Flashback Friday: Prebiotics – Tending Our Inner Garden

Flashback Friday: Prebiotics – Tending Our Inner Garden
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Why does our immune system confuse unhealthy diets with dysbiosis—an overrun of bad bacteria in our colon?

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The total surface area of our gut is about 3,000 square feet, counting all the little folds, larger than a tennis court. Yet, only a single layer of cells separates our inner core from the outer chaos. The primary fuel that keeps this critical cell layer alive is a short chain fatty acid called butyrate, which our good bacteria make from the fiber we eat. We feed the good bacteria in our gut, and they feed us right back. They take the prebiotics we eat, like fiber, and in return provide the vital fuel source that feeds the cells that line our colon, a prototypical example of the symbiosis between us and our gut flora.

How important are these compounds our good bacteria derive from fiber? There is a condition, known as diversion colitis, that frequently develops in segments of the colon or rectum after surgical diversion of the fecal stream, meaning if you skip a segment of the bowel, like with an ileostomy, so that food no longer passes through that section, it becomes inflamed and can start bleeding, breaking down, closing off. How frequently does this happen? Up to 100% of the time—but the inflammation uniformly disappears after you reattach it to the fecal flow.

We didn’t know what caused it—maybe some kind of bacterial over-growth, or bad bacteria, or was it a nutritional deficiency of the lining of the colon due to the absence of the fiber needed to create the short-chain fatty acids? We didn’t know, until this study where they cured the inflammation by bathing the lining in what it so desperately needed, severe inflammation gone in just a few weeks. We feed the good bacteria in our gut, and they feed us right back.

It makes sense that we have good bacteria in our gut that feeds us, tries to keep us healthy—they got a pretty good thing going. It’s warm, and moist, and food just keeps magically coming down the pipe, but if we die—they lose out on all that. If we die, they die; so, it’s in their best evolutionary interest to keep our colon happy.

But, there are bad bugs too, like cholera, that cause diarrhea. They have a different strategy. The sicker they can make us, the more explosive the diarrhea, the better their chances of spreading to other people, into other colons. They don’t care if we die because they don’t intend on going down with the ship.

So, how does the body keep the good bacteria around while getting rid of the bad? Think about it. We have literally trillions of bacteria in our gut, and so our immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerating good bacteria while attacking bad bacteria. If we mess up this fine balance and start attacking harmless bacteria, it could lead to inflammatory bowel disease, where we’re in constant red alert attack mode. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remained largely undefined, until now.

If you think about it, there’s got to be a way for our good bacteria to signal to our immune system that they’re the good guys. And, that signal is butyrate. Butyrate suppresses the inflammatory reaction, tells our immune system to stand down. So, butyrate may behave as a microbial signal to inform our immune system that the relative levels of good bacteria are within the desired range. Butyrate calms the immune system down, saying in effect, all’s well, you’ve got the good guys on board, ultimately rendering the intestinal immune system hyporesponsive to the beneficial bacteria. But, in the absence of the calming effect of butyrate, our immune system is back in full force, attacking the bacteria within our gut because they’re obviously not the right ones, since butyrate levels are so low.

So, we evolved to have butyrate suppress our immune reaction. So, should our good bacteria ever get wiped out and bad bacteria take over, our immune system would be able to sense this and go on a rampage and destroy the invaders, and continue rampaging until there were only good bacteria creating butyrate to put the immune system back to sleep. OK, but here’s the critical piece. Here’s why this all matters. What if we don’t eat enough fiber? If we don’t eat enough fiber, then we can’t make enough butyrate. We could have lots of good bacteria, but if we don’t feed them fiber, they can’t make butyrate. Sensing such low levels of butyrate, our body thinks our gut must be filled with bad bacteria and reacts accordingly. Our body can mistake low fiber intake for having a population of bad bacteria in our gut. Our body doesn’t know about processed food; it evolved over millions of years getting massive fiber intake. Even during the Paleolithic period, 100 grams of fiber a day. So, on fiber-deficient Western diets, eating Spam on Wonder Bread, when our body detects low butyrate levels in the gut, it doesn’t think low fiber—as far as our body’s concerned, there’s no such thing as low fiber—it thinks: bad bacteria. For millions of years, low butyrate has meant bad bacteria; so, that’s the signal for our body to go on the inflammatory offensive.

So, that’s one reason why fiber can be so anti-inflammatory – one of the reasons fiber intake is critical for optimal health. Not fiber supplements, but whole plant foods. Fiber supplementation with something like Metamucil may not replicate the results seen with a diet naturally high in fiber.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to ZEISS Microscopy via Flickr.

The total surface area of our gut is about 3,000 square feet, counting all the little folds, larger than a tennis court. Yet, only a single layer of cells separates our inner core from the outer chaos. The primary fuel that keeps this critical cell layer alive is a short chain fatty acid called butyrate, which our good bacteria make from the fiber we eat. We feed the good bacteria in our gut, and they feed us right back. They take the prebiotics we eat, like fiber, and in return provide the vital fuel source that feeds the cells that line our colon, a prototypical example of the symbiosis between us and our gut flora.

How important are these compounds our good bacteria derive from fiber? There is a condition, known as diversion colitis, that frequently develops in segments of the colon or rectum after surgical diversion of the fecal stream, meaning if you skip a segment of the bowel, like with an ileostomy, so that food no longer passes through that section, it becomes inflamed and can start bleeding, breaking down, closing off. How frequently does this happen? Up to 100% of the time—but the inflammation uniformly disappears after you reattach it to the fecal flow.

We didn’t know what caused it—maybe some kind of bacterial over-growth, or bad bacteria, or was it a nutritional deficiency of the lining of the colon due to the absence of the fiber needed to create the short-chain fatty acids? We didn’t know, until this study where they cured the inflammation by bathing the lining in what it so desperately needed, severe inflammation gone in just a few weeks. We feed the good bacteria in our gut, and they feed us right back.

It makes sense that we have good bacteria in our gut that feeds us, tries to keep us healthy—they got a pretty good thing going. It’s warm, and moist, and food just keeps magically coming down the pipe, but if we die—they lose out on all that. If we die, they die; so, it’s in their best evolutionary interest to keep our colon happy.

But, there are bad bugs too, like cholera, that cause diarrhea. They have a different strategy. The sicker they can make us, the more explosive the diarrhea, the better their chances of spreading to other people, into other colons. They don’t care if we die because they don’t intend on going down with the ship.

So, how does the body keep the good bacteria around while getting rid of the bad? Think about it. We have literally trillions of bacteria in our gut, and so our immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerating good bacteria while attacking bad bacteria. If we mess up this fine balance and start attacking harmless bacteria, it could lead to inflammatory bowel disease, where we’re in constant red alert attack mode. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remained largely undefined, until now.

