SAD States: Standard American Diet State-By-State Comparison

SAD States: Standard American Diet State-By-State Comparison
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The Standard American Diet is worsening, and falls far from the CDC goals for minimal fruit and vegetable intake, with some states doing worse than others.

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The Standard American Diet is in a sad state, but sadder in some states than others. The CDC recently released a survey to chart our progress on fruit and vegetable consumption, and, if you can even imagine, we’re eating even fewer fruits and vegetables than we were a decade ago. Not a single state met the goals they were hoping for, but one, and only one, state did make an improvement, at least. Can you guess which one?

Here’s all 50. Note the deepest darkest color represents 35%-44.9%. So, not a single state even hit 50% for eating two fruit a day, with Oklahoma doing the worst. And for vegetables? Not one state even had a third of their population eating three daily servings of vegetables. And less than one in five people in South Dakota.

The CDC goal was to get all states up to 75% eating servings of fruits, and 50% veggies, by 2010. And, not even close. And those eating both? Forget about it—though I am impressed with New Englanders and their fruit.

Caucasians ate the least fruit; Hispanics the least vegetables. And the one state, the only state to improve over the decade? Idaho, which just made it to blue.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Serena Mylchreest.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Deimos3024 via Wikimedia Commons, and Ali Karimian, and Roco Julie via flickr.

The Standard American Diet is in a sad state, but sadder in some states than others. The CDC recently released a survey to chart our progress on fruit and vegetable consumption, and, if you can even imagine, we’re eating even fewer fruits and vegetables than we were a decade ago. Not a single state met the goals they were hoping for, but one, and only one, state did make an improvement, at least. Can you guess which one?

Here’s all 50. Note the deepest darkest color represents 35%-44.9%. So, not a single state even hit 50% for eating two fruit a day, with Oklahoma doing the worst. And for vegetables? Not one state even had a third of their population eating three daily servings of vegetables. And less than one in five people in South Dakota.

The CDC goal was to get all states up to 75% eating servings of fruits, and 50% veggies, by 2010. And, not even close. And those eating both? Forget about it—though I am impressed with New Englanders and their fruit.

Caucasians ate the least fruit; Hispanics the least vegetables. And the one state, the only state to improve over the decade? Idaho, which just made it to blue.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Serena Mylchreest.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Deimos3024 via Wikimedia Commons, and Ali Karimian, and Roco Julie via flickr.

Doctor's Note

How S.A.D. is the Standard American Diet? Check out Nation’s Diet in Crisis, and Calculate Your Healthy Eating Score. Even small tweaks can dramatically boost the antioxidant power of one’s meals. See Antioxidants in a Pinch, and A Better Breakfast. And check out all my other videos on fruits, and all my other videos on vegetables. Note in the Sources Cited section (above) that the papers are available “open access,” which means freely available to the public at no cost.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

 

14 responses to “SAD States: Standard American Diet State-By-State Comparison

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  1. How S.A.D. is the Standard American Diet? Check out Nation’s Diet in Crisis and Calculate Your Healthy Eating Score. Even small tweaks can dramatically boost the antioxidant power of one’s meals. See Antioxidants in a Pinch and A Better Breakfast. There are dozens more videos on fruits and vegetables and hundreds of videos on more than a thousand other topics. Note in the Sources Cited section that all of the papers are available “open access,” which means freely available to the public at no cost.




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    1. I can’t tell you just how SAD I feel everyday at the office.  But my patients are changing for the better.  With good information and great resources like NutritionFacts.org and NutritionMD.org, patients are finally having the daily support and education they need in continuing their lifestyle change and watching their chronic diseases stop, reverse and even disappear!!
      So maybe I don’t need counseling for my SAD feelings yet ;-}.  I’ll keep using Plants as my therapy and, of course, NutritionFacts.org. 




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  2. What to do? Maybe start nutrition classes in elementary school…? But then if parent or parents don’t know about it, poor little child still has no recourse and is at the mercy of what parent provides for food. Very SAD, indeed!




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  3. Interestingly, looking at the study, women are doing 8-9% better than men in getting both fruits and vegetables, and it seems the farther people have pursued formal education, the more likely they are to eat more vegetables.




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    1. I have also heard that women live longer. Related? I wonder if the whole women thing could be generalized to “People who cook eat more vegetables than people who don’t cook.”




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  4. I am MD living in Denmark and I am very interested in the relationship between disease and diet. I think science speaks loud and clear and MD `s like Michael Greger is doing a wonderfull job trying to bring out the message. But a lot of people just don`t get it. I have close relatives who are intelligent people; despite hypertension, diabetes, bypass surgery, high cholesterol, atrial flutter, obesity etc they keep eating butter, cheese, meat, oils, eggs and expect a pill to cure a disease. I have spent hours telling them about diet and disease, but they dont get it. They think I am a fanatic. After last visit they grabbed a burger on the way home. We have a long way….

       




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    1. Have them watch “Forks Over Knives” (Is it in Danish?)  That will give them a basic level of knowledge, make them think, and will eliminate you from being “The Fanatic” with crazy ideas.  The trick is to give the Documentary to their friends, then have them give it to your relatives.  Good Luck!




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  5.  Simple solution – instead of subsidizing animal foods & corn syrups we should tax these unhealthy foods so a bag of chips cost $15 and turn the taxes towards subsidizing healthy foods so a bell pepper costs $0.10… if a hamburger cost $25 or $30 people would eat a lot less of them and they’d eat a lot more fruit & veggies if they were super cheap. This would be a very effective health care plan (but the people would protest and anti-government hatred would grow out of control, unfortunately…)




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    1. Price regulates behavior, so the idea is not all bad. A little less extreme and it would have an effect without “riots”. When my 6 years old son watches a commercial with a burger he says “yummy!” – Banning commercials with unhealthy food? Too extreme? Having your chest opened and your heart exposed and stopped (by-pass surgery!) leaving you with risk of minor brain-damage is extreme!




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  6. Can’t win against capitalism. They want most people to eat shit so that is the way it is gonna be.. unless you have an education in it – hopefully more people look at this web site. Or have the energy to even think about thier diet at all. capitalism works you to the brink sometiems they gotta eat what is easy… I don;t blame them. I blame the system.




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    1. You would have been happier in the former USSR.
      No capitalism but lots of food lines unless you were a higher up party boss, which i am sure you could have been. The people didnt have the luxury to worry about how many fruits or veggies-they just hoped for a full belly.




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