Is Keto an Effective Cancer-Fighting Diet?

Is Keto an Effective Cancer-Fighting Diet?
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The clinical use of ketogenic diets for epilepsy and cancer: what does the science say?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, is the universal go-to fuel for the cells throughout our bodies. Our brain burns through a quarter-pound of sugar a day, its “preferred metabolic fuel.” Our body can break down proteins and make glucose from scratch, but most comes from our diet in the form of sugars and starches. If we stop eating carbohydrates, or stop eating altogether, most of our cells switch over to burning fat. But fat has difficulty getting through the blood-brain barrier. But our brain has a constant massive need for fuel, one organ accounting for up to half of our energy needs. Without it, the lights go out…permanently.

To make that much sugar from scratch, our body would need to break down about a half-pound of protein a day. That means we’d cannibalize ourselves to death within two weeks. But people can fast for months. The answer to the puzzle was discovered in 1967. Harvard researchers famously stuck catheters into the brains of obese subjects who had been fasting for over a month, and discovered that ketones had replaced glucose as the preferred fuel for the brain. Your liver can turn fat into ketones, which can then breach the blood-brain barrier and sustain your brain if you’re not getting enough carbohydrates. Switching fuels has such an effect on brain activity that it has been used to treat epilepsy since antiquity.

The prescription of fasting for the treatment of epileptic seizures dates back to Hippocrates. In the Bible, Jesus seems to have concurred. To this day, it’s unclear why switching from blood sugar to ketones as a primary fuel source has such a dampening effect on brain overactivity. How long can you fast, though? To prolong the fasting therapy, in 1921 a distinguished physician scientist at the Mayo Clinic suggested trying what he called a “ketogenic diet,” a high-fat diet designed to be so deficient in carbohydrates it could effectively mimic the fasting state. “[R]emarkable improvement” was noted the first time it was put to the test—efficacy that was later confirmed in randomized, controlled trials. Ketogenic diets started to fall out of favor in 1938 with the discovery of the anti-seizure drug that would become known as Dilantin, but ketogenic diets are still in use today as a third- or fourth-line treatment for drug-refractory epilepsy in children.

Oddly, the success of ketogenic diets against pediatric epilepsy seems to get conflated by “keto diet” proponents into suggesting a ketogenic diet is beneficial for everyone. But you know what else sometimes works for intractable epilepsy? Brain surgery. But I don’t hear people at the gym clamoring to get their skulls sawed open.

Since when do medical therapies translate into healthy lifestyle choices? Scrambling brain activity with electroshock therapy can be helpful in some cases of major depression, so what…pass the electrodes? Ketogenic diets are also being tested to see if they can slow the growth of certain brain tumors. Even if it works, you know what else can help slow cancer growth? Chemotherapy. So why go keto when you can just go chemo?

Promoters of ketogenic diets for cancer, paid for by so-called “ketone technology” companies that will send you salted caramel bone broth powder for a hundred bucks a pound. Or companies that market ketogenic meals report “extraordinary [anecdotal] responses” in some cancer patients, but more concrete evidence is simply lacking. Even the theoretical underpinnings may be questionable. A common refrain is that “cancer feeds on sugar.” But all cells feed on sugar. Advocating ketogenic diets for cancer is like saying Hitler breathed air, so let’s boycott oxygen.

Cancer can feed on ketones, too. Ketones have been found to fuel human breast cancer growth, and drive metastases in an experimental model—more than doubling tumor growth. Some have even speculated that may be why breast cancer often metastasizes to the liver, the main site of ketone production. If you drip ketones on breast cancer cells in a petri dish directly, the genes that get turned on and off make for a much more aggressive cancer, associated with a significantly lower five-year survival in breast cancer patients. Researchers are even considering designing ketone-blocking drugs to prevent further cancer growth by halting ketone production.

And think about what eating a ketogenic diet might entail. High animal fat intake may increase the mortality risk among breast cancer survivors, and potentially play a role in its development in the first place through oxidative stress, hormone disruption, or inflammation.

Men, too: “a strong association [has also been found] between saturated fat intake and prostate cancer progression.” Those in the top third of consumption of these kinds of fat-rich animal foods appeared to triple their risk of dying from prostate cancer. Not necessarily fat in general—no difference in breast cancer death rates based on total fat intake—but saturated fat intake may negatively impact breast cancer survival, a 50 percent increased risk of dying from breast cancer. There’s a reason the official American Cancer Society and American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines recommend a dietary pattern for breast cancer patients that’s essentially the opposite of a ketogenic diet: “high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes, meaning beans, split peas, chickpeas and lentils, and low in saturated fats.”

So far, not a single clinical study has shown “a measurable benefit from a ketogenic diet for any human cancer.” There are currently at least a dozen trials underway, however, and the hope is that at least some cancer types will respond. Still, even then that wouldn’t serve as a basis for recommending ketogenic diets for the general population any more than recommending everyone go out and get radiation, surgery, and chemo for kicks.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Ted Eytan via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, is the universal go-to fuel for the cells throughout our bodies. Our brain burns through a quarter-pound of sugar a day, its “preferred metabolic fuel.” Our body can break down proteins and make glucose from scratch, but most comes from our diet in the form of sugars and starches. If we stop eating carbohydrates, or stop eating altogether, most of our cells switch over to burning fat. But fat has difficulty getting through the blood-brain barrier. But our brain has a constant massive need for fuel, one organ accounting for up to half of our energy needs. Without it, the lights go out…permanently.

To make that much sugar from scratch, our body would need to break down about a half-pound of protein a day. That means we’d cannibalize ourselves to death within two weeks. But people can fast for months. The answer to the puzzle was discovered in 1967. Harvard researchers famously stuck catheters into the brains of obese subjects who had been fasting for over a month, and discovered that ketones had replaced glucose as the preferred fuel for the brain. Your liver can turn fat into ketones, which can then breach the blood-brain barrier and sustain your brain if you’re not getting enough carbohydrates. Switching fuels has such an effect on brain activity that it has been used to treat epilepsy since antiquity.

The prescription of fasting for the treatment of epileptic seizures dates back to Hippocrates. In the Bible, Jesus seems to have concurred. To this day, it’s unclear why switching from blood sugar to ketones as a primary fuel source has such a dampening effect on brain overactivity. How long can you fast, though? To prolong the fasting therapy, in 1921 a distinguished physician scientist at the Mayo Clinic suggested trying what he called a “ketogenic diet,” a high-fat diet designed to be so deficient in carbohydrates it could effectively mimic the fasting state. “[R]emarkable improvement” was noted the first time it was put to the test—efficacy that was later confirmed in randomized, controlled trials. Ketogenic diets started to fall out of favor in 1938 with the discovery of the anti-seizure drug that would become known as Dilantin, but ketogenic diets are still in use today as a third- or fourth-line treatment for drug-refractory epilepsy in children.

Oddly, the success of ketogenic diets against pediatric epilepsy seems to get conflated by “keto diet” proponents into suggesting a ketogenic diet is beneficial for everyone. But you know what else sometimes works for intractable epilepsy? Brain surgery. But I don’t hear people at the gym clamoring to get their skulls sawed open.

Since when do medical therapies translate into healthy lifestyle choices? Scrambling brain activity with electroshock therapy can be helpful in some cases of major depression, so what…pass the electrodes? Ketogenic diets are also being tested to see if they can slow the growth of certain brain tumors. Even if it works, you know what else can help slow cancer growth? Chemotherapy. So why go keto when you can just go chemo?

Promoters of ketogenic diets for cancer, paid for by so-called “ketone technology” companies that will send you salted caramel bone broth powder for a hundred bucks a pound. Or companies that market ketogenic meals report “extraordinary [anecdotal] responses” in some cancer patients, but more concrete evidence is simply lacking. Even the theoretical underpinnings may be questionable. A common refrain is that “cancer feeds on sugar.” But all cells feed on sugar. Advocating ketogenic diets for cancer is like saying Hitler breathed air, so let’s boycott oxygen.

Cancer can feed on ketones, too. Ketones have been found to fuel human breast cancer growth, and drive metastases in an experimental model—more than doubling tumor growth. Some have even speculated that may be why breast cancer often metastasizes to the liver, the main site of ketone production. If you drip ketones on breast cancer cells in a petri dish directly, the genes that get turned on and off make for a much more aggressive cancer, associated with a significantly lower five-year survival in breast cancer patients. Researchers are even considering designing ketone-blocking drugs to prevent further cancer growth by halting ketone production.

And think about what eating a ketogenic diet might entail. High animal fat intake may increase the mortality risk among breast cancer survivors, and potentially play a role in its development in the first place through oxidative stress, hormone disruption, or inflammation.

Men, too: “a strong association [has also been found] between saturated fat intake and prostate cancer progression.” Those in the top third of consumption of these kinds of fat-rich animal foods appeared to triple their risk of dying from prostate cancer. Not necessarily fat in general—no difference in breast cancer death rates based on total fat intake—but saturated fat intake may negatively impact breast cancer survival, a 50 percent increased risk of dying from breast cancer. There’s a reason the official American Cancer Society and American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines recommend a dietary pattern for breast cancer patients that’s essentially the opposite of a ketogenic diet: “high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes, meaning beans, split peas, chickpeas and lentils, and low in saturated fats.”

So far, not a single clinical study has shown “a measurable benefit from a ketogenic diet for any human cancer.” There are currently at least a dozen trials underway, however, and the hope is that at least some cancer types will respond. Still, even then that wouldn’t serve as a basis for recommending ketogenic diets for the general population any more than recommending everyone go out and get radiation, surgery, and chemo for kicks.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Ted Eytan via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

“Keto” has been the most-searched keyword on NutritionFacts.org for months, and I didn’t have much specific to offer…until now.

This is the first in a seven-video series. Here is what’s to come:

For an overview of my cancer work, watch How Not to Die from Cancer.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

275 responses to “Is Keto an Effective Cancer-Fighting Diet?

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      1. The current image is a much better choice for this video. The first one which pictured bacon on a burger with cold bacon grease smeared on top was ‘over the top’ imo.

      1. I do not think it was a sarcasm. Have a look at Dr. Tullio Simoncini’s work. I am a proponent of cell metabolic change (Otto Warburg) as a root cause of cancer so I have watched Dr. Simoncini’s vids with an open mind, but he did not change my mind. Fungus can be found in some types of cancer as co-infection – after all, cancerous cells weaken the whole immune system – I would not be surprised if someone comes with a theory that all cancers are caused by parasites (some are, though…). More over, this whole “cancer = fungus” is fed by a group of people promoting MMS/CDS as the miracle treatment for all diseases…

        1. Hulda Clark also used to also claim that cancer was the result of unknown bacteria/fungus/virus and created a ‘zapper’ that was supposed kill them as her book was called CURE FOR ALL CANCERS. She died of uterine cancer, but before she died many people put trust in her and also died.

          1. Jimbo I can second that, but I would rather stay away from “he/she claimed something and he/she died from…” – H Jay Dinshah, founder of American Vegan Society, died in his 66 on heart attack… It is great to be vegan, but you have to do it RIGHT. It is great to be omnivore (with 85-90% plant-based diet), but again – you have to do it RIGHT…

            1. MartinNovotny,

              I agree with you that “vegan” does not necessarily mean “healthy;” there are a LOT of junk foods that are vegan. That’s why I say that I am a Plant Based Whole Foods eater, meaning that I avoid animal products AND processed foods (though I do use some lightly processed ones). I also eat a varied diet: veggies and fruit, legumes and whole grains, and some nuts and seeds, using Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen as guidance.

              But I also recognize that there are no guarantees. Meaning that there is no guarantee that I will avoid all heart disease, cancer, etc. For starters, though I have been a vegetarian for almost 50 years, I only gave up dairy products and eggs a few years ago. And before that, I ate meat growing up — though not much, as we couldn’t afford it back then. And I think that what you eat your whole life is important. But also, nutrition science currently gives only general guidance, and eating PBWF improves my risks, but does not drop them to 0% or raise them to 100% And there are no doubt factors not amenable to diet.

              But I stopped eating meat for sustainability and environmental reasons, and on that basis, there is no reason at all to eat any animal products. I wish I’d stopped dairy and eggs a long time ago, but I was constantly bullied on my food choices, and ALWAYS asked: “But where do you get your protein?” “How can being a vegetarian be healthy?” I am so glad to learn that I can get protein FROM PLANT FOODS, and that eating PBWF is HEALTHIER than eating animal products. I just wish I’d learned this much, much earlier.

              It really is never too late to teach an old dog new tricks. I see this with my little old rescue mutt (now vegan), and I see this with my husband and me.

              1. I am 76 and went PBWF about 3 years ago for my health. Declining kidney function is now “age normal” (slightly down) and all the other factors are normal. I occasionally have a roasted barrel chicken leg, my only vice here in Thailand.

              2. Very true. Lots of Indians are vegetarians but they do have a high rate of CHD. Excessive use of oil and ghee could be one of the reasons. Also it is said that Asians do have smaller diameter of veins and are therefore susceptible to blockages much faster compared to the Western counterparts.

              1. Mr Fumbefingers, may I ask if you have watched that video? If someone stated here that this “keto and cancer” vid is “off the standard”, I do not really know how to classify this 2003 vid… Full of manipulation, full of half-truths… Statements like “fisheaters cheat” by eating EPA/DHA without conversion of plant-based ALA is ridiculous… Dr. Greger somehow forgot to mention that conversion of ALA to EPA/DHA is really low (8-20%, differs men vs. women) so his suggestion to increase consumption of flaxseed is rather laugh-able. Recommending replacement of sawflower/sunflower/cottonseed oil for EVO for cooking and baking is also something that I would never recommend (with the exception of short-time and gentle sauteeing). And the list would go on…. Honestly, if I would be thinking to become vegan or vegetarian, having seen this video as the solely source of information, I would run away from this idea.

                BTW, no reasoning of Jay Dinshah’s death… Or was it a combination of using wrong oils, not supplementing with B12 and not taking care of vitamin/mineral defficiencies?

                One note: I am fully aware that back than in 2003 noone, even Dr. Greger, had data we have now.

                1. Yes,I watched it. Your interpretation seems ‘off’ to me. Perhaps your understanding of colloquial English and humour, eg fish eaters ‘cheat”. is an issue here. Also you don’t give detailed examples of what you claim are problems.

                  One you do give is the ALA conversion rate but the balance of evdence is with Greger not you. First, sure fish eaters have poor conversion rates but there is some suggestion that non-fish eaters have higher conversion rates. Also, as far as I know, trials where people’s DHA/EPA levels have been raised by supplementation have not demonstarted improved clinical outcomes.

                  Also, US mainstream authorities (Academy of Medicine) recommend ALA and there are no Dietary Reference Intakes for either DHA or EPA. Further, the whole question of whether so-called vegans should supplement with DHA/EPA remains hotly debated to this day. I am surprised that you are unaware of this.

                  Note however that Greger currently recommends DHA/EPA supplementation (for brain health).

                  Overall, his point seems simple. And unobjectionable. Many so-called vegans eat unhealthy diets, don’t eat whole foods and nor do they plan their diets to address nutritional needs. Therefore it is unsurprising that many vegans have no better health than most North Americans. Nothing really surprising there – avoiding meat is all well and good but replacing it with.refined carbohydrates, trans fats and processed foods generally just as bad or worse.

                  I am unconvinced that your detailed points are valid.

