Benefits of Grapes for Brain Health

Benefits of Grapes for Brain Health
4.57 (91.3%) 92 votes

Grape juice and whole grapes are put to the test for brain function, including cognitive decline in early Alzheimer’s.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 2010, the first controlled trial was published examining how the brain responds to grape juice. It helped aged rats, but what about people? Concord grape juice supplementation improves memory function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, or so says the title. The problem is that the study was funded by Welch’s, and though the authors claim they have no financial interest in the outcome, that seems disingenuous. I mean, do they think Welch’s would ever fund them again if they found grape juice wasn’t good for you? And indeed, that title is a bit of industry spin. I’m sure that’s what they wanted to find.

Older adults with memory decline, but not dementia, were randomized into a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial with Concord grape juice versus a same calorie, same sugar, similarly looking/tasting grape-Kool-Aid type drink. So that’s a solid study design, and look, berries have those wonderful polyphenol phytonutrients, which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, so it certainly could help brain function and it did seem to help with verbal learning. The chances you’d get such notable results just by chance is like 1 in 25, whereas the higher recall scores are considered not statistically significant––since even if there wasn’t an effect, you might get those kinds of results by chance 1 in every 8 or 10 times you’d run the experiment. And by convention, we really like at least 1 in 20, so a p-value of 0.05 or less––especially if we’re looking at multiple outcomes, which increases the likelihood that something will pop up as a fluke. Bottom line is that we’re less confident in these memory outcomes, so I imagine if this hadn’t had industry funding, it would be titled more accurately: Concord grape juice supplementation improves verbal learning in older adults with mild cognitive impairment—which is still an important finding. And, we have the Welch’s corporation to thank for it. Without industry funding, a study like this might never get done.

The findings suggest that drinking grape juice is superior to drinking grape Kool-Aid, not necessarily for memory, but maybe for helping with learning. When the study was repeated, though, it did seem to help one measure of memory, but found no benefit for verbal learning––even when using the exact same test as before, which calls the previous results into question. So, we’re left uncertain about what effects, if any, grape juice has on the aging brain.

What about the brains of middle-aged mothers? The Welch’s-funded researchers noted significant improvements in one measure of memory and driving performance, as measured in some fancy driving simulator, suggesting on grape juice you might be able to stop a dozen yards earlier on the highway than if you had instead been drinking grape Kool-Aid. I do like how they tried to translate the cognitive effects into more meaningful metrics, but it’s important to acknowledge, as they did, that no effects were found for the majority of cognitive consequences. And when you study 20 different outcomes, the odds are pretty good that you’d just get a statistically significant result or two by chance.

The latest study involved a single dose given to young adults, average age 21: a cup of purple grape juice or white grape juice to which flavor and color had been added to disguise it. In this way, we could see if there’s something special about those deep purple polyphenol pigments in concord grape juice, and, got the same kind of results: two cognitive measures just achieving statistical significance. But that’s out of seven different outcomes. So instead of 0.05 as the cut-off for significance, we’d really like to see closer to 0.007, and none hit that. Maybe it’s because they didn’t use the whole food, like in that blueberry study I profiled before.

There was a study that looked at actual grape consumption, by utilizing freeze-dried grape powder to capture the whole food instead of just the juice, versus a sugar-matched placebo. They used PET scans to track changes in brain metabolism associated with early Alzheimer’s in a group of older adults already suffering from mild cognitive decline. Although the changes couldn’t be picked up on neuropsych testing, in those early-stage Alzheimer regions, the placebo group continued to worsen, but the grape group was spared such decline, suggesting a protective effect of grapes. Here that is in graph form, showing the significant difference, or even better, brain mapping pictures. Here’s one of the placebo brains. The red areas indicate locations where brain metabolism declined after eating six months of placebo grapes. Compare that level of decline to a brain that ate six months of actual grapes.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Pexels via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 2010, the first controlled trial was published examining how the brain responds to grape juice. It helped aged rats, but what about people? Concord grape juice supplementation improves memory function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, or so says the title. The problem is that the study was funded by Welch’s, and though the authors claim they have no financial interest in the outcome, that seems disingenuous. I mean, do they think Welch’s would ever fund them again if they found grape juice wasn’t good for you? And indeed, that title is a bit of industry spin. I’m sure that’s what they wanted to find.

Older adults with memory decline, but not dementia, were randomized into a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial with Concord grape juice versus a same calorie, same sugar, similarly looking/tasting grape-Kool-Aid type drink. So that’s a solid study design, and look, berries have those wonderful polyphenol phytonutrients, which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, so it certainly could help brain function and it did seem to help with verbal learning. The chances you’d get such notable results just by chance is like 1 in 25, whereas the higher recall scores are considered not statistically significant––since even if there wasn’t an effect, you might get those kinds of results by chance 1 in every 8 or 10 times you’d run the experiment. And by convention, we really like at least 1 in 20, so a p-value of 0.05 or less––especially if we’re looking at multiple outcomes, which increases the likelihood that something will pop up as a fluke. Bottom line is that we’re less confident in these memory outcomes, so I imagine if this hadn’t had industry funding, it would be titled more accurately: Concord grape juice supplementation improves verbal learning in older adults with mild cognitive impairment—which is still an important finding. And, we have the Welch’s corporation to thank for it. Without industry funding, a study like this might never get done.

