For Flavonoid Benefits, Don’t Peel Apples

For Flavonoid Benefits, Don’t Peel Apples
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Peeled apples are pitted head-to-head against unpeeled apples and spinach in a test of artery function.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Regular apple consumption may contribute to a lower risk of dying prematurely. Moderate apple consumption, meaning like an apple or two a week, was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of dying from all causes put together, whereas those who ate an apple a day had a 35 percent lower risk.

You’ll often hear me talking about a lower or higher risk of mortality, but what does that mean? Isn’t the risk of dying 100 percent for everyone, eventually? Let’s look at some survival curves to help visualize. If you follow thousands of older women over time, for example, you might see a survival curve like this. They all start out alive, but over a period of 15 years, nearly half succumb. Okay, but this is the survival curve of those who rarely, if ever, ate apples—less than 20 a year. Those averaging more like half a small apple a day instead fall off…like this. Over the same time period, closer to only about 40 percent died. And those who ate an apple a day, one small apple or about a quarter of a large apple, did even better—survived even longer.

Why is that the case? It seems to be less the apple of one’s eye than the apple of one’s arteries. Even a fraction of an apple a day is associated with 24 percent lower odds of having severe major artery calcifications, a marker of vascular disease. And if you’re like, duh, it’s a fruit, of course it’s healthy, the effect was not found for pears, oranges, or bananas.

Both these studies were done on women, but a similar effect was found for men, for apples and onions; we think because of the flavonoids, naturally-occurring phytonutrients concentrated in apples, thought to improve artery function and lower blood pressure, leading to improvements in blood flow throughout your body and brain—thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease and strokes. But you don’t know until you put it to the test.

When I first saw this paper on testing flavonoid-rich apples, I assumed they had selectively bred or genetically engineered some special apple, but no, the high-flavonoid apple was just an apple with its peel on, compared to the low-flavonoid apple, which was just the exact same apple but with the peel removed.

Over the next three hours, flavonoid levels in the bloodstream shot up in the unpeeled apple group, compared to the peeled apple group, which coincided with significantly improved artery function— peeled versus unpeeled. They conclude that the lower risk of cardiovascular disease with higher apple consumption is most likely due to the high concentration of flavonoids in the skin, which improve artery function, though it could be anything in the peel. All we know is that apple peels are particularly good for us, improving artery function and lowering blood pressure.

Even compared to spinach? Give someone about three-quarters of a cup of cooked spinach, and within two to three hours, their blood pressure drops. Instead, eat an apple with some extra peel thrown in, and you get a similar effect.

The researchers conclude that apples and spinach almost immediately improve artery function and lower blood pressure. What’s nice about these results is that we’re talking about whole foods, not some supplement or extract; so, this could easily translate “into a natural and low-cost method of reducing the cardiovascular risk profile of the general population.”

I’ve got more videos coming up on other natural low-cost methods for preventing and treating our leading killers; so, keep your eyes peeled—but, keep your apples unpeeled.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alexandra via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Regular apple consumption may contribute to a lower risk of dying prematurely. Moderate apple consumption, meaning like an apple or two a week, was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of dying from all causes put together, whereas those who ate an apple a day had a 35 percent lower risk.

You’ll often hear me talking about a lower or higher risk of mortality, but what does that mean? Isn’t the risk of dying 100 percent for everyone, eventually? Let’s look at some survival curves to help visualize. If you follow thousands of older women over time, for example, you might see a survival curve like this. They all start out alive, but over a period of 15 years, nearly half succumb. Okay, but this is the survival curve of those who rarely, if ever, ate apples—less than 20 a year. Those averaging more like half a small apple a day instead fall off…like this. Over the same time period, closer to only about 40 percent died. And those who ate an apple a day, one small apple or about a quarter of a large apple, did even better—survived even longer.

Why is that the case? It seems to be less the apple of one’s eye than the apple of one’s arteries. Even a fraction of an apple a day is associated with 24 percent lower odds of having severe major artery calcifications, a marker of vascular disease. And if you’re like, duh, it’s a fruit, of course it’s healthy, the effect was not found for pears, oranges, or bananas.

Both these studies were done on women, but a similar effect was found for men, for apples and onions; we think because of the flavonoids, naturally-occurring phytonutrients concentrated in apples, thought to improve artery function and lower blood pressure, leading to improvements in blood flow throughout your body and brain—thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease and strokes. But you don’t know until you put it to the test.

When I first saw this paper on testing flavonoid-rich apples, I assumed they had selectively bred or genetically engineered some special apple, but no, the high-flavonoid apple was just an apple with its peel on, compared to the low-flavonoid apple, which was just the exact same apple but with the peel removed.

Over the next three hours, flavonoid levels in the bloodstream shot up in the unpeeled apple group, compared to the peeled apple group, which coincided with significantly improved artery function— peeled versus unpeeled. They conclude that the lower risk of cardiovascular disease with higher apple consumption is most likely due to the high concentration of flavonoids in the skin, which improve artery function, though it could be anything in the peel. All we know is that apple peels are particularly good for us, improving artery function and lowering blood pressure.

Even compared to spinach? Give someone about three-quarters of a cup of cooked spinach, and within two to three hours, their blood pressure drops. Instead, eat an apple with some extra peel thrown in, and you get a similar effect.

The researchers conclude that apples and spinach almost immediately improve artery function and lower blood pressure. What’s nice about these results is that we’re talking about whole foods, not some supplement or extract; so, this could easily translate “into a natural and low-cost method of reducing the cardiovascular risk profile of the general population.”

I’ve got more videos coming up on other natural low-cost methods for preventing and treating our leading killers; so, keep your eyes peeled—but, keep your apples unpeeled.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alexandra via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Here are my last few apple videos: 

What about dried apples? See Dried Apples vs. Cholesterol.

What about apple cider vinegar? Check out: Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss?

And what about head-to-head vs. açai berries? See The Antioxidant Effects of Açai vs. Apples.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

173 responses to “For Flavonoid Benefits, Don’t Peel Apples

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  1. Thanks dr Greger for your interesting video’s on the apple. I eat them every day now!

    Even more benefits besides that super healthy peel:

    Apples contain 100 million bacteria per apple. Which bacteria? Depends on whether the apple is organic or not. Organic apples contain a different mix than conventional ones.
    Researchers found the bacteria Shigella (sick making) on the conventional ones, but not on the organic apples. What they found on the organic, were many kinds of Lactobacillus bacteria, also found in probiotic yogurt.
    The most bacteria were found in the core of the apple. When not eating the core you will discard 9/10 of the beneficial bacteria.