                  1. Yup, I might not be familiar with this kind of humor. But I was referring to conversion of ALA to EPA/DHA that also Dr. Greger mentioned. Without adding that info on 8-20% conversion rate… With “US mainstream authorities” – if there any other authority that you would follow? How about https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf or https://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/FFA_summary_rec_conclusion.pdf?ua=1? Naming one that does not have any recommendation does not change much…

                    1. The 2010 US dietary guidelines you reference have been replaced by the 2015-20 dietary guidelines. They do not recommend DHA/EPA supplementation for ‘vegans’ either (consistent with the position of the US National Academy of Medicine)
                      https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-5/

                      I am aware that the WHO report recommends DHA/EPA consumption. So does the EFSA for that matter.

                      However, Greger is a US MD and criticising him for providing advice in 2003 to ‘vegans’ (advice that was consistent with the position of the US National Academies of Science), because it was later,contradicted by a 2010 WHO report, makes it seem lthat you are trying much too hard to find something critical to say about him.

                    2. Note: The video was uploaded in 2013 but the talk was actually given in 2003. Greger refers to Dave Thomas dying in ‘Januray of last year’ Dave Thomas died in January 2002.

            2. There is nothing to back up the idea that it’s great to be an omnivore (with 85-90% plant-based diet). That is the equivalent of saying it’s great to smoke 2 or 3 cigarettes a day (with 85-90% fresh air). When you sit down at the table to eat an animal carcass, it’s 10-15 minutes of enjoyment for you, but for the animal (generally) it’s an entire lifetime of suffering. The environment, health, endurance, karma… all give the same message when it comes to diet.

              1. Michael, this comparison if really off any charts… Too simplistic and too manipulative. But my main problem (and it is my problem, not yours, all the other readers) is that I do have a health perspective on this whole discussion, not an ethical one. Not saying that most of the readers here do not know that there are positive health consequences when moving towards plant-based diet. But I do know quite a few people that went vegan way purely from ethical reasons and destroyed their health, not minding what they eat (except for checking it does not come from an animal…). And again, if I eat anything animal-based, it would be of highest quality = this is somehow not in line with commercial agriculture, cruelty, cages, etc., etc. So even though my main interest is my health (and health of my closest ones), it is about being mindful (not consciously) about suffering and environment… Again, if everyone would get to the stage where 90% of his/her diet would consist out of whole plant based diet, this world would be a better place to live…

                1. Hopefully the maturity level of this site always keeps it’s professional demeanor. Debate with the intent to learn can be very helpful.

                  In the past I’ve been open to the idea that meat was healthy, after all this was the message for the last hundred plus years. But no one ever shows legitimate evidence that meat is healthy. At some point a person comes to the conclusion, no one shows evidence, because there is none.

                  Martin, we can agree, a 90% plant based diet would be a huge benefit to Westernize, meat eating countries.

                  1. Good that we agree on the last note. Just to make it clear – I would never ever buy anything animal-based from the local hypermarket. I do eat eggs (delivered by my mom – from pasture-raised chicken), fish (mainly local ones that I catch on my own – 99% of types living in my area have zero problems with heavy metals) and once or twice (max.) organ meats from grass-fed bulls that I buy directly from the farmer (that I visit on regular basis, without prior announcement). With fruits and veggies – I only buy those listed on “Clean 15” list published by EWG is hypermarket. For the rest – I grow it on my own or exchange my produce with other growers that grow organic quality. I do buy about 350 ingredients in organic quality (worth of 4 Mio dollars monthly) for the production plant (vegan/organic/gluten-free certified) and you would be surprised what is offered with “bio” label – no problem to get an analysis with 3-4 pesticides within one offered lot… Germans even invented their own norm (BNN) that is less strict compared to EU-Organic norms – just to be able to offer something labeled that way… So with both, animal or plant, one has to be really cautious what he/she buys…

        2. Ever hear of the reverse Warburg effect? I find it to be interesting, especially since I’m related to Otto (and Paul) Warburg on my mother’s side. I hate to admit it, but I think my famous, Nobel prize winning relative made a mistake in this by doing his analysis on cells in vitro instead of in vivo. The disease of cancer is apparently a complex of both cancer cells and normal cells that have been recruited to support the cancer cells.

    1. simple carbs overload the regulatory system in the body, yes. I assume you are using “fungus” metaphorically. Sweets ( processed food to extract all nutrients leaving only sugar ) are not advocated by most knowledgable people, agreed, being anti-Keto does not then assume you live at Willy Wonka’s Chocolate factory.

      This video says that Keto has not demonstrated that carb restricted diets prevent cancer in a general sense. The Warburg effect still exists for treatment of specific cancers if they prove sensitive, I recommend the Prolon FMD protocol for cancer treatment advocated by Dr Valter Longo, and being a good way to leverage the Warburg effect and others by using a periodic fast, not a constant diet. Complex carbs are king, I am now readjusting my thinking over fats. Peace.

    2. Up to 20% of all cancers are linked to infections—particularly viruses—and the list of potentially carcinogenic infectious agents is growing.

      That is a quote from the Bovine Leukemia and Breast Cancer video by Dr. Greger.

      The problem with “Cancer is a fungus” logic is that Cancer has different causes.

    3. A little observation goes a long way when it comes to good health.

      A few years back, I relocated with work from out of state. Myself and another business professional were in the same boat, both of us moving from out of state and renting the same house until we found something more permanent.

      He was in his sixties, and one night returned from work late in the evening, which was normal for him. He managed a small fiber optic company and generally worked into the evening. So he started to prepare his meal for the evening, a large steak and some wine. Dinner time would have been around 8:30 PM for him. Both of us would be up early and out the door the following day before 7 AM. And I distinctly remember seeing him as he headed out the door, his face was all sunken, bags under his eyes, it looked like the grim reaper was coming for him. In a word, he looked like crap! And I remember thinking, why does he look so bad off! And then the thought came about his meal the night before, and how his body was likely smuggling to digest that large hunk of animal flesh all night.

      With a little observation anyone can see the results of diet. On the opposite end of the scale, if you’re ever around someone that eats a good amount of raw greens and fruits you will notice a glow and distinct beauty in their skin and eyes.

    4. Doug Kaughman from the show “Know the Cause” states that some cancers and fungus look and act the same and look & act the same under the microscope. He has offered up many studies of varying resources that offer evidence that if some cancers were treated with fungus/mold remedies that many cancers have been shown to become either non-life threatening or just go away altogether. *Doug Kaughman has been about the ultimate healthy diet and lifestyle for decades. I happened to come across his show back around 2004 ? or earlier. He’s been around since the 90’s and some of his books came out in the 80’s.

  1. So, I notice you say oatmeal is a reduced risk food in regards to Non alcohol fatty liver disease. Are you really saying its ok to eat food that are a reduced risk? That sounds risky. How about if you concentrate on telling us what is not risky? Is that really a novel idea?

    1. Breathing is risky. Everything is risky, even the most heathy foods, in some way. it’s just that risk is relative, context is important and it’s the dose that makes the posison. Is that really a novel idea?

      This site gives us useful and relevant information. How we use that information is up to us.

  2. Great informativ video as always! I have a very serious concern regarding a family member and wanted to ask for advice:

    Μy sister, who went plant-based vegan with me nearly 6 years ago, recently (a few months ago) decided that, because of her acne and digestive issues, going full on animal-based keto with no fruits and very limited vegetables was the best decision for her. Since then, her cravings and issues went away, her acne cleared up and she reportedly feels better and lighter than ever.
    Me, a curious and skeptical med student, also noticed extrem halitosis, her seemingly lethargic temper and her first ever shingles 3 months ago which accompanied a viral infection, that made her feel sick and stop exercising for several weeks.
    Whenever we try to talk about diet, she gets very aggressively defensive and brings up books like “Lies my doctor taught me” and how illnesses associated with western diet come from the vast amount of refined and unrefined carbohydrates consumed and not from grass fed organic meat, coconut oil (her holy grail) and other foods rich in saturated fats. She also reports studies she read about cholesterol actually being quite the opposite from harmful for the body, but rather necessary and atherosclerosis etc. being the result of inflammation correlated to high-“sugar” (=carbohydrates) consumption. All she sees in plant foods are harmful anti nutrients and insulin spiking carbs. She has spent a lot of time researching the ketogenic diet, the AIP and all their benefits for the treatment of various diseases. But the lacking evidence in actual studies really makes me question her sources
    I am deeply worried about her health and wanted to ask if anyone has ever faced a similar situation and how he/she dealt with it?

    Your fellow plant-based nutrition interested med student from Vienna.

    1. I am in a similar situation, just study up on keto and plant based. Become the expert and lead by example. Let the dead burry the dead, and if the dead want to live they will see the living thrive and follow them. Hopefully by the time Dr.Grergers last video on keto comes out his series will go viral and the keto age will end. We must all be experts on the human body and foods. Learn absolutely everything and become a bulletproof plant-based badass!

    2. Cara,

      I have gone through this for the past year and a half. Everybody around me went Keto and I went WFPB.

      What I will say is that if you can just listen and not debate, and just genuinely make peace with them and care, a year and a half later, 3 or 4 of them have become more open to WFPB. That happened without one lecture for me.

      There were times in the beginning when they did their spiel that I tried to interject the opposite logic to theirs but having me be polar opposite genuinely harmed our relationships.

      There is a way to make peace with them and from that place of peace it will open up space for calm, dispassionate conversations and those are so much more effective.

      Just genuinely care.

      1. Deb, this is a beautiful sentiment, and you expressed it equally beautifully. I think you have the key for harmonious living. This sadly seems to be a lesson lost for a great many. I find that plant-based diet proponents can be especially rigid. I probably have some moments like that too, but I try my best not to be that kind of vegan. Thank you for sharing this. I’d like to frame it and hang it on the wall!

        1. …because despite the major differences in the different dietary approaches, everyone pretty much seeks the same outcome of improved health and vitality. I don’t really know whether my answer is right for everyone.

          1. Scott, that is beautiful.

            I will say that almost every type of diet seems to have the same rigidity. People believe that they are right.

            You are right about them wanting the same outcome.

            When I was a young person, I did Atkins, and during that time, I thought it was the best diet in the whole world.

            I lost weight so quickly and was never hungry.

            Interestingly enough, I look at the vegans who went carnivore and it strikes me that during that time I was nearly carnivore.

            I was young and the social pressures were tremendous. People go Keto, but Keto isn’t the only thing people do. Probably even more people go into Bulemia, Anorexia, and every trick yo yo diet that ever existed. People go on pills to decrease their hunger and speed up their metabolism and pills to block carbs and fats. People go on diet soda and Lean Cuisine and every low calorie processed food possible. The thing I will say about Keto is that my friends got rid of their junk food and processed food and started eating a few vegetables and maybe even berries now and then.

            In a lot of ways, it can be a transition to WFPB and Vegan.

            My sister-in-law was so angry with me back in the Winter for wanting to feed my brother who had cancer vegan meals. He accepted the meals and ate them and liked them, but she made it plain that it was not what they wanted to do dietarily, but a few weeks ago, she said that the meal program they are doing now has the foods two ways – one with meat and the same meal with vegan options and my brother started eating Boca burgers and some of the meals he eats are vegan and when I was cooking in February, there were a few rules. No lettuce and no cauliflower. But a few weeks ago, he had a spicy cauliflower dish.

            None of us want to be manipulated or controlled and sometimes when we disrespect each other we make it so much harder. We make it so that they hate vegan.

            I will also say that I am emotionally closer to vegan now AND Whole Food Plant-Based, but when I first came here, two years ago Thanksgiving, I announced that I would never give up dairy.

            In a lot of ways, the emotional care for animals and the planet is a process and we can welcome people who are not perfect at the process and it often becomes a transition.

            I am still here almost 2 years later. If people had been judgemental, I might not be here right now, but it had to be in my time and my way.

            1. One of the revelations I got was that from the time I was Atkins, until now if I had stayed with it, I would have had probably 50,000 animals who would have died for my meals, just between then and now.

              I think that vegans often feel so traumatized by that and don’t understand that people were raised so disconnected from their food being animals that they have never processed it and haven’t felt it emotionally.

              Back then, I was so happy with losing weight that I honestly didn’t care about health back then and wasn’t thinking about dead animals either.

              Not long after that time period, I went from almost carnivore to vegetarian.

              I think it was Dr. Lisle who said, “Just be nice to people.” or something like that. Don’t argue with them. Just smile and explain your own logic and don’t try to control their lives.

              Easier said than done when you are worried.

              My brother getting cancer caused me to step over the line and start cooking vegan Whole Food Plant-Based for him without gently discussing it with his wife, but when she got upset, I valued her feelings and we are good now.

          2. We can at least agree with them that processed foods are unhealthy and grass-fed meat offers a better lipid profile than grain fed meat.

            We could however ask them why in countries where all the meat is grass-fed, the rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer remain high. And go up as more grass-fed meat is eaten.

            We can see all the old healthy plant based doctors – Campbell, Esselstyn, McDougall etc. Perhaps we can ask where are all the old keto/grass-fed experts?

      2. That sounds like a good plan Deb.

        For anyone that has been fortunate enough to have fiends who are either (long time) vegan or vegetarian, the comparison against your common meat eater is drastic when it comes to weight, aging and health. When you see photos of people like Christie Brinkley and how she aged, it’s not an accident – she avoids both meat and alcohol.

        I feel for you and your sister, on-line nutritional information is mine field. Most of us have had family fall prey to the marketing campaigns which proliferate across media platforms. Hopefully all this misinformation corrects, just like it did with the tobacco industry.

          1. Michael,

            There is mercy that most diseases take time to become fatal.

            Things like gout and having to pay medical bills may change people faster than anything.

            They just need to hear the WFPB reverses diseases message.

            Honestly, the people who don’t want to do it often have a hidden reason.

            My sister-in-law doesn’t like cooking and my brother doesn’t like vegetables or fruits all that much (and neither does she or she would push for them and win)

            I thought she was going to be happy that I was cooking and that he was liking the food, but she has a stressful six-figure job and didn’t want the added stress in her household and, mostly, she has a strong aversion to feeling out of control and my taking over just didn’t fly.

            I was mentally trying to take the stress off of their family, but vegan was a threat cognitively and that has more to do with the vegan/Keto war and the fact that she read Gundry, etc. She was closer to a soy police, anti-nightshades, anti-lectins, anti-gluten and my cooking vegan chili and vegan lentil loaf, DID add stress on the inside of her.

            She has softened on a lot of it, but it is the wider culture, which is stressful on everybody. People trying to learn all of this while their loved ones are sick already hate everybody.

    3. Sounds like she’s been following Dr. Mercola. I did for several years until I realized he was simply pushing supplements and his science was suspect. Dr. McDougall and Dr. Campbell and colleagues are the most reliable. They actually have the science to back it up.

      1. Brian,

        Yes, the science that is out there is so confusing.

        Thank God for the longevity communities and for the testimonials.

        Seeing people like Brenda Davis being able to go into a place and heal diseases makes it easier to figure out.

