Flashback Friday: Whole Beets vs. Juice for Improving Athletic Performance

Flashback Friday: Whole Beets vs. Juice for Improving Athletic Performance
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What is the latest science on the performance-enhancing qualities of nitrate-rich vegetables?

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Nitrates, concentrated in green leafy vegetables and beets, underwent a great makeover a few years ago from inert substances to having profound effects on the power plants within all of our cells, reducing the oxygen cost during exercise—meaning we can bust out the same amount of work with less oxygen. So, one little shot of beet juice allows free divers to hold their breath for over four minutes; they get about a half-minute longer, and for others, this improved muscle efficiency allows athletes to exercise at a higher power output or running speed for the same amount of breath. I profiled this discovery in an unprecedented 17-part video series, the longest I think I’ve ever done—it was just so fascinating. But that was back in 2012; what’s happened since? Well, this all led to many athletes—elite and amateur alike—consuming beetroot juice prior to competition. But what does the new science say?

Well, most of the studies were done on men; turns out it works on women too—even African-American women, an even more neglected research demographic. Same workload power outputs using significantly less oxygen after drinking beet juice. But forget beet juice; what about whole beets? Cheaper; healthier; can find them in any produce aisle. But there had never been any studies on actual beets, until now.

Whole beetroot consumption acutely improves running performance. They gave physically fit men and women a cup and a half of baked beets, which is equal to about a can of beets, 75 minutes before running a 5K. They started out the same, but during the last mile of the 5K race, the beet group pulled ahead, compared to the placebo group, who were given berries instead.

Though they were running faster, their heart rate wasn’t any higher. If anything, the beet group reported less exertion. Faster time with less effort? They don’t call them block-rockin’ beets for nothing.

But if nitrates are so good, why not just take them in a pill? Nitrate supplements with names like “Hellfire”—although they can work, their long-term safety is questionable. Non-vegetable sources of nitrates may have detrimental health effects; so, if we want to improve our performance, we should ideally obtain nitrates from whole vegetables. The industry knows this, so instead markets an array of nitric oxide-stimulating supplements. However, there is little or no evidence of a performance improvement following supplementation with these so called NO boosters. The evidence is with the vegetables.

How much money can companies make selling beets though? So, how about a novel beetroot-enriched bread product? We’ve tried to get people to eat their fruits and vegetables, and where has that gotten us? But hey, lots of people eat white bread; why not have them eat red bread? And, indeed, it worked; red beet bread brought down blood pressures, and improved the ability of arteries to relax and dilate naturally. Bread, therefore, may be an effective vehicle to increase vegetable consumption without significant dietary changes, because heaven forbid people should have to change their diet to improve their health.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to New Africa via Adobe Stock.

Nitrates, concentrated in green leafy vegetables and beets, underwent a great makeover a few years ago from inert substances to having profound effects on the power plants within all of our cells, reducing the oxygen cost during exercise—meaning we can bust out the same amount of work with less oxygen. So, one little shot of beet juice allows free divers to hold their breath for over four minutes; they get about a half-minute longer, and for others, this improved muscle efficiency allows athletes to exercise at a higher power output or running speed for the same amount of breath. I profiled this discovery in an unprecedented 17-part video series, the longest I think I’ve ever done—it was just so fascinating. But that was back in 2012; what’s happened since? Well, this all led to many athletes—elite and amateur alike—consuming beetroot juice prior to competition. But what does the new science say?

Well, most of the studies were done on men; turns out it works on women too—even African-American women, an even more neglected research demographic. Same workload power outputs using significantly less oxygen after drinking beet juice. But forget beet juice; what about whole beets? Cheaper; healthier; can find them in any produce aisle. But there had never been any studies on actual beets, until now.

Whole beetroot consumption acutely improves running performance. They gave physically fit men and women a cup and a half of baked beets, which is equal to about a can of beets, 75 minutes before running a 5K. They started out the same, but during the last mile of the 5K race, the beet group pulled ahead, compared to the placebo group, who were given berries instead.

Though they were running faster, their heart rate wasn’t any higher. If anything, the beet group reported less exertion. Faster time with less effort? They don’t call them block-rockin’ beets for nothing.

But if nitrates are so good, why not just take them in a pill? Nitrate supplements with names like “Hellfire”—although they can work, their long-term safety is questionable. Non-vegetable sources of nitrates may have detrimental health effects; so, if we want to improve our performance, we should ideally obtain nitrates from whole vegetables. The industry knows this, so instead markets an array of nitric oxide-stimulating supplements. However, there is little or no evidence of a performance improvement following supplementation with these so called NO boosters. The evidence is with the vegetables.

How much money can companies make selling beets though? So, how about a novel beetroot-enriched bread product? We’ve tried to get people to eat their fruits and vegetables, and where has that gotten us? But hey, lots of people eat white bread; why not have them eat red bread? And, indeed, it worked; red beet bread brought down blood pressures, and improved the ability of arteries to relax and dilate naturally. Bread, therefore, may be an effective vehicle to increase vegetable consumption without significant dietary changes, because heaven forbid people should have to change their diet to improve their health.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to New Africa via Adobe Stock.

Doctor's Note

17-part video series? My videos were much shorter back then, but still! Here you go if you want to put the whole discovery in context and get the detailed mechanism:

Wait, that’s only 16. I think at the time I was also including Meat Additives to Diminish Toxicity.

How else can we support athletic performance? See:

On the other hand, Paleo Diets May Negate Benefits of Exercise.

It’s great that we can improve athletic performance eating a few beets, but what about people who could really benefit from a more efficient use of oxygen? That’s the subject of my next video, Oxygenating Blood with Nitrate-Rich Vegetables.

I recently did a series all about vegetarian athletes:

And what about the keto diet and athletes? Check out Keto Diets: Muscle Growth & Bone Density.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

145 responses to “Flashback Friday: Whole Beets vs. Juice for Improving Athletic Performance

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  1. I understand a bit more now how the nitrogen in beets improves athletic performance, perhaps by allowing oxygen to be utilized better. I’m still unclear of how this works inter cellularly—not that I would understand the chemical pathway. I seem to remember that too many beets are not a good thing because of kidney stress. Oxalates maybe?

      1. Thanks for posting that Deb. I needed a reminder. I was eating too much spinach not long ago, although I do boil it in water (the Japanese way).

    1. Dan, Regarding your statement “I’m still unclear of how this works inter cellularly … “, the below video may help:

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/priming-the-proton-pump/

      From the text of the video:

      “Our body uses oxygen to create ATP, the energy currency of our bodies. Every time we think; every time we blink; every time we flex a muscle; we use up ATP, which has to be replenished by breathing more oxygen—or we die.
      The enzyme that makes ATP (ATP synthase), deep inside our cells, is literally a microscopic rotary mechanical motor. Oxygen causes the flow of protons, and like a water wheel in that flow, the enzyme turns, and makes ATP. Like any motor, it’s not perfectly efficient. There’s some slippage of the gears. There’s proton leakage out the edges. But it’s an extraordinary mechanism.