    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01629/full

    https://www.spektrum.de/news/100-millionen-bakterien-pro-apfel/1662254

    Reply

      1. Yes, from the german article:

        “Die meisten Bakterien stecken übrigens im Kerngehäuse. Wer das nicht isst, nimmt also nur ein Zehntel der vorhandenen Bakterien auf”

        Most bacteria are in the clockhouse. If you don’t eat that you will only ingest 1/10 of the amount of bacteria.

        1. Not really sure what the clock house is. Is that the stem and butt area? However, I know we don’t really want to eat the seeds.

          End

          1. Hmmm ……….. so ‘Kern’ in modern German means seed.

            it is clearly the same word as the moden English word ‘corn’. And corn basically means any grass seed (wheat, oats, barley, maize etc). Of course, maize or sweetcorn is commonly just called corn in American.

            Facinating how the meaning of words change over thousands of years … or just a few years for that matter.

    1. Hi
      I saw research done recently on which Apple has the highest nutrient levels all round , and it turned out to be the Granny Smith Apple by a mile . Sweeter apples don’t make them better.

    2. Dan,

      Dr. Greger got me to buy apples last night and your post got me to eat so much more of today’s apple than I normally do. I didn’t eat the stem or the seeds, but my apple waste was so tiny and that made me happy. And, yes, my apple was cold and crisp and I will have to go to the grocery store nearly every day.

      Also, I did verify what the wax was made from and there really is a sign with very small print, but I found it.

      1. Deb, me too! Hadn’t eaten apples for years, I didn’t like those sour things. But now with the new knowledge I devour 2 small organic apples a day thinking come in good stuff and bacteria!
        Do you mean the wax on organic apples is ok?

    3. Hi Dan,

      I already eat 2 apples with skin, so was interested in the extra benefits you mentioned and went onto try.

      Yesterday no problems eating the core, end bits as easy to chew. But the stem I just couldn’t manage to chew, today I put stems in the grinder, 2 stems not enough to get the blades to breakdown. Cut the 2 stems up into small pieces, still just spun around and not ground. Popped the chopped stems into a pestle and mortar, it was still just bits of hard fibre.

      I chew the fibre for a short time, but still couldn’t break them down. Decided to not swallow, as I fell it will just go through the system as is. I’m not about to start cutting up the stems and grinding daily if this is the result, so unless anyone has other ways of breaking down the stems, other than just saying swallow them, I shall not waste my time.

      Interesting addition to apple info, thanks for adding.

    1. Smart,

      He has videos on improving eyesight.

      Baldness, I think it would be more trying gadgets like laser caps or something like MicroPulse ICES. Bob Dennis has said that he has been offered big money over 30 times from people who wanted to market his product as a device for hair re-growth but he has not done any studies on it being useful for that. When I looked for mechanisms, there are things like increased blood flow and other things, which I felt could be mechanisms, but he sees them all as con-artists trying to make a lot of money. I have an M1 and a C5 and I use his devices whenever I need pain-relief and have it on-hand if I ever break a bone and I am trying to use it preventatively for keeping knee and hip cartilage and those things it is helpful for, but I am not 100% sure about the preventing baldness. Some people have had improvements in sleep apnea. Not sure it is worth it for that, either, but I never run out of things to use it for. For instance, it increases the circulation to my fingers and toes and I use it for that in the Winter.

      1. For the sleep apnea, there are things like lifting the head of the bed or sleeping on the side.

        There can be surgeries if you know you have nasal polyps or a deviated septum.

        My friend had her tonsils and adenoids removed and it improved her situation but didn’t cure it. It only improves things 50% of the time and only cures things 16% of the time, so it is a pretty invasive way to only have a 16% chance it will work.

        They do a jaw surgery which has a 43% cure rate, but it takes a long time to recover and it means not eating solid foods for 4 to 6 weeks.

        They do have an implantable magnetic device (I have a friend with severe sleep apnea who is so petrified by CPAP that she couldn’t make it through 5 minutes of a sleep study. She has tried a few times to do the sleep study with it, but always runs out of the building, so I did look for alternative things.)

        https://researchfeatures.com/2017/09/18/magnetic-force-obstructive-sleep-apnoea/

        1. MI usually stands for ‘myocardial infarction’ – which is ‘heart attack’ in simple English. Or it could mean ‘military intelligence’.

          C5 is frquently used to refer to the 5th cervical (neck) vertebra from the top.

    2. Baldness is often genetically determined and I don’t know of any diet that effects it one way or the other in the majority of cases such as male and female pattern baldness. Poor eyesight is effected by diet especially some of the more common chronic conditions such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Cataracts seem to be less prevalent in healthy populations who eat healthier and are active. Once you have attained a healthy body fat most cases of sleep apnea are markedly improved or resolved. There are a small percent of cases where it is structural. As we wrestle with “aging” we need to eat the best diet to avoid chronic conditions. It appears that for the US the averages are 62 years of good health and 14 years of poor health… of the 14 years of poor health 7 are spent in disability. Good luck and keep tuned to NF.org as the science keeps coming.

      1. But seriously, to the extent that diet can influence health and longevity, the same diet is best for everything: whole food plant based, with specific emphasis placed on leafy greens, brassicas, berries,nuts, and the rest of the Daily Dozen. If you adhere 100% that is the most diet can do.

        1. Yes, that certainly seems to be the case. It’s also the diet that that maintains cardiovascular health, keeps obesity at bay, keeps blood pressure and cholesterol low and significantly reduces diabetes.and cardiovascular risk.

          And, as this recent twins study shows, better cardiovascular health is associated with better cognitive health.
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191021135040.htm

          They used the AMA’s seven key factors as measures – blood sugar, serum cholesterol, blood pressure, body mass index, physical activity, diet and cigarette smoking

    3. Most apples in the supermarket have become inedible due to how they are handled. Fact: the apples you are buying right now were not picked a few weeks ago but were picked LAST YEARS APPLE SEASON and put into cold storage. In fact when a store does sell ‘fresh crop’ apples they openly label them and charge a premium price (such as Costco).

      Most people I know can only eat normal store apples if cooked because long term cold stored apples cause stomach problems and as one person put it ‘turn me into a salad shooter’. The fresh crop apples cause none of those problems eaten raw.

