Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?

Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?
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The tea plant concentrates aluminum from the soil into tea leaves, but phytonutrients in tea bind to the metal and limit its absorption.

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Aluminum is the third most abundant element on Earth, and may not be good for our brain, something we learned studying foundry workers exposed to high levels. Though the role of aluminum in the development of brain diseases like Alzheimer’s is controversial, to be prudent, steps should probably be taken to lessen human exposure to this metal.

There are a number of aluminum-containing drugs on the market like antacids that have the highest levels, though aluminum compounds are also added to processed foods as anti-caking agents in like pancake mix, melting agents in American cheese, meat binders, gravy thickeners, rising agents in some baking powders, and dye-binders in candy. So it’s better to stick to unprocessed, natural foods. However if you cook those natural foods in an aluminum pot, a significant amount can leach into the food, compared to cooking in stainless steel.

If you do the same thing with tea, though, you get a few milligrams of aluminum regardless of what type of pot you use, suggesting the aluminum is in the tea itself. And indeed back in the 1950s, it was noticed that tea plants tend suck up aluminum from the soil, but like anything it’s the dose that makes the poison. According to the World Health Organization, the provisional tolerable weekly intake—our best guess at a safety limit for aluminum, is 2 mg per healthy kilogram of body weight per week, which is nearly a milligram per pound, so someone who’s around 150 pounds probably shouldn’t ingest more than 20 mg of aluminum per day, up to a fifth of intake may come from beverages so what we drink probably shouldn’t contribute more than about 4mg a day, which is the amount found in about 5 cups of green, black, or oolong tea. So should we not drink more than 5 cups of tea a day?

Well, it’s not what we eat or drink, it’s what we absorb. If you just measured how much aluminum was in tea, it would seem as though a couple cups could double aluminum intake for the day, but if you measure the level of aluminum in people’s bodies after they drink tea, it doesn’t go up. This suggests that the bioavailability of aluminum in tea is low, possibly because most of the extractable aluminum in brewed tea is strongly bound to large phytonutrients that are not easily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, so it just passes right through you without actually getting into your body. Probably more than 90% of the aluminum in tea is bound up.

But what about studies like this showing a large spike in aluminum excretion through the urine after drinking tea compared to water? The only way for something to get from our mouth to our bladder is to first be absorbed into our bloodstream, but they weren’t comparing the same quantity of tea to water. They had the study subject chug down about 8 and a half cups of tea, or just drink water at their leisure, so they peed a lot more with the tea, so the aluminum content was no different tea versus water, suggesting that gross aluminum absorption from tea is unlikely and that only little aluminum is potentially available for absorption.

So though as few as 4 cups of tea could provide 100% of one’s daily aluminum limit, the percentage available for absorption in the intestine may be less than 10%. Therefore, it is unlikely that moderate amounts of tea drinking can have any harmful effects on humans. However, that’s for people with normal aluminum excretion. For example, tea may not be a good beverage for children with kidney failure, since they can’t get rid of aluminum as efficiently. For most people, though, tea shouldn’t be a problem. Though if you drink tea out of a can, buy undented cans, as the aluminum in dented cans can leach into the liquid boosting aluminum levels by a factor of 8 sitting on store shelves for a year.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to AGX via Flickr.

Aluminum is the third most abundant element on Earth, and may not be good for our brain, something we learned studying foundry workers exposed to high levels. Though the role of aluminum in the development of brain diseases like Alzheimer’s is controversial, to be prudent, steps should probably be taken to lessen human exposure to this metal.

There are a number of aluminum-containing drugs on the market like antacids that have the highest levels, though aluminum compounds are also added to processed foods as anti-caking agents in like pancake mix, melting agents in American cheese, meat binders, gravy thickeners, rising agents in some baking powders, and dye-binders in candy. So it’s better to stick to unprocessed, natural foods. However if you cook those natural foods in an aluminum pot, a significant amount can leach into the food, compared to cooking in stainless steel.

