Flashback Friday: Turning the Clock Back 14 Years

Flashback Friday: Turning the Clock Back 14 Years
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Four simple health behaviors may cut our risk of chronic disease by nearly 80%, potentially dropping our risk of dying equivalent to that of being 14 years younger.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1903 Thomas Edison predicted that “[t]he doctor of the future [would] give no medicine, but [would instead] instruct [their] patient in the care of [the] human frame in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease[s].” A hundred and one years later, the American College of Lifestyle Medicine was born. We still prescribe drugs when necessary, but our emphasis is based on the understanding that the leading causes of disability in the United States, and the leading causes of death, are caused mostly by lifestyle—particularly what we put in our mouth: food and cigarettes.

“An impressive number of studies have shown that lifestyle is the root cause of what ails us.” The good news, though, is that by changing our lifestyle, we can dramatically improve our health. We have the power.

For most leading causes of death, we’ve long known that our genes account for, at most,10 to 20% of risk, given the fact that rates of killers like heart disease and major cancers differ up to a hundred-fold among various populations, and that when people “migrate from low-[risk] to high-risk countries, their disease rates almost always change to those of the new environment.” For example, at least 70% of strokes and colon cancer are avoidable; “over 80%” of coronary heart disease; “over 90%” of type 2 diabetes, avoidable.

So, maybe it’s “time we stop blaming our genes, and focus on the 70%[-plus] under [our] control. That [may be] the real solution to the health care crisis.”

And, it doesn’t take much. “Adhering to [just] 4 simple healthy lifestyle factors can have a strong impact on the prevention of chronic diseases.” Not smoking, not being obese, half-hour of exercise a day, and eating healthier—like more fruits, veggies, whole grains, less meat. Four simple things cut our risk of developing a chronic disease by 78%. 95% of disease risk, out the window; 80% of heart-attack risk, gone. Half of stroke risk, a third of cancer risk; simply gone. Think of what that means, in terms of the numbers. As it stands now, each year a million Americans experience their first heart attack or stroke; a million get diabetes; a million get cancer.

If we clean up our act, do we actually get to live longer, too? Well, the CDC followed about 8,000 Americans 20 years or older for about six years. They found that “three cardinal lifestyle behaviors exerted an enormous impact on mortality.” People “who do not smoke, consume a healthy diet, and engage in sufficient physical activity can substantially reduce their risk [of] early death.” And, by not smoking, they just meant “not currently smoking.” By “healthy diet,” they just meant in the top 40% in terms of complying with the rather wimpy federal dietary guidelines, and “physically active” meant averaging about 21 minutes a day, or more, of at least moderate exercise. Those that managed at least one of the three had a 40% lower risk of dying. Those that hit two out of three cut their chances of dying by more than half. And, those that scored all three flushed 82% of their chances of dying in those six years down the drain.

What does that mean in terms of how much longer we get to live? A similar study on health behaviors and survival didn’t just take people’s word on how healthy they were eating. They measured the level of vitamin C in people’s blood—as a “biomarker” for how many plants people were eating. And, the drop in mortality risk in those nailing all four healthy behaviors “was equivalent to being 14 [years] younger.” It’s like turning back the clock 14 years.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1903 Thomas Edison predicted that “[t]he doctor of the future [would] give no medicine, but [would instead] instruct [their] patient in the care of [the] human frame in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease[s].” A hundred and one years later, the American College of Lifestyle Medicine was born. We still prescribe drugs when necessary, but our emphasis is based on the understanding that the leading causes of disability in the United States, and the leading causes of death, are caused mostly by lifestyle—particularly what we put in our mouth: food and cigarettes.

“An impressive number of studies have shown that lifestyle is the root cause of what ails us.” The good news, though, is that by changing our lifestyle, we can dramatically improve our health. We have the power.

For most leading causes of death, we’ve long known that our genes account for, at most,10 to 20% of risk, given the fact that rates of killers like heart disease and major cancers differ up to a hundred-fold among various populations, and that when people “migrate from low-[risk] to high-risk countries, their disease rates almost always change to those of the new environment.” For example, at least 70% of strokes and colon cancer are avoidable; “over 80%” of coronary heart disease; “over 90%” of type 2 diabetes, avoidable.

So, maybe it’s “time we stop blaming our genes, and focus on the 70%[-plus] under [our] control. That [may be] the real solution to the health care crisis.”