If you think about it, there’s got to be a way for our good bacteria to signal to our immune system that they’re the good guys. And, that signal is butyrate. Butyrate suppresses the inflammatory reaction, tells our immune system to stand down. So, butyrate may behave as a microbial signal to inform our immune system that the relative levels of good bacteria are within the desired range. Butyrate calms the immune system down, saying in effect, all’s well, you’ve got the good guys on board, ultimately rendering the intestinal immune system hyporesponsive to the beneficial bacteria. But, in the absence of the calming effect of butyrate, our immune system is back in full force, attacking the bacteria within our gut because they’re obviously not the right ones, since butyrate levels are so low.

So, we evolved to have butyrate suppress our immune reaction. So, should our good bacteria ever get wiped out and bad bacteria take over, our immune system would be able to sense this and go on a rampage and destroy the invaders, and continue rampaging until there were only good bacteria creating butyrate to put the immune system back to sleep. OK, but here’s the critical piece. Here’s why this all matters. What if we don’t eat enough fiber? If we don’t eat enough fiber, then we can’t make enough butyrate. We could have lots of good bacteria, but if we don’t feed them fiber, they can’t make butyrate. Sensing such low levels of butyrate, our body thinks our gut must be filled with bad bacteria and reacts accordingly. Our body can mistake low fiber intake for having a population of bad bacteria in our gut. Our body doesn’t know about processed food; it evolved over millions of years getting massive fiber intake. Even during the Paleolithic period, 100 grams of fiber a day. So, on fiber-deficient Western diets, eating Spam on Wonder Bread, when our body detects low butyrate levels in the gut, it doesn’t think low fiber—as far as our body’s concerned, there’s no such thing as low fiber—it thinks: bad bacteria. For millions of years, low butyrate has meant bad bacteria; so, that’s the signal for our body to go on the inflammatory offensive.

So, that’s one reason why fiber can be so anti-inflammatory – one of the reasons fiber intake is critical for optimal health. Not fiber supplements, but whole plant foods. Fiber supplementation with something like Metamucil may not replicate the results seen with a diet naturally high in fiber.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to ZEISS Microscopy via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

Some foods don’t just lack fiber. They may interact with our gut flora to contribute to disease in other ways, as I discuss in my video Microbiome: The Inside Story.

This amazing prebiotic story helps explain why fiber-rich foods—that is, whole plant foods—are so good for us. See, for example, Dr. Burkitt’s F-Word Diet. This reminds me of The Broccoli Receptor: Our First Line of Defense, in terms of our body using what we eat as cues to optimize immune function.

Since this video originally came out, I have a bunch more on the microbiome and gut health, including:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

116 responses to “Flashback Friday: Prebiotics – Tending Our Inner Garden

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  1. Just a quick question off topic, recent news out of the UK questions whether vegans can get enough choline. I know it is probably just another dig at vegans but is there any truth, should we be concerned? Thanks for all you do.

    1. Mary,

      Go up to the search bar, type in “choline,” and check out the results.

      Here is one example: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/carnitine-choline-cancer-and-cholesterol-the-tmao-connection/

      “Unlike carnitine, we do need to take in some choline, so should vegans be worried about the choline they’re getting from beans, veggies, grains, and fruit? And, same question with carnitine. There’s a small amount of carnitine found in fruits, veggies, and grains, as well. Of course, it’s not the carnitine itself we’re worried about, but the toxic TMAO, and you can feed a vegan a steak—literally, an eight-ounce sirloin (anything in the name of science). Same whopping carnitine load, but, essentially no TMAO was produced.

      Apparently, the vegans don’t develop those TMAO-producing bacteria in their gut. And, why should they? It’s like the whole prebiotic story. You eat a lot of fiber, and you select for fiber-consuming bacteria. And, some of the compounds they make with fiber are beneficial, like the propionate I’ve talked about, that appears to have an anti-obesity effect….

      Maybe that’s why meat, milk, and eggs have all been associated with advanced prostate cancer, because of the choline. In fact, choline is so concentrated in cancer cells, if you follow choline uptake in the body, you can track the spread of cancer throughout your body.”

      Enjoy your research! This is a great site for that.

      1. Seriously how self absorbed and disrespectful can some of you be?
        ——————————————————————————————–
        I’m personally holding my self absorption and disrespectfulness down to about 50% of my capacity. Hoping I get points for doing that?

      2. This is a masterly piece of deception by the meat industry which appears to be concerned by a move to plant based diets in the UK. As David w has pointed out, the article that sparked the headlines was written by a member of the UK Meat Advisory Panel

        There is clearly no ‘choline crisis’ in the UK as the author as speculated … nor could there be one on a plant-base diet (vegan junk food diets are another and completely matter).

        However, focussing on the mote in the eye of others (ie non-meat eaters) in an attempt to distract attention away from the beam in their own (meat eating omnivore) eye is a time-honoured tactic. There’s no reason to think that people in the UK have a better average diet than people in the US> We know that in the US

        ‘Just 1 in 10 adults meet the federal fruit or vegetable recommendations’ and
        “This report highlights that very few Americans eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables every day, putting them at risk for chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease,” said Seung Hee Lee Kwan, Ph.D., of CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, lead author of the study. “As a result, we’re missing out on the essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber that fruits and vegetables provide.”
        https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

        So, yes mount a gaslighting attack on the food choices of a very small minority of people (those who eat a vegan junk food diet) in order to distract attention away from the serious health challenges faced by the 90% of the population facing vitamin and mineral deficiencies because they don’t eat anough fruits and vegetables.

        it seems pretty despicable to me.

    2. That article was funded by the meat industry. They quoted Dirbyshire who works for the meat industry. Scroll to the bottom of this to find conflicts of interest.
      https ://nutrition.bmj.com/content/early/2019/08/30/bmjnph-2019-000037

    3. This is a bit dated but take a look at
      https://veganhealth.org/choline/

      “To summarize the information above on choline intakes:

      50 mg/day is clearly not enough.
      Although I am unaware of any vegan woman having a baby with a NTD, vegan women who might become pregnant should try to get 450 mg/day (the AI) to be safe.
      Choline might help lower homocysteine levels, but it’s not clear that this has any benefit for health. The concern for vegans regarding homocysteine continues to be to avoid the very high homocysteine levels that occur with vitamin B12 deficiency.
      There is reason to think that choline in large amounts might contribute to heart disease. Keeping levels not much higher than the AI is a prudent choice at this time.
      ***It might even be better to keep levels closer to 300 mg/day.***
      Research on choline and cancer indicates that a moderate amount of choline (about 300 mg/day) could reduce breast cancer compared to lower amounts, but too much could increase the risk of colon and prostate cancer.”