The findings suggest that drinking grape juice is superior to drinking grape Kool-Aid, not necessarily for memory, but maybe for helping with learning. When the study was repeated, though, it did seem to help one measure of memory, but found no benefit for verbal learning––even when using the exact same test as before, which calls the previous results into question. So, we’re left uncertain about what effects, if any, grape juice has on the aging brain.

What about the brains of middle-aged mothers? The Welch’s-funded researchers noted significant improvements in one measure of memory and driving performance, as measured in some fancy driving simulator, suggesting on grape juice you might be able to stop a dozen yards earlier on the highway than if you had instead been drinking grape Kool-Aid. I do like how they tried to translate the cognitive effects into more meaningful metrics, but it’s important to acknowledge, as they did, that no effects were found for the majority of cognitive consequences. And when you study 20 different outcomes, the odds are pretty good that you’d just get a statistically significant result or two by chance.

The latest study involved a single dose given to young adults, average age 21: a cup of purple grape juice or white grape juice to which flavor and color had been added to disguise it. In this way, we could see if there’s something special about those deep purple polyphenol pigments in concord grape juice, and, got the same kind of results: two cognitive measures just achieving statistical significance. But that’s out of seven different outcomes. So instead of 0.05 as the cut-off for significance, we’d really like to see closer to 0.007, and none hit that. Maybe it’s because they didn’t use the whole food, like in that blueberry study I profiled before.

There was a study that looked at actual grape consumption, by utilizing freeze-dried grape powder to capture the whole food instead of just the juice, versus a sugar-matched placebo. They used PET scans to track changes in brain metabolism associated with early Alzheimer’s in a group of older adults already suffering from mild cognitive decline. Although the changes couldn’t be picked up on neuropsych testing, in those early-stage Alzheimer regions, the placebo group continued to worsen, but the grape group was spared such decline, suggesting a protective effect of grapes. Here that is in graph form, showing the significant difference, or even better, brain mapping pictures. Here’s one of the placebo brains. The red areas indicate locations where brain metabolism declined after eating six months of placebo grapes. Compare that level of decline to a brain that ate six months of actual grapes.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Pexels via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

When commercial entities fund studies, it’s more for marketing purposes than science. That doesn’t necessarily mean the findings are invalid, but you do have to pay special attention to things like the framing of the research question, the experimental methods, statistical analysis, and biased interpretation of results (spin).

The blueberry video I mentioned is Benefits of Blueberries for the Brain. There’s also Benefits of Blueberries for Mood and Mobility.

What else might help protect brain function?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

134 responses to “Benefits of Grapes for Brain Health

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    1. Agree YR, fruit juices in general are too high in sugar. Eating the fruit is so much better. Even grapes are high in sugar, I prefer berries. But your lunch dessert sounds really good!
      Of course, most anything compared to Kool Aid (Ugh) will do better. Never allow kids to drink that stuff!

      1. “I prefer berries.”
        – – – –

        Marilyn, those I have for breakfast. Previously frozen Wyman blueberries and a banana atop my hot whole-grain cereal. (Plus oodles of other yummies.)

        1. That sounds like my breakfast as well YR, atop steel cut oats . Mmmmm with ground flax and a few pieces of chopped walnuts and cinnamon!

      2. Grapes are berries. Botanically speaking. So are bananas and tomatoes for that matter..

        On the other hand, neither strawberries nor raspberries nor blackberries are berries. Botanically speaking.

        .This makes understanding difficult on occasion.

    2. Frozen grape juice is VERY high in sugar — even half a serving.
      ————————————————————————————-
      But goes well when drinking Just Blueberry or Just Tart Cherry Juice.

      Mixing them together balances out the natural sugar to being just right for me. ‘-)

    3. Blueberries and red grapes makes for a tasty combo (2/1), especially the grapes you get in the Summer and Fall. They seem to be a little sweeter, the grapes we get over the winter don’t have the same quality.

      1. Usually true, Michael. But surprisingly, Walmart had some organic black grapes a week ago that were some of the best grapes I’ve ever had.

        Anyone else in the mood for grapes now?

  1. I wish there was more statistical significance for eating grapes / juice. They used to be on my menu but the price bumped them off. Instead, I now have a constant supply of frozen blueberries (not cheep either). Not that this study did not find benefit. While following the video I jogged a memory, when growing up, my family would buy frozen juice canisters, pull a tab around the can top (after running warm water over it), add water and have a pitcher of juice. I still have the metal pitcher we used, sitting on my fireplace hearth. The sugar content was kind of syrupy. As in sugar lugies syrupy.

    1. Hey Dan – If you live near a Costco (and have a membership or know someone who does), they carry 5 pound frozen wild blueberries that have never been sprayed and the brand is Nature’s Touch. I can buy a 5 pound bag for $11 (I saw 3 lb bags of Wyman’s wild blueberries which are not free of spraying for about $9 at Kroger). Best deal I have found.

      JD

      1. A COSTCO member can order a gift card for you (a non-member) and have it mailed to you. I have a friend with payPal and I paid her for the card and also to keep the card loaded. The only products I need from them are the 6 lb bag of frozen blueberries and fabulous Nuttzo (Vegan).

        1. Costco also has, at least here locally, lots of organic fruits and veggies and much better prices than the grocery stores. Also, if you have a Natural Grocers nearby, they have a great selection of produce.

