading these posts knows who he is.
      Good luck to you and your family – my stepsisters were both Type 1 diabetics and I understand the difficulties.

    2. Tisha – the fellow whose name I was trying to remember is the fellow who wrote the Forks Over kNives article – I just read to the end of the article and saw his picture. He has a link in the article to his website. He counsels those with Type I diabetes on how to use a WFPB diet to control their Type 1 diabetes. Hope this is helpful.

    3. Hello Tisha,

      Type 2 diabetes is often the one mentioned because it is a disease that is caused by lifestyle and can be effectively treated by lifestyle changes. Type 1 is a bit more tricky. Since it’s an autoimmune disease, there is currently no way to reverse or cure the issue; however, that doesn’t mean that a plant-based diet can’t be great for those with Type 1. One common feature amongst all forms of diabetes is insulin resistance, and a plant-based diet is a great way to treat insulin resistance. If you eat a healthy enough diet and prevent worsening of insulin resistance or further pancreatic damage, you can thrive as a person with type 1 diabetes.
      I would highly recommend visiting https://www.masteringdiabetes.org/. Mastering Diabetes is a program created by Dr. Cyrus Khambatta and Robby Barbaro, both of whom are thriving while living with type 1 diabetes. They have plenty of great information and coaching available for those looking to optimize their health.

      I hope this helps,
      Dr. Matt, Health Support

  11. I now look at type 2 diabetes differently. At the end of February I was cleared to resume normal activities. Put on a few pounds recovering from an accident. Pounds did not want to disappear, so in March I went on a no sugar (refined) diet. With no sugar my hunger vanished. Then I added highly processed white flour as in no more pasta in mid April to my banned list at the recommendation of a friend. Since mid April I have dropped 18 pounds without trying.

    Off sugar and the stiff fingers disappeared, I do a home type blood glucose test weekly and my last three morning numbers were 102,102, and 106.
    My BP is now around 120/65. Since I stopped feeling hungry I make myself eat a breakfast around noon. Sites like this and others would have saved me a lot of grief if I had known 10 years ago. I eat all the cabs I want with vegetables and fruits. Oh well, old too soon and smart too late, Been doing better with things I don’t eat.

  12. Just found this great quote from Dr Kim Allan Williams, the former President of the American Academy of Cardiology: “There are two kinds of cardiologists: vegans and those who haven’t read the data.”

    1. It’s interesting why so many people lump WFPB eaters into the same category as……*drum roll*….vegans! They’re simply not the same “animal”!

  13. YR – Thanks for the alert!
    But, thankfully, there is something that we can do about bacterial contaminants (listeria, E. coli, etc.) on our leafy greens (which are the most difficult to clean) and other veggies. We can clean them in a water-bath spiked with chlorine also known as bleach. And, yes, this is very safe to do. Fill your sink with water, add a splash of bleach – the same stuff one puts in their laundry. For a full sink of water, add perhaps 1/8 – 1/4 C of bleach. Throw your leafy greens in and let them sit there for a bit – 10-15 minutes. This lets any dirt fall off but also kills any harmful bacteria. As an additional benefit, this also kills the bacteria that rots your veggies in the fridge. After the soak, rinse with plain water and let them drain fully or put in a salad spinner and spin them. Then refrigerate as you normally would. When you’re done with the leafy greens, throw your other fresh veggies and fruit in the same solution for the same reason. And, no, don’t worry about the bleach. This is perfectly safe to do.
    I once accidentally drank 3/4 of an inch of bleach in a glass. I had it in a glass because I was doing laundry and this was a little bit left over sitting on the kitchen counter. I was running like mad that day and had forgotten that the clear liquid in the glass was bleach. I was thirsty, so I picked up the glass and downed it in a gulp while I was running to the next thing to do. I realized immediately it was bleach and called the poison control center and explained what had happened. She told me it was nothing to worry about – I’d not consumed nearly enough to cause any problems. I asked her if I should drink a glass of water to dilute the bleach I’d already consumed. Her reply was that I could if it made me feel better but it was not necessary – I’d not consumed enough for it to be harmful.