    1. That was helpful, Tom!

      I noticed this sentence: Getting plenty of betaine in your diet can somewhat reduce the need for choline.

      Sources of choline they listed: Legumes, tofu, green vegetables, potatoes, nuts, grains, and fruit

      Sources of betaine they listed: Quinoa, spinach, sweet potatoes, beets, and wheat-based bread, crackers, breakfast cereals, and pasta

      I have been trying to learn about Homocysteine and what lowers it and choline and betaine are both on the list, along with the B-vitamins and SAMe.

      Along with betaine, choline functions as a methyl donor. Like many other molecules including folate, vitamin B12, and s-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), methyl donors are involved in keeping homocysteine levels low, among many other functions.

      Someone on this site still had high Homocysteine. I can’t remember who, but they can look at the foods above to make sure they are getting enough choline and betaine.

  2. So, when it says that they are Methyl donors, does that mean that it helps the MTHFR people?

    People are taking pills like Methyl Folate.

    Don’t the choline and betaine in foods donate enough Methyl donors?

    1. Deb:
      I have the MTHFR polymorphism. I take a methyl-folate supplement, but my understanding is that it is actually unnecessary if one loads up on green leafy vegies rich in folate, which I definitely do. I may be wrong in this, but after researching the topic extensively, I came to the conclusion (?) that it is only the folic acid pathway that is awry in MTHFRs, and that folate metabolizes correctly. So only people who are just taking vitamin pills for all their folate are likely to have problems. Have you read something different?

      1. plant_this_thought,

        No, I was just trying to understand it because so many doctors recommend the methyl-folate supplement and reading that the very foods Whole Food Plant-Based have people eating provides folate, choline, and betaine, it just seems like it wouldn’t be an issue.

        I just wanted to see if I was thinking properly.

        I haven’t been tested for it and don’t want to be tested. I know to avoid folic acid supplements to avoid having the whole folate trap issue and I also know that too many Methyl donors have been shown to not be good in studies.

        I am checking off my check-list while I am healing my brain and controlling homocysteine and glutamate are things I have decided to learn more about because so many things like strokes and traumatic brain injuries and schizophrenia and other conditions have problems with elevated rates of glutamate, so I want to know how to prevent a glutamate storm if anything ever happens. (I had a few falls with head impact years ago and now I know that glutamate can cause excess damage)

        1. I took SAMe for a while. It, too, is a powerful methyl donor. I generally take as few supplements as possible, and I have discontinued the SAMe for that reason.

          I am curious about glutamine/glutamic acid/glutamate, especially after watching Dr. Seyfried’s videos. Luckily for me, the top sources of glutamine are the no-nos of WFPB people: meat, eggs, dairy. However, a big source of glutamate in my diet is nutritional yeast, which I absolutely love. But nutritional yeast is also loaded with beta-glucan, which is a great thing for the microbiome. Like so many things, it is a plus and minus calculation.

          1. Yeah, I love Nutritional Yeast, too.

            And, yes, Beta Glucan’s are important enough that I won’t stop eating it unless I find a study that clearly states that it might be messing with my brain somehow.

            I have had serious brain injury, which I have been reversing and it is working.

            Most types of brain damage and brain injury, glutamate comes up as causing the extra damage.

            I listened to a PodCast on Adventures in Brain Injury about glutamate and how it pools and causes damage and it is comforting to me to know how to not have a glutamate storm happen.

            Blueberries and turmeric and Bergamot essential oil and Broccoli Sprouts are some of the answers I have. Lowering Homocysteine because Homocysteine raises it.

            And now, I have added in food with Choline and Betaine and making sure my Folate is from food and keeping my foods from Methionine low.

            Most of it is covered in a WFPB diet but I consider it important for me to learn because of the brain damage I already have had. My step-mother had a stroke and if I had known that blueberries and turmeric and broccoli sprouts could have lowered some of the damage, I would have shown up with some.

            I am not listening to doctors explain it to me and that is probably something I should try to find.

  3. O.K. now for some earthshaking news that will cause your body to create Butyrate at a high rate. I think it is important to us all, but perhaps EXTREMELY important to anyone with IBS.

    https://neurosciencenews.com/whole-body-vibration-diabetes-14739/

    My personal experience is that I bought a vibrating platform a short while ago after reading the above and learning how it can (plausibly) create high levels of Butyrate almost out of thin air (but actually by mixing the layers of the microbiome in the gut.)

    My goal in good health has been to fight inflammation at every level in my body. I’ve only been using my particular model of a vibrating platform (the least expensive one I could find) but after a few uses to get used to it, I can now stand on it without losing my balance, even when in the impossible-to-focus my eyes when set to the Pro mode.

    I’ve been doing (3) ten minute sessions per day for about the past week. My bowel movements have changed in frequency and in appearance.

    I’m pretty sure I’ll be staying with this program for the rest of my life and beyond… ’cause I’m gonna insist on a vibrating coffin in case I accidentally die. ‘-)

        1. Keep us posted on what changes you see.
          ———————————————————
          O.K… here’s the first one. (I posted this in a reply to Ruth a day or so ago in another comments section)

          (Funny story: One of the cats here has a foot fetish… that is, anytime I’m outside and standing still for even a short time, the little juvenile cat is rubbing on my ankles before taking a top of the head dive onto my shoes, rubbin’ and purrin’. At first the cat was leery of the vibration platform I stand on but finally the feet were just too tempting so it steps on and goes in to its routine. It tries to meow but the vibration creates a staccato meow… and the purrin’ is really stepped up as a result of the vibration. ‘-)

          1. Laughing.

            Cats are so funny. A lot of them have quirky little things like that.

            The staccato meow probably could go viral if you put it online.

    1. Wow, Lonie, interesting article. I bought a vibrating platform and have yet to take it out of the box. Now I’m motivated! Thanks for the info.

      1. I bought a vibrating platform and have yet to take it out of the box. Now I’m motivated! Thanks for the info.
        —————————————————————————————————————————
        Great! Hope you will share your observations here as I’ve been asked to do. ‘-)

        1. caveat – vibration is contraindicated to those of us who have sustained neurological damage via high impact/stretching injuries such as motorvehicle,esp m/bike,skiing/snownoarding mishaps,etc or even accidental electrocution…found out the hard way after 2min pd for one week …the Osteopath was shocked at the excitation in the nervous system…Buzzzing…a hypersensitive ns is Not good, & using mech vibration is like dumping petrol on a bonfire.

