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green tea

Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages we can drink, with antibacterial, antitoxin, antiviral, antifungal, anti-cancer, and reduced all-cause mortality benefits (although hibiscus tea may actually have more antioxidants). Green tea vs. other good teas. Green tea may also reduce nausea, pain, and stress and help prevent nitrate to nitrite conversion. Tea may even positively affect our mind.

Drinking coffee is also health-promoting, though green tea is better. But adding cow’s milk or soy milk to tea may compromise some of the beneficial effects. About 10 cups of tea a day is probably the safe upper limit.

Matcha tea (powdered green tea leaves) is likely the healthiest form, but if brewing instead, cold steeping may actually be best.

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