    On another interesting note, here is a new piece of research on the possible harmful effects of the Paleo diet if anyone is interested. Turns out that Paleo diets (heavy on the meat) increase the harmful TMAO that we WFPB eaters do not have in our guts. Here’s the link:
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325832.php?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_country=US&utm_hcp=no&utm_campaign=MNT%20Weekly%20Full%20%28non-HCP%20US%29%20-%20OLD%20STYLE%202019-07-24&utm_term=MNT%20Weekly%20News%20%28non-HCP%20US%29

    Have a great day everyone!

    1. Ruth, your drinking bleach episode sounds scary! You’re lucky Poison Control was able to reassure you. I suppose they must be open 24/7. I’d probably be so rattled I wouldn’t be able to find their phone number, or my computer might cause me some major grief. And the minutes would go by! Although, come to think of it, I could also dial 911.

      When my brother was a kid he somehow swallowed pieces of glass. (Same kid who used to brag he ate angle worms.) I remember my mother stuffing him with bread and water. He’s still kicking.

      Re the Paleo link: Seems to me what’s even worse is the carnivore diet. After several years of eating nothing but animal foods (mostly meat, often raw), how will they end up health-wise?

  14. Just recently published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) is a piece showing that those who adhere most to a WFPB diet are 23% less likely to develop Type2 diabetes. It’s only taken decades for them to pay attention but it seems they are finally starting to get the word. Although “more research is needed”. What a bunch of old farts! (and I’m in my mid-60’s!!). It takes mountains to move these old, staid, stuck institutions. As I said to Bobbi, above, when the people lead, the leaders will follow.
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325826.php?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_country=US&utm_hcp=no&utm_campaign=MNT%20Weekly%20Full%20%28non-HCP%20US%29%20-%20OLD%20STYLE%202019-07-24&utm_term=MNT%20Weekly%20News%20%28non-HCP%20US%29

      1. Maybe there’s another Ruth at this site, but I remember a “Ruth” posted two or three times that she’s in her mid-80s. ????

  15. I want the recipe for the salad that is pictured on the face of this video… No… I’m not kidding… recipe please! :-)

  16. Is there any way to have links to the articles cited listed in the doctor’s notes below? I would dearly love to print off that article from the Canadian Diabetic Association and leave it lying prominently around my work place. I am an RN who works in a federally qualified health center. I’m trying to educate my providers, co-workers and patients, but I am a lone voice in the wilderness. I truly believe that a whole foods, plant based diets would not only be healthier, but also more affordable for my patients. I’ve educated Spanish speaking patients through an interpreter about the importance of whole, plant based foods and had the interpreter slip in “carne” in the list of suggested foods, which I did not say. It’s frustrating and slow going. I learned about whole food, plant based diets by reading “The China Study” and other books, but I wish I had short, authoritative sources I could provide.

    1. Hello, it’s great that you are working so hard to spread the word! You can find links to all of the video’s sources in the Sources Cite button right above the Doctor’s Note.

    1. Dear Karen: You do have a challenge with allergies to so many of the foods traditionally relied on for protein in a vegan diet. HOWEVER, don’t give up. You can still successfully adopt a whole food plant based diet. You’ll just have to be more creative and diligent in discovering ways to rely on other sources and perhaps eating them more often than other WFPB eaters. Check this link out and review protein sources. Protein in the Vegan Diet https://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php You said legumes, so I’m assuming you can’t do lentils. As you are aware there are many foods that contain protein, so even by eliminating the “heavy hitters” there are still many options. What caught my eye on this list is seitan, quinoa. I encourage you to find more…
      Hope that helps.

        1. It’s almost impossible to be protein deficient with a plant based diet.
          Just stay away from junk food. Protein in almost all veggies, grains etc.

  17. I can find nothing on the American Diabetes Association website that endorses a plant-based diet. Dr. Greger, where did you find this?

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