And, it doesn’t take much. “Adhering to [just] 4 simple healthy lifestyle factors can have a strong impact on the prevention of chronic diseases.” Not smoking, not being obese, half-hour of exercise a day, and eating healthier—like more fruits, veggies, whole grains, less meat. Four simple things cut our risk of developing a chronic disease by 78%. 95% of disease risk, out the window; 80% of heart-attack risk, gone. Half of stroke risk, a third of cancer risk; simply gone. Think of what that means, in terms of the numbers. As it stands now, each year a million Americans experience their first heart attack or stroke; a million get diabetes; a million get cancer.

If we clean up our act, do we actually get to live longer, too? Well, the CDC followed about 8,000 Americans 20 years or older for about six years. They found that “three cardinal lifestyle behaviors exerted an enormous impact on mortality.” People “who do not smoke, consume a healthy diet, and engage in sufficient physical activity can substantially reduce their risk [of] early death.” And, by not smoking, they just meant “not currently smoking.” By “healthy diet,” they just meant in the top 40% in terms of complying with the rather wimpy federal dietary guidelines, and “physically active” meant averaging about 21 minutes a day, or more, of at least moderate exercise. Those that managed at least one of the three had a 40% lower risk of dying. Those that hit two out of three cut their chances of dying by more than half. And, those that scored all three flushed 82% of their chances of dying in those six years down the drain.

What does that mean in terms of how much longer we get to live? A similar study on health behaviors and survival didn’t just take people’s word on how healthy they were eating. They measured the level of vitamin C in people’s blood—as a “biomarker” for how many plants people were eating. And, the drop in mortality risk in those nailing all four healthy behaviors “was equivalent to being 14 [years] younger.” It’s like turning back the clock 14 years.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

I discuss the role diet may play in preventing the 15 leading causes of death in my 2012 annual review video, Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, and my 2016 video, How Not to Die.

How does your diet compare? Calculate Your Healthy Eating Score.

I go in depth on the exercise component in the follow-up video, Longer Life Within Walking Distance.

For more on slowing the aging process, see my videos:

I just published a new one: The Benefits of Calorie Restriction for Longevity.

For more on my chosen clinical specialty, lifestyle medicine, see:

And here’s a recent series about the lifestyle health program, CHIP:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

89 responses to “Flashback Friday: Turning the Clock Back 14 Years

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  1. Happy Birthday Dr. Greger!
    My goal for the remainder of the year is to meet with each of the presidential candidates and tell them that I am a single issue voter -> I am against institutionalized nutrition miseducation. I have met with four of the candidates so far and they have all expressed some interest in the topic.

    I have also passed out more than 40 loaner copies of How Not to Die at a local college campus. Many of the students are wondering why a biochemistry course in nutrition science is not currently being offered. Cheers!

    1. Deb

      You are interested in brain health. Have you seen these two studoes below?

      1.
      ‘In summary, our study comprehensively investigated the effects of tea drinking on brain connectivity at both global and regional scales using multi-modal imaging data (i.e., functional and structural imaging) and provided the first compelling evidence that tea drinking positively contributes to brain structure making network organization more efficient. Our study suggests that tea drinking is effective in preventing (slowing) or ameliorating cognitive decline and that tea drinking might be a simple lifestyle choice that benefits brain health.’

      https://www.aging-us.com/article/102023/text

      2.
      ‘ These findings identify a causal link between dietary salt, endothelial dysfunction and tau pathology, independent of haemodynamic insufficiency. Avoidance of excessive salt intake and maintenance of vascular health may help to stave off the vascular and neurodegenerative pathologies that underlie dementia in the elderly.’
      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1688-z

      1. We need to keep hearing this message—because it is so good it is hard to really believe. Just think of how fast this message is deflected off those who are really clueless about nutrition.

  2. I’m adding 1 thing to the list of 4 things, because it’s a relatively new, and hard to avoid problem. It’s the EMF’s (aka electromagnetic radiation) we are all exposed to from WiFi, smart meters, cell towers, electric power lines, cordless phones, cell phones, anything called “smart” nowadays like smart appliances. It will get much worse as 5G gets rolled out to the rest of the country. People need to take steps to shield and reduce their exposure. EMF’s are the new cigarettes. Only this time everybody is a smoker because you can’t just quit EMF exposure. It’s everywhere. Watch a Dr. Devra Davis presentation on YouTube. Watch the documentary “Take Back Your Power” (get it from the library). Read “Overpowered”, by Martin Blank PhD. Read The Non-Tinfoil Guide to EMF’s, by Nick Pineault.