          1. a hypersensitive ns is Not good, & using mech vibration is like dumping petrol on a bonfire.
            ————————————————————————————————————————-
            Thanks for the cautionary tale.

            I was just remembering some of the things I’ve tried out on the platform. That is, on the low mode I start out with my feet close together on the platform… then I widen them out a bit at the 7 minute mark (which increases the strength of the shaking) once again at the 4 or 5 minute mark, and finally at the three minute mark I widen out to the very edge, which causes, I’m guessing, ~ a 6.0 Richter Scale earthquake shaking. ‘-)

            But I’ve also done some varied body position testing. That is, locking the legs sends the vibration all the way up through the body. I can bend my knees a bit and the shaking is strongest from my hips down. If I lock legs and lean slightly forward I can feel my chin skin shake, even though I have relatively trim jowls.

            Going from one of these stance/positions to another helps keep one engaged and does away with the boredom of just shaking.

            1. I used to lift light/mediumdumbells when I was on the machine. It seemed a bit more productive than just standing there.

              1. I used to lift light/mediumdumbells when I was on the machine. It seemed a bit more productive than just standing there.
                ———————————————————————————
                Heh, probably a better way to utilize one’s time than looking down and chuckling at the cat at your feet, but we make do with what we have. ‘-)

                  1. I prefer my insides ‘stirred not shaken’.
                    ——————————————————–
                    Far be it from me to go against the wishes of anyone with a License to Kill. ‘-)

      1. Lonie, These machines have been around since the 1930’s and 40’s!
        ——————————————————————————————–
        Heh! A comical look back then. ‘-)

        1. I wonder how these old machines would have worked as Whole Body Vibrators?

          It would have been great to follow up on these individuals to see if the procedure kept them healthy and perhaps long-lived as the findings in the link suggest.

          1. Lonie, I believe those old machines were advertised as only weight-loss devices, but who knows, they may even have had the same health effects as the newer whole-body vibration platforms.

            1. “….. who knows, they may even have had the same health effects as the newer whole-body vibration platforms.”

              I doubt it. The jiggly belt devices seem to have only affected the areas they were applied to (eg abdomen, thighs or wherever) rather than the whole body.

              The WBV devices apparently emerged from the Soviet space programme and owed nothing to the earlier jiggly belt machines.

        1. Deb, I tried one once also, but just to see what they were like because I didn’t need to lose weight. Didn’t do much for me.

          I was more into weight-lifting to build muscle. I didn’t want those bully’s at the beach to kick sand in my face in front of all the pretty girls ;-) (Remember those comic book advertisements! )

    2. Lonie,

      From the article you linked to: “A 2017 study published in Endocrinology by Drs. Alexis Stranahan and Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence at MCG provided evidence that in their animal model of obesity and diabetes, whole body vibration was essentially the same as walking on a treadmill at reducing body fat and improving muscle and bone tone, including reducing seriously unhealthy fat around the liver, where it produces damage similar to excessive drinking.”

      So it appears that walking (or running, etc) would have the same effect as a vibrating machine. But it also seems as though a Plant Based Whole Foods diet would have the same effect.

      I ride a Me-Mover in our local cemetery, and the roads are in such bad condition that I get lots of vibration (but maybe not good ones) — especially since the Me-Mover does not appear to have any shock absorbers. I also walk in the mornings. I love being outside.

      I also recall ads from my childhood of vibrating machines that were supposed to “jiggle the fat off.” These seemed to work with a belt that wrapped around the body — the hips, perhaps? They fell out of favor, presumably because they didn’t work.

      1. provided evidence that in their animal model of obesity and diabetes, whole body vibration was essentially the same as walking on a treadmill at reducing body fat and improving muscle and bone tone, including reducing seriously unhealthy fat around the liver, where it produces damage similar to excessive drinking.”

        So it appears that walking (or running, etc) would have the same effect as a vibrating machine. But it also seems as though a Plant Based Whole Foods diet would have the same effect.
        ————————————————————————————————————————————————–
        Hi Dr. J,

        This is what I was afraid of… that too many would concentrate on the vibrating platform machine rather than the LIFE CHANGING INFORMATION IN THE LINK

        https://neurosciencenews.com/whole-body-vibration-diabetes-14739/

        which barely mentioned the machine used to attain those benefits. Dr. Greger’s video clearly states that Butyrate is the secret sauce for keeping our gut from leaking and allowing our immune system to be compromised and led to attack because there isn’t enough Butyrate in our system to tell the immune system that there is not an overload of bad bacteria, so no need to go into attack mode to rid the gut of those bad actors.

        So no… “So it appears that walking (or running, etc) would have the same effect as a vibrating machine. But it also seems as though a Plant Based Whole Foods diet would have the same effect.” This is incorrect as far as running or walking on a treadmill… those are about burning calories. WBV is about short chain fatty acids.

        You need whole body VIBRATION in order to churn your insides enough to mix up the layered microbiome in the gut. That’s when you get the right mix to create Alistipes which in turn help create Butyrate.

        “While there were other changes, the most dramatic they documented was the 17-fold increase in this bacterium called Alistipes, a gut bacterium not typically in high supply there but known to be proficient at making short chain fatty acids which, in turn, are “very good” at decreasing inflammation in the gut, says Dr. Jack Yu, chief of pediatric plastic surgery at MCG. Alistipes, which helps ferment our food without producing alcohol, generally improves the metabolic status of our gut and makes us more proficient at using the glucose we consume for energy.”
        —————————————————————————————————————————————–
        I also recall ads from my childhood of vibrating machines that were supposed to “jiggle the fat off.” These seemed to work with a belt that wrapped around the body — the hips, perhaps? They fell out of favor, presumably because they didn’t work.
        ——————————————————————————————————————————
        I suspect you are right that they fell out of favor possibly because no one lost weight… but we only know about the WBV just recently… maybe it did work for that?

        1. Dr. J, please forgive my use of shouting All Caps in the above post. There’s no option on this site to use Bold, Italics, or underline, so I had to resort to that tactic to draw attention to those particular comments.

      2. Yes, exercise (eg walking/running) does appear to improve our microbiome (WBV is a form of exercise after all) including increasing production of short chain fatty acids like butyrates

        RESULTS:
        β-diversity analysis revealed that exercise-induced alterations of the gut microbiota were dependent on obesity status. Exercise increased fecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids in lean, but not obese, participants. Exercise-induced shifts in metabolic output of the microbiota paralleled changes in bacterial genes and taxa capable of short-chain fatty acid production. Lastly, exercise-induced changes in the microbiota were largely reversed once exercise training ceased.’

        https://insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=29166320

        Like everything though, too much of a good thing may be a bad thing

        ‘However, on the basis of in vitro models, Huang et al. (79) showed that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier function may be concentration-dependent. Butyrate promotes intestinal barrier function at low concentrations (≤2 mM) (77) but may disrupt intestinal barrier function by inducing apoptosis at high concentrations (5 or 8 mM) (79)’
        https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/9/1/21/4849000

        1. Wow, Tom, I am overloaded.

          I am already bummed out that my exercise might not be increasing my fecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids.