If you do the same thing with tea, though, you get a few milligrams of aluminum regardless of what type of pot you use, suggesting the aluminum is in the tea itself. And indeed back in the 1950s, it was noticed that tea plants tend suck up aluminum from the soil, but like anything it’s the dose that makes the poison. According to the World Health Organization, the provisional tolerable weekly intake—our best guess at a safety limit for aluminum, is 2 mg per healthy kilogram of body weight per week, which is nearly a milligram per pound, so someone who’s around 150 pounds probably shouldn’t ingest more than 20 mg of aluminum per day, up to a fifth of intake may come from beverages so what we drink probably shouldn’t contribute more than about 4mg a day, which is the amount found in about 5 cups of green, black, or oolong tea. So should we not drink more than 5 cups of tea a day?

Well, it’s not what we eat or drink, it’s what we absorb. If you just measured how much aluminum was in tea, it would seem as though a couple cups could double aluminum intake for the day, but if you measure the level of aluminum in people’s bodies after they drink tea, it doesn’t go up. This suggests that the bioavailability of aluminum in tea is low, possibly because most of the extractable aluminum in brewed tea is strongly bound to large phytonutrients that are not easily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, so it just passes right through you without actually getting into your body. Probably more than 90% of the aluminum in tea is bound up.

But what about studies like this showing a large spike in aluminum excretion through the urine after drinking tea compared to water? The only way for something to get from our mouth to our bladder is to first be absorbed into our bloodstream, but they weren’t comparing the same quantity of tea to water. They had the study subject chug down about 8 and a half cups of tea, or just drink water at their leisure, so they peed a lot more with the tea, so the aluminum content was no different tea versus water, suggesting that gross aluminum absorption from tea is unlikely and that only little aluminum is potentially available for absorption.

So though as few as 4 cups of tea could provide 100% of one’s daily aluminum limit, the percentage available for absorption in the intestine may be less than 10%. Therefore, it is unlikely that moderate amounts of tea drinking can have any harmful effects on humans. However, that’s for people with normal aluminum excretion. For example, tea may not be a good beverage for children with kidney failure, since they can’t get rid of aluminum as efficiently. For most people, though, tea shouldn’t be a problem. Though if you drink tea out of a can, buy undented cans, as the aluminum in dented cans can leach into the liquid boosting aluminum levels by a factor of 8 sitting on store shelves for a year.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to AGX via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

What about the levels and absorbability of the aluminum in my other favorite type of tea? Find out in my next video, How Much Hibiscus Tea is Too Much?

The tea plant also sucks up fluoride. So much so that heavy tea drinking can stain the teeth of children. See my video Childhood Tea Drinking May Increase Fluorosis Risk.

Why should we go out of our way to drink tea? See:

Is Caffeinated Tea Dehydrating? Find out by watching the video!

For more on metals in our food supply, see:

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

60 responses to “Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?

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  1. Very concerning to me. Maybe our GI tract does not absorb the aluminum, but i wonder what other effects (detrimental) this known/factual/established aluminum in tea could have on other body organs, systems as it passes out of the body.




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    1. I share your concerns, but for the time being I’m still going to drink my tea. So far, it sounds like the benefits of tea, which are many, outweigh the risks, especially if the aluminum in tea does not reach the brain but is released in the urine. That being said, I would like to see more research done on this topic and am eager to learn of new findings as soon as they’re available. So thank you for sharing your concerns with Dr. G; I second them.




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    2. Dr. Neal Barnard, in his book “Power Foods for the Brain,” also discusses the controversial topic of aluminum and Alzheimer’s disease. How does aluminum potentially get to the brain? Are there any ways of possibly chelating aluminum?




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  2. There is a little typo in one of the authors name of the sources linked (it’s the first that appear on the video): “Tamljenovic” instead of “Tomljenovic”

    I already knew the author but for another highly controversial field that everyone could easily understand looking at other studies from her:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Tomljenovic%20L%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=21157018

    Unfortunately i do not cover this topic yet.