  3. Dear Dr. Greger, I am still a subscriber to your newsletter and when I have seen the word “keto” I was curious about what you have to say… No surprise for me. Again, you are using false statements such as “all cells feed on sugar” (I guess you know very well, that cancer cells have approx. 18times higher affinity to glucose compared to normal cells due to the fact that Krebs cycle does not work in these cells and it is replaced by fermentation of glucose as a way to produce enough energy to grow, sustain angiogenesis, etc.). Also, you are mixing up a ketogenic diet with “eating animal fat”… I am not advocating for very-low-carbohydrate diets (rather for intermittent fasting – to stay healthy and to prevent a lot of chronic diseases) as this can have really deleterious effects esp. on women in productive age = 100g/day carbs would be more than OK for sedentary adult (for really active person even 250g/day is OK). You can achieve that with nearly no animal fat – just choosing the right kind of veggies wisely, esp. for breakfast. One more comment – it has been proven that if you somehow adapt your metabolism to be OK with ketogenesis as an alternative process to get your fuel (become “keto-adapted”) and you give your brain a choice of fuel, it will choose ketones to glucose… I will stay your subscriber, but you definitely do a better job promoting veggies (and fruits) than criticizing different diet lifestyles…

      1. It does, Deb, but as I have mentioned, going for intermittent fasting with 50-100g/day and doing Crossfit does NOT work. Glucose works as a “messenger molecule” within the HHO (Hypothalamic-Hypophyseal-Ovarian) axis and even though your body can produce a limited amount of glucose via gluconeogenesis, it is not enough – I have had a lot of patients that did exactly this… It is nice to see body fat % dropping down while muscle mass going up, but if you do not get curious that you have 4-5 irregular periods in a row, it might be late to fix it…

        1. Deb, why do you say intermittent fasting doesn’t work for women?
          I have many patients doing that and it works for them. The type I recommend is not eating for between 12 and 14 hours a day. For many with gut problems, it gives the digestive system a chance to rest. And it really helps type-2 diabetics control their blood sugars.
          As long as insulin levels are high, a person cannot burn off body fat. Insulin is a storing hormone. Eating raises insulin levels.

          1. Marilyn,

            Well, there have been studies where women got worse in glucose tolerance and women often lose their periods, but you are doing 12 to 14 hours and the 2005 study where the women had to adversely affect glucose tolerance, alternate-day fasting.

            If you look up studies on PubMed about “skipping breakfast” which is a type of intermittent fasting which many, many people do, you will find correlations with mortality and increased abdominal girth and all sorts of negative things for women and I actually do skip breakfast because I don’t fall asleep until time for breakfast, and what I will say is that I didn’t lose weight no matter how much I cleaned up my diet – going 99.999% vegan and eating mostly nonstarchy vegetables and beans and mushrooms and other non starchy vegetables. I feel like it killed my metabolism.

            I am still working on it and I think doubling my Vitamin D seems to be helping. So maybe I was just too low in Vitamin D? But either way, I have zero results after years of situational intermittent fasting.

          2. And, Marilyn, I am in favor of the type you are talking about. I know that there are studies with Breast Cancer where that type of intermittent fasting changes the equation for women to not get it back.

            I almost don’t count that as intermittent fasting, I consider that not snacking after dinner.

            1. The Vitamin D seems to be helping.

              I have to patiently wait and see if it keeps helping.

              It has been so difficult for me to lose weight even the weeks I didn’t eat nuts or seeds or avocado or starchy vegetables.

              It has been so frustrating to see gains on the scale when I am mostly eating kale and arugula and watercress.

    1. Intermittent fasting is different than the Keto diet.

      People doing Keto use either animal products, oil or fasting. Dr. Greger has a webinar on intermittent fasting.

      Intermittent fasting is not a diet. People who are Whole Food Plant-Based do sometimes use intermittent fasting.

      He has favorable videos on eco-Atkins.

      But that all doesn’t undo the fact that cancer becomes more aggressive on Ketones.

      People are getting healed of Cancer on Whole Food Plant-Based regularly.

      Will they get healed better having Ketones?

      The fact that they could block Ketones for treatment for Cancer, and the fact that my Keto friends have been getting cancer, and having it be large tumors, rather than getting rid of Cancer, the Ketones and Cancer part still needs to be told.

      1. I will add that women’s brain’s switch to running off of ketones after menopause and that is when the breakdown of the brain happens and women’s brains become more vulnerable to things like Alzheimer’s.

        You don’t hear women’s brains becoming healthier after that process happens.

        That is when our brains are in danger.

        1. Interesting… Can you elaborate on your reasoning why that happens? Any study backing up what you write? How would you connect Alzheimer’s plagues (protein) to ketones (fat metabolites)? With 6+ years of biochemistry studies, I would really never thought of this theory…

          1. I am not saying that it is causal, but women’s brains go Keto after menopause and it is also the same time period when women become more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s.

            Keto doesn’t protect them from Alzheimer/s.

            1. That’s certainly not borne out by the work of Dr Dale Bredesen, not only does keto protect from Alzheimer’s but it can provide remission to a significant if not complete degree (indeed sometimes exposing that the diagnosis was incorrect and the patient actually had (e.g.) a chronic magnesium deficiency

      2. Deb, blocking ketones for treatment of cancer is definitely blind way – as ALL big pharma “trials” to come with some miracle treatment… I can report 7 patients of mine, healed from brain cancer in stages II and III – with a combination of intermittent fasting (or rather mild ketosis, in their case), herbs such as Sutherlandia and other dietary changes (such as avoiding all highly processed foods). The only part of “holy trio” of allopathic medicine they went through was a surgery – when their tumor shrank to 1/3rd or less and it was already encapsulated. All of them are more than alive, even though they all got “prediction” from their doc living for 3-6 months if they do not proceed with radiation/chemo/surgery… I am not a native English speaker and I do not really like “diet” word – in my case or in case of my clients I would rather call it “lifestyle” – this goes for “keto” or for “I/M”…

        1. Martin,

          you seem to be knowledgeable in this area; I assume you’re a physician.  For some reason, my comments beyond one line aren’t showing.

          My story is I have prostate cancer and a rising PSA about 8 now. When it was diagnosed 6 months ago I decided to go vegan.  In the interim I came across the book “Cancer as a metabolic disease” by Thomas Seyfried.  You’re probably aware of it.  It’s hard reading for me as my background is engineering, not biology, but one thing that caught my eye is Seyfried’s recommendation to do a 7 day fast once a year.  That got me doing research to where now I do daily IF of about 6 hrs eating (2 meals) and 18 off.  Plus I’ve already done a 7 day fast and plan to do a 4 day fast once a month.

          In any event, that plus exercise got me a clean bill of health on my recent MRI.  Hard to know if it’s the fasting that did it, but I was interested mostly because of the increased atophagy and decreased IFG-1.

          As a vegan I could not go keto and it’s difficult to do so without eating meat anyway, so I’ve settled on fasting and exercise while being mostly vegan (still eat salmon on occasion)

          Maybe keto is a good thing but I just can’t go back to eating animal products due to the negative effects on health that Dr. Greger has shown.

          Your thoughts?

          1. Hi Vic, I am a vet doc (animal nutrition specialization), but I do study human nutrition (gazillion of 1+ year courses, online and in-person, cherry-picking the best from each “styles”) & biochemistry (mainly building on works of Dr. Dicken Weatherby) for past 15 years. I will be 50 next year and it took me some time that there is something wrong with official medicine propaganda. Nevertheless, last time I have seen my doc (taking apart blood tests every 2 years that I evaluate myself…) 24 years ago = my “prescription is prevention”. I have had one client with prostate cancer, but as he was already in T3N2M1 stage, I could not help him. I am connected here via my FB profile – quite sure you can find me there. I would need to know more (complete blood tests, etc.) to be able to let you know if I would be able to help you or not.

            To all readers here: even though my “negative” comments to this post of Dr. Greger, I still think that he did more good to the overall health of the human population than anyone else. I just think that going “positive way” (read “explaining reasons why we should eat more veggies and fruits”) is, in long-term, better for faster and wider promotion of this LIFESTYLE ;-)

            1. Deb said: Martin,

              Let me start again with a welcome to the community. I already enjoy your comments.
              ————————————————————————————————————–
              Lonie says: Yeah, what she said. ^

          2. Vic, great news on your remission! I think you’ve hit upon a great lifestyle regimen. It’s very similar to my own. People need open minds and a willingness to listen to their body’s intuition.

            1. Yes, I’ve read pretty much everything I could find re: Ornish and reversing PC, but after I went vegan, my PSA continued to rise, for like 4 months so I was either too impatient or it wasn’t working. That’s when I added intermittent fasting and a periodic 7 day fast. Lost weight and exercised as well.  That seems to have made the difference.  I’ll know more in 6 months when I get another biopsy.

              1. Vic,

                I wish you all the best with PC.

                When I met my husband 12 years ago, he’d already been diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer. Like you, he was an engineer, and spent 2 years researching his options; he eventually decided to have brachytherapy. And after he met, he decided to become a vegetarian — which I already was — because he liked my cooking! (Amazing! I am not a good cook; I have to follow recipes. But any food cooked at home is much tastier and healthier than buying prepared food.) He also lost about 35 pounds, practicing portion control and avoiding processed food (he was a widower for almost 5 years before we met, and though he didn’t eat much, a lot of it was processed. At the time, I wondered: “How can processed food cause weight gain?”) A few years ago, we stopped eating dairy products and eggs, and even more processed food, and we each lost more weight without meaning to — in his case, another 20 lbs. And his PSA remains low. Among other good news.

                So, for the both of you (actually, all of us), I am hoping that PBWF eating staves off any cancer progression.

                Though we both probably need to exercise more…unlike you, apparently. Keep up the good work!

              2. Vic,
                Interesting story. My PSA has climbed steadily over the last 15 years to 10.5 six months ago. Fortunately, I have never had a positive biopsy or suspicious DRE or MRI. About 3 years ago I switched from many decades of being a lacto-pesco-vegetarian to a 100% WFP diet but in that period my PSA still went up but much more slowly (doubling time went way down). Then last week I had my 6-month PSA test again and it came back 8.0. The only real differences in my diet I can think of is that I recently started eating at least a cup of chopped, raw cruciferous vegetable (purple cabbage) as well as increased my intake of steamed cruciferous veggies (always combined with some raw) every day. I also upped my intake of nuts/seeds (which includes 2 TBL of ground flax seed) to about 25% of calories. I also exercise several hours per day including high intensity interval training, weights and lighter aerobics and have a very low, normal BMI. Maybe it’s a fluke or maybe it just can take take time. I hope it’s a trend.

                1. Oh, and I started eating within a 10-11 hour window per the recommendation of Dr. Longo. I think if I restricted it further I’d lose too much weight. I am too skinny, I think, to do long fasts.

                    1. Right you are (that’s where I got that from). More specifically, he said that fasting longer than 14 hours per day increases the risk of getting gallstones. He is also not in favor of long, water only fasts and recommends his fasting mimicking diet, in which various nutrients are taken in liquid form in small amounts but not enough to interfere with autophagy. Of course, he has been accused of merely trying to promote the product (Prolon ?) resulting from his research but his response is that he makes no money from those sales. I have not looked into this in any detail (I read his book and watched a few videos) but got the impression someone as thin as I am should not refrain from eating flr days at a time.

                    2. Gengo,

                      Yes, you are right. He says people are more likely to get gall stones and who wants those?

                      I have listened to him several times and he said that he came up with the Mimicking fasting diet because he couldn’t convince doctors to let their cancer patients do water fasting diets and the patients also weren’t keen on the concept.

                      I have bought ProLon and will say that it is pretty expensive for essentially soup packets and olives, but my brother was diagnosed with cancer and I wanted him to have the option of trying it if he wanted to.

                2. My urologist said that for a man of 70, a PSA in the 7’s is not atypical, and the MRI showed that the cancer was not growing (which I was sure it was). So he told me to stop measuring my PSA (on my dime) every month, relax and come back in 6 mo for the next biopsy.

          3. An eating schedule, such as an 6/18 hour eating window, is better described as Time Restricted Feeding. Intermittent Fasting usually refers to fasting for a regular period within a larger time frame. such as 2 days per weeks (5/2) or 5 days per month (5/25).

            1. Yes, you’re correct but IM seems to now be describing both. I’m doing TRF of 6/18 and IF of 5/25 plus 10/365 (actually plan to do this twice a year). I think that will give me as good a result as keto without the beef, dairy, chicken, etc.

              1. Cool! I have a very similar WFPB regimen: I do 7/29.5 (days), with the fast centered on the new moon, and I shoot for 6/18 (hours) with the eating window centered on the solar meridian (solar noon). This is about a quarter of the days of the month fasting, and a quarter of the hours of the day eating, which has a nice symmetry to it. I’ve been doing this for about a year.

                1. Hi plant_this_thought – I was intrigued by your syncing up with the moon and sun. We watch for the new and full moons at our house :) Can you tell me more about this? Thx

                  1. Hi Two Red Socks,

                    I really enjoy feeling the big rhythms: solar day, lunar month, solstice and equinox. It is a way of connecting with nature when so much of our lives is disconnected (alarm clocks, arbitrary schedules, electric lights at night, etc.). There is certainly a health connection here. I watched a YouTube video about fasting in which the woman synced her fasting to her menstrual cycle. Anything we can do to be more aware of our bodies and connect them to the universe that supports us….

                    Peace

          4. Vic

            There are quite a few people doing ‘vegan’ keto out there and they have websites. Just Google it. Personally, it seems crazy to me since there’s no credible evidence that it’s beneficial. Especially for people with prostate cancer where there is evidence that dietary fat may promote and fuel the cancer’s growth
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6572108/

            But people are entitled to make their own choices

            As for fasting and cancer, it’s hardly an ‘alternative’ strategy … at least not in the context of a course of chemotherapy.
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6530042/
            https://www.nature.com/articles/s41568-018-0061-0
            https://www.researchgate.net/publication/221822308_Fasting_Cycles_Retard_Growth_of_Tumors_and_Sensitize_a_Range_of_Cancer_Cell_Types_to_Chemotherapy

        2. Martin,

          I know several people who had their cancer go away just drinking juices and so many people have had their tumors go away going Whole Food Plant-Based without Keto or Intermittent fasting. Testimonials for Whole Food Plant-Based for Cancer are all over the internet. Plus, they are in the documentaries, like “Eating You Alive.”

          Anyway, I am not against using fasting. I water-fasted my dog when he had very advanced Hemangiosarcoma and he was supposed to die within a few weeks and water fasting for 2 weeks kept him alive for over a year.

          I know that Thomas Seyfried has had a small degree of success combining a very strict Keto diet, plus short term water fasting, plus calorie restriction and intermittent fasting, plus glutamate inhibition, plus hyperbaric oxygen and exercise. Hyperbaric oxygen improves the results of Keto on Cancer by 30%, but cancer can use glutamate and your own muscles for glucose and I have looked at it from that side.

          1. I am not a doctor obviously.

            I am a post-menopausal woman who has intermittent fasted for years, not on purpose, but because I don’t sleep at night so I can’t handle eating breakfast almost ever. I gained abdominal girth and didn’t lose a pound and seem to have shut down my metabolism almost entirely where I can’t lose weight even just eating kale and mushrooms and beans.

            But I came to Whole Food Plant-Based after serious brain damage. I was completely out of my mind 7 years ago and I still only have 5% function in parts of my brain. This diet has enabled me to get rid of hallucinations and night terrors and paralyzing social anxiety and it has enabled me to have some executive function again. Still working on that one.

            1. Martin,

              Let me start again with a welcome to the community. I already enjoy your comments.

              I am someone who has serious brain damage and I never studied science, but I have learned a lot in the year and 7 months that I have been here.

              I do agree with you that Dr. Greger did a simplistic explanation of the glucose part. Sometimes he does analogies versus a fuller explanation of the mechanisms and this is one case where I wish he hadn’t because the Keto community is listening to Dr. Fung and Dr. Seyfried and Dr. Berg and have already heard the glucose and cancer part taught a particular way.