          Now, I just have to figure out what: but may disrupt intestinal barrier function by inducing apoptosis at high concentrations (5 or 8 mM) implies.

          The word “apoptosis” I mentally have in cancer category, not in intestinal barrier function.

          1. That was interesting.

            The fact that Butyrate can either improve or make obesity worse and that it also is involved in metabolism makes it an interesting topic.

          2. Now, I just have to figure out what: but may disrupt intestinal barrier function by inducing apoptosis at high concentrations (5 or 8 mM) implies.

            The word “apoptosis” I mentally have in cancer category, not in intestinal barrier function.
            ——————————————————————————————————————–
            Deb, Tom’s job is to act as that disclaimer for like a Budweiser commercial… “Pick up a couple of six packs for the holidays but remember… drink responsibly.

            That is, he is the parking brake left on as we drive to a destination. ‘-)

            He has to search high and low to find these parking brakes. In case you didn’t catch it… “Butyrate promotes intestinal barrier function at low concentrations (≤2 mM) (77) but may disrupt intestinal barrier function by inducing apoptosis at high concentrations (5 or 8 mM) (79)’ ” The operative word here is “may” plus the (5 or 8 mM) figure.

            That sounds like something pulled out of someone’s imagination. If that was proved then it would have been offered as a real thing rather than a “maybe” thing.

            Also, if it were a danger don’t you think Dr. Greger’s researchers would have noted that on his teleprompter? ‘-)

            1. Lonie,

              Yes, Tom has some qualities in common with a parking brake, but parking brakes have useful functions, which I happen to appreciate.

              https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/0ac2fc9b-3638-47c5-b6c5-2a4d83d340b7

              Science has so many “maybe” concepts right now, just waiting for studies to prove them out.

              Reading the article in the link he posted, the first thing which stood out was that maybe some of the results they got came because they were giving Butyrate as a supplement to a high-fat diet rather than it coming from the gut bacteria. Maybe the bad gut bacteria cause problems.

              Yes, that is my non-scientific winging it thought process, which generally means that the topic is over my head by a million miles so far.

            2. ‘That sounds like something pulled out of someone’s imagination.’

              It was in fact an article in one of the professional, reporting the results of a lab study. Personally, though, I wouldn’t give it much mind because 1) it was only an in vitro study, and 2) the chances of building up that amount of butyrates is probably pretty low.

              I’d rather stay grounded in the facts than build castles in the air – but your approach is probably more fun. It’s a bit Napoleon XIVth though,.to my mind.

              1. Personally, though, I wouldn’t give it much mind because 1) it was only an in vitro study, and 2) the chances of building up that amount of butyrates is probably pretty low.
                ——————————————————————————————————
                Thanks for that… you hold great power over some and this is a better use of that power.

                Hopefully this puts Deb’s mind at ease and she can continue searching for ways to increase her Butyrate which I think most will agree is a very good thing.

              2. I’d rather stay grounded in the facts than build castles in the air – but your approach is probably more fun.
                ——————————————————————————————————————————————-
                I get it… you are a skeptic. And healthy skepticism is a good thing. But skepticism just for the sake of being skeptic is feeding a personality trait rather than letting the original (newer in this case) data speak for itself.

                As for being fun. Well, I do take great joy in stumbling upon something that I believe will make my life better and am quite excited to share that with others. I leave it to others to judge the information for themselves but willingly jump in when I think they may have misunderstood the data.

  4. I have been using a vibration plate for years with two 4k dumbells doing ‘indian club’ exercises,twenty minutes a day,unfortunately cannot use clubs not enough space! then use an inversion table,full inversion for a few minutes with the dumbells this reverses the compacting effect of vibration plate. I think the high power expensive vibration machines may be questionable.

    1. I have been using a vibration plate for years with two 4k dumbells doing ‘indian club’ exercises,twenty minutes a day,unfortunately cannot use clubs not enough space! then use an inversion table,full inversion for a few minutes with the dumbells this reverses the compacting effect of vibration plate. I think the high power expensive vibration machines may be questionable.
      ————————————————————————————————————————
      I have an inversion table and was thinking about using that again, but cannot find a good place to set it up. You’ve got me thinking of what I can do away with to make the room.

      As for the expensive vibration machines, I can’t think of anything they might have that mine is lacking… except for handles to hold on to. But I just set mine up next to something I can grab if I need to stabilize. But after using it just a few times, my balance has improved to the point I don’t want any sort of safety measure.

      One of the selling points was that the vibrating platform equates to walking on a treadmill as far as exercise goes… but I didn’t buy it for the exercise. ‘-)

  5. Off topic –

    Does anybody have some recipes for some portable snacks that are savory that fit in the parameters of the daily dozen, etc., and include other recommendations for low cooking temperatures, etc., etc.?

    I’ve even tried to substitute vegetables and dried vegetables in some of these sweeter recipes but I can’t figure them out.

    I’m tired of all the sugar in these things and I usually crave something somewhat salty anyway. I know some things are available, but I also get thirsty and don’t like eating something that has the dryness of dry wheat biscuits.

    Thank you in advance.

  6. The title of this presentation is regarding probiotics, but the information delivered is regarding fiber, and I’m just a little confused

          1. On course, the good gut bacteria is fed by fiber, beans and resistant starch and that is a different way to build up good gut bacteria versus taking a probiotic. Those good gut bacteria eat what you feed them and they produce short term fatty acids such as butyrate and propionate.

            Dr. Greger has several videos on it.

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/microbiome-the-inside-story/

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/whats-your-gut-microbiome-enterotype/

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-change-your-enterotype/

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-good-bacteria-in-the-colon-without-probiotics/

            https://nutritionfacts.org/video/resistant-starch-colon-cancer/

            There are a lot more. You can go to the topic. If I post more links, it might not post.

            The whole point is that the food you eat actually works better than probiotics. Your gut microbiome needs the right food to have good gut bacteria.

      1. Oncourse,

        Probiotic refers to microbes, especially bacteria, specifically in the gut; prebiotics are the food sources that feed the probiotics/microbes, such as fiber.