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    1. According to Dr. Russell Blaylock, retired board certified neurosurgeon and current nutritional advisor, “One test using eight normal men found that addition of citrate to the oral dose of aluminum hydroxide gel (found in most antacids) could increase aluminum absorption by as much as elevenfold. This is important to remember when you are drinking tea, which can contain high levels of aluminum. If you squeeze a little lemon (high in citric acid) in your tea, you will greatly increase the aluminum absorption.” This is from page 148 of his book, “Health and Nutrition Secrets that can Save Your Life.” For all you reference junkies out there, the study of the eight men mentioned above is from this study: Coburn JW, Mischel MG, et al. Calcium citrate markedly enhances aluminum absorption from aluminum hydroxide. Am J Kidney Dis 17(1991): 708-711. So the unanswered question this brings up is will the citrate be powerful enough to draw the aluminum away from the organic binders it is attached to in the tea and enhance its aborption in vivo? Blaylock devotes over 10 pages of his book to aluminum and its toxic effects on the brain. I, for one, am not a tea drinker. If I want the EGCG found in tea, I’ll just take an extact thank you.




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      1. Adding lemon juice, an acid, to an antacid is nonsensical in normal consumption of the antacid . As part of an experiment, well it’s not necessarily going to tell you anything about normal consumption.

        Given that the stomach contains hydrochloric acid, that the aluminum in tea is excreted by the body with minimal absorption, I would be more concerned that adding lemon juice to my tea might lead to softening of tooth enamel. Or that an extract from tea concentrated bioavailable metals or other poisons.




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  3. Regarding foodsafety, aluminium is the least of my worries. On behalf of the average consumer, I am more worried about dioxin, growth hormone, methylmercury, PCB, flame retardants, prescription drugs (like prozac in fish around NY), listeria, salmonella, cholesterol, E. coli, saturated fat and antibiotics in eggs, milk, fish and meat.




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    1. Most of what concerns you “on behalf of the American consumer” can be avoided simply by not eating meat and dairy. The one-to-five pounds of food we consume daily is our most risky exposure (and most deadly) to the environment. In fact, Industry goes out of it’s way, it seems, to maximize the risk by adding chemicals and drugs to our food supply. The antibodies fed to animals to cause rapid growth on less feed creates superbugs medicine can’t combat. Are medical doctors speaking out about the practice of contaminating our food?
      Dr. Greger’s video exposes the presence of contaminants by revealing so many “pneumonic” or misleading names the element “aluminum” hides behind. To avoid flame retardants read the label on the furnishings you bring into your home. Dr. Greger can’t cover all these assaults on our health in one short video.




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    2. Correct me if I am wrong, but you are vegan, no? If so, the fish in NY are not your concern, nor the saturated fats in eggs
      milk fish and meat. I mention this cause most of us here are vegan, and their seems to be some major issues with vegan foods that serve us all here as well. Hopefully the good Dr. G will continue to explore these plant foods (and drinks), and dive into the nightshade issue (so many people get off pain meds, apparently, when they abstain), as well as dive into some of the other issues
      out their such as salicylate sensitivity, FODMAPS, SCD-VEGAN-DIET, and much more. Just my thoughts, and I LOVE your posts, but at the end of the day one has to preserve their own health, if they want to be of help to others, and as a vegan I’d sure like to expand my knowledge base of how the plant foods might be negatively affecting me.




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        1. The “threat” is big business with its freedom of choice to manufacture the cheapest, most profitable food (and other products) possible regardless of the consequence to you and me. . All those contaminants don’t just appear in our food. Someone chooses to put them there. That someone is the threat. Very unhealthy atrocities are committed against American consumers under the guise of “free enterprise”. We are so far removed from our food source it’s unthinkable. Just recently an elderly woman in the produce section of my grocery store ask me what I had in my hand and how do I cook it? I was holding a beet.

          It started so innocently. First they removed the “germ” (oil) from wheat so it would not spoil on the grocers’ shelf. They weren’t totally aware the nutritional part of the wheat was what they removed. The remaining lifeless white flour won’t even support insect life. The removed wheat germ was packages and sold as a nutritional supplements for much more profit that the original wheat grain it was taken from. Today, much of what we eat is broken down that way and the food components are marketed for greater profits than the whole food can demand. Other manufacturing industries have scraps of every kind remaining after their manufacturing process. those scraps are used as cheap fillers in our food. The progression to processed foods happened over decades in small increments until today, our economy is based on utilizing whatever scraps are available as food.

          The last one hundred years is nothing more than an experiment using humans as test subjects. Our descendants will study this moment in the history of mankind and wonder, “What were they thinking?”