    4. While you have received some helpful advice, Smarty, next time you might want to
      1. Use the drop down menu on the left (VIDEO LIBRARY) to see if the medical condition has been covered. You may have to broaden the category (hair or Vision or Sleep) then you can review those videos to see if the specific topic you’re looking for is covered. It may not be a topic that has been researched in terms of nutrition or one that Dr. Greger has covered.
      2. Another approach is to use the SEARCH box and just put in the health condition you are looking for (baldness, sleep apnea, vision–again you may need to broaden the category) and you can see if Dr. Greger has prepared any videos, blogs mentioning on these conditions. It may be the topic is mentioned, but only in passing and no specific studies related to your specific topic will appear.
      As mentioned, this site reinforces the idea that generally a whole food plant based diet is good for all body parts, so since you’re looking for a diet, that’s what would be recommended.

  2. What’s up with this psoriasis I developed 4 years into WFPB eating? Does this mean I have stress issues? I eat a bag of apples per week, or more.

    1. Wade,

      I also have psoriasis; I was diagnosed in my early 30s. Luckily, it’s a very mild case. But I have noticed that since dropping dairy and eggs (I’ve been a vegetarian for almost 50 years, but dropped the eggs and dairy over the past 6-7 years), I haven’t had any outbreaks on my elbows or knees (knock wood), and the remaining psoriasis on my scalp seems milder (knock even more wood). Though I must admit, my life has also been much lower stress since I retired about a decade ago.

      So I don’t know why you would develop it now, but I do know it can be diagnosed in adulthood. I also understand the WFPB eating is a huge help in avoiding many lifestyle conditions/diseases, but the risk of them does not appear to go to zero. Plus, there is the accumulated damage of eating SAD during our entire previous lives. I’ve read that it takes 15 years after stopping smoking for the risk of lung cancer to drop to what a non-smoker’s (never smoker’s?) risk is — and even that risk isn’t zero. Maybe the same is true for WFPB diet: benefits start accumulating immediately, but it takes a while to reverse previous damage.

      1. Thanks Dr. J, for your input.

        Every other problem vanished, and I no longer take any pills or potions save D3 and B12. I get tired of digging up “answers” that involve changing diet to a healthy WFPB type. I changed to WFPB 4.5 years ago, and this started last year in the Fall, and comes and goes. I’ve yet to identify any triggers. It’s embarrassing a bit because everyone thinks I’m the health nut, with zero problems (was)–and here is this angry skin condition.

      1. Mr. FF I don’t take any drugs for anything since adopting this new lifestyle 4.5 years ago, and don’t appear to be infected except when my skin goes through these spells.

        1. Ah, OK. I’ve had scalp psoriasis since birth though and find that it is much better controlled now that I am eating WFPB.

          Very occasionally, stress – emotional, infection-related or calorie restriction – seems to cause a lare-up. But this is very rare in my case.

    2. All from the gut my dear ! Make sure you go to the bathroom everyday , and ask yr dr if he recommends probiotics. I suffered with this since I was 20 yrs old now I am in my late fifties. I found the culprit for me was wheat and gluten, dairy too. I still have some lactose free milk every now and then however if I eat bread it flares up. Otherwise I have finally managed to control it pretty well. Hope this helps !

      1. Catherine, I have a movement once or twice every single day. My gut is loaded with WFPB eating, plus flaxseed meal. I cut out dairy LONG before I went WFPB (for sinus issues). I’ve done gluten elimination twice (pre-WFPB) to rule it out for any issues. I’ve been on vacation for a week, twice this year-with another family, and none of the junk foods or alcohol imbibed during those periods caused any flare ups. Thanks for offering your personal experiences.

      1. Julie I don’t drink daily anymore, but did for about 35 years. I had a beer Saturday. I had lots at the beach–but skin stayed perfectly calm. I don’t eat sugar or dairy, and can avoid alcohol no problem. But I do LOVE some tomatoes and am enjoying the very very last ones of the season presently. When they’re gone, all I have to do is avoid katsup and marinara for a bit. That would be SOOOOO SAD!!! But I’d like to link this to something to gain some control over it. Gluten avoidance, is nothing I want any part of, but may do another elimination session to test it again. I’m hoping that it’s more about STRESS than anything. I shall address that better as well. Thank you.

    3. Wade, I came across this vid https://nutritionfacts.org/video/sodium-and-autoimmune-disease-rubbing-salt-in-the-wound/ while looking for relief from my own ailments. I know from past years you mentioned you are not salt sensitive with respect to blood pressure, but what if it’s causing a flare?

      Anyway, hope you solve this soon. After so many years wfpb, I still have high cholesterol, autoimmune, fibromyalgia, migraine, and various seasonal afflictions, so I think you’re doing well.

      1. Hey Barb, Thanks for remembering (and you got it right) but also I don’t eat as much salt now as I did (of course WFPB naturally reduces the salt in our food, but also I do not add as much as before. I now recognize salt as a negative because of endothelial function even in the absence of hypertension.

        Migraines simply don’t develop for me any more–not fully. I still get the aura or “pre-migraine” and got it driving the other day–stopped and bought some caffeine to clear my vision and was AMaZED (again) and how effective a little SIP of caffeinated beverage can be for those who don’t drink caffeine daily. I’m now off coffee. I sleep much better now without daily caffeine in my life.

        Hope you get better as well.

      2. On the salt issue, I came across this earlier today

        ‘In the study, published Oct. 23 in Nature, the investigators sought to understand the series of events that occur between salt consumption and poor cognition and concluded that lowering salt intake and maintaining healthy blood vessels in the brain may “stave off” dementia. Accumulation of tau deposits has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

        “Our study proposes a new mechanism by which salt mediates cognitive impairment and also provides further evidence of a link between dietary habits and cognitive function,” said lead study author Dr. Giuseppe Faraco, an assistant professor of research in neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine.’

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191023132201.htm

      3. “After so many years wfpb, I still have high cholesterol, autoimmune, fibromyalgia, migraine, and various seasonal afflictions,”
        – – – – – –

        Barb, did you have all these ailments before you started the WFPB diet, or did they kick in once you went off animal foods? You sound almost like those “ex-vegans” who are so often interviewed on YouTube. Uh-oh!

        1. I had these conditions, and more, prior to being wfpb. The start of menopause made some things worse.. and strangely, allergies in general are much worse now after years of wfpb. Maybe it is all about aging and nothing to do with wfpb.