      2. How do you know that the Wyman’s wild blueberries are sprayed?
        If they are that would be disappointing news to me as I love their taste and looks.

        1. Howard, this fellow filmed his call to Wyman’s to ask directly, and yes, the wild blueberries are’managed’ by the farm and are sprayed when needed. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xepRiilnajQ

          Also, people often don’t realise how many pesticides are used in ‘organic’ agriculture either. It’s worth researching if it is important to you.

    2. Dan, grapes are too expensive here as well to be bothered with. There are more nutritional foods for the same calories available. Concord grapes are lovely but rarely available in stores. I prefer fruits and veg that have colour throughout like cherries or blackberries

    3. buy fesh blueberries in summer when it’s abundant. i used to buy by the case. sort, wash, dry, and freeze in cookie sheets then bag and freeze. even though we just had a freezer at the top and there were only me and my child son then, i would buy about 20-30# and feast on the giant ones and froze the rest. it never made it to spring. we love eating them frozen with toothpicks. great snack for a child!

    4. Dan, wasn’t there only one study used with “whole grapes?” (powdered grapes don’t necessarily promise the same outcome as whole would)
      And these were just looking into cognition. We know grapes contain antioxidants not to mention a good amount of nutrition in general such as potassium, so certainly grapes are a valuable addition to anyone’s day.

      1. Frozen berries are actually a life saver for me because they are so affordable compared to fresh berries. I actually don’t find them expensive at all apart from sometimes wishing I could afford an unlimited supply lol. Of course it drr e pends on where you shop and the brand e.g. Woodstock is RIDICULOUSLY priced.

      2. I agree. I will put them back on my get list. It’s just that blueberries have better statistics. I stopped drinking coffee for green tea (Bengal spice) not because I didn’t like coffee (for taste or nutrition) but because green tea is better nutritionally.

  2. ‘Grape and raisin (dried grapes) toxicity is well documented in dogs.* Although the exact substance that causes the toxic reaction is not yet known, dogs should not eat grapes and raisins because even small amounts can prove to be fatally toxic for a dog.

    Dogs of any age, breed, or gender may be affected. Grapes and raisins are bad for dogs because one of the most serious complications of grape/raisin toxicity is they can cause severe kidney damage leading to acute (sudden) kidney failure with lack of urine production (anuria). However, kidney failure is not seen in all dogs after ingestion of grapes or raisins, and again, the reason why some dogs are affected excessively, while others are not, is still being studied. ‘

    https://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/digestive/e_dg_grape_raisin_toxicity

    1. We well know! Our 95-lb black lab helped himself to a wooden basket FULL of Concord grapes. We had been out and returned home to find the empty basket on the floor. It cost a mint–we immediately brought him to the vet who treated him…. Yikes!!! $$$$$$$$$$ He’s alive and has graduated to other “stolen” snacks when he can snatch them. Sadly, we don’t buy grapes anymore–just berries of various types.

      1. We had a little fox terrier when I was a kid. Back then we didn’t know that we’re not supposed to give dogs chocolate.

        I was always making chocolate fudge, and she’d beg for some of it. Probably chocolate cake and brownies too (I loved to bake and “poison” the rest of the family, har-har). Can’t remember what else she ate other than people food that might have kept her going until she was 11 years old. She got hit by a car in front of the house; possibly lost her hearing or eyesight thanks to all that chocolate. The chocolate probably made her hyper too…she sure did like to bark.

        Crotch-sniffing dogs are okay, but for various reasons I became a cat lover years later. ^_^

    2. My dog (older toy fox terrier) does not eat fruit. I give him bits off my bread and peanut butter sandwiches. He loves the peanut butter but will eat the bread with it. He likes sweet potatoes. His dry dog food is “For Health,” sweet potato and salmon. The salmon is probably farm pond, but he has made it to 12 years of age. He scarfs down old fashioned oats as much as I do. He pooped rabbit / deer pellets yesterday–not sure what that is about. He started out being my mom’s dog and she would have several bowls of food sitting around for him. He got to where he would eat it all —bacon, sugar, anything off the table–anything goes–and he survived.

  3. I have raisins or grapes most days in my morning fruit and oats blend (blueberries always). Eat a pound or two of grapes each week. They’re great snacks for the evening too-along with Fuji apples. Fruit is good food.

    1. I go through over a bag of red delicious apples a week. I have a refrigerator drawer with over two bags of apples in it now. Great with oatmeal, car trips, walks across an old bridge. When I lived in Norman, Oklahoma I would eat apples in my van on trips around town. I would throw the cores out the window into curb gutter openings. I rarely missed.

  4. I throw a handful of raisins in my oatmeal along with a few black walnuts. I love eating a small amount of fresh grapes or blueberries and when getting in your daily walking and exercise you keep your blood sugar in balance. I rebound for 45 minutes daily, on top of getting in a lot of walking and running.

    1. Grapes are also really good paired with nuts. I love eating walnuts or pecans with fresh grapes or an apple. It’s kind of fruit pie-y but healthier.

  5. Have I told you lately that I love you?

    You make me smile every single day.

    I am going to be taking this video to my grape-eating 90-year-olds.

    Those last images are fabulous!

    I bought grapes for myself this week. I had stopped eating them, but you just got me started again.