    1. Chuck, I was going to say the exact same thing. Don’t expect responses as people don’t like unpleasant truths. These companies have convinced gullible
      people to buy all this smart garbage they don’t need. All this smart tech, robotics and AI over the years has mysteriously elevated the obesity epidemic, opioid epidemic, teen depression, accidents from texting on the cancer phone and the list goes on.

    2. I watched a documentary about people that need to live somewhere without power lines and WiFi etc. cause it gives the migraines and other ailments. Really interesting. The name escapes me

      1. The problem is that all the objective clinical studies that have been done on these patients clearly show that you could secretly turn on wifi and string up power lines nearby their wilderness homes, and these people’s migraines and other ailments would not return. In other words, it’s the placebo affect: when they see power lines and wifi transmitters, they actually get headaches and don’t feel well, but there is no real cause and effect between the electromagnetic energy and their health problems.

  3. I ended up having 4 vegan birthday cup cakes this week, but weighed myself and I didn’t gain weight.

    I think I only lose weight when I eat 3 pieces of fruit and eat a broth soup though.

    We will see what happens on a non-cup cake week.

    Cup cakes need to be sold one at a time. Some of us ate 4!

    1. Yes, I didn’t have cake at my birthday dinner and it ended up me seeing vegan cupcakes and wondering what they tasted like. Laughing. I hope you have a happy, healthy birthday.

  4. There was a consistent audio rumble in the video. I kept looking out the window to see if there was heavy machinery nearby doing work.

    Other than that, the message was good.

  5. Happy Birthday! Your videos, cookbook and How Not to Die have changed my life dramatically for the better!

    I hope your day is full of whatever makes you happiest. I, for one, am very, very happy you were born!

  6. I like that Dr. Greger chose this one for his birthday. Sort of a Back to The Future vibe with Dr. Greger’s smiling face next to “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest his patient in the care of the human frame, in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease.”

    The future and past have joined hands.

  7. Happy, happy birthday! or as we like to do around these parts…Happy Birth-Month!
    I really appreciate everything that happens here….enjoy your book tour travels!

      1. I am a tea tank from way back and have never drunk bourbon in my life. Tea is my beverage of choice but I usually drink coffee when I go out since most restaurants/cafes don’t know how to make a decent cup of tea. And, well, coffee is just coffee.

        What witch’s brew do you drink YR? The classic one perhaps?

        ‘”Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting, Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.”

        I understand though that all of those were just colloquial terms for for verious herbs and plants. Eye of newt referred to mustard seeds for example. At least according to the internet …. go to Wikipedia and search for ‘eye of newt’, it will redirect you to ‘mustard seed’

        Though, to be honest, I’ve always thought you might be more the Granny Clampett type with a fondness for monnshine whisky and corncob pipes.

        1. Too cutesy, Fumbles. ^_^ And so apropos is your comment, being as it’s so close to the trick ‘r treating time of year and all.

          Nope, I don’t drink booze of any kind…just don’t like the taste of it, for one reason. I’m a black coffee, nothing added, kind of gal. Same with tea. Gotta drink ’em both black. Other than those, just water. Maybe a glass of champagne at a big celebration of some kind.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ruD6K7fhs0

          1. Great song, YR! There you go again … finding those real cool videos on Youtube … keep ’em coming :-)

            I, too, am a black coffee & tea drinker. Sometimes I add a dash of matcha green tea to the black tea and it gives it a unique but pleasant taste.

  8. Happy Birthday Dr. G!
    Without your website
    Don’t know where I’d be.
    Quirky, witty, wise & true blue
    This world could use more soul – “like you do.”
    Nutrition Facts – ideas we wanna share
    It’s straight up help
    And crystal clear that you care!❤️

  9. A LOT of the genetic theory about humans having diseases that ‘run in the family’ is pure hokum. The reason is these theories ignore one very important fact, that people tend to EAT the way their family taught them to….resulting in the same food related diseases. No genes involved. Just Darwinism.