            1. Interesting. In my case, though, I sailed through menopause with no problems. I think this is because I had been doing yoga exercises for decades beforehand. The shoulder stand, in particular, is very helpful. And the plough. I continue to do a bunch of yoga exercises every morning. Am addicted! :-)

              https://www.healthline.com/health/yoga-for-menopause#1

              Some of the exercises I started eons ago when I received the energizing lessons from Self-Realization Fellowship:

              https://yoganandasite.wordpress.com/2017/06/08/paramahansaji-and-the-energization-exercises-stories-brother-naradananda/

    4. I get flare ups of facial rosacea and blepharitis if I eat too many apples, raisins or breads. I’m OK with them in moderation. Also, I get a pain around my collar bones if eating more than three or so apples at a sitting or on an empty stomach.

  3. The fact that it has to be apples and I stopped buying apples a week or two ago, makes me happy that I still eat spinach.

    I am so picky when it comes to fruit and my apples need to be crisp and cold. (I just had the thought that crisp apples are actually crisp and apple crisp isn’t crisp, who named that and was it what they did when the apples lost their crispness or what?)

    Oh shoot, I have to eat apples again and I do like them, but the last one I ate was not crisp and it was yucky.

  4. Okay, I will give video feedback because this video showed me that I was right conceptually that when it isn’t a complicated video with lots of text and charts and information, your being there isn’t nearly as distracting.

    Still, you are a hand-talker and about half-way through, it was mildly distracting when they were moving you around to put the charts and graphs in.

    1. Deb, thanks. Yes I agree,

      Dr.Greger is distracting from the videos we have come to love and respect over the many years in the traditional and CLASSIC format!

      Hard to follow. Totally distracted from the content.
      Dr.Greger LIVE is classic. NutritionFacts videos in the OLD format are CLASSIC. NutritionFacts.org and Dr.Greger please re-consider!

      From a Top Fan … but disappointed and less likely to Share. The articles on screen are now props – not so easyt to pause and read :(

      1. For what it’s worth, I am very pleased with the new format and I greatly enjoyed this video as a result. In my opinion, it is a huge success.

        incidentally, I think he looks great for 47. How many US males look that youthful and that healthy at his age?

        Incidentally, HAPPY BIRTHDAY Dr Greger!

  5. I’ve never peeled my apples. Mostly because it was too much work. But I’ve read and heard for decades that apple peels are healthy for us.

    So I eat my raw apples unpeeled, add them diced but unpeeled to my steel cut oats and other dishes before cooking them, and make apple desserts (I love apple crisp!) and apple sauce from them unpeeled. So much easier! And healthier to boot! (But I don’t eat the apple cores.)

    Apple sauce is so simple and quick to make: I add large pieces of unpeeled apples to my Instant Pot with a bit of water, cook them at high pressure, then add cinnamon and some nutmeg and blenderize them (I use an immersion blender right in the pot). No sugar added, and very tasty. Useful for a son-in-law who has Oral Allergy Syndrome, and can’t eat uncooked fruits and veggies.

    1. For a long time, I was looking for a reason to like amaranth. Here it is.
      Apple-Pumpkin Amaranth

      10 apples, cut into 3/4 inch pieces
      3 cups water
      1 cup Amaranth
      1 cup raisins
      2 tsp cinnamon
      29 oz can pumpkin

      Bring the apples and water to a boil. Add the Amaranth. Simmer and stir for 15 minutes. Add the raisins and cinnamon. Cook for another 5-10 minutes or until all liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat and mix in the pumpkin.


    2. I ate one core one time. Mostly, there was no garbage around and I was a young person and the logic of what to do with the core escaped me.

    3. Dr. J, I too make apple sauce…with rinds still on, of course. I mix it with grapes and cut-up walnuts and there’s half my lunch!

      The other half is my trusty nothing-added peanut butter (sometimes almond butter, but it’s too sweet for me) on toasted San Francisco sourdough bread. The bread can be bought from our local Target. A nearby “Bread Alone” restaurant/bakery also carries it. Maybe one of these days I’ll try to bake my own, like you do.

      1. YR,

        Oh, yes, try baking your own bread. Start with the No Knead method with whole wheat flour and yeast; it’s so easy, and you will be surprised at how good it tastes. But be careful; you might get hooked! On the other hand, if you have good bakery bread nearby, you are lucky. I only started because I couldn’t find any decent bread locally. Now I add whole seeds (sunflower, chia, sesame, and flax) to my sourdough whole grain bread; the sourdough culture seems to really like them! As do we, of course.

        And we eat bread everyday for lunch, open face sandwiches: some days hummus, others peanut butter (like yours, roasted peanuts, no salt, nothing else). A modified hold-over from our younger days when we would pack a lunch for work. We add veggies and/or salad, and afterward raw apples with a small serving of nuts for “dessert” — or for a dinner “appetizer” if we eat these later in the day.

        1. “But be careful; you might get hooked!”
          – – – – –

          I’m already hooked, Dr. J.! The sourdough and Ezekiel are the only kinds I eat — one for breakfast toast, and the other for luncheon toast.

          Yes, I’m lucky (and therefore lazy) that I have the sourdoughs so nearby. But I’ll make my own some day…I’ll do it, I’ll do it! Back when hubby was alive I’d knock off (bake) two loaves of 100% whole wheat bread every few weeks or so. Delicious toasted!

          1. YR,

            We only like our home-baked sourdough bread, compared to breads that we can buy around here. And we don’t eat a lot of it, basically just for lunch.

            I made my own sourdough culture more than 5 years ago. I’ve shared some with our apple vendor at our little local farmers’ market; she uses it to make sourdough waffles (I use it for that, too. I’ve also made sourdough cornbread, brownies, cake, maybe some other stuff).

            I followed the directions here to make my own sourdough culture (you can also buy cultures from here, which is easier and faster): https://breadtopia.com/make-your-own-sourdough-starter/ There are also lots of sourdough recipes on this website, including the sourdough waffle recipe which I use, slightly modified. Plus I buy most of my wheat from this site, since I can’t find any locally; I keep looking.

          1. Dr. J, just had time to look at the website you posted for sourdough culture. Noted there are lots of bread recipes there. Thank you so much for this info. :)

      2. “….with rinds still on, of course.”
        – – – – –

        I dunno WHY I typed “rinds”! Should be peels, of course. Maybe I’ve got watermelon too much on my mind.

        Mmm, watermelon! Can’t get me enough of that! :-)

      3. I also make applesauce, but I do not cook my apples. I cut them up and blend them in my vita mix. I do not peel them if they are organic. Add some cinnamon and Voila! I use parts of the core but take out the seeds, as I thought apple seeds were unhealthy due to arsenic levels.