    ((((((great big happy hug)))))

        1. Note that it was a ‘grape formulation’ not actual grapes – since you can’t blind people to the fact that they are eating grapes.

          The full study is behind a paywall but according to the California grape industry, a mix of red black and green grapes was used – freeze dried and then ground into a powder.
          https://www.grapesfromcalifornia.com/grapes-health/health-research/emerging-research/

          So whether the formulation included water or whether the 72 grammes refers only to dry weight is still unclear to me . This is important since grapes are 90% water. So, if the 72 grammes is dry weight only, we would have to eat 720 grammes of mixed fresh grapes daily to replicate this trial with whole foods. That’s a lot of grapes..

          Perhaps one of the staff or volunteers with access to Elsevier journals could clarify this point.

  6. Great video, cutting the the BS and providing insight into the science and the funding, and once again proving the whole food is better than just the parts.
    Cheers

  7. I liked this video. I definitely am used to this format now and enjoy it when the topic isn’t complicated.

    Some of the suits and tops you wear are better with the background than others.

    Can I say that you shouldn’t wear your green shirt in this format?

    Green shirt goes well on you walking treadmill, but when I looked at the obesity webinar, the lighting and the green on blue-green it felt like St. Patricks Day and you would make a very good Leprauchan, but I like it when you don’t have the audience tossing green tomatoes at you.

    1. I liked this video. I definitely am used to this format now and enjoy it when the topic isn’t complicated… but I like it when you don’t have the audience tossing green tomatoes at you.
      ———————————————
      Personally I still scroll down and try to just listen, although sometimes my mind wanders and I don’t hear the message.

      The reason you don’t have the audience tossing green tomatoes at him is because those will ripen and be edible if you handle them right. On the other hand, if you have any rotten tomatoes… well let’s just say those have a target to be thrown at. ‘-)

      1. “On the other hand, if you have any rotten tomatoes… well let’s just say those have a target to be thrown at. ‘-)”
        – – – –

        Good to know. Just where DO you live, Lonie? :-D

        1. Good to know. Just where DO you live, Lonie?
          —————————————————————
          I think I’ll keep that close to the vest… I don’t look good in rotten tomatoes. ‘-)

          1. “I don’t look good in rotten tomatoes. ‘-)”
            – – – –

            And you know this because you’ve been pelted with them before? (Probably many times. :-)

      2. I just realized there is a 1-5 star rating thing we can use to rate the video. I hadn’t noticed this before. I’ve been going backwards and rating the ones with all the personal distractions as 1 star, and the Flashback Fridays or blogs as 5 stars.

  8. Not all grapes are the same. European grapes have been heavily bred. Concord grapes have a lot of antioxidants in them, as they haven’t been bred as much. They are the American labrusca grapes, hardier and more wild than the Euros. A different species. The kind that Leif Ericson found on his voyage to the New World around 1000 A. D.

    1. Thanks, John.

      That is interesting.

      It makes the process harder, but it is interesting.

      I am just happy that I can find organic grapes this time of year.

      1. It’s awesome to know the highest antioxidant foods—wild blueberries are a staple for me—and so important to include them. But it can be a bad idea to only eat foods based on which are the highest in antioxidants. If things are strictly done in that way, you might never eat an apple or orange again because berries are so much higher, and we know that we have special receptors in our bodies for these different things and they offer uniquely different benefits to different parts of our body. Not to mention, while lower in overall antioxidants compared to something else, a food can still contain something unique and rare that you don’t get elsewhere and their composition of nutrients can offer something completely unique. Variety is also very important.

    2. John,

      The concord grapes are small with seeds so some people who like convenience based foods will find it annoying
      and time consuming to deal with.
      That’s why they are good to have.

      1. Concord grapes were my dad’s favorite grape. We had lots of fun spitting the seeds out. He was a bare foot farm boy from the sticks of NE OK. His did moonshined and made grape wine out of concords. One of dad’s best memories was opening the tap of the wine barrel and taking a good swig with his mouth.

    3. The wild grapes that grow on our Michigan property are intensely flavored and sour compared to domesticated Concords, but oh, so good. We eat them off the vine when they are ripe, but we have a lot of competition from the birds, raccoons, possums, skunks, and pretty much anyone else who can reach them. The deer nibble them off the vine as well. I cut them out of important trees, but allow a lot of grapevines to grow in the hedgerows for the wildlife.

      1. That is so nice, Anne! I suspect your grapes are all the healthier for you because you share them with all the little ones :) Sounds like you live on some beautiful land.

  9. Think I’ll stick to eating the frozen wild blueberries I get from Costco. Grapes tend to spoil quickly. Speaking of polyphenols, I just finished reading a book called “The Coffee Lover’s Diet” by Bob Arnot, MD where he tested various coffee brands for phenol content (chlorogenic acid). Surprisingly, Dunkin Donuts Original Blend had the most phenols among mainstream brands. Speciality roasters had more phenols, but they are harder to find. I recommend this book if you are a coffee lover.

    1. Think I’ll stick to eating the frozen wild blueberries I get from Costco. Grapes tend to spoil quickly.
      —————————————————————————————————————————-
      Yeah, no Costco here but WalMart has their own house brand, Great Value, of frozen wild blueberries… 40 oz bag. They also sell a 40 oz GV brand of Dark Sweet cherries that I buy.