      Beets offer one of the most concentrated sources of dietary nitrate, which is absorbed in our stomach, and then actively concentrated and pumped back into our mouth through our salivary glands, because our body knows that there are special commensal bacteria that live on our tongue.
      Our tongue bacteria take these nitrates, and convert them into nitrites, which are then re-swallowed, absorbed again, and then make their way to our cells, and then converted into a third compound—nitric oxide, which then acts on the proton pump to either reduce the slippage, or plug up the leaks, or even take the place of oxygen in the whole contraption.”

      1. Thanks Darwin,
        I watched the video. The nitrogen metabolite in beets helps seal the proton motor wheel (making it more efficient) that delivers ATP to our muscles.

    2. I have been putting beet powder in all my smoothies. Does anyone have information on the efficacy of beet powder instead of eating actual beets?

      1. Nobody really knows if beetroot powder is as good as whole beetroots. On general principle though, I would expect some damage/loss of nutrients due to the dehydration process, especially if high temperatures are applied. It is also important to ensure that you are buying powdered whole beetroots. I’ve noticed that a lot of vegetable and fruit powders sold in stores and on the net are in fact just powdered juice not powdered whole vegetables/fruits.

        Powdered whole beets seem a pretty good choice though, certainly compared with juice and even canned whole beetroots which have lots of added sugar and salt.

        You might find this article useful.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049374/pdf/10068_2016_Article_11.pdf

      2. I would like to know if beet powder is as good as real beets in my smoothies? Anyone?
        ———————————————————————————————————
        Larry, I can only offer an opinion as I have no facts of the matter… but I assume the powder is made either from dried juice since the powder I have used totally integrates with water. So it would seem to me it is as efficacious as juice would be.

        Hope that helps.

      3. Why not put beets in your smoothie? I do sometimes, and it works fine. (I have a high speed blender and assume you do, as well, if you’re making smoothies.)

        1. Liisa,

          What do you put into your smoothies with your beets?

          I actually bought a smoothie today for the first time in a year or more.

          It had a mixture of things in it and the person accidentally put strawberries in with the other ingredients and I drank it.

          I drank strawberries.

          It was on my list of foods I couldn’t get myself to eat because I had gotten so sick on them when I was young.

          1. Hi, Deb,–understand that I am “hard core” and eat for health rather than much flavor….
            I start with my Vitamix smoothie maker pitcher 3/4 full of fresh, washed greens of any type: tat soi (in the winter,) broccoli, spinach, Romaine lettuce, kale, mustard greens, collard greens, parsley, cilantro, basil, etc. I usually allow myself a generous cup of Eden unsweetened soy milk.
            I add a tsp of amla, a half tsp of turmeric, a few grinds of black pepper, and some frozen fruit. Frequently the fruit is mango or dark, sweet cherries–about a cup. I rarely use an apple or pear instead. Sometimes I add a tbsp of ground flax (unless I added it to my morning oatmeal, the contents of which would probably make you gag, but to which I have become accustomed and which I now look forward to. *:D* Sometimes I add a huge, heaping tbsp of cocoa powder. If I am using arugula, I add a banana because arugula is something I can’t stand otherwise. I frequently add a wedge of lemon, peel included, and if I am out of lemons, I add a wedge of lime. Other things I use but seldom: a small beet, peeled and quartered, or a carrot. I used to have a smoothie every day; now I make them when I need greens in a hurry or when I don’t feel like concocting a salad or cooking greens.

    3. Hi, Dan! The nitric oxide from vegetable nitrates (like those found in beets) not only improves oxygen efficiency, but also oxygen delivery by vasodilating blood vessels, opening up arteries so there’s more blood flow (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/oxygenating-blood-with-nitrate-rich-vegetables/). Here’s a video that explains the process in more detail: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/priming-the-proton-pump/. Our bodies use oxygen to create ATP, which provides us with energy. Oxygen cause the flow of protons, which stimulates ATP synthase – the enzyme within our cells that makes ATP. Beets offer one of the most concentrated sources of dietary nitrate. These nitrates are absorbed, converted into nitrites, re-absorbed, and then once in our cells are converted into nitric oxide. The nitric oxide acts on the proton pump to allow ATP synthase to make ATP more efficiently. This is how beets improve athletic performance.

      As far as oxalates and implications for our kidneys, it’s not just the amount that matters but also how well particular oxalates are absorbed, and the bioavailability of oxalates in beets is relatively poor (6 times less so than spinach, for example). Beets also contain less oxalates than beet greens (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/kidney-stones-and-spinach-chard-and-beet-greens-dont-eat-too-much/). Cooking the beets could cut levels about 25% but for the rare person with a condition like idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis (a type of kidney stones) that needs a low-oxalate diet, a better high-nitrate vegetable choice would be arugula (https://nutritionfacts.org/questions/oxalic-acid-in-beets/).

    1. YR,

      I feel the same way about beets.

      I did see a video for a steamer where they put the beets in whole and steamed them and that looked so much easier than anything I have done with them, but I realize that they didn’t touch them after so they made beets look clean and easy.

      It almost caused me to buy the steamer, but that was before I read the reviews where the steamers were dying in a year,

      1. Deb,
        I have a cheap plug in induction burner, pan and a stainless steaming pan. I love the combo and steaming in general. No heat greater than boiling and the water is steam so many contaminants in water won’t reach the steamed items. Kale is better steamed than any other way IMO. Really all you need is the stainless pan/steamer pan. The induction burner is just handy because it has temp control and a timer. I wouldn’t bother buying a dedicated steamer.The pans work fine. Chances are you already have an 8 inch diameter pan with lid so you would just need the steamer pan.

        1. Deb,
          I have a cheap plug in induction burner, pan and a stainless steaming pan. I love the combo and steaming in general. No heat greater than boiling and the water is steam so many contaminants in water won’t reach the steamed items.
          ——————————————————————————
          Jack, your setup is similar to one I use. I have two induction hot plates… one with two rings for small stewers (for heating a can of soup) and one with 3 rings.

          On the three ring model I sometimes set my tall stainless stock pot on it, put a little water in the bottom and place a stainless steel basket in the top, all under a glass lid. Anything I’m steaming gets surrounded by steam as the lid reflects heat back down on the contents of the open basket. I’ve also found some bamboo weave “plates” that fit into the stainless basket and place my food on that.

          When I used to eat them, this was a great way to steam a frozen dinner without leaving the food in the plastic tray it came in.

          1. Lonie,

            I like your set up with induction burners.