      1. That looks like a recipe I used to use back in the day, Barb. Nowadays I’d think it’s waaaaaay too sweet, though. I’d use a whole less sugar and substitute the white flour for a healthier one, for starters. But one of my favorites, for sure.

  6. really great video …. you may want to look into fisetin another flavonoid in apples (1) seminar cancer bio 2016 oct , 40-41: 130-140 (2) antioxidant and redox biology signalin vol 19,#2, 2013, 151-162 (3) biomolecules 2019, 9 174

    …of course organic apples would be best

  7. I’m on board. I eat over a bag of red delicious apples per week. Sliced on oatmeal is good. Great to munch on car trips. Dr. G. may have a video about apples being good for pain management. No adverse sided affects either.

  8. So how do you know that the apple eaters aren’t living longer because maybe they are eating other fruits and veggies vs the non-apple eaters???

      1. And blueberries have yet other health benefits; they too get good press.

        Who can keep up! Seems to me all fruit has its good points.

        1. Each fruit & veg, not all, has its good points. Separate videos … 6 of 9 fruits & veggies conferred DNA repair. If you’re interested in cancer, don’t waste much time on peaches, grapefruits or bananas. Some more anti-inflammatory than others. Etc.
          Hard to keep up? Yes.
          So as much as they say it’s one diet for all ailments (WFPB), which is generally true, it’s not specifically true.
          That’s why if you’ve got an ailment or are trying to prevent one, it’s important to focus on the videos in that category.
          So I’m putting a lot less faith in foods that show little to no benefit against slowing or stopping cancer, ’cause who wants to deal with that beast?

    1. Peter,

      I think the fact that it wasn’t true for the bananas and oranges or pears makes it more likely to be something specific to apples.

    1. I don’t agree. I liked the old format; it was a more “nutrition factual and scientific looking” approach.
      Love Dr.Greger Live and in Q&A on the treadmill, and certainly suggest that his pic appears in the beginning of the video; however,
      The old format was MUCH more informative with less Distraction. Dr.Greger is distracting from the video style we’ve come to expect.
      I pause the videos, read what’s presented, rewind, play, rewind, pause, take notes.
      Can’t do this with Dr.Greger taking half the screen and the articles referenced bouncing around as if they’re just props.
      Dr.Greger has shifted from voice-over scientific looking reviews to the very common talking head like everyone else is doing … WHY?
      Don’t like it, and much less likely to Share this type of presentation. Seriously. I’m I’m a NutritionFacts Top Fan! :(

  9. It’s a video of hand talking, very distracting. I wondered if all the hand waving was to conjure up a white rabbit out of a barrel of apples, but no

    Dr did talk slower (very slow this time). Showing the article text is helpful, thanks, but talking hands Dr is too much it’s too cutout and too staged compared to his normal talking videos from his office or treadmill when he seems more natural (and without the intense backdrop color, also distracting). Just a static apple instead of animated Dr would have been less distracting

    1. Found the video a bit too busy as well… scrolled down so I couldn’t see the video but could still hear it. Missed the charts and highlighted text, but can make do with just the audio.

      1. Lonie, thank you. I agree!

        So distracting you had to scroll down to NOT WATCH! and just listen. Hopefully the NutritionFacts feedback department is hearing this.

    2. WFPB me, thank you! I agree whole-heartedly. 80+ comments on this video and only about 5 commenting on the new presentation format? Really?
      Agree, Dr.Greger spoke more slowly which is good. Too staged.

      I liked the old format; it was a more “nutrition factual and scientific looking” approach.
      Love Dr.Greger Live and in Q&A on the treadmill, and certainly suggest that his pic appears in the beginning of the video; however,
      The old format was MUCH more informative with less Distraction. Dr.Greger is distracting from the video style we’ve come to expect.
      Dr.Greger has shifted from voice-over scientific looking reviews to the very common talking head like everyone else is doing … WHY?
      Don’t like it, and much less likely to Share this type of presentation – seriously. And I’m I’m a NutritionFacts Top Fan! but not happy :(

      1. “80+ comments on this video and only about 5 commenting on the new presentation format? Really?”
        – – – – – –

        Some of us who only read the transcripts and bypass the videos don’t get our panties in a twist. Maybe that’s why.

        1. YR, YA, that explains a lot. 1) I usually check both, depending on time, interest in the topic, and whether I’m using the transcript to pre-check the content or searching/reviewing content.2) you don’t know what you’re missing! and3) the panty twist answer, speaking for more than yourself Supports my negative feedback on the new animated video format, because ” Some of us who only read the transcripts and bypass the videos ” are clearly more interested in Dr Greger’s words than his presentation. So…Thank you for your valuable (although inferred) support for any presentation that detracts from the NutritionFacts.

          1. “Some of us who only read the transcripts and bypass the videos ” are clearly more interested in Dr Greger’s words than his presentation.”
            – – – – – –

            You got it! Bingo!

            1. Good point but the videos show various charts, graphs and quotes from studies that don’t make it into the transcript.

              The transcripts are vital for the hearing-impaired though so they are a very valuable feature of this site.

      2. David,
        Several videos ago when the first video of this style aired, many of us voiced our opinions. Dr Greger and team had asked for feedback, which they got abundantly. Since the video collections are made well in advance and released on dvds, there is nothing they can change at the moment. We are not far into the dvd, so I suggest you read the transcripts for the next few months til a new dvd is released, and enjoy the thousands of videos made available to us at no charge.

        1. Yes, Barb, you are right.

          The videos were made a long time ago. Honestly, this particular one didn’t bother me at all. In fact, I enjoyed watching Dr. Greger say the last line.

          I will say that Dr Greger is a human being and some people see him as some sort of tool to use.

          They can get their information anywhere and should not be disrespecting the man who has labored for this site.

          It is one thing to say that the new format is harder to learn from, but Dr Greger deserves respect and we are a selfish and self-centered audience and some of the people should just go read PubMed instead of using these doctors.

          1. Dr Greger,

            Your being so generous has made us arrogant.

            I genuinely pause to apologize that this community is not communicating depth of gratitude to you.

            Culturally I know that we are opinionated and do not appreciate your hours of hard work.

            I do appreciate it and know that when people do something as a nonprofit public service that being treated respectfully is the very least that you deserve.

            1. I see it as some people have disdain for Dr Greger and his free gift.

              The greater culture on the internet tends to be like spoiled teenagers, saying hurtful things on purpose as if how we say things doesn’t hurt real human beings.