              They may not have heard that Cancer can run on Ketones and Lactate and may have glossed over the fact that Dr. Seyfried used things like glutamate and fasting and calorie restriction and he wasn’t having them eat “Atkins” any amount of meat diets and they might not have understood that he did use like water fasting and intermittent fasting and calorie restriction and hyperbaric oxygen all affect the results as much as the diet itself. He also did his keto versus carbs study using what I would call carb generic where the Whole Food Plant-Based community ALSO doesn’t have people eat refined carbs.

              Anyway, I am the resident insomniac who is a baby in the science, but who genuinely appreciates discussions and you are polite.

              A lot of people put Dr. Greger down and skip the whole Whole Food Plant-Based heals diseases logic.

              Thank you for being respectful.

              I appreciate it.

              Being in atmospheres with bullying affects my brain function. Probably cortisol. I guess.

              1. Deb, I really enjoy our conversation (even though by subscribing to email me every reply to this topic I did not realize that I will be falling behind 1 hour providing one of my clients’ complete protocol for reversing endometriosis…)! I would never use insulting words here – I respect Dr. Greger’s work more than anyone else.

              2. Deb,
                Try hydrogen water for brain problems. It acts as an antioxidant in the body and brain. The Japanese have been studying it for decades. Here is one NCBI (branch of the National Institute of Health) research paper on hydrogen water. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5525017/
                Research in the US is just starting, and everything points to good results with no bad side effects. You can buy it in pill form, (just add water) or a machine. Be careful if you get a machine. Quality is important.

                1. Thanks, Pamela!

                  I will look into it!

                  I am slow to try things because I have to do a lot of research first, but if I try it and it works, I will post it.

                  The things Dr. Greger has shown have helped so much.

                  I can’t point to which thing, but collectively, it is working.

            2. I gained abdominal girth and didn’t lose a pound and seem to have shut down my metabolism almost entirely where I can’t lose weight even just eating kale and mushrooms and beans.
              ————————————————————————
              Deb, the link below should explain a lot for you and so many others. I admit that after reading that I will never see an obese person the same way. This may lead to a groundbreaking solution that makes all weight loss diets moot.

              This doesn’t affect me personally, but I am so excited for the health of this country… no, the health of the world!

              https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-08/uoh-tro082819.php

              1. Thanks, Lonie,

                I will read it.

                I am slightly encouraged because doubling my Vitamin D seems to be helping, but it is going to take me weeks to know for sure.

                At the rate I have been going actually losing pounds, rather than a few ounces would be so exciting.

                I did see my first “over a pound” difference on my scale at one time.

                That is already pretty good.

                The truth is that I am past vanity about the whole thing, but my friends and relatives watching me to see if I lose weight as how they will decide whether to try this diet matters greatly to me.

          2. Cool! You seem to be pretty experienced! I guess we are on the same boat. I’d wish we’d have the same possibilities as you (I guess you live in the U.S., right?). I have had one patient with ALS – I was only able to help him to live 1 year longer than docs predicted, partially due to the fact that it took me 4 months to convince private med centrum in neighboring country to provide him a timeslot to use their hyperbaric oxygen chamber… – there is not one single facility that would be able to offer real (read “metal tube” type, not the inflatable one…) one in my country… There is a lot of ways that is not “FDA approved”, but works. Plant-based diet, herbs (adaptogens mainly), boosting endogenous immunity system (compare it to weakening it by applying chemo…), i.e. inhaling N-Acetyl L-Cysteine to boost endogenous production of glutathione, etc. More ways to achieve the same result and (mainly) plant-based diet is an inseparable part of this result.

                1. That is nice.

                  I am trying to remember if I stopped there when I traveled through Europe one whole Summer.

                  Boy, looking at the map, I was close several times, both from the Austria and Germany directions.

                  I was with a friend who was a serious traveler, and who did try to see each culture.

                  The architecture is beautiful.

                  It was a long time ago and he was the tour guide.

                  Maybe not. I know we went to Salzburg and Vienna.

                  We had a Eurorail pass and all the time in the world and often would just randomly get off and explore.

          3. Deb,

            Thanks for introducing me to Thomas Seyfried. Watched his “Cancer as a Metabolic Disease” on YouTube. A very smart guy.

            1. Plant this thought,

              He is interesting to listen to, but also know that he is overly optimistic about things.

              Read the skeptic sites about him.

              Tom is right that you have to know the criticisms about him.

              For one, almost everybody failed at his diet in the cancer community and they don’t know whether his diet was too restrictive for them or whether it made them sicker faster or just plain sick (fats can make you sick) Making the cancer more aggressive is one theory and that has to be considered.

              Second, the fact that patients are on Keto may confound the PET Scans. Meaning, there was a woman who seemed to be healed and eventually she had gone off the Keto diet and died of the same disease. (The other woman also died) Seyfried thinks it was because she went off Keto, but it could also be that the cancer was there and her metabolizing Keto may have messed up the PET Scan.

              Third, he also used things like water fasting, intermittent fasting and 600 calorie restriction and hyperbaric oxygen and a glutamate inhibitor and most people won’t have access to glutamate inhibitors or hyperbaric oxygen and water fasting has healed some cancers without a Keto diet.

              Again, the vast majority of the people didn’t succeed and that part isn’t in his talk.

              Plus, not everybody goes into Ketosis. Genetically, some people don’t.

              Plus, not every cancer demonstrates the Warburg Effect, so those are things to think about.

              Anyway, Tom is better at the skeptic end. I still appreciate that Seyfried did succeed at all.

              But he was treating a type of cancer which he knew statistically was more likely to demonstrate Warburg Effect, so when he generalizes out from that, he is probably over-stating what he achieved and Tom will tell you that some cancers just do go into spontaneous remission on their own.

              I do like listening to the science of the mitochondria and, if anything, it would cause me to do something like fasting or intermittent fasting or eco-Atkins if I was diagnosed with cancer.

  4. OT: I want to grouse about how badly the comment app is designed and works… Bradley Delaney’ s comment appears to be responding to another comment, but I can’t see any commenter talking about oatmeal. It would be really useful if commenters had a “reply” button to use instead of launching their response with who knows how many new comments lodged in between. Sometimes makes a discussion thread unfollowable. /grouse

    1. Ralph, I agree… of all the forums/threads/comment sections I’ve been involved with or visited… this is the worst I’ve ever seen.

    2. Ralph

      I think that the person commenting on oatmeal wasn’t responding to anyone here.

      Instead, I think he was just making some silly criticism relating to the ‘Can oatmeal help fatty liver disease’ video

  5. Cara, great post. I see Keto as becoming more and more popular; books and websites abound, but I’m still not convinced that animal protein and tons of fat (albiet ‘good’ fat) is the right way to go. There are too many studies (presented here as well) that meat from animals can have a detrimental effect on your health.

    I’ve recently gotten interested in fasting as a another tool to fight my prostate cancer. There are documented positives like increase in atophagy, decreases in glucose and IFG-1 as well as weight loss and probably a cleansing. Fasting and Keto do have the ketosis in common but with fasting you don’t have to eat meat or fat obviously, but going keto as a vegan is very difficult.

    So for me, I settled on intermittent fasting, IE eating two meals a day over a 6 hr. period and then nothing for 18 hours, plus a 4 day water-only fast once a month and a 7 to 10 day fast once or twice a year. I don’t eat meat or dairy, but will eat salmon once or twice a week. Every time I think about going full meat and fat to go keto, I talk myself out of it. My recent MRI after ja 7 day fast showed that the prostate cancer has stalled, maybe even shrunk a bit. It’s hard to know if that’s because I went vegan or fasted or started exercising or lost weight or just the nature of the typical non-aggressive PC ; I mucked up the experiment by changing too many variables :) but I was able to put off radiation therapy.

    Also, there’s a very good book worth reading re: cancer: Cancer as a metabolic disease by Thomas Seyfried. It reads like a medical textbook but for you it should be doable; for me it’s a hard read. Seyfried is a biologist at Boston College, but one of his recommendations is to do a 7 day fast once a year. He doesn’t talk about keto though.

    I’d like to thank Dr. Greger for this video as I’ve been wanting him to tackle the whole dilemma of keto vs vegan. I did watch his fasting webinar and plan on viewing the next two coming up as well.

    1. Hmmm, I just wrote a fairly long post and it never appeared…
      ——————————————————————————–
      Yeah, I noticed that…

      (Joking, just joking ‘-) I’m not claire-voyant… I’m not even a female ‘-)

    2. That happens sometimes when the post includes links – the anti-spam filter can be quite arbirary on occasion

      Copy your text before hitting the Post button so it’s not completely lost.

  6. This article attacks animal products but there are plant based ketogenic diets.

    There is no doubt that ketogenic diets are neuroprotective and have been used since the 1920s for epilepsy. However, those diets used animal fats. Now we know that plant based diets are healthier and it is possible to design plant based ketogenic diets.

    Might plant based ketogenic diets be helpful for neurodegenerative diseases?

    Are ketones a cleaner fuel source than glucose?

    Isn’t it a fact that cancer feeds on glucose?

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453016301355
    “Both the direct administration of ketone bodies and the use of high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets have been shown to be efficacious in animal models of AD and clinical trials with AD patients. The mechanism underlying the efficacy of ketogenic diets remains unclear, but some evidence points to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. At present there is only limited evidence of the usefulness of ketogenic diets in AD. However, this dietary approach seems to be promising and deserves further clinical investigations.”

    As Carl Sagan said about extraterrestrial life “Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.” :)

    1. Ketosis itself long term is not good for the human body. It also is just another name for the recycled Atkins diet, which was of course created by a doctor who died with massive coronary blockages.

      1. It seemed to work OK for around 99% of your and my ancestors (nomadic hunter gatherers who subsisted on a largely ketogenic diet, at least for 3 out of 4 seasons and evidenced by existing studies of Hadza, Masai, San etc) so I am not sure how you draw this conclusion

      1. I’ve wanted to try keto as a vegan but it’s difficult to do.
        ————————————————————————-
        Vic, instead of animal fats or some harmful non-animal fats, look into MCT oil as a substitute. I occasionally use it like this morning on my fat free yogurt cup sprinkled with 1/4 tsp of inulin, 1/4 tsp of kale powder, 1/4 tsp of chlorella powder, and about a tsp of MCT + walnut oil.

        I’m not keto but I do show a goodly number of ketones in my blood from my labwork.

          1. I may yet try to go keto/vegan; I just have my doubts about ingesting all of that fat!
            ———————————————————————————————————
            Hmmm, never thought of it that way. But I guess I did it different than how many consider going keto. In my case, I did a 3 1/2 day Valter Longo inspired fast which cleared out my glucose and converted my body to using my stored fat as my source of liver produced ketones. My main source of fat when I went back to eating (slowly building up) was MCT oil (Medium Chain Triglycerides from coconut or palm oil) and Walnut oil (to dampen the production of IGF-1 (Insulin like Growth Factor-1) but I didn’t over-indulge. I tried to eat fat free foods and just added the oils back into the products that would have normally had fat in them. Also, I would add the oils into foods that normally do not contain fat but went well with it. Things like beans for instance, with the MCT oil (no taste of its own) and the Walnut oil (a noticeable taste but not overwhelming) added. Even things like non WFPB chicken noodle soup and fat free yogurt (which I have recently gone back to eating due to a Whole Body Vibrating platform regimen I have started, that actually changes the biotics in the gut to become like a resistant starch and produce Butyrate.)

            Anyway, there are a number of ways to incorporate acceptable fats into a keto diet. But this is just a personal bias not based on anything scientific… I would personally do a keto diet if having your condition a proper period of time to affect the prostate problem, perhaps take some time off from it, then go on it again for a period to insure that the problem was indeed solved.

            Come to think of it, I have better advice still. Get online and look up Valter Longo and read his research, and if you can find a Dr. who has experience in practice with keto clients, talk to him or her. My experience with ketogenics is completely different from what you are dealing with and my keto experience may have no bearing on what would work for you.

            At any rate, I do wish you the very, very best outcome for your situation.

            Cheers Vic.

    2. Women’s brains start running on Keto after menopause and it isn’t a good thing.

      That is when we become vulnerable to things like Alzheimer’s.

      1. Women’s brains start running on Keto after menopause and it isn’t a good thing.
        ——————————————————————————————–
        Deb, this is a natural thing? I wonder how natural selection determined it was a good thing?

          1. I wonder how natural selection determined that death was a good thing?
            ————————————————————————————————
            I guess we’ll eventually find out… we’re not that far from eradicating the death disease. ‘-)

          2. Deb,

            Without death, there would be no evolution.

            And, if organisms kept on multiplying, eventually food sources would be exhausted, and everything would die.

            Plus, it seems to me that the whole system of life is very Rube Goldbergian (which certainly refutes “intelligent design.”) Natural selection didn’t “determine” death was a good thing. It’s a process by which life evolves. Death appears to be a result of accumulated errors and environmental hits — including being eaten, or diseased, etc.

            1. Dr. J.

              It was a joke, but I could have used worn-out joints or any other decaying flesh thing in growing old.

              I was responding to the thought that if the brain goes Keto, maybe there is something better about Keto.

              A women’s brain goes Keto, doesn’t make Keto this ideal thing.

              It is the time of life when women’s brains are most vulnerable to things like Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

              The longer it takes for that shift to Keto to happen in a women’s brain, the better if you are caring about the woman versus getting rid of her so that life can be better for the babes.

        1. Marilyn,

          Boy, I have to retrace my steps. I know I read it when I was looking up estrogen and hormone replacement and post-menopausal women and how glucose metabolism in the brain decreases.

          I don’t know what to search for to find it again, but it was a science journal. It had to be that the hormonal replacement helped if it was close to menopause, but made things worse if the women tried it after the brain had adapted.

          I guess I have to find it again and verify that the person wasn’t way off in the science.

          I have also seen researchers who did seem to verify that the glucose metabolism decreases.

          Well, I will look for it.

    3. >>>Isn’t it a fact that cancer feeds on glucose.

      https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/in-depth/cancer-causes/art-20044714

      “Myth: People with cancer shouldn’t eat sugar, since it can cause cancer to grow faster.

      Fact: Sugar doesn’t make cancer grow faster. All cells, including cancer cells, depend on blood sugar (glucose) for energy. But giving more sugar to cancer cells doesn’t speed their growth. Likewise, depriving cancer cells of sugar doesn’t slow their growth.

      This misconception may be based in part on a misunderstanding of positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which use a small amount of radioactive tracer — typically a form of glucose. All tissues in your body absorb some of this tracer, but tissues that are using more energy — including cancer cells — absorb greater amounts. For this reason, some people have concluded that cancer cells grow faster on sugar. But this isn’t true.

      However, there is some evidence that consuming large amounts of sugar is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers, including esophageal cancer. It can also lead to weight gain and increase the risk of obesity and diabetes, which may increase the risk of cancer.”

      1. Gengo,

        I have read that about the PET scans and I have read that sometimes the Keto diet causes it to be harder to see the tumor.

        A skeptic to Dr Seyfried spoke about a very small success where one of the women died and the other one the cancer didn’t show up on the PET Scan and that could have been because of the woman being in Ketosis. Theoretically.

        Anyway, the woman in that instance did also die of cancer and he felt it was because she went off of Keto when she thought the cancer was gone. The person suggested that the PET Scan maybe didn’t show it because of the Keto diet.

        I read it a long time ago, but I believe that was the writer’s argument.

        1. I remember that he said that not all cancers demonstrate Wahrburg Effect in the first place.

          Dr Seyfried chose a type of cancer which statistically was ideal for demonstrating Wahrburg.