            I want to replace my stovetop with 2 induction burners, since I use my stove so infrequently now (I love my Instant Pot). And I could use more counter space. I would like to store the induction burners in a cupboard below the counter.

            I understand that they are more energy efficient, safer (they have high heat and time cut-offs, I’ve read), and they provide more precise heat control.

            1. ‘For nearly all models of induction cooktops, a cooking vessel must be made of, or contain, a ferrous metal such as cast iron or some stainless steels. The iron in the pot concentrates the current to produce heat in the metal. If the metal is too thin, or does not provide enough resistance to current flow, heating will not be effective. Most induction tops will not heat copper or aluminum vessels because the magnetic field cannot produce a concentrated current’
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooking

            2. I want to replace my stovetop with 2 induction burners, since I use my stove so infrequently now (I love my Instant Pot). And I could use more counter space. I would like to store the induction burners in a cupboard below the counter.
              ————————————————————————————————————————-
              Dr. J, apologies for the late reply.

              Tom is exactly right about cooking in a magnetic metal utensil. I’ve bought pots that were enamel on the outside and ceramic on the inside, but with a magnetic metal in between. Before buying however, I carry a small magnet that I see if it will attach to the pots and pans I’m shopping for.

              I haven’t read Tom’s link to wikipedia, but I suspect they well explain the difference between the 2 induction heating ring and the 3 ring model. One thing I’ve learned about the two ring is to use a small stewer (although you can put a bigger pan on there and get the job done, but done better with the three ring-sized induction burner.

              Still, I use my small two ring burner more often because it fits a small orange outside, cream colored ceramics inside with a screw in wooden handle that is just right for a large can of soup. But even though it has about 6 heat settings I seldom ever get over 3 and usually just two. Takes a little longer to cook but I’ve had things like tomato soup burn when cooked too fast.

              Was able to clean it off the bottom eventually with a pot scrubber, but I don’t like getting harsh with any pot surface… even ceramic ones, as I worry about exposing some sort of dangerous unknown thing that might be then touching my food.

              Both my induction cookers are pretty lightweight and should be no problem storing. But I just put a paper towel on mine and use them as places to put other things when not cooking. ‘-)

        2. Jack,

          Thanks so much for your comment.

          That is what I have been trying to wrap my head around.

          I know that when I lost my brain, aluminum was a big factor.

          And, honestly, it wasn’t until recently that I read the sentence that if your pans have nicks and scratches in them, you might be getting a lot of aluminum from the aluminum layer.

          I had gotten rid of most of my pans because they were old and weren’t great quality in the first place.

          Laughing.

          I just bought All-Clad. My other pans were probably from Walmart. $10.

          Still, my stainless steel pot with my strainer inset is in pretty okay shape.

          I am going to be so spoiled using All-Clad, but, happiness and contentment and the sense of “finishing the decision-making and figuring every single thing out process” has driven me to buy more expensive things.

          Not everything is expensive in my house, but the functional things all got an update over the past 5 years.

          I have 50-year shingles on my roof now and double the support beams so I don’t have to go outside with a roof rake ever.

          A waste of money? Well, I am never, ever, ever going to do another roof ever, ever, ever again.

          And I did my version of “the math” with the fact that every single support beam on my roof was broken and nobody ever, ever, ever went up into the attic, so nobody knew that we were one storm away from collapse.

          I did a “What is the biggest possible storm that we could get and what if we got a few of them in the same week?” math process and decided to put in good, new plywood and energy star insulation and I don’t have any idea if any of it was a good idea, but it is finished and I already know that I am never, ever, ever, ever going to do this process again, even if 25 years from now, someone tells me to.

          1. I have been thinking quite a bit about whether the leached metals would go up with the steam or not.

            The various Multi-Pot designs please me.

            Even though they say that some of them the inner pasta pot isn’t long enough so you have to put a lot of water in, but I look at it and see that there is enough room at the bottom of the Multi Pots that I could steam 2 things beautifully at one time or I could do “pasta method” for my rice while steaming my broccoli.

            They simply are elegant designs and most of them cost $100-ish.

            There are brands that do have Tri-Ply steel, though most of those are just pasta insert pots, which you can boil or steam only one thing with but people like how big the pasta insert is for steaming.

            All-Clad did something strange to me because their multi-pot is made in China, but they have a copper core pasta pot, but they put a very flimsy pasta insert in it and one woman had broken her pasta insert a few times in a short period of time.

            I am happy with my choices but what I know is that the Multi Pot versus high-quality Pasta pot with flimsy pasta insert versus other brands – some of whom switched to China for theirs, too, caused a lot of extra work, but I know that I went as far as logic could take me and now I need experience.

            1. I have an expensive All-Clad pasta pot. I’m happy with it and it’s VERY sturdy; I couldn’t see it breaking unless I hit it with a sledge hammer.
              My beef is that it takes a long time for it to heat up the water because it’s so sturdy. Other than that, I’m happy enough with it. I used to have a cheap enamel-coated pasta pot, but it rusted out and I decided to get the All-Clad. If I had to look for a new pot again, I’d see if I could find one that would heat up faster.

      1. Roasted beets are easy to use. Roast whole washed beets 1 hr or til done, then put them in a strainer under cold running water, and peel. Great in borsht.

        They are ok, but I find the sweet earthy taste of beets does not go well with sports on an empty stomach. I use a short term bronchodilator which works well.

      1. What about the fact that a canned beet is processed? Ergo precooked and thus denuded of a good portion of its nutrient value
        Also modern cans are lined with a BPA off-gassing plastic liner and you would be consuming large doses of BPA every time you ate a can..
        Or am I misinformed. (Cancer warrior here)..

          1. Mr. Fumblefingers,

            I wonder why sugar is added? Because beets are already quite sweet.

            Maybe it’s because sugar and salt are added to all processed foods — to disguise the taste of sub-par food prepared in a sub-par manner?

            1. I wonder why sugar is added? Because beets are already quite sweet. Maybe it’s because sugar and salt are added to all processed foods …
              ——————————————————————–
              Perhaps to act as a preservative?

          2. Fumbles,
            The brand of canned beets that I buy has no salt and no sugar added. A lot of canned products are like that now. And about the same price as the regular ones with salt added.

            1. Thanks Darwin. I never came across no sugar, no salt canned beetroot in Australia. I used to just wash canned beetroot slices under running water to try to get rid of at least some of the added sugar and salt. I lived in a small town though and they may be available in cities.

              Here in the Philippines I have never seen canned beetroot at all. I did see some actual beetroots once but they were the price of a large screen TV. Haven’t seen them since.

    2. YR,

      I have a little cutting board that I reserve for cutting vegetables that stain wooden boards, such as strawberries and beets. It does get stained.