      Mix them together in a bowl and pour almond milk over them. The Cherries sweeten the bowl just enough to make sweetness not an issue.

      1. “Grapes tend to spoil quickly.”
        – – – –

        Which is why — as soon as I bring a bunch home from the supermarket — I wash them in a solution of baking soda and white vinegar — stick ’em in a freezer bag, and toss them up in my refrigerator freezer. They last, like, forever, that way.

        1. YR, I also do the same with a lot of fresh berries, cherries, and grapes. Buy them fresh while in season, then wash, then freeze.

          BTW, I wonder what Welch’s does with all the fiber and seeds left over when they make the grape juice? Seems a shame to waste all that good fiber and nutrients!

          1. Hey Darwin,

            Did you get a steamer?

            I am definitely going with Chief. Kevin is still talking me through how to decide which one.

            I love him already. I emailed him probably 2 in the morning on Sunday and there was a really sweet detailed answer waiting for me on Sunday morning.

            He didn’t over-sell. If anything, he under-sold and just told the truth about the differences.

            I might be going with one of the smaller residential units after all that.

            I have one last question in.

            The residential ones don’t need the same maintenance. In the commercial one, you have to use tap water.

            I think he said that the residential one you can use either tap or distilled. Verifying that.

            If the residential one uses tap water and doesn’t need maintenance and is cheaper and is commercial quality with slightly less power, and if he is right that it is more technique than power for steam cleaning, I will go cheaper.

              1. There is a lot to think about in any purchases.

                I am excited though.

                I just finished buying my pans and I finding that with the proper coupons and choosing the right sizes, I could get D3 All-clad for less than $90.

                I am not someone who spent a lot of money on pans before, but I really do feel contented with every decision I have made and I think contentment comes from feeling like I really thought everything through and looked at what expert sites said and looked at which sites would give me sales, plus coupons, plus free shipping.

                It is hard to know when you have made the best decision, but it is sometimes easy to know when you made a good decision.

                And, sometimes it is even easier to know when you got suckered by a good sales pitch or a lie on the internet.

                I was never the one in my family who had to make these decisions. There was a group of males in my life who would sit and chat about topics and the women usually would go in the other room. They were intelligent and hard-working men who really understood topics. I always felt safe with them around. It is so strange to have reached an age where I couldn’t trust my own brain, but I have gone through decision after decision after decision in my house and I have way more good ones than bad ones.

                Maybe a bunch of best for me decisions.

                I think Kevin from Chief reminds me of my brothers and my auto mechanic and my carpenter and those men who sat around and talked about plumbing or electricity or insulation.

                I had to do every single topic that they used to talk through together all alone, but it will make me stronger and I will be able to help people.

                1. Deb, It sounds to me like you’re doing great at making decisions! Keep it up.

                  I think you’re in a positive feedback loop now … the more correct decisions you make , the more confident you feel, which leads to making more good decisions in the future and the cycle continues … :-)

                  1. Darwin,

                    Thanks for the encouragement.

                    I think probably you get burned some in the beginning or get fooled a few times with internet spam or advertising and get better at it.

                    Finding experts with pictures of Petri dishes and MRI’s help so much. I think I eventually got a system.

                    I probably do the same circles for WFPB.

                    Find a favorite doctor to camp out on his website and find a group of other similar doctors and listen back and forth. Then go to the skeptics and go to the studies and go to YouTube and see what regular people are saying and look for testimonials.

                    I think in about 2 years I may be walking people through WFPB at the Senior Center which is not far from where I work.

                    At least one more year, but How Not To Age makes sense of when to do it.

                    I am walking my 90 yesr olds through now.

                    I think in a few years I will be able to really help people with just about any house issue and WFPB and water-only cleaning.

                    1. When I started making these decisions, my brain was so far off.

                      There were nights that I was so paranoid that I started sleeping in my clothing in my car.

                      I know now it was because of a man who was sending serial killer fantasy messages while being a charismatic good guy. He posted something that terrified me and it came a few weeks after we were getting serial killer sex sound And threat crank calls.

                      I got rid of my landline but it took a getting my brain back to stop being afraid.

                      It is interesting because I thought I was afraid because of losing my brain and those things, but I think it was the brain chemistry itself.

                      I am never afraid about things like that now and I can make all of these good decisions.

                      Getting there.

                    2. The man I was afraid of had posted an image which looked like my clothing and I felt so much like he was stalking me.

                      That was years ago now.

                      And, no, that part wasn’t a hallucination.

                      Vegetables have helped me process that nobody on earth knows what to do when some things happen.

                      I didn’t know that then.

                    3. He stalks other vulnerable people and I did contact authorities and I also still do pray for him.

                      But what surprises me is that I think nutrition prevented it from affecting me.

                      Zero PTSD or fear or depression.

                      I thank God daily, but I think he used fruits and vegetables.

                    4. Anyway, not knowing what to do was what was the most terrifying but now that almost never happens.

                      I found experts like Dr Greger.

                    5. I got fooled by him because I thought he cared about children and various special needs groups and I conveyed my emotional gratitude to him and he was with all of these children and all sorts of vulnerable people, but he also is at the very least a porn addict with serial killer fantasies.

                      He taught me that I can be way too naive for modern culture.

                      This is the last one on that topic.