          I also remember that most of the patients dropped out of the studies and could not succeed with the severely restricted diet which they were on and
          there was a hypothesis that they dropped out because the cancer might have gotten worse for most of them, rather than improving.

      2. Fact: Sugar doesn’t make cancer grow faster. All cells, including cancer cells, depend on blood sugar (glucose) for energy. But giving more sugar to cancer cells doesn’t speed their growth. Likewise, depriving cancer cells of sugar doesn’t slow their growth.
        —————————————————————————————————————————————
        Some of this statement doesn’t jive with what I have learned.

        That is, just because all cells depend on glucose for energy doesn’t mean they can’t adapt to getting their energy from ketones (made from fat.) I think I take issue with saying depriving cancer cells of glucose doesn’t slow their growth… that is, if the body is converting fat in the liver to energy and the body is thus running on ketones… and if cancer cells cannot run on ketones… what are they using for fuel?

        1. that is, if the body is converting fat in the liver to energy and the body is thus running on ketones…
          —————————————————————————
          additional: I think Dr. (Phd) Valter Longo said when fasting, it takes about 3 1/2 days before the body runs out of glucose and converts to burning stored fat into ketones. He said that starches are converted into glucose in the gut but the liver converts fat into energy and does it more efficiently than the gut does starches into glucose.

          1. Just a quick follow-up… my last fast (New Year’s holiday) done for 5 days left my body with little fat on my bones. Didn’t have a lot to start with, but I am now Jack Sprat. ‘-)

        2. Lonie, Looking into it a bit more, it seems the situation is more nuanced, but you are right that some cancer cell types are sensitive to sugar removal.
          But your skepticism was justified.

          Starving cancer cells of sugar — does it work?
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180126095312.htm

          “Not all cancer cell types are sensitive to the removal of sugar, and even for the cancers that are sensitive, sugar depletion only slows down the rate of cancer progression. The pathways that sensitise cancer cells to sugar deprivation remains poorly understood.”

          Guess a deeper dive is called for…

          1. Starving cancer cells of sugar — does it work?
            https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180126095312.htm

            “Not all cancer cell types are sensitive to the removal of sugar, and even for the cancers that are sensitive, sugar depletion only slows down the rate of cancer progression. The pathways that sensitise cancer cells to sugar deprivation remains poorly understood.”

            Guess a deeper dive is called for…
            —————————————————————
            Gengo, Very much appreciate your further contribution to the discussion.

    4. ‘There is no doubt that ketogenic diets are neuroprotective’

      There is considerable doubt. Especially since keto duets are often high in saturated fat and

      ‘To estimate the relationship between saturated and trans fat intake and risk of cognitive disorders. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies reporting saturated or trans fat intake and incident dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or cognitive decline. Only observational studies met the inclusion criteria: 4 for AD or other dementias, 4 for MCI, and 4 for cognitive decline. Saturated fat intake was positively associated with AD risk in 3 of 4 studies, whereas the fourth suggested an inverse relationship. Saturated fat intake was also positively associated with total dementia in 1 of 2 studies, with MCI in 1 of 4 studies, and with cognitive decline in 2 of 4 studies. ‘
      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0197458014003558

      1. Tom,

        Thanks for posting that.

        I am still wondering about it for women’s brains. Going Keto correlates exactly with when they are prone to get Alzheimer’s and, yes, it is because the estrogen isn’t there, but it would be an instance where Keto isn’t from eating fats, so it would be an instance where if Keto was going to be protective, it could be. But it is the low fat which is protective, not the Keto.

        I am not sure yet whether my logic is making sense, but once Dr. Ornish’s study comes out, maybe I will be able to formulate my thoughts better.

      2. Not sure I can buy this – a) because of work like that of Dr Dale Bredesen and b) because it looks t me like a lot of these studies that demonise fats are carried out using some model that they term HFD (High Fat Diet, natch), which is not synonymous with Keto – keto is defined by High Fat, Restricted Carbs – that is what leads to a consistent state of ketosis. Do just high fat – or low-carb – and you will still be burning glucose from gluconeogenesis and all bets are off. PS of course if you eat fat you get thin, if you eat fat plus carbs you get fat because that is how the body is wired (insulin = burn glucose, store fat)

  7. I learned while employed in the natural product industry that over 80% of what is ‘common knowledge’ about dietary supplements and alternative therapies is actually little more than a marketing angle used by companies to sell products. They love to claim they are backed by studies, but more often than not is you actually look for those studies they were very small groups done by the company wanting to sell the product and have not been peer reviewed. Or they take a study that is credible and make claims on it for their product that is ‘kinda’ related to the study but not actually if you read the details.

    1. I learned while employed in the natural product industry that over 80% of what is ‘common knowledge’ about dietary supplements and alternative therapies is actually little more than a marketing angle used by companies to sell products.
      ———————————————————————————————————–
      I agree, Big Pharma should not be allowed to advertise on TV or in print or radio or Internet for that matter.

        1. Lonie, I do see the trend of supplements getting on the same level as pharmaceuticals, at least from the point of bold claims (I would argue that they do less harm then farmaceuticals…). A lot of inactive ingredients (not taking into account a lot of people with MTHFR issue…), a lot of incomplete formulas (Calcium alone, in better cases Calcium + vit. D, but still not taking into account vit. K2…)… This is the situation within EU where I live.

          1. Lonie, I do see the trend of supplements getting on the same level as pharmaceuticals, at least from the point of bold claims (I would argue that they do less harm then farmaceuticals…). A lot of inactive ingredients (not taking into account a lot of people with MTHFR issue…), a lot of incomplete formulas (Calcium alone, in better cases Calcium + vit. D, but still not taking into account vit. K2…)…
            —————————————————————————————————————————————-
            Martin, completely agree that supplements are just as egregious in their advertising as pharmaceuticals, though I do think the pharmaceutical hucksters play more of the emotional card than the supplement commercials I’ve seen.

            Personally I shy away from “formulas” and just buy a proven ingredient to take, from a company I have history with and trust.

          2. This is the situation within EU where I live.
            ———————————————————
            Probably the biggest problem here in the States are the Drug Cartels… Johnson & Johnson, Purdue Pharma, just to name the ones in the news cycle… but there are many other drug pushers that are also dangerous Cartel members.

            1. that are also dangerous Cartel members.

              Should have said: that are also dangerous Cartels in their own right.

              The distinction being that they don’t seem to act in collusion but rather act in their own self interests.

    2. Yeah, alternative health practitioners and high fat diet promoters use the same tactic.

      Keto diets must be neuroprotective for everyone because they may benefit some people with specific diseases or highly inbred strains of mice, for example.

  8. Hi I’m a MD 44 year old with metabolic syndrome who recently lose 80 pounds in 5 months. with a very controled and mild keto diet, focusing primarily in protein, and some carbs and healthy fats, my blood labs improves dramatically. Now I feel great and regain high energy exercise. For me the key is to do the most healthy keto diet available, test me, I tried everything for so long, I documented my whole experience, if anyone wants it.

    1. Dr Atkins also claimed his ‘keto’ diet was good for him too until he died. A medical report issued by the New York medical examiner’s office a year after his death showed that Atkins had a history of heart attack, congestive heart failure and hypertension.

      1. When I was younger, a lot of us did Atkins.

        My friend’s step-father lost a whole lot of weight and then dropped dead before he got to enjoy it.

    2. Hi I’m a MD 44 year old with metabolic syndrome who recently lose 80 pounds in 5 months. with a very controled and mild keto diet, focusing primarily in protein, and some carbs and healthy fats, my blood labs improves dramatically. Now I feel great and regain high energy exercise. For me the key is to do the most healthy keto diet available, test me, I tried everything for so long, I documented my whole experience, if anyone wants it.
      —————————————————————————————————–
      Dr. Rodriguez, your testimony is infinitely more valuable than the video the good Dr posted.

      Thank goodness for the comments section.

      1. Lonnie, I’d love to get the details of what you’ve done, particularly if you follow the keto macro percentages and if you did it as a vegan.

        Thanks

        1. I’d love to get the details of what you’ve done, particularly if you follow the keto macro percentages and if you did it as a vegan.
          ———————————————————————————————————————————————————————
          Sorry Vic, I’m not one to color within the lines… meaning I make up the rules as I go. (Seriously, I was given a bad grade in coloring class by my 1st grade teacher for coloring outside the lines. ‘-)

          And to be clear, I’ve never been Vegan, WFPB, or even vegetarian in my life, although I have cut out most meats (beef because of the vCJD (mad cow disease) that happened in Britain.

          I later cut out all red meat due to the NeuGen5 molecule in red meated animals that we humans don’t have, and that cause us to create antibodies against it, further causing a constant low grade inflammation response. I still eat chicken and other fowl, plus tinned herring fillets.

          To make things worse in my being able to relay any useful information to you… I never (seldom) do anything the same way twice. When I cook a one pot meal, the odds of it being the same as one I’ve done before would be astronomical.

          I really wish I could help you in more detail, but I have this gift of throwing away stuff from my brain to make room for tons of new stuff. (I have a relatively small head. ‘-)

      2. Lonie

        As usual your logic escape me

        The video cites multiple studies to support the statement it makes.

        Dr Rodriguez’s post containing a single anecdotal report is nothing new. Plenty of people who lose weight post similar glowing reports of the benefits they experience as a result. How is this ‘infinitely more valuable’? We saw the same thing being reported years ago when many people were doing Atkins and reported the same or similar benefits

        In any case, I’d like to know what he means by ‘healthy fats’. The global scientific and medical communities have one idea of what constitutes healthy fats but many keto devotees and eg the WPF seem to have a quite different idea

        1. As usual your logic escape me
          ——————————————-
          Well, at least I’m consistent. ‘-)

          And the same can be said for you… that is, you are the consistent apoligist for Dr Greger irregardless of how fragile his references may be. If you are happy (and I wouldn’t expect otherwise ‘-) with his references, then so be it. I’ll stick to Longo as my expert on ketogenics as that is one of the main subjects of his studies.

          Your expert, Greger, skims across many subjects and is accepted as expert in any and all of them by you and his acolytes.

          1. I disagree with Greger’s stance on conventional cancer treatments and his continued association with eg the Hippocrates Institute. I am also not convinced that a completely vegetarian WFPB diet is nutritionally superior to a WFPB that does inclde small amounts of animal foods.

            However, those asid,. as far as I can tell most of his analyses seem to be pretty much in accordance with current scientific knowledge – especially when the ACC and AHA can recommend plant-based diets for CVD prevention and the US Dietary Guidelines state that a (well-planned) ‘vegan’ diet is healthful. And the World Cancer Research Fund tells us to eat a diet rich in wholegrains, vegetables, fruit and beans.

            As for Longo, I don’t thiink he recommends a keto diet? I was under the impression that he was talking the effects of fasting (which causes ketogenesis and fasting-mimicking diets instead.

  9. This has been an informative video . I like the logic of comparing keto to brain surgery.

    I do have one request: A video on microdermabrasion facials. Are they safe and have long-lasting effects. I went full-on plant-based but my complexion could be better. It’s better than it was, but I am considering getting microdermabrasion.

    Thanks, Dr. Greger for all your hard work!

    1. I like the logic of comparing keto to brain surgery.
      ———————————————————————-
      Logic? Breathing the same air as Hitler? I should have just laughed at those associations but instead found them disappointing, to say the least.

      1. I agree.

        The Hitler analogy was a little bit lame.

        I also felt like the “why do Keto when you could do chemo” comment is one which will alienate the alternative cancer community faster than any possible comment.

        Usually, those “Why do….. when you could do…..” sections are funny and insightful.

        In this case, it just wasn’t as well-conceived.

        Note to writing department. You generally do so much better than this.

        This one was too simple in parts and too manipulative in parts and the ketones fueling cancer part was the most interesting part and that could have been longer for those of us who want to understand the mechanism.

          1. One more comment. Besides having my own practice I do work as a head of procurement of Lifefood, 13-yrs old company that produces EU-Organic (not the same as USDA Organic…), vegan certified, gluten-free, really raw (all ingredients we buy are processed bellow 45C degrees and our production lines are way bellow that) bars and crackers. Even though we are all over EU, we still struggle to get to the U.S. market (I did taste most of the bars available on the U.S. and they are really inferior to ours…) and loosing on EU market due to the fact that “raw” is not a certification mark (unlike EU-Organic) – most of the competitors (I call them “gangsters”) are using similar production lines, but do not care about quality of the ingredients they buy – if one of the ingredients is heated to 90C degrees you cannot simply call the final product “raw”… Our main problem is the target group and I repeat it to the company owner every day – we shall not focus on vegans that are already buying our bars/crackers for 10+ years – they already know how our products taste like compared to the other ones – we shall focus on those “thinking about” (it is usually spontaneous decision…) to eat something healthy and to make sure they choose our bar/cracker first – if they would choose (supposedly) raw bar/cracker from those “bandits”, we might lose them as a customer for good… Analogy = I would really like to see NutritionFacts.org focus on attracting more readers wanting to be healthy/stay healthy by pinpointing what is good on plant-based diet rather than ensuring those long-time subscribers that they are on the right pathway…

            1. Analogy = I would really like to see NutritionFacts.org focus on attracting more readers wanting to be healthy/stay healthy by pinpointing what is good on plant-based diet rather than ensuring those long-time subscribers that they are on the right pathway…
              ————————————————————————————————————————
              I argued this very point some time ago. It may be difficult to find a middle ground that doesn’t alienate the WFPB die hards who are here and are probably the biggest contributors, and allow for some divergence in the diet to keep the newcomers who will not convert… to keep them from feeling left out and leaving.

              I don’t know what is best in that regard.

              To your point of crackers, for years I ate WASA Rye Crispbreads rather than saltines or any kind of regular bread. I stopped eating sandwiches when my teeth got too bad to chew meat (chicken salad sandwich) and as I bought them over the Internet by the case, put the ones I had left in the freezer to keep any weevils out. ‘-)

              Come to think of it, I may just break them out and start crumbling them into my tomato or chicken noodle soups! ‘-)

              1. …alienate the WFPB die hards…
                ————————————————-
                that would have been better expressed as “alienate the WFPB faithful”

                Apoligies to said faithful for expressing an opinion using charged words.

        1. Note to writing department. You generally do so much better than this.
          ——————————————————————————————–
          Deb, the voice-over is Dr. Greger’s… he has to own this.

            1. Yes, but there is a writing department and a research department and I am speaking to the team.
              ————————————————————————————————-
              Oh… o.k.

              I was just thinking that he is not only the talent, but the CEO as well and should have the last say on what he says. ‘-)

        2. adeb

          I think you cut the keto crowd way too much slack.

          Their ideas and claims kill people .. just like Atkins did before them.

            1. Tom,

              That may be. I feel like some of them are doing much closer to a Dr. Fuhrman diet than Atkins.

              I don’t like the oils, but I do respect that they aren’t overloading on animal products and that they get rid of processed foods and they aren’t big on sodium.

              Too much coconut oil for me.

              But when I heard Dr. Berg say “5% animal products and 10 servings of nonstarchy vegetables” that sounded a lot healthier than the version of Atkins that I was doing when I was young.

              1. I’m not a fan but to give Berg his due, he does also recommend that his keto dieters stay away from saturated fat.

                As you say, his diet is healthier then Atkins.

                it’s the Atkins part Deux crowd, heavy on butter/cheese/lard etc etc that are lethal I think. “Vegan” keto diets that rely on coconut and palm oils are probably also very dangerous.