    1. Jimbo, I tend to agree. Seems to me that blaming genetics for all our ills is really overblown. I’m not denying that it certainly plays a role in some obvious cases, but it’s simply overemphasized.

      And your comment: ” people tend to EAT the way their family taught them to….resulting in the same food related diseases.” reminds me of the concept of a “meme”, a term coined by the famous evolution expert, Richard Dawkins. Eating habits “inherited” from our parents could be considered to be an example of a meme.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme

      “A meme is an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture—often with the aim of conveying a particular phenomenon, theme, or meaning represented by the meme. A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.

  10. I really liked the webinar.

    Looking forward to the links so that I can push the pause button.

    You are such a sweetie-pie in the in-between sections & the Q&A’s. You really have a pleasant personality.

    (Cutie-pie, too, no matter what YR says.)

    Hooray for 5 webinars for next year. Excellent format, the Q&A part of it takes it over the top!

    Hooray, for longer formats. Nice to see you off your treadmill with Cancer as your topic.

    Hoping that you enjoy the time with your mother and that you get some good lentil soup.

      1. I would send you one of my MicroPulse ICES to try because broken toe is one of the things it got a rave review for, but I have no idea which international airport you chose to relocate to be near.

  11. Happy B-day, Dr. G! I hit 68 last month and the last three years have been a lot better since I discovered you. My prior A1c was north of 8, and the one right after my b-day was 6.1. Your diet and a ridiculous amount of exercise seem to have been the ticket. (I do about an hour a day on my elliptical, and am now up to 5 miles.) Too old for just walking to do much good. For what it’s worth, I also seem to have fixed my chronic kidney disease, at least to where my kidney function is normal for my age. I’d like it to be better, but I was on the verge of a transplant 6 years ago, so I’ll take what I can get.

    My mom died of colon cancer, but I’m cavilling at another colonoscopy. I haven’t had meat in almost 30 years (though dairy was part of my diet for ten of those years) and my mother was a two times a day meat-eater with a love of ham. She did eat a salad a day, but it was mainly iceburg lettuce. So I’m not real worried about the colon cancer connection. Hers was lifestyle related, and that ain’t genetic.

  12. Happy Birthday, thank you for all you do to help so many people ‘see the light’ and have the information and where with all to change their lives and mortality.Including myself and my family, you cookbook is amazing as is your website .

  13. Things must be dire when even Nestle publicly acknowledges inconvenient facts:

    ‘SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Nestle SA, one of the world’s largest food processors, believes population growth will require human diets to adapt, reducing consumption of sugar, salt and meat products, an executive said on Wednesday.

    “We have 7.5 billion people and the population continues to grow, so there is a need to eat more vegetables, cereals, and less sugar, meat products,” said Laurent Freixe, Executive Vice President and head of operations in the Americas.’

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/920342?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=129079FG&impID=2143719&faf=1

    1. This Nestle’s article is so fascinating.

      I wonder what economic factor triggered it.

      Clearly, they are talking about the consumers being informed causing them to change how they do business.

      That is good news.

      They are constantly looking for how to reformulate their products sounds pretty good, too.

      Though I would have liked to hear what they are actually doing about it.

      The fact that they are grouping child slave labor and environmental factors in with health factors, they are saying all of the right words, but there wasn’t a sentence about their new product line or something tangible.

  14. And while I am off-topic, what about this study?

    ‘A phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) together with a Bayesian analysis of tree-structured phenotypic model (TreeWAS) was performed to examine disease outcomes related to genetically determined serum urate levels in 339,256 unrelated White British individuals (54% female) in the UK Biobank who were aged 40–69 years (mean age, 56.87; SD, 7.99) when recruited from 2006 to 2010. Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses were performed to replicate significant findings using various genome-wide association study (GWAS) consortia data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine possible pleiotropic effects on metabolic traits of the genetic variants used as instruments for urate. PheWAS analysis, examining the association with 1,431 disease outcomes;;;;;;;;;;
    In this study, high serum urate levels were found to be associated with increased risk of different types of cardiac events. The finding of genetic pleiotropy indicates the existence of common upstream pathological elements influencing both urate and metabolic traits….’
    https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002937

    This Australian study suggests that we can moderate serum urate (or serum uric acid SUA) levels by prudent dietary choices – although I am not sure about dairy since it is high in fat but it’s clearly a better choice here than meat

    ‘CONCLUSIONS:
    Healthy food choices with high intake of carbohydrates, dairy products, fiber and micronutrient-rich foods, and limited intake of fat, beer and spirits, might be recommended to prevent high SUA. Dietary factors seem to have qualitatively similar impact on SUA in obese and non-obese men and women from Australia and Norway.’
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459487/

    So, lay off the moonshine YR.