                      I haven’t even thought about it except when Ron and I talked about it a year ago.

                      Mostly, WFPB helps prevent PTSD is what I will say again.

                      It healed social anxiety, too, though it started to come back after I stopped eating broccoli for 6 weeks.

                      These videos are so good for me.

                      I will try to tone down the sharing.

                    6. Sorry again.

                      That was years ago but it was what pushed my brain over the edge.

                      But it was not what caused the brain problems at all.

                      Diet caused it.

                      Me thinking that man was kind-hearted because he seemed to care about homeless people and children was when I started over-analyzing and I lost everybody.

                      Somehow, right this second I have to analyze how to analyze quietly because I like this site and I am not in danger now so I can not know everything again.

        2. Water expands when frozen. I would have thought that freezing grapes would result in them bursting their skins, especially since they are 90% water.

          I have never frozen grapes so perhaps someone could tell me what happens when you do?

          1. Tom, I am in my 70’s, but my mom used to just wash and freeze green grapes in plastic freezer containers when I was a kid. We kids ate them like popsicles. They were EXcellent!!! They didn’t have ice on them or anything, so she must have let them dry off a bit before freezing them.

    2. That is very surprising info about Dunk Donuts coffee… probably cheaper than Starbucks, too! Also, Starbucks is ridiculous enough to charge extra for plant milk instead of dairy! I only know from reading… I don’t buy from any of these places. Good to know for if I did, though. However, for most people, I think the risks of actually buying a donut or other “food” product along with their coffee might outweigh the antioxidants in the coffee, if you think about it.

      1. S,

        I brew my own coffee at home, and have been doing so ever since I lived in Germany more than 30 years ago, where the coffee was fabulous compared to what was made in the US at the time. When I returned, I couldn’t stand the weak, watery, bad flavored beverage sold as coffee here.

        Now I grind my own beans; I’m lucky to live close enough to a store that roasts their beans in-house (actually, the roaster is in the front room; heavenly aromas!!). And I drink my coffee plain — except that I’ve developed a taste for added ginger. So I now add 1/8 teaspoon powdered dried ginger per 8 oz cup.

        I even take my coffee with me, in a 16 oz thermos travel mug that is actually spill proof — as long as I lock the lid properly — and keeps it warm for hours.

        1. Sounds good! I’m like you, I like my coffee strong and freshly ground. I also drink it black but I also liked it with cinnamon when I tried it—the ginger sounds good too!
          The idea of getting good coffee in Germany sounds so appealing, that must have been a pleasant experience all around.

              1. Boy, I will have to bring my cinnamon to work tomorrow.

                I have never been a flavored coffee fan, but cacao and cinnamon sound good and it might help me ditch the plant milk.

  10. If I were Welche’s, instead of reaching for some medical claim, I would have invested my money more strategically. Obviously their juice contains antioxidants, that’s a fact. So I would have funded a study to see what happens when you pair concord grape juice with a standard westernized meal—in other words, an unhealthy meal—vs. water and/or a placebo group and looked for things like DNA protection, blood sugar blunting, antioxidant status (as we know SAD meals actually deplete antioxidants from base line), and things of this nature. So at the end of the study, most likely with some positive outcome or outcomes, I would be able to make a scientifically-backed commercial claim that drinking our juice with meals instead of something else (I probably would have had it compared to other popular juices like apple juice, as well) can improve this or that…

    1. …to see what happens when you pair concord grape juice with a standard westernized meal—in other words, an unhealthy meal—vs. water and/or a placebo group and looked for things like DNA protection, blood sugar blunting, antioxidant status (as we know SAD meals actually deplete antioxidants from base line), and things of this nature…
      ————————————————————————————————————
      Good point post.

      The part I highlight above is along the lines of what I wish NF.o would do. Don’t just give us positive video or negative results… give us the missing element that can somewhat tamp down the damage… other than the stock WFPB solution.

      I think offering additional tweaks to ameliorate the diet negatives could help a lot of people who come here but just can’t go all in on re-inventing themselves.

      1. I agree that kind of info is useful in a lot of ways. There is evidence that helps provide tips like that and general knowledge on how protective and amazing antioxidant-rich plants are, scattered all throughout the site. So it would be doable to pull some of that together for some evidence-based tips. And I’m sure there’s more info on that which hasn’t been reported here (yet, perhaps) our in the scientific realm.

    2. S,

      I was looking at Vitamin D studies today and it has to be so hard to figure out which study to do.

      I am so glad they did the study they did.

      My 90-year old relatives have dementia and they grasped the color thing but Concord grapes aren’t always available.

      My uncle pulled out Welch’s grape jelly and all sorts of things in the red/purple color.

      Cranberry sauce.

      Beets

      Etc.

      He loves grapes, but I watched him eat almost an entire pack of grapes at one sitting.

      That is so expensive.

      1. Expensive, but healthy and nutritious!

        The more studies, the more info and that is a great thing. I’m just saying they had vested interest and it would have been wiser for them to play off of what they already know about grapes (they contain antioxidants) and what has been shown in other studies in including antioxidants, even in juice form, with meals. There would have been some really valuable science-based claims available to them almost guaranteed if they took that route. And I would have enjoyed seeing the results to that as well as I love that kind of insight.