  7. I get plenty of fibre from my legume, grain, nuts, seeds. herbs, and spices every day, and lately I’ve been juicing (Omega Juicer NC800HDS) the various greens, etc. as listed on the Daily Dozen so as to get all the nutrition and calories possible without overeating.

    I lost 30 pounds 8 months ago (down to 115lbs from 145 –I’m 70″ tall) unexplainably, (doctors are at a loss after all the lab tests) and so I want to get as many calories as possible without overeating, because overeating makes me bloated and throws my digestion into a tailspin. But juicing vegetables takes the fibre out.

    So my question is, should I go back to eating a combination of raw salads, and steamed or MW’d veggies, together with all the legumes and grains I Instant Pot? Or am I missing something?

    1. Peter,

      Your lab tests were all good?

      Juicing between meals caused people to gain weight in one study. Juicing with meals didn’t.

      But you are sensitive in your digestion and sensitive to overeating, which means you have good stretch receptors.

      I think Dr. Fuhrman had some advice for people who needed to gain weight.

      1. Hi Deb,

        Thanks for responding. Yes, the labs were all normal. My theory on the Juicing was that since juicing will retain the calories and the nutrition without the fibre, I would not feel as full and be able to eat more of the legumes, whole grains, etc. I’m getting to believe that I am not digesting what I eat completely between meals, which I try to eat as far apart as I can — I tried Betaine HCL to no avail. I am still working on eating/masticating more slowly and trying to be sure that what I swallow is liquid and not a slurry of food and liquid. It doesn’t seem to be helping very much yet. I’ve tried intermittent fasting, but it would work in the beginning and then not.

        Then I tried to eat only from 6:30am to 12, but I’d been eating too much out of fear I won’t get enough calories. So now I’m trying to eat less, to see if I can actually gain some weight, because even if it’s less food, digested well enough may actually gain me weight. Btw, I have been maintaining Dr Greger’s Daily Dozen fairly consistently, including exercise, climbing up the mountain near me for about 200 feet for about 40 minutes every day.

        One thing I didn’t mention is that when I lost all that weight, I also had a lot of belching, diarrhea-constipation, and extremely bloated — so bloated that I actually developed stretch marks! Now that I’m eating less, the bloating has subsided somewhat, and the belching, diarrhea-constipation syndrome has gone. All this is from the beginning of December, 2018. . . None of the doctors I visited mentioned anything about Candida or Yeast overgrowth, though these symptoms seem to point there, according to online info. If it is Candida, then the symptoms have been building for some time, which I can believe, because I’ve not had a flat stomach since my 20’s or 30’s — now I’m an otherwise healthy and happy 80 year-old.

        Thank you for bearing up and reading through all of this. I wish I had a doctor like Dr. Greger. Wouldn’t that be good?!

  8. Generally enjoy the Dr.’s videos but why must he always refer to “the evolutionary interest of the bacteria keeps us healthy”? Evolution is a lie. How can you deny God after observing such a complex system as the human body. It didn’t “evolve”, it was CREATED by God. No evolution is possible to make such a wonderful, dynamic machine as the human body. Stop with the atheist lies!

    1. Stop with the religious fantasies!

      I’m confused though. Why are you you using a Yiddishism if you are presumably some kind of christian creationist? Is there a Jewish version of evolution denialism?

      1. What are you calling a Yiddishism?

        The Christian Bible has the Torah as the Old Testament, so maybe that explains whatever you see as a Yiddishism.

        1. Deb

          by Yiddishism I meant this – ‘Stop with the atheist lies!’ ‘

          In standard English, we would simply say ‘Stop the …..”

          Saying ‘stop with’ isI believe a Yiddish way of saying the same thing. It is like ‘enough already’ – a literal translation into English of the Yiddish (or German) original, that no standard English speaker would ever say. Yiddish speakers have had such a big influence on US (especially NY) cultural life that it may sound perfectly normal to you but to native English speakers from other countries, it simply sounds bizarre (unless they have been watching far too much Seinfeld).

          Is evolution denialism limited to christian fundamentalists or do people from other religions share it, I wonder. Everyone I have come across so far who denies that evolution occurs seems to be a christian of some sort or other.

          1. Yes, it is a way of saying, “enough already” in a more casual, less imperative, more friendly and lighthearted way.

            Yes, maybe I watched far too much Seinfeld.

            1. Deb

              Yes thanks but they are not English expressions – they are Yiddish/German expressions literally translated into English.

    2. No evolution is possible to make such a wonderful, dynamic machine as the human body. Stop with the atheist lies!
      ————————————————————————————————–
      Right there with you Brian. These Non Believers are also members of the “Round World” theory… their argument being we could never sail to the Orient if the world was flat. Of course they are not taking into consideration gravity.

      Captain Nemo proved long ago that there is a transition piece of water on the sides of the earth that allows one to transition from right-side-up to upside-down without noticing it.

      Of course the peoples down under think they are right side up, but they aren’t. Again, thanks to gravity. I’ll bet if one were to measure the size of the heart of the down under people they would find it is slightly enlarged… due to needing to pump the blood up to their feet.

      Stay the course man… there are fewer and fewer of us left, but when the Rupture comes and we ascend to heaven, they will be left here on this flat earth to await the endgame.

      Neemeshubeda, porgiua, nishocta my brather.

  9. “Brian Howe says:

    Generally enjoy the Dr.’s videos but why must he always refer to “the evolutionary interest of the bacteria keeps us healthy”? Evolution is a lie. How can you deny God after observing such a complex system as the human body. It didn’t “evolve”, it was CREATED by God. No evolution is possible to make such a wonderful, dynamic machine as the human body. Stop with the atheist lies!”

    Joking, right…?

  10. Thank’s for this wonderful video, which makes me wonder if this information can be useful for treating inflamed bowel patients.
    A dear friend has recently been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, and the treatment she was administrated includes immune-suppression medication with a low fibre diet . It kind of works for avoiding seizures, although her overall level of energy is kind of low.
    Are you aware of a treatment protocol that is “proven” (double blind, placebo based) to recover Crohn’s patients, and ween them from the above mentioned medication and diet?

      1. Amir, the gastro doc here recommends starting to add -Soluble- fiber -After the flair is over-.
        Starting with a small amount and working up. Can start with something like ‘Heather’s Acacia Fiber.

        As the gut heals then other fiber can be slowly added.
        Note there are 2 primary types of fiber, soluble, and insoluble. The insoluble type can be harsh on an inflamed gut. The soluble is soothing and healing. You can find out the breakdown of the fiber content in various foods on the internet.
        Many high carbohydrate foods become more digestible when cooked, then cooled, and reheated.
        And, in general, raw food can be a problem till healing has occurred.