      1. I enjoyed it very much but paused at the metabolism concept.

        I am confused by the ups and downs of metabolism.

        I remember that you posted the lives longer from a slow metabolism, wasn’t it metabolism?

        This one is the metabolism goes up and they live longer again.

        Is there a good up and a bad up?

        Or did I just hallucinate the whole thing?

        I am saying it laughing but I have had many hallucinations over the past 7 years, maybe longer.

              1. Darwin,

                That is interesting about “class” and pronunciations. I have been thinking a lot about the topic of “class.” I have wealthy and poor people in my family and the wealthy people do everything according to “class” and the poor people are more focused on “being real” but the “class” list even extends to food and drinks and what brand of paint and what type of car people drive. Keeping up with the Jones’ is what they used to call it. My father was a “keeping up with the Jones'” type of person and my mother was from an infamous figure in American history and she was be yourself, whatever that is, nobody is better than anybody else. She insisted that we respect everyone, no matter what they looked like or how they dressed or how they spoke or whether they were criminals or homeless. She didn’t demand “earning respect” from people, she based respect on the dignity that human beings needed to survive. I suspect that coming from an infamous family line might have colored her opinions somewhat. I use the word, “colored” and the time period where people were putting down “colored” people and women and all sorts of people, was something she stood against. I watch a lot of PBS and we really should be ashamed of how we have treated people historically and it call comes from that class orientation.

                My Fair Lady author becoming a NAZI eugenics person would be an example of ridiculously cold-hearted class-orientation. How could someone write that and then want to murder the flower lady? Yes, I get less classy when I try to communicate things like that. I don’t even know why I do it, but I think my writing falls apart on purpose in protest of every cruel event where feeling “better than” for stupid things like pronunciation was used to justify things like murdering people.

                1. It does extend into food.

                  That is why people try so hard to become the “soy” police and make sure everybody knows that soy is “bad” and if it were about health alone, and they just believed differently, that might make sense, but when my grandmother was alive, I had cable and I remember the Food Network chefs would explain that portobello were “so early 1990’s” and I remember that but it was 20 years later and they didn’t see them as fit to serve anymore. They were out of fashion.

                  I remember thinking, “You have got to be kidding me?!” and I know that “You have got to be kidding me?” was my mother’s side of the family. My father’s side of the family had a baby grand piano and gold-rimmed teacups in their fancy hutch and they were all pretty, but my poor side of the family relatives would sit around telling funny stories, and playing music and they were there for me my whole life – as long as any of them were alive, I had someone to go to. Except about being abused, but that was long before the “me, too” generation and the fact that I did tell and did public speaking on it, I was a forerunner of that in a way, but not one anybody would know about. I have so many areas of my life where there is such strong dichotomy and that is what happens when City Mouse and Country Mouse do the whole Green Acres type of thing.

                  1. When I was reading the article, “Psychiatry’s Role in the Holocaust” the author mentioned that the USA was less willing to allow the information to get out than Germany, and American psychiatrists were calling for the same type of eugenics and sterilization.

                    http://breggin.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/psychiatrysrole.pbreggin.1993.pdf

                    People who were high class back then wanted the right to kill inferior people.

                    That mindset still happens, but it is less popular now.

                    When I watch history programs or read articles, I genuinely hate the whole notion of “class” and I have always been that way.

                    1. What I came away with is that Hollywood nicely gave us villains like Hitler, but Hitler and Stalin were both thanking the eugenics movement in the USA and we had very wealthy, powerful people who wanted to do it, too.

                      I didn’t learn history like that.

                      It was the black hat bad guys versus the white hat good guys.

        1. ‘I remember that you posted the lives longer from a slow metabolism, wasn’t it metabolism?
          This one is the metabolism goes up and they live longer again.’

          These are very good questions Deb.