      I love oven roasted beets: I scrub beets, slice off either end, cut them in half, then cut them into slices, maybe about 1/4 – 1/3 inch thick, and toss in oil with ground black pepper, and garlic and onion powder. Then I roast them at 400 F for 15 min a side. Tender and sweet! We eat them maybe once a week.

      They can also be steamed, and diced for use in salads. Or grated or sliced raw for use in slaws. All good.

      And none of the non-wooden dishes used stain, but wash clean easily. As do my hands. Maybe that’s because I don’t peel the beets. I’m peeling fewer and fewer veggies these days; I just scrub them really well. Though I still peel parsnips and butternut squash.

        1. YR,

          I have cut back on my use of oil, but I cannot figure out how to oven roast vegetables without it, and avoid having the veggies dry out. (Plus, they taste really good, even though I now use about half the oil I did previously.) I’m still working on it — and I welcome any and all suggestions.

          1. Dr. J.,

            My suggestion? Keep oiling them! Some vegan gurus say yes to oil, others say no. I think a little oil splashed on something or other is perfectly fine. :-)

          2. Dr. J.,

            They say to add water to keep the vegetables from drying out while roasting.

            My brother puts a small bowl of water at the bottom rack of the oven when he roasts red peppers and his roasted red peppers are awesome. I tried to figure out where he got the idea from and whether you can use it while roasting other vegetables, but I couldn’t find it.

            Not sure it is a good idea, but maybe.

      1. I lean toward not peeling also and never peel carrots or parsnips unless they need to be peeled to get them reasonably clean. That’s for home grown out of clean soil.

        I read a disturbing article in Rolling Stone on fracking waste. The fracking waste or brine is contaminated with various toxic substances. But the geology in western PA, western NY, Ohio and WV is such that the brine contains radium. The industry is virtually unregulated and they dump the brine on the dirt roads in the rural areas. The radium bonds to clay molecules and then becomes air born as dust. So large rural areas including farmlands are contaminated with radium. A company even makes and sells commercial ice melter from the fracking brine.

        https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/oil-gas-fracking-radioactive-investigation-937389/

        1. There is seemingly no safe place left on this planet… LOL it’s like everything is in cahoots to give us cancer and kill us all.

      1. cp,

        I buy seeds for golden beets, and chioga beets (striped white and red) from either High Mowing or Johnny’s Seeds, mail order or online. There are probably other places as well. Some years they do very well, others not so much. Even though I rotate my “crops” through my rather small garden beds. (I should probably keep better notes.)

        Which reminds me: My mother was amazed that I grew the beets to eat the roots; she said that her family grew beets to eat the greens. She and my dad, did too, for a while. I don’t recall that. So now I eat both, when I grow them in the backyard. Otherwise, I buy just the roots from the store.

        1. I like both greens and roots. I have a list of seeds to remember to procure for this years garden that I didn’t look for until too late last spring.

  2. Watching this, I thought about my cousin who sometimes ends up on oxygen.

    I wonder if this line might help people who are on oxygen use less oxygen.

    “Same workload power outputs using significantly less oxygen after drinking beet juice.”

    He isn’t on it right now, but if he could not go on oxygen, he would be happy.

    1. Watching this, I thought about my cousin who sometimes ends up on oxygen.

      I wonder if this line might help people who are on oxygen use less oxygen.

      “Same workload power outputs using significantly less oxygen after drinking beet juice.”

      He isn’t on it right now, but if he could not go on oxygen, he would be happy.
      ———————————————————————————————————————-
      Deb, I had a brother-in-law always dragging an oxygen unit. I suggested the beet juice to him once and he dismissed the idea out of hand.

      I also have a brother who just wouldn’t even try it. (But he did do the expensive cord blood stem cell treatment, twice, and seems to be breathing just fine.)

      I’ve been drinking a daily shot of the Biotta brand beet root juice for some years now, since reading that it will bring perfusion back to parts of the brain that have gone dormant due to lack of oxygen.

      I buy it a case of 12… 32 oz glass bottles, at a time. I keep a bottle in the fridge and just drink a quick shot out of the bottle when I think about it. Often times I notice the veins on the back of my hand or fore arm stand up, well above their normal size of being observable, but flat.

      Knowing the veins I can see are this elastic gives me confidence the same is happening within. Oh, and my oxygen count is normally around 98.

      1. Lonie,

        Thanks for sharing.

        I am trying to incorporate beets again.

        I do the MicroPulse ICES and also a nasal light for oxygen to my brain. I haven’t used either of them for months, but those and an infrared panel are in my gadgets all for blood flow and oxygen.

        I also took Serrapeptase and, I don’t keep taking it, but I do it maybe once a year. The thing is, if the testimonials are right, people decrease their need for oxygen while taking it. I honestly started taking it because when I was a young suicidal person I drank things that would produce crystals and Serrapeptase gets rid of things like calcium deposits and helps peope with carpal tunnel.

        That is if there is actually any in the pills themselves. Dr. Greger’s videos about supplements having ridiculous things like Prozac and Viagra in them makes me not really want to take them at all.

        I had one bottle the first time I tried it that blew me away.

        I had a foot injury and pain and the Serrapeptase took the swelling down. It didn’t stay down on it. And after a week, I would say that it no longer felt so amazing, but the pain and swelling went away for a few days and that was astounding. When it stopped working, I lost interest, but I had bought it when my contractor was told that the biofilm on his knee replacement area was going to cause him to need a peg leg and someone else said that he had a friend who did get the peg leg and he wanted them to just cut the leg off because the peg leg was so useless. Serrapeptase helps with biofilm problems and allows antibiotics access. That man had to retire, but he is doing so great now a year and a half later he looks like his old self. He stayed retired, but it was just that I read all of these things online and am just like you wanting to share everything and people either listen or get mad.

        The next bottle of Serrapeptase I bought, I would say nothing at all happened, but enzymes are sensitive to heat and light and who knows. I am not sure a woman would know if their supplements were spiked with Viagra.

  3. I bought my cousin the brand of silver-infused pillow that they use in rehab and in the hospital and I laughed because I thought I bought him 1 pillow, but 12 pillows arrived, so I am taking one for my spare bedroom and sending some to the shelters. If I ever get MRSA and go on oxygen, I will be looking for my silver-infused pillow and asking for beet juice and they will think I have dementia. (The fact that nobody said anything when I really did have it will be what I will be laughing about as they force me into a nursing home for thinking beet juice will lower my oxygen intake.)

  4. Do they have to be red beets? Chiogga and golden beets are delicious and unmessy; I steam them whole and keep in the fridge for easy addition to daily salads.