        Thankfully, in regards to brain health, there is so much evidence on blueberries and anthocyanins! Among other things… There are so many great videos here showing how amazing plants are for the brain. One of my favorites is how they impact our brain chemistry in such a positive way as wonderfully shown in Greens Vs. The Blues I believe the video is called.. or something along those lines. Not to mention the zeaxanthina and lutein for eyes and brain and the connection with that… such awesome info here on diet and brain health.

    1. Cool info. I agree they’re surprisingly good together in a salad. I once did a fruity salad with nuts and halved grapes with a homemade raspberry vinaigrette and the red onion slices I added made the salad especially amazing.

  11. Thanks for the recipe, I will give it a try, sounds delicious! Fascinating those synergistic food combinations, to make healthy food even healthier. I use the one from dr. Gregers video about food synergy too, adulki beans and raspberries. And of course the combination steamed broccoli or other sorts of kale with ground mustard seed although that is perhaps not synergy in the true sense of the word. Btw broccoli and tomatoes enhance each other too.

    1. Dan II, That research paper on food combinations producing synergistic or antagonistic effects highlights a whole new area for research. I’ve often wondered what happens when different foods hit the stomach at the same time. Do some combos enhance each other while other combos diminish the effects of each food?

      I know several WFPB docs have mentioned a few of the food combos, such as Dr G and T Colin Campbell, with his book “Whole” Testing all the millions of combinations of foods seems like it would keep researchers busy for the next century!!!

      1. Darwin,

        Yes, testing food combinations would keep researchers busy.

        I would like to know how many foods have their own receptors in our bodies, too.

    2. Thank you, it was! The vinaigrette I actually blended up some whole thawed from frozen raspberries, sweetened with the tiniest bit of agave or maple syrup (a date would probably work) and red wine vinegar. I made it a few times, and I did walnuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds for the nuts (and seeds), all good but I think my favorite in it were the pecans and walnuts.

      Yes I love the whole synergy things, it’s amazing to me and I hope to see more studies showing that on this site—maybe the onions and grapes will make it on here one day. Very cool about broccoli and tomatoes! Thanks for the info, I’ll look into that.

        1. I make chopped veg salads often. Broccoli, cherry tomatoes, green onions or shallots, celery, green beans, artichoke hearts, olives sometimes, chickpeas and cooked rotini or bow tie pasta or whatever. The other is cubed apple, chopped celery, grapes, walnuts, butter lettuce.
          I use an organic raspberry dressing on veg or fruit salads – it’s quite nice

  12. One BIG concern is when we “learn” about the benefits of certain foods and then eat them ALL the time. Eating with the seasons is so important, it is part of our circadian rhythm.
    “Today it’s so easy to transport food long distances that we take it for granted that we can eat fresh berries in January or have avocado toast every day. Yet many of us have no clue when fruits and veggies are actually in season where we live. Foods that are grown and consumed during their appropriate seasons are more nutritionally dense. In a study it was found that broccoli grown during its peak season (hint: fall) had a higher vitamin C content than broccoli grown during the spring.
    When foods are grown out of season, they aren’t able to follow their natural growing and ripening rhythms. In order for certain fruits and vegetables to be available year-round, post-harvest treatments, known as ripening agents, are used. These include chemicals, gases, and heat processes. Some produce is also coated with an edible film to protect it.” https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-4807/10-Reasons-To-Eat-Whats-In-Season.html

    1. That is some interesting stuff, Ruby. But obviously we still need to eat fresh produce throughout the winter because if not, a lot of us wouldn’t even have produce because nothing is locally in season during those parts of the year.

      As for the chemical stuff, that’s some scary info… all the more reason to get organic so as to have more transparency and protection.

      So there’s definitely nothing wrong with eating these healthy foods all year round, but it’s always a good idea to take advantage of the stuff in season. But it is important to have variety. A lot of people will focus on one studied thing and then eat that all the time, which is good, but not eat anything else. And even though every food may not be equal in antioxidant levels, they still have their own unique functions and nutrients and antioxidants, etc.

      1. Ruby,

        That is interesting about broccoli.

        So do you think it is better to not eat produce at all in the Winter?

        I think I am with S on this because for years I ate zero fruits or vegetables particularly in the Winter.

        Less Vitamin C is probably better than none.

        1. “….for years I ate zero fruits or vegetables particularly in the Winter.”
          – – – – –

          It’s amazing how you made such an about-face, Deb! So what DID you eat, other than maybe grains? Or are you saying the no-fruit and veggies took place during your SAD years?

          Mother Nature made so many colorful and delicious fruits and veggies, and which are healthy for us to boot! Look at the vast, creative array! (Thank you Mother Nature!!) I don’t know how anybody like yourself could have had such a disdain for them….and for years, you say!

          I can’t think of any fruit or veggie that I don’t like. (Although, as a kid, I never liked parsnips.)

  13. Off topic: Is this the only way to send a suggestion to Dr. Greger? Can one of the volunteers please pass this message along to Dr. Greger or let me know if there’s an email I should send it to?

    I was just reading more on the devastation of palm oil to wildlife, the planet, and even humans in these areas. Dr. Greger has said here and there that palm oil is worse than even coconut oil making it the worst oil (apart from hydrogenated oils I assume), yet while there are many videos on nutritionfacts that explain why we should not use coconut oil, there are none specific to palm oil, which is even more unhealthy and one of the most environmentally damaging as well as unethical products on the planet. Palm oil isn’t just a bad product, because it’s in so many things hidden or sold by the jar, it’s an epidemic to the animals, the planet, human rights, and human health.