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      1. A contaminated food supply should be everyone’s concern. Because it isn’t everyone’s concern, the handful of billionaires who own much of the food processing business get to decide what goes in our food. Their choice is based on what maximizes shelf life and profits. The comedian summed it up when he noted we have artificial lemon in lemon pie and real lemon in dishwashing soap. Of the hundreds (or thousands) of components that make up a plant’s nutritional value, only a few give it it’s flavor. Chemists have isolated those chemicals and it’s cheaper to flavor with them than for the billionaires to buy the food with the flavor already there. It sells so well in the U.S.A. they are exporting their concoctions to other countries. Someday, humans worldwide, may think like Americans, “illness is normal”.




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    3. Planstrongdoc: Once again, you do a great job of putting a topic in perspective. I think this video was needed because so many people have posted a concern about aluminum and tea. However, in the big picture, this is really a tiny issue as you pointed out. It is important that tea not become yet another distracting issue from the very serious food issues facing our society. Thanks for your post. I found it helpful in putting the issue in perspective.




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      1. Can you imagine the headlines in inferior newspapers: Dont drink tea – it is filled with aluminium (drink milk instead, it makes your bones and body strong!)
        Some time ago a story (I think it was from England) hit the news – a child got seriously ill because of an inadequate (B12, vitamin D, protein, calcium) vegan diet. You can imagine the headlines in the news!
        I see no headlines regarding parents feeding their kids all kinds of junk – burgers, pizza, candy, chips, soft drinks, strange breakfast products, no vegetables, no fruit, no legumes – making their children fat, sickly, diabetic, hypertensive and actually reducing their lifespan!




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        1. “Parents” aren’t as sophisticated as media, advertising, and the industrial food giants who brow beat them to feed their children meat and dairy.. Parents obediently listen to their family doctors so get little, if any, beneficial nutritional information. When medical doctors stop scapegoating their patients and act responsibly, the parents will accept their doctors’ words. There’s too much profit in sick people for most doctors to actually follow the Hippocratic oath.

          Tell a typical American parent “meat and dairy are harmful” and they think you are nuts. Only when they hear that message consistently from medical doctors, media, and government will they accept the science. As is, those authoritarian figures give parents (and all Americans) permission to eat unhealthy food under the guise, “everything in moderation”, which each parent defines as whatever they put in their mouth.

          Your “ill vegan child” story was the direct result of medical manipulation of the facts. What medical doctor challenged that nonsense? When good men who know the truth don’t stand up and voice the truth then the truth doesn’t matter.




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    4. With a history of hairy cell leukemia and hemochromatosis both diagnosed in 1994, my 69 year old husband, now has decreased brain volume. He worked at every “brownfield” site in Massachusetts and I often wonder if that was/is connected to his evolving neurological deterioration from accumulation of toxins in his 20’s, 30’s, early 40’s. He also served on an aircraft carrier right out of high school. I’ve been trying to get him to take tannin products when he eats his meals because i was told tannin block over over absorption of iron. I cannot get him to stop alcohol and read meat. Help!




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    1. Hi K.J. There is aluminum in coffee. Research Chris Exley’s group of scientist from the Keele University. Might find it in Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. Liver is where most of the aluminum stores. Do not ever use antiperspirants or crystal style deodorant as they prevent the body from excreting yhe aluminum salts from our lymphatic system. If you use them have a Thermograpy scan taken of the armpit and see what the effects are, especially on the non dominate arm.




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  4. Hi Dr. Michael, I have just listened to the aluminum in tea clip and was wondering if you have or know of any research done on the aluminum content in Red Tea. The South African “Rooi Bos Tea” ?




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    1. This study found low levels of aluminum in rooibos infusions, only 13% as much as in Assam teas, which happens to be the main component of most U.S/British black teas. Some abbreviated results (in mg/L brewed):

      Black Assam 1.73
      Black Darjeeling 0.248
      Green Gunpowder 0.804
      Oolong 0.602
      White 0.148
      Columbian Arabica coffee 0.205
      Yerba Mate 0.220
      Red Rooibos 0.237
      Chamomile 0.292




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  5. Dr. Greger, thank you so much for doing this video. As you have seen, many people have raised the concern of aluminum and tea. It put the question in my head. Is tea really safe? I’m happy to have this answer.