    1. Do they have to be red beets? Chiogga and golden beets are delicious and unmessy; I steam them whole and keep in the fridge for easy addition to daily salads.
      ———————————————————————————————————————————–
      I don’t know if they provide any nitrate (I think is what red beets have that convert to nitric oxide) but I’m pretty sure they are without betanin as it is a product of the red color in red beets. Below is a link to properties of beets and they do mention the golden ones which do have a component, Vulgaxanthin, that shows up in yellow beets.

      https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/beetroot

  5. I eat them raw cut in little pieces with some garlic and a little bit of olive oil in a salad bowl. Quite often leave it in there for at least an hour before eating it. Now I do sometimes use them in the juicer as well together with carrots and ginger. Maybe I missed something in the article, is it better to eat them as a vegetable raw like I do instead of juicing them, or is the effect the same? Have a wonderful day!

  6. Penn State Univ. did not find beet root juice holding up to the test. https://news.psu.edu/story/341148/2015/01/19/research/beet-or-not-beet-researchers-test-theories-beet-juice-benefits
    Their testing did not show improved blood flow to the muscle and that the widely held belief that beet juice is helpful to athletes did not hold up to scrutiny.

    Beets are certainly a terrific addition to meals, but to use for athletes the testing did not yield positive results.

    1. Barb, it appears the researchers (and thus you) based their research conclusion on an invalid assumption. Just because beet juice doesn’t increase the amount of oxygen in the blood or increase the volume of blood, does not mean it is not helpful to athletes. As Darwin explained/transcribed above from this video https://nutritionfacts.org/video/priming-the-proton-pump/, it is not the amount of oxygen, but rather the nitrite effect on the proton pump creating the ATP at the cellular level that improves performance . So rather than assuming it was more oxygen that leads to improved performance, they should have been measuring either the ATP (if that is possible?) or the performance results of the participants. Surprisingly it actually seems to be a flawed study to come to the conclusion that beet juice does not improve athletic performance. Or it could be that the study came to the conclusion that oxygen levels and blood flow were not the cause for athletic performance improvement, and the reporter or you assigned the conclusion a different meaning? Anyhow, hope that helps.

      1. I am currently ensconced in my second battle with colon type cancer. So I have had much exposure to theories about cancer and conflicting research Etc. I have learned that you cannot trust the result of a research study based on the summary. You really must follow the money number one, who funded the research and what dog do they have in that fight?

        As You identified their research really did not even follow the line of what this study was promoting. Then we come along and read their summary saying that their findings disagree with what some other research group is claiming. Only to discover we are comparing apples to oranges. It is very complicated and difficult to truly take care of one’s health; mainly due to so many conflicting opinions and faulty research. Difficult to know whom to trust.

        1. Lonnie,

          I hear you.

          I have tried following the bouncing logic of the cancer research myself.

          It genuinely is so very complicated.

          There is so much money involved and that is both in the medical and alternative sides of the equation.

          Are you doing something like immunotherapy?

          My brother is in an immunotherapy study right now. Only a few more infusions left.

          Do they do Tumor Treating Fields for Colon Cancer?

          They are doing them for a few types of cancer now.

      2. Thank you very much for the explanation John! I appreciate it. They say the research is continuing, and I have no doubt about that more will be revealed. And, yes, I read it as though beet juice did indeed relax arteries, which is great, they could not prove beets to be a cause of athletic improvement. And as we know, the use of oli e oil in cooking them would presumably negate the arterial relaxation.

        For me, the conclusion I came to was from my own experience using beet juice, whole beets, or grated
        raw beets. In other trials Dr Greger presented, 1 hr ahead of time was suggested… did anbolutely zip for me, though I experienced sudden nausea using beets on a semi-empty stomach. John, this is NOT a good thing during a sport event, especially swimming.

        Instead, rather than focus on one food, I try to eat the best quality wfpb I can. Eating greens will provide a boost, and 1/4 tsp powdered garlic will relax arteries like beets without the fear of nauseating consequences.

        1. “..there was no direct effect on forearm muscle blood flow or artery dilator function”….. was a conclusion they came to. Sorry, I am on my phone and can not copy/paste properly.

          Lots of veg help our arteries and circulation, but no need to buy shots claiming something that doesn’t happen.

          1. “..there was no direct effect on forearm muscle blood flow or artery dilator function”….. was a conclusion they came to.
            ————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
            Interesting… I personally observed dilation happening to the blood vessels on my arm and hand after a shot of beet juice.

            1. Lonie, I imagine there have been many ti,es in my life that beet juice shots or eating beets an hour before swimming or running would have made a real difference.
              But, in eating nitrate veg throughout the day every day with wfpb, the results just don’t stand out for me.

              If you read the study carefully, they say that different conditions could yield a different result.
              Also, they are doing a trial with older people with higher blood pressure etc to see what happens.

              I have found over the years of eating wfpb consistently that eating a single food with the expectation of yielding
              a particular result is almost guaranteed to disappoint. As Dr J so often asks, what was the study population like? What were they eating? Studies on people eating wfpb would really be interesting.

              1. I have found over the years of eating wfpb consistently that eating a single food with the expectation of yielding
                a particular result is almost guaranteed to disappoint.
                ———————————————————————————
                Certainly I understand that not everyone will have the same experience. I thought you were giving advice when you said: “no need to buy shots claiming something that doesn’t happen.”

                But if I understand you, you were more or less just stating your personal position rather than dismissing the benefit of drinking beet juice to promote blood vessel elasticity.

                1. yes ty Lonie, I am on the phone today which isn’t the best.
                  You reminded me of something. A few years back I suffered angina attacks while exercising. Not huge, just annoying. I tried the beets then…. basically eating beets for breakfast and 90 min later exercising. I got a good result then – no pain. I started to ramp up my eating of spinach and kale, as well as beets, and anything else that I thought would help. Lots of berries too. No pains since.

  7. Consumption of beets do not increase kidney stone production? I’d this true? I love beets buy stopped eating them after kidney stone surgery.

    1. Hi, Linda! This post should help answer your question: https://nutritionfacts.org/questions/oxalic-acid-in-beets/. As far as oxalates and implications for our kidneys, it’s not just the amount that matters but also how well particular oxalates are absorbed, and the bioavailability of oxalates in beets is relatively poor (6 times less so than spinach, for example). Cooking the beets could cut levels about 25% but for the rare person with a condition like idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis (a type of kidney stones) that needs a low-oxalate diet, a better high-nitrate vegetable choice would be arugula. It’s also important to note that beet greens contain significantly more oxalates than just beets themselves (see here for more information: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/kidney-stones-and-spinach-chard-and-beet-greens-dont-eat-too-much/).

      For more links and information on preventing kidney stones, check out the kidney stones topics page: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/kidney-stones/.

  8. Beet POWDER – concentrated beets – is about $25 per pound on ebay. It never goes bad. You can swirl half a teaspoon into a liquid and take off on your run.