                Jenkins’ eco-Atkins diet is probably the (or ‘a’) best option I’ve seen for this general approach.
                https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/415074

                1. Tom,

                  I find him refreshing compared to the overall Keto group.

                  Stay at 5% or lower calories from animal products
                  Avoid saturated fats
                  Eat at least 10 servings of vegetables.
                  He also uses intermittent fasting, rather than just take oil for achieving Ketosis.

                  That is so close to Dr. Fuhmran right there.

                  The problem is that any benefits to his diet are probably more from those things, but his followers often are using oil and eating too many animal products and may not eat and vegetables at all and they don’t understand that they aren’t really doing the version he is describing.

        3. I was very disappointed in the ‘why do keto when you can do chemo’ comment. Why would anyone choose a cocktail of chemicals over a dietary change? That made no sense.

          I’m not a keto fan, though have M.E. and a group I’m in are very pro keto which is frustrating so I don’t participate as much. It just feels like the latest fad.

  10. Dr G, you should have saved this one for Halloween. Though you tried, you don’t scare me at all vis a vis the Ketogenic diet (which I’m not on, by the way.) But maybe as a Halloween tale of fear, it could gain traction. ‘-)

    1. What an exchange!!

      Im an 65 Argentinean Oncologist -living in the US.CA- who no longer does have a clinical practice, who trusts science.
      UC professor who finds increasingly difficult to have “reasonable” dialogues/exchanges with US born (Millennials & Gen-Xs) around scientific issues of any kind (unless they are my students where the dynamics are different)

      a. I do think Dr. Greger/Nutrition Facts team is marketing a general population. I applaud them for doing that!
      I respect Dr. G as the second generation pioneers -trailblazers who are doing something important/transformative to the health of the West.
      Cancer-Alzheimer-Autoimmune (degenerative diseases in general) are for the XXI Cent West what was lead for the Roman Empire.

      b. Is fun to say that I am living proof that you can reverse completely a huge BPH at my sixties with a 100% WPBD and getting better & happier.

      c.. Anyway if interested in hearing the good news about the future of Lifestyle Med. Check this panel Dr Greger & the first generation of my American M.D heroes: Dr. Ornish, Dr.Campbell. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jP1nw71E9g0&t=14s (around a month ago at SummerFest)
      I hope you enjoyed the 45 min clip as much as I did.

      d. If anyone reading this post, have equivalent clip suggestions, let me know.
      Best. E.A.

      1. >>>Is fun to say that I am living proof that you can reverse completely a huge BPH at my sixties with a 100% WPBD and getting better & happier

        Are you saying your prostate has reduced significantly in size?

        What kind of WFPB diet are you on?

        Mine is stable in size but still quite large.

      2. Many thanks for your post and link!
        After some years of eliminating animal products from my diet as a result of reading Campbell’s “The China Study,” I finally eliminated oils from my diet and excessive nuts/seeds in the last six months. To my surprise, my cholesterol dropped to 132 from 158 or so and my doctor congratulated me on my “excellent” cholesterol. I am in my early 70’s and had cancer in 2001 with surgery and radiation.

              1. But they were eating meat. Why would mine drop from not eating vegetable oil–mostly olive, I suppose…. I never thought not consuming vegetable oil would affect cholesterol. (???)

  11. I used the keto diet to control my metastised prostate cancer lowering my psa 50%. I wasn’t taking and drugs. The problem with keto for me was I lost too much weight and it is ahard diet to maintain in the theropetic level at least. There is research that shows keto works for some people on some cancers. It is hard to make blanket statements because we are all different as is our cancers. Two prostate cancers are different. You have to try it on your cancer to find out for yourself, is my experience.

  12. Awesome video, Dr. Greger! I love how clearly you explain ketones and the different ways the brain uses fuel. Based on all the ketone hype we hear these days, pretty shocking to hear that keto doesn’t prevent or treat cancer, it may cause it.

    1. Based on all the ketone hype we hear these days, pretty shocking to hear that keto doesn’t prevent or treat cancer, it may cause it.
      ——————————————————————————————————————————————————–
      One man’s hype trash is another man… person’s health treasure. ‘-)

      1. keto diets containing high levels of saturated fat may well be ‘trash’

        ‘Results: Fifteen prospective cohort studies investigating total fat and/or saturated fat intake (g/day) and breast cancer mortality were included. There was no difference in risk of breast-cancer-specific death (n = 6; HR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.52; p = 0.34) or all-cause death (n = 4; HR = 1.73; 95% CI: 0.82, 3.66; p = 0.15) for women in the highest versus lowest category of total fat intake. Breast-cancer-specific death (n = 4; HR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.09; p < 0.01) was higher for women in the highest versus lowest category of saturated fat intake. Conclusions: These meta-analyses have shown that saturated fat intake negatively impacts upon breast cancer survival.'
        https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408398.2012.724481?journalCode=bfsn20

    1. But what about a keto diet that is plant based…
      ————————————————————-
      Rene, you are asking the right questions.

    2. Rene,

      That is a very good question.

      Whole Food Plant-Based is working by other mechanisms – lowering IGF-1, inhibiting mTOR, healing people of things like Diabetes and bringing them into lower blood glucose levels, inhibiting Methionine.

      The one factor which may be a factor is that oils can almost all speed the growth of cancer and people use oils when they go Keto.

      I know that Charlotte Gerson said that her father tested all of the oils and everything other than flax oil caused cancer to grow faster.

      Everything except flax oil fueled the growth of cancer.

      I also did see a video with before and after scans with a woman with Breast Cancer whose Cancer grew faster while she was on flax oil and cottage cheese.

      I mentally go back to the CBD oil and even that can cause cancer to either shrink or grow faster and the human study, it only shrunk for a few weeks and then grew in all of the patients.

      I would be interested if the Ketones themselves in vegans would cause cancer to grow.

      1. The one factor which may be a factor is that oils can almost all speed the growth of cancer and people use oils when they go Keto.
        ————————————————————————————————————————————————–
        Deb, that’s important news if true… no offense but I’ve got to see multiple data before I’ll accept that as a fact.

    3. Rene

      It is probably very important to stay away from saturated fat (found in high amounts in coconut and palm oil as well as in animal fats). For example, the World Cancer Research Fund reviewed all the breast cancer evidence (page 682) and

      “Significant positive associations were observed for saturated fat, as intake or percentage of
      energy, and breast cancer risk (summary RR per 10g/day=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.07; summary
      RR per 5% of energy=1.06, 95% CI=1.02-1.10, respectively), with low heterogeneity
      between studies (I2=0%, P=0.74; I2=9%, P=0.35, respectively).”
      https://www.wcrf.org/sites/default/files/breast-cancer-slr.pdf

  13. When I go to “keto” (or greasy) on my WPBD (with exclusively soy milk, tofu & tempeh (& of course nuts & ground flax seeds)
    My BPH symptoms start appearing….mhm…mhm..(I reduce my “soy fat” intake…& back to normal).

  14. So while we all argue about keto, cancer, carbs, studies… meanwhile the Sardinian Blue Zone people, who have the “largest number of centenarians, both male & female”, in the world, healthy, active, mentally sharp, many of them 110 years old.. are over there in Sardinia living the way they always have-
    Physically active outdoors, strong family & social connections, growing & eating their own grains, vegetables, fruit, olive oil, wine,(which they drink every day), all grown organically, and 30% of their diet is dairy & eggs from their own goats, sheep, & chickens, very little meat(mostly on holidays), and eat whole grain bread & pasta every day from the grains they grow-
    Centerpiece of their diet is bean & vegetable soups with whole grain sourdough bread, dairy from their animals(which roam the fields and are lovingly tended), copious amounts of olive oil from their own trees, and average 3 glasses of red wine a day from their own vineyards…. they are healthy, happy, and having a blast-!!
    Are we going to argue with crowds of healthy 110 years olds..?? I’m sure not-!!!
    What study needed…?!! These people are
    LIVING PROOF that their way “worked”…!!
    Now we in the US, should be focusing on how to emulate their diet & lifestyle here, where we live…, instead of silly arguments about “carbs”, etc… “Look to the REAL LIFE examples on the planet……. Instead of following these doctors who mostly “die in their 80’s”… (Including Dr. Herbert Shelton, who died of Parkinson’s in his 80’s, and who many consider to be the “founder of the vegan movement” in the US…
    Autospy found he had extremely low levels of taurine in his brain- which animal products are rich in…)
    Maybe it’s time we “vegan enthusiasts”
    realize, “maybe there’s a lot more for us to learn”…….
    So after having personally been a vegan for over 20 years-
    Am now deeply considering switching to a Sardinian Blue Zone Diet & Lifestyle…

    1. You are leaving out one aspect that always seems to be ingored, perhaps because there is nothing to do about it – the role of genetics. Same for their dietary diametric opposites, the Okinawans.

      https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/11/14/sardinia-oldest-people-world-italy/811783001/

      “Genetics is the main thing. The individuals living to these ages are almost always related,” said Pino Ledda, lead researcher of the Blue Zone Project in the region.” “These areas are remote and have a history of isolation, so the gene pool is small — but why the genes here are leading to such long lives, that’s what we’re investigating,” he said. ”

      I am not knocking your general argument at all, but to be fair, it is not clear that their particular diet is superior than other Blue Zone diets or better for most people. No one knows that.

      1. Even Dr.Greger says “Genetics can mostly be overcome by a healthy diet”… I strongly disagree with the “genetics” argument… If that was the case, the SDA people, WHO ARE NOT GENETICALLY RELATED-
        Would not be a “Blue Zone”-!!!
        I’ve said all I have to say on this forum-
        God Bless You All… and I pray we all may enjoy long, healthy, happy lives…❤️
        Peace.

    2. …meanwhile the Sardinian Blue Zone people, … healthy, active, mentally sharp, many of them 110 years old.. are over there in Sardinia living the way they always have-Physically active outdoors, strong family & social connections…
      ——————————————————————————————————
      Layla, what perfect timing… I saw a PBS program yesterday afternoon on BBC In America where an author was interviewed… her book was something about a Rabbit study.

      Anyway, the study referred to was how groups of rabbits were being studied in re: their diet. But one group outlived all the others by a remarkable amount. It turns out the long-lived group was getting hands on attention like rubbing and petting, while the others were not and diet etc. made no difference.

      So they did another study with just this difference, and again it proved to be the deciding factor in the well-being of the petted group. I’m not sure if they extrapolated this to humans or if they actually did a well being study of some sort, but IIRC, the social connection for humans was proved beneficial above all other factors such as diet and so forth.

      I was actually left with the impression that this was THE deciding factor above all other variables… everyone… go hug an old/young/middle aged person!

    3. Shelton was a naturopath and Natural Hygienist, and we already know that many so-called vegan diets are unhealthy. They have little or nothing to do with WFPB diets which may or may not contain small amounts of animal foods.

      I’ll stick with what the scientific evidence shows rather than base my beliefs on a very personal interpretation of what confounded international observational studies appear to show,

      The idea that because a group is particularly long lived, then everything it eats must be healthy sounds a bit naive to me.

  15. Respectfully disagree, Leila.
    I have read everything about “blue zones” and I agree with Dr. Greger that the largest centenarian population is still Loma Bonita CA with the Adventists.
    It was before that the Okinawa centenarians in Japan, and then start westernizing the diet with chicken.
    Is scary now how the cancer rates start rocketing…

    1. I am a third generation SDA… and I can assure you- “we eat a lot of dairy and eggs”
      And still manage to be a Blue Zone…
      I was sure LOTS of people on this forum would disagree with me-
      But truth has to be told-
      How silly for any of you to say
      “Being a centenarian does not mean is a healthy diet..”. Excuse me… I thought the whole “point” was, how to live a “long, healthy life..”?? And per the comment about “lifestyle” factors-
      I mentioned ALL of that in my first post
      “Active, strong family & social ties”etc..
      Look, we can cling to our “sacred vegan beliefs” all we want, while the Blue Zone Sardinians munch out on their dairy, and live longer than any of us arguing on here, but the facts speak for themselves…….
      What I was suggesting, was that people in the US transition to adopt the “total diet & lifestyle” of Sardinians… to achieve their health & longevity success-
      (And FYI… whoever commented that the SDA Blue Zone is longer-lived, needs to do their research… Sardinia is the ONLY Blue Zone in the world that has just as many MALE centenarians as FEMALE centenarians, AND the largest total number of people over the age of 100-110…
      And yes, have vacationed there, and they use “copious” amounts of olive oil from their own trees…)
      So, as I said before, we can follow doctors dying in their 80’s from diseases, and “studies”…, or follow the Blue Zone people that have SUCCEEDED ALREADY….
      And lived, healthy & happy, to a ripe old age of 110….
      I know who I’m going to follow-
      You all have to make your own choices, and live with the results…

      1. Layla, you left out the fact that the women walk about 6 miles a day, and the men 9, up and down mountains.
        It’s not all about diet. Total lifestyle, and genetics are important.

        1. No I did not- In my first post I said “physically active outdoors “
          I didn’t think I had to elaborate….
          Also said “diet & lifestyle”…
          Go back and read it.

      2. Layla,

        You are talking about munching out on their dairy and what I will use for contrast is Finland.

        They switched to a high-dairy diet and so many people started having heart attacks in their 40’s and 50’s that they did an initiative to get rid of the fats and it did improve things by 84% in people who switched off the fats.

        They are also #1 in Alzheimer’s in the whole world and they have a study that going off the fats for that by age 50 dropped people’s risk for Alzheimer’s by 90%.

        So the concept of “munching out on their dairy” isn’t likely to be what you think it is.

        They use sheep for their source of milk and chances are that causes them to drink very modest amounts.

        1. I said “30% of their diet is dairy from their sheep, goats & chickens”…
          Is amazing to me how many comments mis-quote me-!
          “Obviously, Sardinian dairy would be much healthier, and US dairy, much less so”..
          (However, the SDA community Blue Zone in US, which I grew up in, eats lots of dairy, and enjoys great health & longevity…)
          Sorry folks, the Sardinians have been living and eating this way for generations, with extremely low rates of disease, if any..
          And best longevity on the planet-!!
          I’m the type of person who follows “what been PROVEN to work”…
          Even though I was raised SDA, I went vegan over 20 years ago, and honestly, see no difference in my health from when I used to eat dairy & eggs…
          Like I said before, if you all want to argue with a whole community of healthy 110 year olds, be my guest…
          I’m going to do what’s been PROVEN FOR GENERATIONS to create happy, healthy centenarians…
          Like I said, everyone must make their own choices, and live with the results.

          1. With my relatives the ones which ate high fat died in their 40’s and 50’s and the ones who ate a lot of fruits and vegetables lived well into their 90’s and that is in line with Finland.

            I will tell you that I was high dairy and my mother who was high dairy died at 53.

            I had so many health problems until I went off dairy.

            I will never go back to it.

              1. When I came to this site, I announced 2 Thanksgivings ago, I announced that I would never go vegan, but I have gone Whole Food Plant-Based and my diseases are reversing and I was lacto-ovo vegetarian but dairy was my favorite food back then and now my health means more.

                1. The fact that Finland lowered their dairy fat to reverse heart attacks by 84% and Alzheimer’s by 90%, and the fact that the vegan Adventist’s have such longevity, and the fact the Sardinians longevity has so many factors apart from diet, and they don’t drink cow’s milk with its Bovine leukemia coming from cows who are kept pregnant and honestly morally I don’t like how the animals are treated at all and living within the conscience matters.