    I was also very interested in the very last line about eating food from cans. The question would apply not just be tea, but any food in a can, I would guess. And the issue about not getting a dented can is very interesting. I would expect about the same amount of leaching whether the can was dented or not. I learned several somethings today.




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    1. Yes, this is very scary. Most people I know have no idea whether or not their bodies properly eliminate aluminum. We all seem to be assuming we have these great systems that are able to safely excrete without absorbing. And to to think of all the kids who have no idea whether there little bodies are absorbing aluminum from tea – all these flavored tea drinks parents give their kids (hello caffeine!). Let’s all stick to plain old water and eat our fruit and veggies.




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      1. Nancygal: I agree with you that it would be great if kids rarely drank those sugary and chemical laden drinks masquerading as “tea”. However, I walked away from this video with a completely different bottom line. Based on all of the great health benefits of green tea and the minimal risks as we learned in this video, I would try hook as many healthy kids as I can on real green tea. I wouldn’t replace all water with green tea. But I would definitely work to get kids to develop a taste for the good stuff.




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    2. As a chemical and materials engineer who completed all the course work for a PhD in metallurgy, the elevated metal leaching from a dented can makes total sense. At the risk of going Full-Pocket-Protector on y’all, the dented area stretches and thins the thin film of protective aluminum oxide that is present on any aluminum exposed to oxygen. That thin film of aluminum oxide is usually impenetrable to more oxygen and so the corrosion stops and the metal is protected… same mechanism that protects stainless steel.

      Additionally, the deformed area in the dent creates a region of metal that is thermodynamically more energetic and accordingly more inclined to corrode than the undeformed area.

      As an experiment, bend a steel can, put it in water, and you’ll see that the corrosion occurs on the bent region at a much higher rate than the rest of the can.




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      1. As a practical matter, it’s not likely a dented aluminum can of tea will set on a grocer’s shelf fore a year while eight times the aluminum “leaches” into the tea. Shelf space is expensive. A faster seller would quickly replace it.

        My old metallurgy professor would tell you aluminum oxide only forms in the presence of “moist air”. The inside surface of aluminum cans are sprayed with a coating to protect the contents from the metal. The aluminum isn’t exposed to air, moist air, or even liquid, normally. The elasticity of aluminum is likely greater than the elasticity of the coating so any dent stretching the aluminum will cause the coating to flake off microscopically exposing the aluminum, a highly active metal, to be reactive to the tea.

        Aluminum and steel cans have very different properties. I wouldn’t conclude what happens to bent steel will be reproduced with spray coated aluminum cans. Welds also rust first on steel. The aluminum oxide protects aluminum from further deterioration. Rust is iron oxide, the result of steel exposed to moist oxygen. Unlike aluminum oxidation, the chemical reaction continues until the steel is consumed, like a log reduced to ashes by a fire.

        What this study tells me is the protective coating isn’t 100% protective, even in an undented can. Since aluminum isn’t normally found in the human body I might want to brew my own tea and drink from a glass.




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      2. RalphRhineau: That’s a great explanation. I really appreciate it. It makes perfect sense too. Thanks for taking the time to explain in terms that would make sense to someone who does not have a PhD in metallurgy. :-)




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  6. My own experience is that stainless steel can cause problems too. I was eating from an old stainless steel plate and could taste a metallic taste. Persistent sores also developed in my mouth, which also swelled up. Once I stop eating from the plate, the sores went away along with skin rashes.




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  7. someone mention lemon with tea will boost absortion ten times.

    there is 2 related extension to this.

    1. what about if u take lemon at different time from the tea ? Will the mixture be equally dangerous ?

    2 what about other fruits similar to lemon like oranges or most other fruits which are acidic ?




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    1. Hi there Hollywood Resident, I’m sorry to hear that you had difficulty hearing this video. I’m thinking that there might be an issue with your computer speakers or the volume control at the bottom of the video. I’d be happy to walk you through adjusting those controls if you wanted to send me an email at Tommasina@nutritionfacts.org. Thanks for getting in touch!




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        1. I’m a little confused as to why you think that. Could you tell me, please, how this video’s sound differs from other videos? I can hear all of them well on my end but I’d like to understand what you’re experiencing in case other visitors are also experiencing it. Thanks!