    I am positive that by at least getting the very true science out there in one of Dr. Greger’s extremely effective videos, that it will have a good impact on the fight against this ridiculous product and simultaneously it will bring the much needed awareness to people and their personal health as this oil is touted as being a health food. The palm oil industry is pretty serious stuff… they make fake sustainability claims… they made up their own little “roundtable” spiel to do it, they work with corrupt organizations such as WWF, they even have false “conservation” groups out there which actively promote the continued manufacturing of palm oil using the same trophy hunting spiel: kill to protect. It’s truly a sickening epidemic and this industry not only doesn’t care about the animals or the planet or the native peoples, but they also couldn’t care less about the health of consumers. Dr. Greger, PLEASE consider doing a video or series of videos on palm oil. It would be one of your most valuable videos yet.

    1. S

      That is a good topic and I would love to see the environmental impact and health together.

      Seems like a lot of the vegan junk food uses it.

      It might help that community be more motivated to go oil-free.

      I have been buying an oat milk and they added one category with oil and my grocery store stocked that instead of the oil-free one I buy.

      I looked at the other 4 brands of oat milk and they all had oil.

      I have talked to a store employee, but they are going to get me to make my own.

      1. Deb,

        I agree, I would love to see the environmental and health impact together as well, that is what I’m hoping for should he do a video or series on palm oil.

        Yes, the vegan junk food and even a lot of vegan cosmetics and other products use palm oil. There are actually a lot of vegans, such as myself, who understand the massive direct cruelty and exploitation of the animals as well as the indirect horrific devastation to the animals over the production of palm oil, making us adamantly reject it as a “vegan” product… not enough, though, unfortunately. And this kind of thinking did me favors even before I was health conscious because I avoided A LOT of palm oil due to it as well as palmitate which is another topic worthy of discussion in and of itself over its potential adverse health effects. So it definitely helped me to reduce some of my oil consumption or at least my saturated fat-laden oil consumption without me even realizing it.

        It’s good you reached out to the store, consumer demand is a powerful thing so when people speak out and make requests, etc., it accumulate and makes a difference. I’m not sure if the store will oblige, but at least you said something and thankfully there seems to be a lot of oat milk recipes out there–it seemed pretty easy to make from what I gathered.

  14. I just did a quick search on this site for “grapes,” and there are a lot of positives shown in studies about them. A good reminder not to throw the baby out with the bath water just because one study or certain studies doesn’t show significant results. There is a lot of data out there. It’s good to look at the collective rather than focus on only one thing.

    1. The benefits would most likely be found in all grapes, and most likely all other fruits and vegetables as well. Its not like there is any evidence whatsoever that any particular plant food has astonishingly amazing clinically proven benefits over any other plant food.

      1. What are you talking about, Ben? I get what you’re saying to some degree for sure, but there is tons of data showing specific and profound health benefits for specific plant foods, like literally presented on this site.

  15. Dr. Greger–we LOVE your work and your website and have purchased multiple copies of your books for friend and family. However, your new format for videos is VERY distracting. You are in the video while at the same time trying to show us research papers and major points. It doesn’t work. A person can’t focus
    on two competing things. The old format was much better–when you were the voice in the background and the research and conclusions were the major focus
    on the screen. You are famous, we get that–but the new format of showing you give the mini lecture while all the research flashes by, just doesn’t work. We’ve started to just listen to the video’s audio and forget about viewing it altogether. So why not just do an audio podcast instead and not waste time with a video? Would love a response. Maybe folks in their 20’s don’t mind the competing distractions but when you get into your 50’s it takes longer to process all this information whizzing by while you appear on the screen. Thanks

    1. S P, under the video are an array of 5 stars. To show your disapproval of the format, check the 1 star. For flashback Fridays, check the 5 star button to show approval.

    2. s. p, others have commented on this as well. It’s not just for those people in their 50’s—I find it distracting as well because it obviously is impossible to fully focus on two separate things at once and the movement and such is much more eye-drawing than the clips of data.

  16. Gobsmacked Dr G didn’t mention anything about the (neuro)toxicity and hormone disruption of artificial flavors and colors, and artificial sweeteners, and whatever other garbage is typically in this experiment’s “control group…”

    I’m all about phytonutrients and nutraceuticals but the difference to cognition simply between pure and (relatively) natural, and synthetic purple flavored dreck… surprised it wasn’t worse. Or called out…(?)

  17. So, I am in Costa Rica, and there are no Concord Grapes here, but our friends at Welch’s DO so kindly ship HFCS sweetened grape jelly here.

    I am typically using about a heaping tablespoon on my oatmeal on tha days I have it. I have been willing to trade off the HFCS for the antioxidant benefits in general, given that the rest of my diet is HFCS free and whole foods.

    Anyone have a good rationale, maybe even some scientific basis for whether Welch’s Concord Grape Jelly is either a good or bad deal, nutritionally? I do note that it is roughly half the cost per ounce of other jellies, and we know to regard, for example, strawberry as dangerouis. Mora, the Costa Rican blackberry, I like, too, but Welch’s at half the price is what I usually buy.

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