    1. Beet POWDER – concentrated beets – is about $25 per pound on ebay. It never goes bad.
      ————————————————————————————————————————
      I bought a couple of units of beet powder to use as a back-up when I run out of the glass bottled Biotta. I went to mix some powder that had set up from my last use of it.

      And though the top was screwed on tight to the plastic small can, apparently moisture had gotten inside and the whole contents were hardened into one big blob. I’ll try to melt the blob if needed, but for now I have many bottles of the juice on hand.

  9. I have trouble pushing beets past my teeth/lips barrier. However, pickled beets of your own make, could prove to be the key to enjoying the vegetable.

    1. You really had three heart attacks, Todd? Yikes! Did they stick a stent in you after each one? :-0

      One of the tenants in my building had two (or was it three?) strokes, which would also be scary. I didn’t ask her if she’s made any major changes in her life, such as diet, but next time I see her maybe I will.

    2. Hey, 3-heart attack Todd,
      I’m not crazy about beets either but I slice beets and cook them first with a little water. Toward the end with the water being used up, I add balsamic vinegar. I do like beets that way.

  10. Grandmother (mothers side) had it right, ” Eat your beets, they are good for you.” Grew up eating beets in every way imaginable. Still eat a lot of borscht in the cooler months. Usually make my own, but have found some good tasting borscht (from Poland) and beetroot soup (from Lithuania) at a local European type market in the area. Mix in some chicken broth instead of water, add some beetroot concentrate (from Poland) and I have a good borscht. Not as good as making it fresh which I prefer. Fresh beets with stalks still on at a reasonable price are hard to get where I live, but the roots are not.

    My favorite summer soup is Lithuanian cold beet soup with a hot boiled potato on the side.

    I also eat a lot of mildly pickled beets and Russian style fermented beets when I can convince a friend I need a beet fix.

    All this making me wanting some borscht so after volunteer work on Monday I will get some beets and make a pot,

    1. Even the word “grandmother” makes me smile.

      Sounds like you had a good one.

      I look at your list of places and someday I will have to look at beet recipes.

  11. Dr. G I’d like you to investigate the amino acid gylcine and collagen/gelatin supplementation. It’s quite a potential subject with little data to my eyes. It’s pushed by some nutritionists and Paleo type people as a health panacea.

    1. There’s a lot of marketing hype out there trying to persuade us to buy all kinds of supplements. Also, high protein diets are very fashionable.

      Collagen basically comprises a range of amino acids while glycine itself is another amino acid, so yes these supplements play to the current fashion for all things high protein..

      I’m very wary of all this ‘bro-science’ marketing of high protein diets, powders and other supplements. Especially since there is some evidence that high protein diets may significantly increase atherosclerosis risk eg

      ‘To understand how high dietary protein might increase plaque complexity, Razani and his colleagues studied the path protein takes after it has been digested — broken down into its original building blocks, called amino acids.
      Razani and his team found that excess amino acids from a high-protein diet activate a protein in macrophages called mTOR, which tells the cell to grow rather than go about its housecleaning tasks. The signals from mTOR shut down the cells’ ability to clean up the toxic waste of the plaque, and this sets off a chain of events that results in macrophage death. ‘
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200123152614.htm

  12. I like to slice red beets and throw them in my smoothie with kale, carrots, berries, and a frozen banana. I think I will try steaming, cubing and putting in one of my Buddha bowl versions.

  13. Dear Dr Greger
    Thank you and your volunteers for all that you do. I have a question about beet powder. Is it healthy to use? Have there been any studies done on beet powder?
    Thank you
    Pat

    1. Pat, the info you’re looking for may possibly be in one of his other videos regarding beets. Just type in “beets” in the search box and see what comes up if you want to check.

    1. Just scanned the article and MY eyeball test says it is written by conspiracy theorist types who offer a concept based on their own fears and irrational beliefs. Granted, their idea sounds somewhat plausible, but I didn’t see anything that backed up what they are suggesting.

      Personally I don’t use my microwave for cooking but I have seen people use one for heating water… and the water appeared to be o.k. after the nuking. ‘-)

      On the other hand, I’ve learned that magnetizing water causes the water molecules to change to being 8 sided which makes it the same as the water in our body.. and I can’t see that by eye, so I won’t say definitively that microwaving is bad or good.

        1. But then, I don’t have any interest in alcohol beverages either, except a glass of wine at a rare biggie event.
          ————————————————————————————————
          Yeah, I quit alcohol once I read that it kills brain cells. I rarely use imitation vanilla ’cause it is high in alcohol content. ‘-)

          Oh, speaking of brain cells, I’ve just a couple of days ago started taking a small part of a dropper of lithium after reading it can be helpful in preventing Alzheimer’s. Instructions said take a full dropper but I rarely take the recommended amount of anything.

              1. “One of the most important uses of lithium is in the treatment of bipolar disorder and depression.”
                ———————————————————————————————————————————-
                Great! The lithium should keep me from catching that! ‘-) But I’ll probably be more susceptible to Alzheimer’s than that so:

                https://neurosciencenews.com/lithium-alzheimers-15563/

                1. Lonie, maybe you could sign up to be on a clinical trial. Sounds like the whole thing is still in the “let’s see how it goes” phase.

                  But I have a hunch you don’t have to worry about getting The Big A. Just a hunch, mind you! :-)

                  1. Lonie, maybe you could sign up to be on a clinical trial. Sounds like the whole thing is still in the “let’s see how it goes” phase.
                    ———————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
                    In re: the clinical trial… at some point they would want to do an MRI or even worse, a CAT scan. I barely let a dentist do an x-ray. ‘-)

                    But actually they’ve been doing lithium as treatment for a long time. FDR went to a spring in Georgia that is known to have lithium in the water, and another of the mineral springs sells their mineral water as containing lithium. I suspect if unsafe it should be known by now. Besides, this early connection to prevention of Alzheimer’s states that they are using a very small dose compared to what is recommended for depression.

                    Thanks for the vote of confidence for my not getting Alzy… but my thinking is if I am in fact successful in my longevity goals, there could be plenty of opportunity for the Alzy to sneak in among my neurons. ‘-)

          1. Liisa,

            How ’bout because they scare me? A mundane reason: I’ve no room on my kitchen counter for one of them.

            Also-also, I’m never in such a damn hurry for a meal that I can’t take a few minutes to steam some veggies on the stove burner. (I don’t see any connection that an electric stove burner has to a microwave oven, BTW.)

            I weigh the pros and cons of everything. If my intuition says “no,” I’ll pass on by. As in, “next”!

            https://foodrevolution.org/blog/are-microwave-ovens-safe/

                1. Logic? What’s that?
                  —————————–
                  Something Spock used to put Captain Kirk and Bones in what Spock deduced was their place. ‘-)

                  An example of logic: It is illogical that Kirk should only be a Captain, as in a grade below Major, and be commanding a Starship.