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          1. If you know sound technology, and I use microphones all the time, you can tell instantly why the sound on many of the Dr’s videos changes, and why the Tea video sound is particularly bad. If I unplugged my speakers, the computers tiny little speakers might thin the sound out a bit, but a lot of the words will still be unrecognizable. What probably occurred was the Dr’s mouth was too close to the mic, so distortion in low register happens and/or if they were using a sound mixer to regulate the mic inputs it was set with overload in the bass levels. It’s pretty obvious even to a listener who knows nothing about sound recording, and in fact many of the Dr’s videos have less than ideal sound. Sound is critically important and should be a priority equal to the video images.




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    2. You might be a bit over dramatic about this…
      I’m sound engineer and I think that the mic might be picking up a bit of extra room at best (which doesn’t bother by the way) and I did found saturation at 3:12, (the only moment where he did get closer to the mic),
      But that’s not to say that the whole recording is saturated, you can clearly understand every word he’s saying.
      You might want to check this video in a different system, the extra boost has to be happening on your end.




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  8. There was a study published a year or two ago that showed drinking water high in silicon, such as in Fiji and Volvic brands, can flush out aluminum from the body. The study showed that this could help Alzheimer’s patients. I don’t have the citation, but the paper was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, Volume 33, No. 2




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    1. That may be. Yet I can’t take anyone even remotely seriously who claims to follow a vegan diet for environmental reasons but drinks water imported from the Fiji isles or from France. (Is there any more absurd way to pollute the atmosphere than by importing water(!!!) from distant parts of the world? Not even factory farming is that absurd.)




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      1. And that right there, is the problem with Vegans… most of them don’t eat a plant based diet for health reasons, they do it for political hippy dippy reasons, they also won’t wear leather shoes, or drink Fiji water, etc… I may eat a plant based diet, but it’s purely because it’s intelligent and I don’t want to poison my body, but i would never ever describe my self as a vegan, that describes something other than an educated person making dietary choices motivated by and based on science…




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  9. What about organic tea?…..its the only type i buy….i think its much safer….being that common supermarket teas…contain BPA, and other contaminants in their bags….and the pesticides of course




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  10. this is concerning to me as i drink a lot of iced tea. the article only referenced brewed tea. i drink tea made with tea bags called “cold brew”, meaning you put them in cold water, no brewing. any info concerning aluminum on this type of tea?




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    1. Thanks for reposting your question. How much are you drinking? Like more than 4 cups per day? As Dr. Greger points out drinking lots of tea may be fine, it’s the dented cans to be careful of and really important for kids or those prone to kidney disease. Many of the studies looked at the tea leaves themselves as well as brewed, but I do not see anything on “cold-brewed.” The good news is according to this study and others mentioned by Dr. Greger toxicity only really occurs when we lose our ability to detoxify correctly.




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      1. i drink iced tea by the glass pretty much all day long and have since i was a little kid. in the “old day” tea was brewed. now it’s in bags. i use the cold tea bags so no need for brew, just put the bags in cold water.




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        1. So like 8 glasses per day? That seems like a lot, but if you have not had any serious kidney problems it may be fine. 4 cups seems more logical I’d check with your doctor for their advice.




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  11. I really appreciate your incredible work . I have a question regarding aluminium and silica.
    Dr Chris Exley, like many others, thinks that aluminium poisoning could cause Alzheimer’s.
    Aluminium is now found in almost everything we eat and drink : infant milk (!!!), tea, cakes, bread, wine, cosmetics, drugs…But, he also said that drinking a water rich in Silica can help to excrete it through urine. The mineral waters that I can buy in the UK that are rich in Silica are in plastic bottles, which is not eco friendly. They are also quite expensive, especially the brand that has the most concentration in silica (it’s called Fiji). What do you think of it?




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  12. Is there *any* tea that is safe to consume?

    I ask because I really like kombucha (I make my own), but if tea isn’t safe to drink (if there is no tea that is low in toxins–lead, aluminum, cadmium, etc.,) then I will stop drinking it.




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  13. Dr. Greger,
    If you can, please do a video on kombucha–specifically about whether the heavy metal toxins already in tea may be being made more bioavailable.




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