                  I guess reversing heart disease and Alzheimer’s and Diabetes and getting rid of Cancer symptoms is already enough for me and going off dairy is what accomplished those things in my life.

                  1. The fact that Finland started having people die in their 40’s and 50’s when they switched to a high dairy society and became the number one in the world for rates of Alzheimer’s, after they believed that dairy was healthy, turning to dairy wasn’t a savior to them.

                    1. Again, it was going off the fat from dairy that lowered their risk of dropping dead of a heart attack by 84% and it dropped their rate of Alzheimer’s by 90%.

                      So that country got worse increasing dairy and got better getting rid of dairy fats.

                    2. And I have shared all of this over the course of the past almost 2 years, but people will know that I was also a junk food junky, but I got rid of all the junk food and refined carbs a full year before coming here and it was getting rid of dairy which started getting rid of the horizontal nail ridges, etc.

      3. Frankly, Layla, you sound very confused.

        Sardinia isn’t a blue zone. It’s only a small cluster of villages in one part of Sardinia that consitiutes the blue zone.. The inhabitants are genetically isolated and most have a specific genetic variation that is linked to exceptional longevity. And the Blue Zones author Dan Buettner doesn’t even mention them consuming olive oil at all let alone in copious amounts. They also don’t eat standard dairy but cheese and milk from local grass fed sheep.
        https://www.bluezones.com/exploration/sardinia-italy/

        Also life expectancy in Sardinia appears to be the same as or lower than in Italy overall. Italian life expectancy is supposedly 82.7
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy

        Whereas life expectancy in Sardinia is aparently 82.6
        https://knoema.com/atlas/Italy/Sardinia/Life-expectancy

        But, hey, you do your own thing..

        1. So I wasn’t going to write anymore on this forum, but then I saw your comments, and must address it… You are right, I have been confused… But things have been getting very clear… The confusion comes from the contradictions between what I’ve been told by vegan doctors and studies, and what my experiences in life have been, and what I’ve seen with my own eyes… Which is what I trust more. Let me elaborate please… As I shared before, I am a third generation SDA and grew up in the SDA Blue Zone Community, so am A third generation vegetarian. The fourth generation of my family, my great grandparents… Died in their early 60s of diabetes and heart disease… Then my grandparents, who became A third generation vegetarian. The fourth generation of my family, my great grandparents… Died in their early 60s of diabetes and heart disease… Then my grandparents, who became SDA vegetarians as young adults, lived to be 98 and 99 years old, healthy their whole life, eating no meat, foods from their garden, and lots of dairy and eggs… My parents are in their early 90s now, eat dairy and eggs all their life, but no meat, and have always been healthy… I went to all SDA Schools, which had vegetarian lunch rooms, again, with lots of dairy, eggs, and canned Loma Linda faux meats, btw, which SDA people eat a lot of, and the kids in my school and I were hardly ever sick… my ex-husband is natural hygienic physician, who based his practice on Dr. Herbert Shelton’s work, including fasting, and through the years I saw many many people come to his center who were very ill, and he’ll using a plant-based diet along with fasting when appropriate to heal them… Then he came home after work, and ate dairy and eggs, along with plants, with me and our five kids… Who btw, were raised without any of them ever getting an ear infection or taking any antibiotics… Unheard of in the US… They continue to be healthy adults, as are all of my grandchildren… I chose to go vegan over 20 years ago, for animal compassion reasons… As I have always been healthy, and my health was not a concern. However, looking at my world and my life, compared to these other opinions and studies, is very contradictory… That’s why I was so excited to learn about the Sardinian Blue Zone, ( not Sardinia as a country, obviously, just as SDA Blue Zone is not all of California..) they are a natural people, who treat their animals with kindness, 65% plant-based diet, 30% dairy and eggs, and about 5% meat…
          Just lovely people!!
          My “ lifetime conclusion “ is this:
          If you take meat out of the equation,(or mostly..), and eat plenty of whole plant foods, the body can achieve superior health & longevity, even with dairy, eggs, olive oil, wine, canned processed soy meats, etc…
          Unless you are sick… and in that case, I wholeheartedly agree, that whole food plant-based, along with fasting, Heals an ill body better than anything… But otherwise, I now disagree that you need to be “so strict” about having some dairy, eggs, and some processed foods like the faux meats..
          Especially as many stores now sell eggs and dairy from cleaner more compassionate sources… otherwise, there would BE NO SDA BLUE ZONE… and the Sardinian Blue Zone just confirms this for me… and SDA Blue Zone people are not genetically related at all… I went to school with people of many nationalities, so I can attest to that! So maybe this cleared up “ your confusion “
          about “ my confusion “… ;)
          And as I said before, may God bless us all with long, healthy, happy lives.…
          As for me, I choose to follow with my experiences have taught me…
          I will not be writing again.
          Peace & Love to you all…❤️

            1. Oh yes, and one more thing… Take a trip to the Blue Zone Sardinia region, so you can watch them literally douse their plates with delicious home-grown olive oil, pressed 5 or 6 hours after the olives are picked…
              So yummy!! ;)

  16. “Why go keto, when you can just go chemo?” What an absurd statement. Conflating brain surgery / cancer therapy with a perfectly natural metabolic state is just beyond the pale stupid. How anyone listens to this vegan propaganda is beyond me.

      1. Yes, he has a great sense of humor. However, I think that some people miss it. I understand most of it as I had a father with the same type of humor and I think Dr. Gregor is quite funny in making his points. The students he has are lucky – I’ll bet he has the most fun medical classes. As long as he clarifies some of his sarcasm for people who are not familiar with that humor….it could be, for some, very confusing.

    1. LOL

      Isn’t that in essence the keto argument? It helps a tiny group with intractable paediatric epilepsy, therefore it must be good for everybody.

      Greger was pointing out the absurdity of keto claims. And no I’m not a vegan …. another keto red herring by the way. The people pointing out the lack of evidence for claimed keto benefits are vegans. Therefore keto must be good.

      Gotta love that keto logic! I am always amazed by the number of people who buy into it.

  17. In my opinion this article is one sided and biased to favor sugar and carbs over the keto diet. Obviously this site would lose a lot of followers if more and more people go keto. Because keto opposes so much of what this site has stood for. Also, there is an epidemic of illnesses caused by high sugar diets.

    1. You should really look at Greger’s videos on sugar before you hurl accusations.around eg

      ‘Concern has been raised, though, that sugar calories may be worst than just empty. A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that the fructose added to foods and beverages in the form of table sugar and high fructose corn syrup in large enough amounts can trigger processes that lead to liver toxicity and other chronic diseases.

      Fructose hones in like a laser beam on the liver, and like alcohol, fructose can increase the fat in the liver, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is one of the most remarkable medical developments over the past 3 decades—the emergence of fatty liver inflammation as a public health problem here and around the globe.”
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-added-sugar-is-too-much/

      Posts like yours just reinforce the belif that keto advocates are largely unconcerned with the facts of the matter and are just ideologues.

    2. George Niiranen,

      Do you know that there is a difference between refined carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates?

      Refined carbohydrates include products like sugar and white flour, which are added to manufactured edible products (processed foods) — these are not healthy for us. And these simple sugars are one primary driver of the “epidemic of illnesses’ that you mention. Processed foods should be avoided, especially highly or ultra processed foods, as should added sugars and other refined carbohydrates be avoided. (There are other problems with processed foods, which included added oils, salt, and additives, which are themselves processed or chemically synthesized.)

      Complex carbohydrates are those found naturally in produce, fruits and veggies both (as well as legumes and whole grains, and nuts and seeds), and include fibers which are digested by the gut microbes, some of which produce products that feed our intestinal epithelial cells or otherwise positively affect us — these are healthy for us. Fruits and veggies both contain simple sugars, but they are consumed with the entire fruit or veggie, and so are not considered unhealthy. But if the fruit (or veggie) is first processed, to remove some of the original fruit, such as occurs in making juice, then the result are simple sugars untethered to the original food, and these are also not healthy for us.

  18. This is all so frustrating. For every expert supporting a WFPB diet, there are an equal number of experts promoting some version of Keto.
    Dr Dale Bredesen, who is a world famous, extremely well credentialed, university professor, supports some versions of Keto diet for individuals with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s diseases (especially for people with APOE4) . It’s very challenging to decide which direction to go.
    Comments??

    1. Fred,

      I am someone who is overcoming serious brain problems and I understand that it does seem confusing, but I will take you back to the fact that Dr. Bredesen promotes only using animal products more like condiments. He also is pro-eating vegetables, so that is the same.

      One of the researchers said that the nutritionists agree on 90% of things.

      They debate fiercely on the 10%.

      It might help you to learn the mechanisms. That helped me to not get confused.

      For instance, Homocysteine is a mechanism for a whole lot of health conditions, including Alzheimer’s. So how do you lower it? Well, B12, foods with Folate, and Omega 3 are things which lower it. There is a whole list of other things which lower it. So, if you are choosing between diets, you look for their mechanism of lowering Homocysteine as #1.

      Lowering inflammation should probably have been #1. Whole Food Plant-Based has all of its antioxidants, and they deal with the whole ROS thing.

      Blood Sugar would be one. Whole Food Plant-Based deals with it by lowering fats and refined carbs and sugar in the diet and that empties the fats out of the pancreas and then the pancreas can work normally again in Type 2 Diabetes. Notice, both diets get rid of refined carbs and sugars. WFPB gets rid of the saturated fats and lowers the oil because that is how their mechanism works. Keto keeps the oil because they are just trying to get the body to not run on sugar and because fat doesn’t spike blood sugar, but a video to come by Dr. Greger will talk about Keto making people more insulin resistant and what I already know from my friends who are Keto who keep going in and out of hospitals, if you cheat at all, the smallest slice of birthday cake becomes infinitely worse if you are on Keto than if you are on WFPB.

      After the pancreas is emptied from fat, people often can use honey or date sugar or maple syrup in recipes without raising their A1C. Keto has a mechanism, which doesn’t heal the pancreas, but it does deal with blood sugar and Dr. Greger does totally agree with the fact that lowering refined carbs is beneficial. He has a video on it. Along with a video on eco-Atkins. Plus, he has a Webinar on Intermittent fasting, which both WFPB and Keto can use. Keto people can use that and not add in the oils.

      Blood flow to the brain and fixing heart health is one of the places where WFPB has an advantage and blood flow to the brain is part of it. I say that WFPB has an advantage because Dr. Ornish was able to reverse heart disease to the point where someone no longer needed a heart transplant. A version of Keto closer to Atkins has people having heart attacks and I know someone who died fairly young right after a year of Atkins. Dr. Bredesen doesn’t recommend the same version of Keto. He recommends limiting animal products so much that it might not be comparable, but clearing out the arteries to the brain is easier on WFPB.

      Fixing nutritional deficiencies, BOTH sides do, so that is a wash.

      Getting things like aluminum out of the brain with something like 12 weeks of Fiji water is easier for vegans because they don’t have animals with heavy metals or toxins and they generally aren’t cooking things the same way.

      You see, there are mechanisms, and you can live in the 90% agreement areas most of the time and then you only have to wrestle with the radical disagreement areas.

      Anyway, I had to learn all the mechanisms of why both sides were doing things and, from there, you can make decisions.

      The Sherzai’s who work with the Adventists for their Brain Health would be a good WFPB set of doctors to listen to for balancing Dr. Bredesen’s information.

      Plus, Dr. Ornish is going to have an Alzheimer’s study out soon and Dr. Barnard talks about Alzheimer’s and fat blocking arteries and how that affects blood flow to the brain.

        1. Fred,

          I understand what it is like to be genuinely confused by all of this. I started this walk with such large cognitive deficits and no science or nutrition background at all.

          Learning the mechanisms of each really can help.

          If it is Alzheimer’s you are worried about, I would start with looking at the Sherzai’s work with the Adventists. They only have something like 5% of the people get Alzheimer’s.

          Finland already shows us that dealing with the vascular causes improves things by almost 90%, so lowering saturated fats and cholesterol already has a great big logic to it.

          Keto points to it as Type 3 Diabetes or however they word it, and they are right, having out of control blood sugar is probably among the top issues, but WFPB does deal with it.

          Inflammation and antioxidants

          Heavy metals and chemicals/Roundup

          Homocysteine

          Mycotoxins/mold

          Alcohol

          Smoking

          Sleep

          Exercise

          Those are some things which you can deal with, but vascular already may take care of 90% of it, so you can be comforted about it.

          1. Deb, That’s so nice of you to provide all that information. Obviously, you’ve been studying the subject and are very knowledgeable. I am aware that Bredesen recommends very little animal products, mostly as a garnish but is otherwise WFPB. I need to read Sherzia’s book and I just ordered Bredeson’s. I just started studying all this. I was WFPB for over a year and then took a segway about 6 mo ago. Having just learned I’m an APOE4x2 so I’m exploring my nutritional options. I suspected I had CD for a while so I had started sauna about 6 months (Dr Rhonda Patrick has discussed this). Have been exercising and meditating most of my adult life (74 yo). I’m Getting evaluated/tested my neurologist in a couple weeks but know I’ll need to address all these modalities. Thanks again Fred

    2. Bredesen has ticked every fashionable alternative health claim box there is And is now profiting from the resulting book sales, as well as selling associated software etc to other medical professionals.

      It really doesn’t matter what individual health gurus claim. What does actual evidence show? That’s the real question.

      Many of these people base their sensational claims on anecdotes and/or case studies. Who knows if Bredesen and his colleagues treated a thousand patients but only reported the 100 cases where some kind of benefit might be claimed? After all, t’s a common enough tactic in selling eg baldness ‘cures’ and skin rejuvenation creams.

      Caveat emptor.

  19. I usually find these videos useful and quite compelling but I must say, the logic used here is confusing. Dr. G questions the use of ketogenic diet for cancer because, among other things, starving cancer cells starves good cells too. Well, the shotgun approach used by chemotherapy kills good cells too. Yet the video seems to support chemo as the treatment of choice. Chemo’s track record for many types of cancers is abysmal. For those cancers, considering dietary changes that hold promise seems sensible. From the journal Aging (2018):
    Based on the results of rigorous preclinical and clinical studies performed thus far, the KD would appear to be a promising and powerful option for adjuvant therapy for a range of cancers.
    It is worth mentioning that a ketogenic diet can be plant-based.

  20. Fred,

    Fewer than 5% of the Adventist vegans and the vegan nuns in the nun study get Alzheimer’s.

    Finland is #1 in Alzheimer’s and they went #1 when they went high dairy.

    They were dying of heart attacks in their 40’s and 50’s and it was such a big problem that they did a country-wide initiative and improved the situation by 86% by removing fats.

    1. It seems like Pam Popper recently spoke about Finland and said that we know that getting rid of the fats is what improves Alzheimer’s from a study in Finland.

      I will try to find it again. It meant something to me because I was wondering why they are #1 in Alzheimer’s and they do know that their problems happened when they went high-fat dairy and they also do know that they reversed by going low fat.

  21. Pam also said that if people start eating WFPB by age 50, they can dramatically lower their risk of Alzheimer’s.

    There was a 90% reduction of risk for getting Alzheimer’s just by eating this way.

    90% is pretty good.

    1. I didn’t mention copper and iron and how lowering saturated fats and cholesterol protects the brain from the heavy metals. That is why meat is only a condiment.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1S9tcC4Xuhs

      Vegetable oils are a big difference in the 2 positions and those raise the rate of free radicals. They are second only to meat for that. That is the WFPB position.