                  On the other hand, if the Enterprise is equated with a sea-going ship, then the rank of Captain is equated to the rank of full Colonel… then that is logical.

                  Thus, logic lives in the details. ‘-)

                  1. Ahso. It’s also logical to assume that there is life on other planets, and that we have been visited for thousands of years by the inhabitants thereof.

                    Then there are the illogical ones who will claim that what I have assumed is pure poppycock. :-)

                    1. Ahso. It’s also logical to assume that there is life on other planets, and that we have been visited for thousands of years by the inhabitants thereof.

                      Then there are the illogical ones who will claim that what I have assumed is pure poppycock. :-)
                      —————————————————————————————————————————————–
                      Like I said… Logic lives in the details. ‘-) ‘-) ‘-)… said another way… yuca, yuca, yuca.

                    2. Errr, umm, I think you are talking about the 3 Stooges term, yucca, yucca, yucca… I was referring to the yuca, (yewkuh) yuca, yuca, guys ‘-)

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMMS5ydRyew

                      Manihot esculenta, commonly called cassava (/kəˈsɑːvə/), manioc,[2] yuca, macaxeira, mandioca, kappa kizhangu[3] and aipim, is a woody shrub native to South America of the spurge family … Though it is often called yuca in Spanish America and in the United States, it is not related to yucca, a shrub in the family Asparagaceae

                    3. ‘Ahso. It’s also logical to assume that there is life on other planets, and that we have been visited for thousands of years by the inhabitants thereof’

                      I’m guessing that you’re a bit unclear on the distinction between making assumptions and making logical deductions from them.

                    4. It’s also logical to assume that there is life on other planets, and that we have been visited for thousands of years by the inhabitants thereof.
                      ———————————————————————————-
                      visited? VISITED!?
                      ———————————–
                      I’LL HAVE YOU KNOW I WAS BORN HERE!

                      I consider myself as much an earthling as the next fellow.

                    5. And the fact I am watching the Supper Bowl proves my point.

                      Which reminds me… that halftime nonsense should be over by now… sohhhhh, back to the Supper Bowl!

                    6. Didn’t Einstein once say that Earth is the insane asylum of the Galaxy?

                      YR is probably well aware of this below (she may even have written it – perhaps with some of us posters here in mind?)

                      ‘The Earth, as being in what may be called the outskirts or outlands of the Galaxy. It is by no means anywhere near the heart of the more advanced civilizations within the galaxy. It is in a very remote area, and many of the entities from various star systems would tend to scatter and take their experiments or their people who do not fit well, experiments that had gone wrong or people who did not fit well in their society; they would take them to these more remote areas such as the Earth.

                      This being much like Australia, wherein Australia was an isolated continent that could be used as a dumping ground for prisoners to get them out of society in Europe and yet let them live their own lives as they desired. This Awareness indicates that this was the case for many of these who were brought to Earth.

                      This Awareness indicates there are some planets that are even more remote than the earth. The earth, in fact, during the past two hundred years has progressed considerably in comparison to many of the others This Awareness indicates that in bringing entities into these remote areas and casting them out from the heart of the greater societies in the galaxy, they planted seeds of civilization, so that the entities could have some sense of organization. It is for this reason that this Awareness once described the Earth as having been the insane asylum of the galaxy.

                      It is not the only one, but it is one of a number in which it was simply a dumping ground for many types of experiments, genetic experiments and creatures and beings that did not fit in the other places.’
                      http://home.claranet.nl/users/lightnet/creator/insaneasylum.htm

                    7. I’ll go along with what Einstein said. I’ve heard that we earth beings are pretty much an experiment, but are “loved” nevertheless. Awwww…… :-)

        1. What is “8 sided” water? Do you have any references for that?
          ——————————————————————————–
          Pretty sure I do, but I may have to take some lithium to remember where I read that. ‘-)

          I’ll get back to you.

        2. O.K., just finished a quick-read (scan) of the link below and didn’t find the needle (reference) in the haystack (data.) Glad I read it though as it re-inforces my reasons for my magnetizing water and Ginkgo Biloba regimens.

          I’ll keep looking, at least until the Supper Bowl comes on (it comes on about supper time. ‘-)

          1. O.K., I initially got hexagonal mixed up with octagonal… but the original thought came from the statement below and the follow-up link.

            “Magnetized water is hexagonal water obtained by passing water through specially manufactured permanent magnet that can activate and ionize water molecules to change its structure hexagonal, like water in our body.”

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3572224/
            —————————————————————————————————–
            I encourage anyone to read the two links I have posted. The knowledge within could change your life forever… or if not forever, at least until you die.

            Magnetized water for the win!!!!

      1. Lonie,

        Today, I sent the person back 5 PubMed links.

        I still couldn’t figure out what study they were supposedly using.

        There might be one in there, but I decided to not become the target because I already am.

        Let them read the studies themselves and let them find one from their side.

        Rather than me doing both sides of the research.

        1. I didn’t even send a Dr. G. video. That friend and I have already run around the block and back because she is opinionated Gundry and Keto wanting to argue with me and I am overly-passionate WFPB wanting to have her follow my logic and it never penetrates because her own is opposite.

          We both have our own studies and maybe we would come together on some topics, but it is a Jack Sprat would eat no fat, his wife would eat no lean sort of friendship.

          Most of my friendships have come half-way but it is hard when you honestly believe the opposite information.

  14. Haha “hellfire.”

    Well I hate eating pure beets or adding them to my smoothies, can’t stand it (love them in recipes though, such as shredded in a dragon bowl). Thank God for arugula… that stuff is the best. It’s so easy and pretty tasteless to add to smoothies and tastes amazing in salads or whatever else—so easy to grow, too!

    While I agree it’s pathetic the world goes to such drastic measures to avoid changing their crappy diet, it’s actually a really good idea to add some beneficial veggie powders to bread if you are going to eat bread. Intact grains are best, but if doing bread, why not use a whole grain (or root… yuca root flour is amazing, there’s also sweet potato, etc), and add some beet powder or maybe tomato powder, etc. Not necessarily a bad idea, BUT among a diet where you also simply eat your vegetables and not as a replacement.

    1. Yikes!!! ARUGULA has no taste? Yikes! My sister made an arugula smoothie and we about died from the taste until we added a sufficient number of bananas to the mass of arugula she’d put in the smoothie.

      1. Lisa, how much arugula did she use? I’ve used quite a bit before but it’s always mixed with kale and berries. I find arugula, while flavorful, pretty mild in flavor. Now arugula microgreens on the other hand, are intense.

        1. I have been eating everything in microgreens lately after the pre-chopping gets rid of the superpowers video.

          Each day is a different microgreen, but I was so psyched that they finally had arugula in the store.

