Meat May Exceed Daily Allowance of Irony

Meat May Exceed Daily Allowance of Irony
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The foreign meat molecule Neu5Gc may not only contribute to the progression of cancer and heart disease by supplying inflammation, but may also set children up for life-threatening reactions to E. coli toxins originating in the same animal products.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Beyond the putative role of nonhuman NeuGC as a potential molecular link between diet, autoreactive antibodies, and the progression of human cancer, let me offer one final tidbit on the evolving NeuGc story: the potentially deadly toxin produced by E. coli O157:H7—that causes the hemolytic uremic syndrome that can shut down the kidneys of children—actually attaches to NeuGc.

When we eat animal products, the “assimilation of dietary Neu5Gc creates high-affinity receptors on [the] human gut [lining] and kidney [blood vessels]…” conferring susceptibility to the gastrointestinal and systemic toxicities” of the E. coli toxin.

“Ironically, the [same] foods rich in NeuGC are the most common source of…contamination [with these toxin-producing E. coli].” So, meat provides us with the receptors to the very toxins the meat may contain. It’s like a gunman handing us our own bullseye.

So, there are both long- and short-term consequences. “Taken together, these findings suggest a ‘two-hit’ process in the pathogenesis of human [E. coli]-induced disease. First, humans eat Neu5Gc-rich food, leading to incorporation of Neu5Gc on the surfaces of…[their] cells. Second, when exposed to a [toxin]-producing strain, the toxin produced would be able to bind to the intestinal epithelial cells, perhaps causing acute gastrointestinal symptoms, and eventually damaging endothelial cells in other organs like the kidney, thereby causing HUS.”

“Neu5Gc-rich foods not only sensitizes human tissues to [the toxin], but also simultaneously increases the likelihood of infection with [toxin producing E. coli]. These pathogens are usually found in the intestines of livestock…” and, as such, “most commonly enter the human food chain by fecal contamination… Thus, those who consume large amounts of these types of foods may be unwittingly preparing their bodies for damage by a [toxin]-producing organism that contaminates their next meal of the very same food types.”

The researchers ask: is this “Poetic justice for…meat eaters?” Not when it’s “a major cause of acute [life-threatening kidney] failure in children.

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Images thanks to Tebu.an via Wikimedia, and Rusty Clark via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Beyond the putative role of nonhuman NeuGC as a potential molecular link between diet, autoreactive antibodies, and the progression of human cancer, let me offer one final tidbit on the evolving NeuGc story: the potentially deadly toxin produced by E. coli O157:H7—that causes the hemolytic uremic syndrome that can shut down the kidneys of children—actually attaches to NeuGc.

When we eat animal products, the “assimilation of dietary Neu5Gc creates high-affinity receptors on [the] human gut [lining] and kidney [blood vessels]…” conferring susceptibility to the gastrointestinal and systemic toxicities” of the E. coli toxin.

“Ironically, the [same] foods rich in NeuGC are the most common source of…contamination [with these toxin-producing E. coli].” So, meat provides us with the receptors to the very toxins the meat may contain. It’s like a gunman handing us our own bullseye.

So, there are both long- and short-term consequences. “Taken together, these findings suggest a ‘two-hit’ process in the pathogenesis of human [E. coli]-induced disease. First, humans eat Neu5Gc-rich food, leading to incorporation of Neu5Gc on the surfaces of…[their] cells. Second, when exposed to a [toxin]-producing strain, the toxin produced would be able to bind to the intestinal epithelial cells, perhaps causing acute gastrointestinal symptoms, and eventually damaging endothelial cells in other organs like the kidney, thereby causing HUS.”

“Neu5Gc-rich foods not only sensitizes human tissues to [the toxin], but also simultaneously increases the likelihood of infection with [toxin producing E. coli]. These pathogens are usually found in the intestines of livestock…” and, as such, “most commonly enter the human food chain by fecal contamination… Thus, those who consume large amounts of these types of foods may be unwittingly preparing their bodies for damage by a [toxin]-producing organism that contaminates their next meal of the very same food types.”

The researchers ask: is this “Poetic justice for…meat eaters?” Not when it’s “a major cause of acute [life-threatening kidney] failure in children.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Tebu.an via Wikimedia, and Rusty Clark via flickr

Doctor's Note

This is the final installment of my video series that began with Cancer as an Autoimmune Disease, the mystery for which may have been solved with How Tumors Use Meat to Grow: Xeno-Autoantibodies. Neu5Gc may also play a role in heart disease (see Nonhuman Molecules Lining Our Arteries) and inflammatory arthritis (see The Inflammatory Meat Molecule Neu5Gc). However, this understanding requires some background on how our immune systems work, which is explained in Clonal Selection Theory of Immunity and Clonal Deletion Theory of Immunity. For more on E. coli, see Fecal Bacteria Survey and Chicken Out of UTIs.

For further context, check out my associated blog posts: Plant-Based Diets for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Probiotics and Diarrhea.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

4 responses to “Meat May Exceed Daily Allowance of Irony

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  1. If a person becomes a strict vegan, would the offending substance/receptor that “attracts” the Ecoli/toxin be cleared from their system? And, were the folks who got Ecoli sickness in the recent past– from say spinach contaminated or fertilized with manuer– Vegan, non-vegan or both?




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  2. My friend got these bacteria during an epidemia in Germany by eating contaminated mungo sprouts. The doctors were very surprised that she had no problems with her kidneys at all. After viewing this video we know why the infection hit her only mildly — she is vegan. Thanks for the information!




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