        People with Crohn’s need to particularly avoid gums in food, and processed foods as those have a lot of questionable ingredients. Many react to certain foods. Keeping a food dairy, and keeping meals very simple can enable them to see if certain foods are triggers. The triggers are usually something eaten frequently. Red meat, wheat, dairy, citrus, corn are common ones.

          1. Amir, there is a probiotic that is used for Crohn’s with varying success. It is called Saccharomyces boulardii. Relevant parts of this paper are on pages 12-13.
            The price has come down considerably since it was first tried. It’s available on Amazon, for instance, and you can read the reviews. Note that it is paired with pharmaceuticals, at least at first.

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3296087/

        1. Thanks for posting the link to the study, Marilyn.

          My cousin’s husband has had debilitating Crohn’s for decades.

          He doesn’t eat well, so his condition can get quite serious.

          My favorite sentence was: Remission was maintained in 15 of 16 patients (94%) in the SVD

          Boy, that poor 16th patient.

          Not losing weight on WFPB, I feel like that person.

          But I also feel blessed because all of my disease symptoms went away.

          Hoping the 16th patient at least got some improvement.

  11. I have been looking at the synapses in Alzheimer’s and the Cholinergic System

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4787279/

    Natural sources and I couldn’t tell if there were any foods in it, because all of the names were scientific names. Possibly asparagus.

    I did find an article which gave me 5 essential oils, which my friend sells, but I would rather use food if possible.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3744903/

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/261774287_Survey_of_Acetylcholinesterase_Inhibitory_Activity_in_Essential_Oils_From_Aromatic_Plants

      1. I just found a source of oil in my diet.

        The hummus I buy at Whole Foods is no oil, but the same brand has an oil version and Whole Foods for the garlic flavor combines them.

        I was still having oil maybe every other time because that is how it was stacked.

        It used to say “no oil” on the front, but they moved that to the cover and the body of the hummus, which you can see is identical.

        Anyway, it is that I buy so many of their garlic hummus that they need to fill in that section, but they literally seem to stack them alternating, and that could be hindering my weight loss.

        Hooray, for finding something.

        Boo, that they do it that way.

        1. It is an identical label from the front and that is what I see when I look up at them on the shelf.

          The no-oil version is on a different side of the case as the oil version, so I never noticed that they had the same label.

          I have even talked to the person who fills that case and she said, “Ours has no oil” and every other hummus that I bought says, “no oil” and the alternating don’t say it.

          Boy, I may need to make my own hummus someday.

          After I catch up on everything.

          I am doing better at executive function and I have started getting things accomplished, but I still am prone to creating clutter and I am still not efficient. I look at the clutter and start speaking to my brain and say, “I know that you are trying to do better, but this shows me that you have a ways to go.”

            1. Thanks, Barb!

              I do have to try it.

              The brand I buy actually has a no-tahini version.

              It does have a little sea salt though.

              So it isn’t perfect.

              I haven’t wanted to do cooking and cleaning for a very long time.

              Honestly, my brain is so much better, but I end up with so much clutter particularly when I do things in the kitchen.

              I end up using 3 times the bowls and utensils that are called for.

              I haven’t figured it out yet, but I genuinely can’t use an instapot and I accidentally threw out the pusher on my food processor.

              I watch a lot of videos, but my brain maybe gets lost between 2 recipes and is so inefficient.

              I am making a dish for a family gathering tomorrow and I thought I chose something simple, without a lot of ingredients, but it cost me $85 and I mentally looked at the dish and I could go to a very nice restaurant for that much.

              Plus, they say 20 minutes prep and it will take me all night tonight and what will happen is that often I end up not bringing it by the end.

              Either the Instapot dissolves it to nothing or I just won’t finish.

              I am hoping that my brain has improved enough to actually succeed, but for the past few years, I haven’t succeeded even once for that. I usually buy a runner-up concept and bring that.

              Yes, I should just do the runner-up concept and skip all the stress, but it is a sweet potato and lentil and chard and curry and ginger and a few other ingredients. If I start tonight, maybe I will finish on time. Or find out that I have to go buy the ingredients again and use the glop as the comfort part of the dish.

              1. Laughing.

                I always start the night before and I never finish on time and usually have to do the whole process twice and still don’t finish.

                But, I end up with $170 worth of meals for myself by the end.

                1. I can’t even explain to you how much of a crooked line my brain functions in.

                  You might be able to figure that out after having me on here commenting for the past year and 8 months.

                  My food processor is an example of my brain not functioning.

                  The funny part would have been the times I tried to use it after and I couldn’t figure out why the machine didn’t turn on at all.

                  I ended up getting a whole bunch of different types of mechanical cutting devices while my brain processed what was going wrong.

                  I eventually figured out that it wouldn’t do anything without the pusher.

                  And I had a vague recollection of looking at something on the counter and thinking it was packaging and it may have gone in my recycling bin or something.,

                  1. I am thinking I figured out that if you adjust the power on my instapot it resets to the 35 minute default time.

                    Plus I know that often it shuts off almost immediately and I have to redo the process.

                    Plus it has a knob that scrolls through settings and one of them is supposed to turn on and off the warmer at the end and I think the writing on the screen is too small for that part and somehow it stays on and those things all make it harder.

                    I used to have a brand where you just set the time and temperature and warmer button was a separate button.

                    1. Well Deb, sounds like you are doing great to me! I think it was Dr Greger’s recipe I tried, but I might be mistaken. I used cooked chickpeas, lemon juice, cloves of garlic, and silken tofu (about 1/4 cup ? can’t remember but i will look it up) Very fresh tasting, and easy to make and you can eat a lot of it lol
                      Lately I have been taking the ultra simple path as far as meals are concerned. Just a bit tired of cooking and chopping lol so I don’t do much. Steam some broccoli, throw the sweet potatoes into the oven, fluff up a salad and we’re done. Apples for dessert. One of these days I will feel inspired again.
                      I do agree with you too about the expense. I find that if I go to the store to buy ingredients to make a recipe, that dish will have cost a lot by the time I am done. If, however, I make a shopping list for items in general that I can make a particular cuisine or style of food, then my money goes farther. Some weeks I make soups, or maybe buddha bowls or wraps for example. Anyway, this week it’s whole food, no recipes, and simple baking or steaming :)

                    2. Barb,

                      Yes, me, too.

                      Steaming, microwaving, salads and wraps are my wheel well.

                      I did buy a new pan this weekend.

                      I think it will be easier for me to do the recipe on the stove.

                      It is a Forks Over Knives video recipe and they did it on the stove.

                      I watched a lot of prep videos with it. I know that my brain has confusion with the Instapot and that I need to succeed this time.