        2. Oh, we fill the Vitamix 3/4 of the way up with greens; we weren’t mixing up the greens for that one! And no, the greens were not microgreens. Whew!
          arugula is potent stuff!

    2. yuca root flour is amazing
      —————————————
      I had to google yuca before learning it is known as tapioca in the states, or casaba in other places. It seems there are a lot of different styles for cooking it and a lot of comments for how good it is.

      1. Lonie, Otto’s flour (yuca/cassava) has a tortilla recipe on the back and it is AMAZING. I use it for burritos all the time or tweak it to make an herby flat bread for when I feel like dipping more than veggies in my hummus. But I use unrefined avocado oil instead of olive oil due to smoke points and cook on a non-stick ceramic electric pan so it isn’t fried.

        1. or tweak it to make an herby flat bread for when I feel like dipping more than veggies in my hummus
          ————————————————————————-
          Reminds me of the only bread I’ve eaten for decades… WASA rye flatbread. Even got out of the habit of eating that for a few years until noticing some in my freezer and buying some chicken salad to spread on top.

          I get it that most here are cringing at my choice of chicken salad, but my kitchen counter is covered with things like two induction hot plates, an air convection oven (use my old electric range oven as storage) and jars of things I buy in bulk and repackage. There’s just no room for “cooking” in the conventional sense… just open cans to heat up things.

          And yes I get that I may not be eating according to best practices, but I am comfortable that I counter any negative results with “positators.”

          Pardon the past two paragraphs of rambling… I think it was triggered by the word hummus. ‘-) That is, for some reason that brings to mind the Scots food Haggis… made from sheep offal and other things.

          That and I am changing to thinking science is going to have more to do with my long term survival than just eating the right foods.

      2. You probably saw my response to Netogate, but just in case, tapioca is derived from the yuca root but it’s different than yuca root flour.

    3. S,

      I make whole grain sourdough bread; I grind my grains at home, and I started my own culture more than 6 years ago. Good bread has only flour, water, salt, and yeast or starter culture. I do add whole seeds, and sometimes wheat or rye kernels (presoaked) to my bread dough; last time, I added raisins and walnuts for fun. Lots of other possibilities come to mind. But probably not the ones you suggested; I’ve no idea what effect they would have on rise, crumb, crust, or flavor. Or shelf-life. Plus whole grain flour is enough processed food for me; I try to avoid processed food in general.

      Most additives in commercial breads are added to greatly speed up fermentation (my bread takes 24 hours or more of mostly sitting around), “improve” taste, and act as preservatives. I love the flavor of my bread, and I can barely eat commercial breads any more.

      1. Dr. J,

        Homemade bread including your own culture, sounds good!!

        Yeah adding dry powders would obviously alter flavor and maybe rising, etc. but I’m not sure how it’s justifiable to put a dried powdered whole food into the “processed foods” bin… obviously anything not intact is processed by strictest definition, but only in the same way some other things are such as some of the healthiest foods on the planet e.g. amla berry powder, matcha tea, turmeric, dried powdered ginger, etc.

        I was never saying, though, that it’s necessary to add to a recipe you already enjoy, just that I think it’s a cool idea and could be fun to experiment with. I tried tomato bread a long time ago and it was really good… not sure how it was made.

        1. S,

          I thought you were referring to adding dried plant protein powders, where the protein is first purified from the whole plants. Since I’m not familiar with powdered whole plants. Other than spices and herbs, maybe dates. Well, now that I think about it, ground wheat and rye are powdered whole plant foods. So there’s probably more in my life that I don’t realize.

          Tomato bread sounds interesting. I’ve tweaked my recipe over the years to something that works fairly well, and I’ve settled into it, routinely making bread pretty much the same way. I also make sourdough whole grain einkorn waffles (fantastic!), and I’ve made sourdough cookies, banana bread, corn bread, chocolate cake, and brownies (that I recall). But mostly I just make bread.

          1. Dr, J… you are making me hungry, lol. I wish I knew how to bake better.

            Yeah I definitely don’t do isolated proteins anymore after learning about the harm too much at once can cause and also why you shouldn’t manipulate and concentrate even plant proteins, from Dr. Greger… not to mention they’re unneeded and saves a lot of money not buying them. I started my healthy vegan journey initially doing Garden of life protein or Sun Warrior, etc… SO glad I learned about whole plant foods.

        2. S.,

          I have seen powdered beets. I have never read the container though.

          It is really just beets?

          Or are there people who powder their own beets?

          I do like the beet chips.

          I haven’t thought about them in a while.

          Sometimes they are hard as rocks though. I haven’t tried making my own.

          I am thinking that I could take the bags and throw them around and make powdered beets.

          Laughing.

          1. Deb, some are just powdered beets, I don’t know if there are brands with filler. Sari foods, where I get my nutritional yeast (the BEST nutritional yeast ever), had a giveaway you once with purchase and sent me a a bag of their’s and it’s pure dried then powdered beets. I never purchased any before so I’m not familiar with other brands.

            Beet chips ARE good! You made me remember. I want to make my own veggie chips, I only see them sold with oil and salt.

  15. Tapioca? Like the starch thing? No way, I have some of that in my closet. It’s used to bind things.

    I’m at the BAT section of How Not To Diet right now. This book is a monster though, I’m going to have to read it multiple times to be able to frame it all together in my mind. Amazing stuff, how we are learning how the human body still has secrets in this day and age.

    1. Tapioca? Like the starch thing? No way, I have some of that in my closet. It’s used to bind things.
      ——————————————————————————————
      Maybe you are thinking of yucca?

    2. Nope, just looked it up. Tapioca and cassava flour are totally different. They come from the same plant but yuca/cassava flour is the whole dried root ground up. That makes sense as to why you can make actual bread and baked goods from yuca flour whereas tapioca is always added in a mix.

      Net, don’t be deluded, they’ll never understand all the mysteries of the human body or anything else.

  16. Regarding brown fat. If you do both the hot peppers and topic menthol methods. Could it be possible that these molecules cancel each other out? Fire & ice? Or is it not like that?

  17. S said: Net, don’t be deluded, they’ll never understand all the mysteries of the human body or anything else.
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    Netgogate said: Tapioca? Like the starch thing? No way, I have some of that in my closet. It’s used to bind things.
    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-
    I asked S: So yuca can be used to bind things like a string or rope? (which is why I thought he had yucca confused with yuca.)

    I don’t know what the guy is saying but the picture is definitely not a yucca plant.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLxTbIDUIEo

    But there are a lot of yucs (read: yucca plants) in the link YR posted ‘-) And some of those pics are of what we call Beargrass where I’m from. Those saber like leaves work great for stripping and using for binding.
    https://pixabay.com/photos/search/yucca/

    Anyway, that was the only problem I had with Netgogatés post.

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