              The internet reveals our true selves.

              It is who we really are warts and all.

              And, yes, some people go online and fake everything and that is who they really are.

              1. Dr Greger,

                You are putting your pearls before swine and they will trample them and trample you.

                I highly recommend Reading Mother .Teresa’s Do It Anyway poem and I will say to not let us destroy you.

                1. I will add that I know that you even are giving your birthday time to us and that some of us consider you, the man, Dr Greger, to be just as important as this website. It is your heart and your mind and your vision that matter just as much to many of us.

  10. To eat the seeds or not, that is my question. Watching James Hamblin over on The Atlantic, he suggests eating the whole thing, seeds and all, because apples have no core, as I have recently learned. But I know that apple seeds have a small amount of cyanide. Is that a problem for a healthy adult so long as you don’t eat more than, what, an apple a day?

    1. Scott,

      If you go to Dr. Greger’s flax video, you will find that with flaxseeds, it is a cup before you reach toxicity from cyanide.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/should-we-be-concerned-about-the-cyanide-from-flaxseed/

      But with apricot kernels toxicity can happen at lower levels for vulnerable people.

      He did a video where a quarter of a teaspoon of ground apricot kernels led to a woman a visit to the ED.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-apricot-seeds-work-as-an-alternative-cancer-cure/

      So, it seems like how many seeds are in the apple might be the factor.

    2. Apple seeds don’t contain actual cyanide I believe however they do contain amygdalin and some other cyanogenic compounds. This is hydrolysed by the human body into cyanide. Apricot seeds contain much more amygdalin than apple seeds though.

      I would have thought that eating half a dozen apple seeds daily was neither here not there though. that said, it could well be dangerous for children You might want to read this blog post (although i can’t vouch for its accuracy)

      https://sciencenotes.org/yes-apple-seeds-and-cherry-pits-contain-cyanide/

  11. What about all the pesticides we are told the farmers spray on the peel to combat insects. Aren’t
    the pesticides on the peel harmful? And if I rinse the apple off with water does that help any?

  12. I guess that most of the polyphenols and other fytonytrients are stuck to the apple skin so it makes sense that eating it with the rest of the apple makes measurable sense for health.

    Offtopic
    Unrelated to nutrition but… Did any of you guys see Sam Berns TED talk on a happy live? Really interesting, just wanted to share it, you can see it, here… https://youtu.be/36m1o-tM05g

  13. A little off topic, but I would be interested in getting Dr. Greger’s opinion on the nutrition of these new veggie burgers that are all the rage now (Impossible, Beyond).

    1. They are processed, not whole foods. But given no other choice, Beyond is better than Beef. Pea-based.
      Impossible is worse. Top 5 ingredients: Water, soy protein concentrate, coconut oil, sunflower oil and natural flavors.

  14. I eat two to three apples a day, and have been doing it for years. However, I am also an ethical vegan (35 years +), and refuse to eat the skin of waxed apples, either organic or non-organic, because of the source of “wax” used on them. If I am lucky enough to find a case of apples that are organic and unwaxed, of course I will eat the skin too. You might want to investigate the sources of “wax” on your program. All that glitters is not good food for us, in my opinion.

    1. Ron,

      We discussed that recently and at Whole Foods, the organic apples have a plant-based wax. The conventional apples have mystery wax. Possibly petroleum. Possibly shellac. Might have some casein in it.

    2. I have been scrolling looking to see if anyone else is concerned about the wax. It’s very difficult to find apples without wax.
      It would be so helpful to see Dr. Gregor address the wax issue. Try scraping your next Apple peel with your fingernail or a knife. So much wax!!! I just can’t bring myself to eat it and I really like the skin. I’ve tried using boil water to melt it off but it starts to cook the Apple.
      I would do an Apple a day in a heart beat except for the wax!!
      Dr. Gregor, please address this!!

      1. I just posted the same question (I didn’t scroll between comments like you did…).
        Yes, the wax scares me too and I’ve been peeling my apples because of that. Would be great if our favorite human on the planet (obviously Dr. Greger), would elaborate on this! Thanks!

    3. All that glitters is not good food for us, in my opinion.

      I agree. However, majority of apples in the market are waxed unfortunately and some people need to consume them; mostly big families like self who cannot afford to pay 4 times of the price for organic unwaxed apples. Who cares about those majority as long as they are lucky to find what they want! We have to peel apples, my friend, until someone trustworthy like Dr Greger addresses this issue.

      1. John,

        This is an interesting article about produce waxes: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/04/why-fruit-has-a-fake-wax-coating/524619/

        Eg: “Fruit wax smooths the divide between the fantasy and the reality of food. People want to eat an apple that delivers the crisp, delicious flavor of a fruit plucked straight from the tree. But they also want the convenience of getting that fruit from a neighborhood grocery store, and at any time of year. At an affordable price, to boot, and even when it’s out of season—which means it’ll need to last longer in storage than an orchard-fresh fruit might. Shoppers want that cheap produce clear of dirt, insect leavings, and chemical residue, even though that cleaning process rids the fruit of its natural protection. As if that weren’t enough, buyers also want their fruit to sparkle.

        Fruit wax is one way produce suppliers try to satisfy all these contradictory impulses. They try to give consumers a fruit that’s better—or at least better-looking—than it ever was on the branch. Beyond fruit, foods including nuts, candies, meat, fish, cheese, and cereals receive a similar treatment: They’re coated to make them last longer and look better.”

        And more: “Those concerned about allergens or animal byproducts can check the point-of-sale information that vendors are required to display alongside waxed fruit. It reads, “Coated with food-grade vegetable-, petroleum-, beeswax-, and/or shellac-based wax or resin, to maintain freshness.” In addition, the coatings are so lightly applied that they’re almost insignificant. One Washington State University study on the wax contents of apples found 994 parts per million for apples that retain their natural wax, 973 parts per million for apples that are washed, and 978 parts per million for apples that are coated with commercial waxes.”

        1. Dr J that’s is about right. I was going to say I’ve washed apples in hot water and just under boiling water, and still they had some wax on them. So I’m sure they trap a lot of chemicals in there also. Therefore, I’m going to have to agree with the Washington state study and say it doesn’t wash off.

          End

  15. If eating the apple peel is healthy, I guess it holds too for the peel of (organic) kiwi’s, mango’s and other fruit with soft peels? I remember that dr. Greger recommended using grated lemon peel somewhere.

  16. Great video as always, now I find myself watching videos that are not even directly related to my specific interests because they are constructed to be so interesting & funny !