                      My coworker has said about me that I am like a cross between Rainman and the Daleks from Dr. Who – that I can glance at the floor and know how many toothpicks fell out of the box and then can’t figure out how to use a crosswalk. The Daleks part was that they had developed the technology and had the plans to destroy the world, but couldn’t figure out how to get up and down the stairs.

                      He turns out to be more than a little bit right, but my defense will come from Rainman, where the walk light starts flashing “Don’t walk” before he even gets halfway across and that is just plain confusing. Who designed it that way? Recently, I used a more modern walk light and pushed the button, which I think was only for blind people and it started talking to me that I had to wait to cross. I can’t remember the words, but it was not confusing for blind people at all. Deaf people still have the confusing end.

                    3. I would be on the anti-Dalek team, but I would have the same executive function problems they have.

                      Though it is 3 am and I ended up coming down to work and getting so much done.

                      It feels so good to get things accomplished.

    1. It has a lot of swearing but I like it because when I was in college my friends and I would go shopping at Goodwill. Also, my friend won at Wheel of Fortune and got a Gucci gift certificate and the t-shirts were $50 back then. He used the same $50 and I don’t believe that they didn’t go up.

      Laughing, I understand his sense of humor, except that I don’t need all of the swears.

      1. And, no, I had never really heard of him, but his grandmother had a 100th birthday and he did a video with her.

        Longevity is such an odd thing.

          1. I succeeded at bringing the dish I set out to bring.

            Stove top is easier for me than Instapot.

            I had stopped using the stove because of aluminum in my pans and because I was afraid that my brain was too bad that I might burn my house down.

            One time back then I put my grocery bags on the stove before unloading them and one hit the knob and turned the stove on and a bag did start smoldering, but my mind is much better now.

            1. way to go Deb! good job on cooking the dish! All of us need to be mindful in cooking, using appliances, driving, where we put our keys etc. Meditation has been helping me develop a bit more choice on where to put my attention, and ability to keep that focus. I am glad you are feeling better, and you enjoyed your day.

  12. One caveat: If your gut is already in dysbiosis, adding fiber will make it worse! That happened to me. My doctor kept insisting I eat more and more fiber, and I just had more and more pain, bloating and misery. It wasn’t until I found out I had a leaky gut and sensitivity to gluten (from another doctor) that I was able to heal the lining of my intestines and begin to eat ample amounts of fiber again.

  13. Claudia,

    Excellent point. Knowing what’s happening in your gut is a critical issue, before just assuming that a certain food or diet will indeed be helpful.

    Glad you found someone who takes the “test don’t just guess” approach. Just for clarity… sometimes it’s an obvious change that makes all the difference, such as sensitivity to glutens….

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  14. Dr. Alan Kadish … Thank you, and kia ora from New Zealand. I’ve not eaten meat poultry fish or eggs for nearly 50 yrs, & dairy for around 20. I’ve always had a high fibre diet, and for the past 15 or so yrs have eaten WFPB, (only concessions, a little salt+ a teaspoon of oil to grease a pan here & there). So I was concerned to find I’d developed IBS. I’m managing it by limiting high FODMAP foods. Which is a challenge, as many of the major fruits, veges, legumes & grains are high in FODMAPS. All the more reason for the WFPB experts to better address the issue. When they don’t, people go back to eating animal foods, since they’re FODMAP free (except dairy). I think, further to just learning how wonderful fibre is, vegans deserve to be better informed on the whole picture on gut management; the difference between IBS, Crones, Gluten sensitivity. This knowledge will help many of use who know we don’t suffer from the Low-Fibre-SAD-Diet problem. I’ve many IBS tips, and it may be that others do. Meanwhile a thorough Dr Greger video on the topic would be much appreciated. The scientists at Monash University in Australia are leading experts in the field should you want a starting point …

    1. Redha,

      May I suggest that you consider doing a bit more testing? When I find someone has developed IBS 2nd to this many years of a successful diet,,I typically find that there is a change in the microbiome or other functional changes, such as a decreased digestive enzyme level, etc.

      In my practice I like using the Genova Lab CDSA2 lab approach however, there are other labs also doing similar work.

      Please keep in mind that in my experience those with the need for a Foodmap diet approach is not necessarily lifelong. So please keep looking for a solution.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com.

      1. Dr Kadish Thank you for your kindness and helpfulness. I live in New Zealand, so have started inquiring re tests here.
        Meanwhile, over quite some years now, limiting certain foods seems to keep it under control, and in every other way I’m very healthy at 70 years.

        The major challenge I find is support for fodmap *vegans*. The WFPB community so far avoids the issue, *(I understand why with so many high fodmap foods being key to WFPB diet!).* I look forward to the WFPB community accommodating the issue. It is surprisingly common, and so far, vegans find ourselves guided towards keto type diets, and fodmap regimes which favour meat, fish, eggs etc, over legumes. Those diets also include many refined foods like white sugar. Groan! There is no way I will be abandoning WFPB, and am creating recipes, and a list of tips from my experience, that I hope will help other vegans/WFPB eaters.

        Thank you once again for o generously taking time to help.

        Radha

        Radha Sahar Songwriter & Painter Art Website Music & Blog Children’s Music

        Virus-free.
        http://www.avast.com

  15. I watched this Youtube video about efas. It’s titled: ‘Essential Fatty Acids: Recommendations for Plant Based Diets: Dr Tim Radak’.

    What interests me is the comment made that says about 80% of the efas get burned for energy and only 20% of them actually get used for other things. I’m guessing that means that you could possibly get away with consuming 20% the adequate intake. I’m thinking though that pufas oxidise easily so perhaps it’s better to get the adequate intake so that the remnant that survives oxidation is enough for the body to use.

    I looked at the back of an oats packet at the health food store and they said that rolled oats are normally steamed to deactivate lipase and stop oxidation from this process. Their oats weren’t steamed and that you should store their oats in the fridge. It is because the dehulling process activates the enzyme. Any other nuts and seeds that have this? I’d like to know about sunflower seed kernels and pepitas.

  16. Hello Dr. Greger,

    Can you please research on Exfoliative Cheilitis (peeling lips)? There seems to be nothing on this condition online and even the hundreds of doctors I visited didn’t know what to do. My lips are always crusting and peeling- it’s nothing short of a nightmare to live with this condition. I have endometriosis too – not sure if this has anything to with it but EC followed endometriosis in about a year maybe. I even tried a variety of diets as well, but nothing seems to be working. I pray that this message reaches you. Thanks!

  17. My question is about fasting and gut health. While on a sustained water fast, I’m not taking in fiber. Does this negatively affect my microbiome? thanks!

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