          My take on it is that the study showing higher RMR was a study of vegetarians vis-s-vis non vegetarians. It wasn’t a study of people eating WFPB diets. Also, that study found:

          ‘After statistically controlling for differences in relative amounts of carbohydrate and fat in the diet and for norepinephrine concentrations, no significant differences in adjusted RMR between vegetarians and nonvegetarians were noted. These results suggest that the higher RMR observed in young male vegetarians is partially mediated by differences in dietary macronutrient composition and increased sympathetic nervous system activity.’
          https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0026049594902054

          Further, another study found:

          ‘Resting energy expenditure was positively correlated with a specific component of the vegetarian’s diet, i.e. vegetable fats.’
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4517036/

          I am not surprised that vegetarians live longer than meat eaters, even with a higher RMR, But, to achieve all the benefits of a WFPB diet and a lower RMR, perhaps we need to adopt a low-fat WFPB diet. Which of course is pretty much the stance of Esselstyn and Ornish. I am not convinced by all the people who say we need concentrated fats added to our diet to achieve optimal health. They don’t present any evidence for their claims and those claims are difficult to reconcile with the healthy longevity enjoyed by Okinaewans and mainland Japanese on their traditional (low fat) diets. Or the results achieved by Esselstyyn and Ornish in their studies. And such things weren’t found in our evolutionary history if that is relevant (I’m not personally convinced that it is but ….).

          All that said, it would indeed be helpful if Dr G could address this apparent inconsistency (between his TedX talk and that slowing metabolism video of his.

          1. Tom,

            That is a great point and it is something to consider.

            Maybe the other option is that if you are eating WFPB, maybe metabolism isn’t as important to longevity.

            Some sort of J curve or U curve or whatever letter curve.

            1. I know that Dr. Greger said that in “How Not to Diet” there will be foods that speed up metabolism.

              That might be how to tell whether it is about a low enough fat diet or not.

              If it is just about fats, nuts, seeds and avocado and longevity would be the studies to look for.

              The Adventists aren’t seeming to suffer all that much eating them.

              My guess is that there would be a continuum.

              For instance, many studies on nuts, the people eating the nuts had the lowest BMI, so is that going to speed up the metabolism and cause longevity to decrease or speed up metabolism and cause BMI to be lower and cause longevity to increase or add too many calories and cause higher BMI and then longevity would still be based on the eating nuts helping the arteries.

              Yes, it is going to be a ridiculously confusing topic is what I predict.

          1. No, I don’t have them anymore.

            All gone.

            The pretty much stopped with the 12 week Fiji water to get rid of the aluminum in the brain, but they started again at a low level when I switched to Methyl B-12 for a while. I suspect that I had high Homocysteine from not eating plant-foods with folate before on top of blood sugar issues on top of being low in Vitamin D, Magnesium, and blocked arteries from all the cheese I was eating and just about everything else, which can possibly cause dementia and Alzheimer’s, high stress, no sleep. I was pretty much eating pizza or pasta most nights and refined carb versions of everything and I suspect that I was low in every vitamin and mineral. My vitamins had copper in them. Sodium might be in there, I can’t remember if that is on the Alzheimer’s list. So many of the things I had could cause hallucinations. Lacking sleep could cause it, but, interestingly, it isn’t causing it and I have been back to not really sleeping the past month, but no hallucinations. Someone who came on the site said that menopause caused hers, but mine went away without doing hormone replacement, but it possibly did correspond with menopause, too, and I did have an older friend say that she went crazy during menopause and then when it was over her brain got better. The concept that my brain might be Keto does not make me happy.

            But I am doing the best I can with everything else.

            I had stopped using my MicroPulse ICES a month ago, and haven’t started again, and that seemed to help me sleep for several weeks, but then, it started to feel like it might be too stimulating and I began to think it might be keeping me awake, so I haven’t tried it again. Soon.

    1. Fumbles, Yes, this TedX talk is one of Dr G’s best for the 15 minute length. He exudes so much enthusiasm one can tell he really wants to get the message out to people to help them get and stay healthy. Thanks for letting us know about this TedX talk.

      Of particular note, are Dr G’s remarks starting at the 10:18 mark in the video, where he talks about the evolutionary history of humans. If one looks at nutrition from that viewpoint, then no reductionist studies are really needed to determine which foods match the human physiology.