      The Keto position is that going Keto causes the body to start to heal the mitochondria.

      By this point, I am more on the WFPB side because the Adventists and Nuns only have a small amount of people getting it and Finland lowered the risk of getting it by 90%. Dr. Barnard talks about how nuts fat is protective, saturated fats and trans fats and high cholesterol bad for the heart and also bad for the brain.

      Even people with the genetic risk factor don’t get it if they eat properly.

      Though if vegans don’t supplement B12, that raises the risk.

      I don’t know if all of this was helpful for you or not. I have had to wrestle all of this through because of my brain problems.

      It has helped.

      I got rid of night terrors and hallucinations and social anxiety and executive function dysfunction.

  22. To the lovely staff and volunteers at Nutritionfacts.org, I recommend Finland’s Alzheimer’s study and heart study combination for a video series.

    The heart improvement was something like 84% and the Alzheimer’s improvement was 90%. That makes a solid case.

    I also would love to see a video on the Nun’s study.

    Thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to healing the world.

  23. I also wanted to thank you for the Bible verse.

    I know that the vegan community and Christian community haven’t learned how to get along yet, but I have hope that the WFPB is close enough to WWJD that maybe it will just sink right into people’s hearts.

  24. I did not like some of the hyperbole in the video which does make the video more entertaining, I felt it was just too dismissive of the sincere search for optimum dietary solutions. However having said that, Greger is one of my rock solid sources, and this video is making me reassess my dietary prejudices.

    I actually do believe in the Warburg effect, I think it does have merit in cancer *treatment* not *general prevention* as Greger says. I think the merit is in the periodic fasting using some like the Prolon fast, which might kill off weak and sensitive senescent cells. This is not something you do on a regular basis, maybe a handful of times a year 2-6.

    This video reset my preference for carbs over fats, and I am grateful. I do not eat much in the way of simple carbs, but more complex carbs. Thank you for your video Greger et al. this is why I support you monetarily, peace. –DavidW

  25. Howdy,
    So I have a vegan friend who is attempting to do this in a ketogenic manner. Omnivore ketogenic is mentioned but not a by studies done on vegans.
    I’m extremely curious to hear more about this. I suspect she is doing harm to herself but I don’t have any concrete evidence yo present to her.

    Thanks for all your work team at NutritionFacts!

  26. Dr greger, first of all thank you very much for all the information you provide us through all the means you use.
    I am a doctor and I have a concern related to the long-term ketogenic diet … how much does renal function affect this type of diet ?, could it cause renal failure? I remain aware of your comments and, if you make them in a video with your usual references, I would greatly appreciate it because that way I could better guide my patients who have heard “wonders” of the ketogenic diet to lose weight.

      1. Yeah but he’s not actually talking about a Keto diet even though that’s what he calls his recommended diet.

        To achieve ketosis you really have to get about 80 or 90 % of your total calories from fat. Or fast. That’s not really what he’s talking about in this video …. since his is just a low carb diet with a bit of intermittent fasting thrown in

        Good marketing though. Calling it keto instead of low carb sounds way cooler.

        1. I see what you are saying Fumbles, thanks. He talks about 65 to 70 % fat using his plate model just before the 7 min mark, and on a ‘part 2’ video I watched later her shows what he eats …ugggh! Four eggs per day for a start! I am going to watch part of a third video where he talks about how to do vegan keto a la berg because some folks asked about it here. We’ll see if he offers anything but avocado and oil.

    1. It may depend on whether it is a real keto diet or not. There is a tendency now to call any low carb diet a keto diet.

      According to Harvard

      ‘Kidney problems. The kidneys help metabolize protein, and McManus says the keto diet may overload them. (The current recommended intake for protein averages 46 grams per day for women, and 56 grams for men).’
      https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/should-you-try-the-keto-diet

      While on a real keto diet there is apparently increased risk of kidney stones. Ketogenic diets have a long history of use in intractable paediatric epilepsy and

      ‘Kidney stones continue to occur in approximately 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet,’
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17621514

  27. Okay, I have a question about the epilepsy thing because there are people who have seen improvement on a WFPB diet.

    There are a few stories like this out there:

    https://nutritionstudies.org/big-dave-became-plant-based-dave-weaned-off-epilepsy-meds/

    I was looking for mechanisms and glutamate was one given in a research article.

    Glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter, is clearly epileptogenic (90); excess intake of glutamate (in particular, monosodium glutamate) has been implicated in seizure exacerbation. Stimulants, such as caffeine, also have been reported to worsen seizures, which probably is due to blockade of the adenosine α1 receptors—activation of which is anticonvulsant (91). Alcohol ingestion lowers seizure threshold, in both the short and long term (92). Some dietary practices include particular foods that can cause seizures [e.g., betel nuts (93)]. A wide variety of herbal remedies can exacerbate epilepsy, even some that are touted to suppress seizures

    So, since it said Glutamate, I looked up Homocysteine and it was there and it said that the epileptics were often Hyper-Homocysteine and low in Folate and they often have the MTHFR problem.

    Patients exhibited significantly higher tHcy and lower folate levels than controls;

    Either way, turmeric, blueberries, and Bergamot essential oil come to mind pretty quickly for lowering the glutamate, plus, you would have to lower the Homocysteine, so B-12, Omega 3’s, and eating your foliage.

    Does Keto have anything to do with Glutamate or Homocysteine?

  28. The third route to normalize a high homocysteine is through a zinc-dependent route via an enzyme called BHMT.

    I am a little confused about the zinc

    Here oral zinc helped prevent seizures.

    https://www.functionalneurology.com/materiale_cic/839_XXX_3/7150_randomized/article.htm

    Zinc and Selenium

    https://www.epilepsy.com/article/2013/1/deficiency-selenium-and-zinc-potential-factor-patients-idiopathic-drug-resistant

    epilepsy had significantly decreased levels of serum zinc and selenium compared to healthy individuals but not for copper.

    Though I guess it is high levels of zinc, which can actually also cause seizures

    https://vitalrecord.tamhsc.edu/zinc-might-increase-risk-seizures-new-research-says/

    Taurine is supposed to help, too, so maybe Taurine in the Keto diet?

    Oh cool, I just found someone who hypothesized that Keto helps epilepsy by enhanced conversion of glutamate to glutamine. Then, glutamine converts to GABA, which is inhibitory.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2722878/

    Lowering glutamate and homocysteine are things WFPB people can do.

  29. Deb, when I took a vitamin years ago to lower homocysteine, I looked through the studies to find where lowering the level would result in lower mortality from heart disease, stroke etc and didnt find anything. In other words, I thought it wiser for me at the time to focus on getting healthy, then let my bloodwork reflect that state of health. I dumped the supplement and decided to just eat the daily dozen and take b12.

  30. I am also wondering if anybody understands Betane.

    Mainly, they are talking about Methyl donor and that it is in foods like wheat bran, wheat germ, spinach, beets

    https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/80/3/539/4690529

    Betaine, but not folic acid, is effective at preventing an increase in post methionine homocysteine concentrations (198, 201, 244, 247, 248). Betaine-dependent remethylation occurs mainly in the liver and kidney, whereas folate-dependent remethylation occurs in most cells.

    Methyl donor. Does that mean it might help the MTHFR people?

    Post methionine is not as big a risk for WFPB diet, so is there a Methionine-restriction diet for epilepsy?

  31. I would like info on “Transfer Factor”. Apparently, this is something from animals to boost immunity? I am breastfeeding & formula supplementing (as needed) my infant whom has Down Syndrome. A local nutritionist has told me to start taking this product (& others), DHA, eating for my/ his blood type, and eat high fat for my son stating that he needs to eat high fat forever. I am very much torn over this advice but she claims to have seen great improvement in children with DS.

    1. I looked up Whole Food Plant-Based and Down Syndrome

      http://terahbelle.com/all-the-difference-how-whole-foods-can-treat-the-effects-of-down-syndrome/

      Here is an article about it from a Whole Food Plant-Based perspective.

      http://www.theconsciouspod.com/optimum-diet-for-down-syndrome/

      They are prone to getting Alzheimer’s so I would feel iffy about a lifetime high-fat diet, too, but I would research it from both directions.

      Interestingly, they were talking about the same topic, which I was already looking up. Balancing GABA and Glutamate and avoiding excess glutamate

      Children with Down Syndrome are born with an excess of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. However they also experience a high rate of Oxidative Stress that damages neurones and exposes them to the harmful effects of excess Glutamate, released from damaged neurones. Optimising the health of neurones in Down Syndrome means moderating the effects of excess glutamate.

      The following neurotransmitters are pulled into the cells by glutamate and should be avoided if Glutamate levels are high:

      Aspartate, Aspartame, Aspartic acid, Glutamate. Glutamic acid, Glutamine, Monosodium glutamate (MSG), Cysteine, Homocysteine.

      Research shows that excess Glutamate can elevate eosinophils causing an inflammatory reaction, increase or cause irregularities in blood pressure and affect areas of the brain involved in speech and language.

      A Urinary Amino Acids Test can identify elevated levels of glutamate, glutamine, glutamic acid, aspartate and/OR aspartic acid.

      Also they were talking about Down’s Syndrome children being functionally deficient in Folate – having the Folate trap thing, which Dr. McDougall has explained where an enzyme can’t break down folic acid fast enough and it ends up causing problems.

      Several clinical observations suggest that children with DS may be functionally folate-deficient despite normal plasma levels of folate and B12.

      Betaine turns out to be what they can use to get around the folate trap.

      The enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) transfers a methyl group from betaine to homocysteine and provides an important alternative route for endogenous methionine synthesis when folate is limited (or trapped).

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1226051/

      That is interesting to me.

      I hope someone who understands Down Syndrome shows up and answers your question. I am someone with brain problems who is learning about controlling glutamate with things like blueberries and turmeric and Bergamot essential oil.

      Tonight was the first time I had seen the Betaine part of the equation before you had posted your comment.

      Interesting that glutamate and betaine showed up in articles on Down Syndrome, too.

      1. Looking at the comorbidities, things like Alzheimer’s Whole Food Plant-Based low saturated fat gives a 90% reduction in risk.

        The comorbidity that they are probably going by is epilepsy.

        Anecdotally, there are people who reversed epilepsy using Whole Food Plant-Based, but Keto has the tests and they don’t know the mechanism.

        They think maybe it is about excess glutamate, which can be even better in a Whole Food Plant-Based Diet.

        Maybe you can go to some of the doctors pages, like McDougall and T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Fuhrman and see if they have testimonials and you can ask questions.

        1. If the comorbidities were just high glutamate, Alzheimer’s, obesity, heart issues, and potential psych conditions, all of those are better with WFPB. WFPB people rarely get Alzheimer’s and they don’t struggle with obesity and Dr. Ornish reversed heart issues and psych issues.

          Epilepsy is the only wild card I see because I don’t think they have studied it from a Whole Food Plant-Based direction and it has been studied from a Keto direction.

          I am not a doctor and I am not trying to sway you away from what they say, but I do not understand that Keto would help with most of the comorbidities and blueberries and turmeric are the types of things which help with glutamate.

          I hope a moderator can help, but my thought is that some of the doctors do consultations over the phone. It might help to find a Whole Food Plant-Based doctor and at least talk it through with them before you commit to a direction.

          1. Hey, broccoli sprouts can help with glutamate-imbalance issues.

            I used it and healed social anxiety and Dr. Greger has a video about it reversing Autism, which can be comorbidity. It also has been used for psych issues, even schizophrenia.

            https://www.nutritioninsight.com/news/broccoli-sprout-derived-compound-may-supplement-schizophrenia-medication.html

            Dr. Greger’s Autism and Broccoli video is so powerful. At least one of the children were permanently healed and didn’t revert.

            Almost all of them improved.

            Just don’t do Sulforophane pills because they don’t work, but 1 or 2 tablespoons of broccoli sprouts can be blended up and put in hummus or sauces or smoothies.

            1. Sorry for posting so much without even answering your question.

              I am someone who had a major brain break-down 7 years ago and I had such severe signs of early-onset Alzheimers and I have been using Whole Food Plant-Based to heal my brain and it has been helping tremendously.

            2. Nope, if your child has something called CBS upregulations, they have them avoid foods with high sulfur content, so under that circumstance, they wouldn’t have them do broccoli.

              Boy, I know that it has to be complicated for you.

              Glad you have a professional who gets good results.

    2. I would suggest getting nutrition recommendations from a Registered Dietitian or licensed medical professional instead. Contacting the national or state Downs Syndrome association may also be useful.

      Anybody can call themselves a nutritionist and some of these people appear to have odd pseudoscientific beliefs. Your nutitionist’s recommendation regarding the blood type diet is a red flag for example – this dietary approach was disproved years ag
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/blood-type-diet-debunked/

      WebMD has a summary discussion of Transfer Factor
      https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1011/transfer-factor

    3. Hi Anne Moore, thanks for your question about Transfer Factor which are found within the colostrum of breast milk. When a mother nurses her baby, transfer factors from her more experienced immune system pass to her baby via the colostrum. Colostrum is rich in immune components that pass to the newborn, affording protection for the baby and their immune system until its immune system can make its own transfer factors.
      As far as diet for children for down syndrome breast feeding is great and gradually weaning to between 6-9 months to a balanced diet with more attention to the nutrition requirements that arise from the down syndrome condition such as digestive issues. A team of medical advisory such as your doctor, Occupational therapist and speech and language therapist and dietitian can help with the child developmental issues.

  32. Is fat intake from nuts also bad for breast cancer survivors?
    Also, over eating of carbs make turn them into fat. Is that also bad for breast cancer survivors?

    1. Joelle, As a previous NutritionFacts volunteer recommended (above) , we really need to clarify when we’re talking about “carbs” whether we are talking about complex carbs filled with nutrients and fiber or simple carbs filled with sugar and minimal nutrients. Nuts being a good source of nutrients can be added to a diet minimizing cancer risk but you also need to recognize that being overweight adds to breast cancer risk. Nuts have lots of calories which have the potential to cause weight gain if you indulge. Even if you do not need to watch your weight, eating lots of nuts may “squeeze” out other foods, so eating a very high-nut diet is not healthy. Complex carbs will fill you up so you can indulge on those, unless again you’re focusing more on more processed carbs like bread rather than fruits and vegetabes. Hope that helps put things in perspective.

  33. I had prostate cancer – I tried a ketogenic diet. It did not lower my PSA. I tried a whole food plant-based diet and my PSA came down from 10.5 to 7.

  34. Doug Kaughman from the show “Know the Cause” states that some cancers and fungus look and act the same and look & act the same under the microscope. He has offered up many studies of varying resources that offer evidence that if some cancers were treated with fungus/mold remedies that many cancers have been shown to become either non-life threatening or just go away altogether. *Doug Kaughman has been about the ultimate healthy diet and lifestyle for decades. I happened to come across his show back around 2004 ? or earlier. He’s been around since the 90’s and some of his books came out in the 80’s.

  35. Thank you for the great video !

    Lately, I see many people supporting the vegan keto diet.

    From the series about keto diets, it is obvious that is, at least, dangerous, about the human health.

    However, does this apply also for the vegan keto diet ?

    Thank you very much for your time

    Best regards

  36. Dr. G has covered this. Whereas the animal based keto increases risk for premature death compared to the standard american diet (SAD), the plant based keto diet reduces the risk for premature death as compared to the SAD.

  37. “Why go keto when you can go chemo?” Is like asking “why change your diet and lifestyle when you can just take your insulin, statins, omesartan, etc?”
    I just lost any respect I had for this guy.

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