    I’ve enjoyed the Dr’s long presentations to live audiences (so many videos on YouTube) where he is shown presenting his material & interacting w/ audience members. However for these short videos, I do miss the previous format where I could see in large print the scientific papers’ text, data & graphs. The image of the Dr. takes up 1/2 the screen where I’d prefer to see the scientific paper instead (I do pause the video & read whatever I can on the paper !). If showing the image could be made optional (provide a button/link, etc. that would be great). Just my preference !

    1. AP, thank you! Great comments totally in line with my thoughts exactly. Much appreciated.

      “enjoyed the Dr’s long presentations to live audiences (so many videos on YouTube) where he is shown presenting his material & interacting w/ audience members. However for these short videos, I do miss the previous format where I could see in large print the scientific papers’ text, data & graphs. The image of the Dr. takes up 1/2 the screen where I’d prefer to see the scientific paper instead (I do pause the video & read whatever I can on the paper !).”

  17. Off-topic:

    I had to go the dentist today (where else do I spend most of my time!) to get a permanent bridge inserted. Wouldn’t you know, at one point they had to whip out the lead apron for dental x-rays. They have the ‘newer” type that supposedly doesn’t emit as much radiation as previous ones did. But still, radiation does accrue over time. *angry smiley*

    Every morning I’ve been putting “a little dab’ll do ya” of organic miso in my cooked cereal….been doing it for years. (Can find it only in the health food stores, like Mother Earth). Would sure like to hope this keeps me relatively safe fron all that damn radiation.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3695331/

    1. YR,

      I don’t know how often you get dental x-rays, but here is one article with some guidelines (there are many others): https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/14/well/why-does-my-dentist-give-me-so-many-x-rays.html

      I support dentists, too; I fell of my bike at age 18, broke my jaw in two places, and smashed some teeth. That was a long time ago, and dental techniques have improved since then. Though I try to limit my exposure to x-rays, one of the reasons given for doing them is “complicated dental work.” Which I guess translates to prior dental damage, since repaired.

      But I’ve also had radiation “therapy” for breast cancer, so I’m sure I’m quite damaged. Slash, burn, and poison: that’s how we treat solid cancer tumors.

      Meanwhile, I like miso; I like the taste, and I like all that salt. One tooth that did not appear to be damaged from my fall was my “salt tooth.” (Another was my “sweet tooth.”) So I eat miso for enjoyment. I never really thought about whether it’s healthy, or protective from radiation damage. I’ve actually never heard of that theory before. And I lived in Hamburg, Germany, when Chernobyl exploded —about 600 miles away. Even so, we did have some radiation fall-out. And I learned, in German, that there is no safe level of radiation exposure, that the damage is cumulative. Shiver me timbers!!

        1. Fumbles, from your very-small print link:

          “From a practical point of view, two recommendations can be made. First, with regard to X-ray examinations, efforts should be mainly focused on the reduction of the dose delivered to pregnant women, infants, and young children, because for them the risk may be significant although probably quite small.”
          – – – –

          “Significant although probably quite small” means….huh? Anyway, as an ol’ crone, I guess I shouldn’t let the dental stuff worry me so much. I wish I had WFPBLiisa’s dentist, though.

          Dr. J., back to the sourdough bread: I admit this is a dumb-dumb question, but once we have created this Live Creature (isn’t Nature amazing!), what do we do with it then? I assume we’re to take a certain amount of it and plop it into a greased/non-greased bread pan and stick it in a preheated oven, but what temp and for how long?

          Loni, I can see your next screenplay — or at the very least, the makings of a children’s (horror) story. The title would be “Bob, the Bubbling Blob.” Bob morphs into the whole kitchen and 3/4 of the living room, attempting to fill up the house and scare away little kids and other creatures. Talk about a best seller! :-)

          1. Lonie….Mea culpa, sir, for misspelling your name.

            Yep, we’re in the shadow of another fun time, so we’re feeling it now: Mercury will be turning retrograde in Scorpio in another week (the 30th). :-(

          2. YR,

            The starter culture is the source of the sourdough culture you use to make your bread rise; you can keep it in the fridge until you want to use it, when you can take some out to use for the bread, then add some flour and water to your culture (which is called “feeding” it). There are recipes for sourdough bread on Breadtopia.com, including how to make No Knead breads. Basically, you add a small amount of your sourdough culture to water, add flour and salt, mix, and let it ferment all day or overnight, then bake it. How you bake it at what temperature and for how long depends upon your bread recipe; I make a very wet bread dough, and bake it in slightly oiled bread pans (my recipe is a bit more complicated than no knead bread. But that’s how I started: no knead. No need to knead) Other people bake their bread in cast iron pots with covers.

    2. I finally rebelled in my dentist’s office. I asked had they ever found any issues with these x-rays I’ve been getting? (I’m in my 70’s and no, they haven’t–knock on wood.) I then asked which was worse–a possible root canal resulting from not finding decay via an x-ray or cancer (resulting from x-rays?) The dentist said cancer would be worse, (of course.) Now I don’t get asked to have x-rays any more. They just note that I don’t get them.

      And Dr. J: I’m with you. I also had radiation therapy for cancer…. I hear you!

      1. OK, WFPBLisa,

        One possible problem could be a tooth abscess, which could then spread to your brain. I read about one case where a woman was diagnosed with brain cancer — which she died from. Except that an autopsy showed that she actually died from a tooth abscess that spread to her brain. Now, would a dental x-ray show an abscess before you had symptoms? Could it be missed by the lack of dental x-rays? That is something you could discuss with your dentist.

        Also, speaking from years of experience in the dentist’s office, due to those smashed teeth I suffered in a bike fall decades ago, root canals are no picnic. Nor are bridges. But if you’ve had no dental issues, you are lucky AND do a good job of dental maintenance. Keep it up, and knock wood.

        My approach is to try to maximize the benefits while minimizing the risks. It’s hard to do with limited research. But I LOVE evidence-based medicine, dentistry, and nutrition. And I like prevention best of all. Too bad most of medicine, and to some extent dentistry, focus on treatment rather than prevention.

  18. I am still thinking about the whole hemorrhagic stroke thing.

    Colder months result in thickening of the blood and so does dehydration. Does drinking things like coffee dehydrate people further in months where they are less likely to drink cold water and are less likely to eat fruit (which has higher water content) and maybe are more likely to eat soup which often has higher sodium content? The sleeping over 8 hours per night – could be depression/inflammation or maybe sleep apnea? Spring allergies and Winter colds and flu blocking the nasal passages?