      1. Perhaps then, in the contect of considering a diet to which we and our ancestors have long been adatped, we should be getting our B12 and possibly some other micronutrients from insects and grubs?

        1. Fumbles, when I said “food”, I was implicitly referring to macro foods such as meat vs plants. Yes, reductionist studies are still needed to refine our optimal diet for things like B12 and specific foods that help specific diseases.

    2. Wow, Tom,

      Three in a row! You have given me so many things to look at!

      Urate is such a new topic for me that my cell phone is going to change it to irate over and over again.

  15. I was still thinking about topics from yesterday’s webinar.

    He talked about whether underweight people should do water fasting before chemo and how doctors tend to say not to.

    But if they don’t water fast, they are going to probably vomit the food up and may get such a stronger aversion to the foods they used to like so it could mean permanent bigger problems in feeding.

    Plus, once they start vomiting they won’t have gotten those calories in, plus, probably won’t eat much, on top of never wanting to eat those foods again. Plus, the chemo will be more toxic to their bodies.

    It changes the risk/benefit ratio.

  16. Happy birthday :), now the stress factor. The new video format :( …
    The black text block at bottom of video is VERY disturbing and seems of no useful value.
    On numerous videos it has blocked view of important information. I read everything and pause to see text and chart scales of evidence presented. The text block has hindered that in many videos.

    1. Willis, the black text block isn’t a part of nutrition facts new text format. It is “closed caption” feature of youtube. You turn it off by tapping the “cc” symbol in the lower right of the video screen . You can also check out the sources used in the videos by clicking on the sources tab. Sometimes the papers are available in their entirety.

  17. I’ve heard/read your info but because of my situation (whipple June 2017 because of pancreatic cancer) and it was successful in that all but 1 scan in the past two years have been good. I did get a lung nodule however that was removed via ablation process.
    Honestly I heard much of what you said about how to eat and then seem to run into a major conflict. First cut seemed eat more veggies was the answer and then I came across your piece on ratio’s of omega 6 and that made veggies look like not the best idea. I am committed to be disciplined once I know the best plan.
    Help please .
    Randy

    1. That’s awesome Randy that you are doing well. These 2 links sum up Dr Greger’s recommendations. The first is describing his Daily Dozen. This is also described in the second half of his book, How Not to Die.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/

      The second is his recommendations for the very few supplements that you need. I take only B12 every day, and ground flax seed in my porridge. Don’t worry about the omega 6 to 3 ratio if you are following the whole food plant based plan. People consuming a western diet high in processed foods, flours, veg oils (common sources of omega 6 ) can get too much omega 6, but not if you are eating this way. All the best to you!

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/

  18. Barb, I checked the second link you posted. Back then, when the site was still in its infancy (?), there were 554 comments!

    In that link I also clicked the one “Jack Bloom” posted. If you read it, what did you think of this quote from that link?

    “One vegan told me that when she decided to go and buy some eggs for the first time in, I don’t know, 10 or 15 years … her boyfriend, who was a staunch vegan, refused to go in with her. In fact, he had told her … he would rather she was a continually suffering vegan than to be a healthy meat-eater.”

    Say what???? :-o

    1. Re the suffering vegan: It makes no sense to me YR. Though I myself really try to avoid animal products now, I hail from an agricultural background. I get the ethical arguments, and probably have a deeper understanding than many who write in these forums. But I realise that we are not all alike, nor are we at the same place healthwise. People need to do what they need to do. On the other hand, I admit I don’t have a lot of patience for folks who insist on self-diagnosis etc and don’t checkvwith their doctors when things go awry.

      About the 554 comments. At one time this was not all that unusual YR. Something that struck me as being odd was that this website promotes a lifestyle of whole plant food diet, exercise etc. which is all good BUT people went crazy with comments when the video was about a pill, (like vit D for example) not when it was about whole foods. I have seen it happen time and again over the years.

    1. That’s me every a.m. before breakfast, Barb. Except that I wear nothing but a man’s extra large t-shirt when doing the exercises. I hope I’ll be able to keep my creaky ol’ butt up in the air as long as this gal has. :-)

      Here’s a video of a yoga teacher. I wonder if she’s still alive — 98 when this was recorded in 2017.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEjgAFPRIdE

  19. Tao looks great too! I love her outfit as well. I do my exercises in the morning too while the coffee is brewing and I will keep going as long as I can!

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