    Either way, I found something: Mannitol

    https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009357

    Is D-Mannose close enough? I ask because I had a UTI once and it didn’t go away with one round of antibiotics, but I added D-Mannose and it was gone almost immediately. I don’t use it at all, but if I ever have incontinence and use incontinence pads, I will be likely using it every week in low enough doses to try not to have problems from it. Will it be lowering the pressure in my brain, at the same time?

    Can I mix it with turmeric and blueberries and lower my glutamate and lower the risk of UTI and lower the risk and severity of a Hemorrhagic stroke?

    Licorice was the other thing and again it was something which is dangerous in high doses and is used as medicine in low doses and I can’t remember what they used it for in Hemorrhagic stroke, but I will end up eating some in the Winter and not remember why.

      1. I was looking up the amyloid and hemorrhagic stroke connection so not having misfolded proteins is an issue in that.

        But I was reading about Astrocytes and ended up at Notch 1 and the science is a million, trillion, zillion miles above my head, but sulforaphane came up when I Googled Notch-1.

        So, maybe, Broccoli Sprouts?

          1. Oops, except for the blood thinning.

            Oh well, broccoli sprouts still makes the list and blueberries would be another preventing glutamate storms.

            1. Wikipedia has a really cool visual of coritcal spreading depression, which they say is one of the things, similar to glutamate, which causes the secondary damage.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortical_spreading_depression

              Sulforaphane and curcumin and astaxanthin and lycopene and melatonin are some of the things, which help with that.

              https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2019/6218239/

              Some of us would be in the hospital asking why they don’t have foods to help cortical spreading depression on the menu and would be trying to explain it to my relatives, but they would be arguing and so would the doctors.

                1. Sulforaphane, seems like one, which hits many of the categories – both the pre-hemorrhagic stroke risk factors and the post-hemorrhagic stroke prevention of the extra damage from things like inflammation.

                  For instance, it prevents amyloid-beta deposits, which is a risk factor in hemorrhagic stroke.

                  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1533317514542645

                  Plus, it lowers the inflammatory pathways markers – things like Interleukin 1, Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-α

                  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4185976/

                  Also, for those who don’t like cruciferous, fruits decrease the risk of stroke by something like 54% (Yes, I forget the exact number by the time I get back here, but they did a “2 apples per day keep the strokes away” and apples, which almost brings me back on topic, was specifically mentioned, along with pears.)

                2. Associations like those are not always causal though – the low vitamin C level may be caused by the same process that leads up to the stroke.

                  Neverthelless, studies show that:

                  ‘ The linear dose–response relationship showed that the risk of stroke decreased by 32% (0.68 [0.56–0.82]) and 11% (0.89 [0.81–0.98]) for every 200 g per day increment in fruits consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.77) and vegetables consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.62), respectively.’
                  https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.004836

                  So, yes, eating plenty of fruits and vegetables does appear to be protective.

    1. This meta analysis found

      ‘The linear dose–response relationship showed that the risk of stroke decreased by 32% (0.68 [0.56–0.82]) and 11% (0.89 [0.81–0.98]) for every 200 g per day increhttps://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/strokeaha.114.004836ment in fruits consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.77) and vegetables consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.62), respectively.;

      1. Barb,

        But red delicious aren’t delicious. I feel cheated by the name, because I consider it a misnomer. Our fruit vendor at our little local farmers market sells up to two dozen or more different varieties of apples (not all at the same time, as some are early, some are late, etc); last Saturday, she had 12 varieties. And these apples are ALL delicious! With nary a “Red Delicious” among them. Her family sure know how to grow fabulous fruit!!

        1. Dr J, I agree! LOL, cant stand them myself usually, though once in a blue moon I will have the good fortune to eat a crisp juicy one. My favorite is Ambrosia, but the sellers here claim Gala outsell everything else, 5 to 1. The organic gala to me are closer to a red delicious and often disappointing. Sometimes we can get locally grown at the farmer’s market.
          I will eat a bag of apples per week (2 or more per day) but not always organic. I don’t like the oily coating on them and they are expensive here.

        2. Odd. Red Delicious are my preferred apple … I find most of the other varieties are too sweet.

          Unfortunately, here in the Philippines we get Washington apples which means that half of them are floury by the time they hit the shelves here. As a result, I usually eat Fuji apples which are consistently non-floury (but are nutritionally weak).

          1. Mr F- by floury do you mean “mealy” texture? (as opposed to actual flour on surface? I’m a celiac and just checking for any possible gluten sources…

          2. I called an organic apple distributer in Washington about the waxy appearance . They assured me that the Daisy brand has no spray or wax or shellac used on them. They said that ambient apples put out a waxy coat as a defensive mechanism and just rinse and eat. I was surprised when I was told this, but happy too. It seems that they should make this well known. My bag does not have any of the information seen on other bags that have the notice about wax or shellac. Mr. F F —what are your thoughts about this? Fact or fiction? You are a better researcher then I am. Thanks.

  19. I have been enjoying this thread. It’s also got me thinking of a revision to the old ditty: An apple a day keeps early death at bay.

  20. What about the wax that is added on the skin of an apple to make it look shiny on the market shelves? I was peeling my apples assuming that was toxic, or at least un-natural… I knew I was missing out on some nutrients, but not knowing the composition of the wax, I figured it was better not to risk.
    Thanks!

  21. I called an organic apple distributer in Washington about the waxy appearance . They assured me that the Daisy brand has no spray or wax or shellac used on them. They said that ambient apples put out a waxy coat as a defensive mechanism and just rinse and eat. I was surprised when I was told this, but happy too. It seems that they should make this well known. My bag does not have any of the information seen on other bags that have the notice about wax or shellac. Mr. F F —what are your thoughts about this? Fact or fiction? You are a better researcher then I am. Thanks.

  22. Nouns day, fruits and vegetables tend to contain harmful pesticides. If buying organic is not the case, could you please kindly suggest the effective method to wash our produce ;with minimum nutrient loss but maximum toxin removal?

    1. Dr Grerger has a vid on washing fruit and veg, end result is salt water.
      Can’t remember how much salt to water, think it was a 10 min soak? But you’ll need to look up the vid to get correct info. 10 mins salt soak for berries don’t feel right though, regardless of taste, soft fruit likely to absorb the salt and thus we are consuming undesired salt.

  23. Dr. Greger, with you in the frame, the videos are now more about you, less about the information. Please please PLEASE go back to the old format!

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