Beauty Is More than Skin Deep

Beauty Is More than Skin Deep
5 (100%) 27 votes

Some foods appear protective against the development of skin wrinkles—while others may make them worse.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The skin is the largest organ in the body—about 20 square feet—and, the most vulnerable organ in the body, exposed to both the oxidizing effects of UV radiation from the sun, and the oxidizing effects of oxygen in the air.   

And, years of oxidant stress can take a toll. Over the years, skin becomes thinner, more easily damaged; loses volume, elasticity, and can sag and wrinkle.

What can we do about it? “Skin wrinkling: can food made a difference?” They measured healthfulness of skin using a microtopographic method. It’s cool; they make a mold of the back of your hand with a silicone rubber, peel it off, and then look at it under a microscope.

This is what young, tight, healthy skin looks like. But, then, as we age, our skin can get all coarse and flaccid. How can we stop it? Well, three things contribute to the aging of skin: “Oxidative stress…induced by [sun]-damage, inflammation and ischemia [lack of adequate blood flow].”

Oxidative stress means we need antioxidants. “Under these circumstances, many skin antioxidants undergo depletion…and must be replaced continuously in order to delay the otherwise inevitable deterioration which would lead to skin aging.” So, plant foods would presumably help.

And then, inflammation and lack of blood flow. And so, one might predict that saturated fat (inflammation) and cholesterol (ischemia), might be associated with adverse effects on our skin.

Let’s see if our predictions hold up. “In particular, a high intake of vegetables, [beans, peas, lentils, soy] and olive oil appeared to be protective” against skin wrinkling, whereas “a high intake of meat, dairy and butter” appeared to have an adverse effect.

Prunes, apples, and tea appeared especially protective. A recent study, for example, found that green tea phytonutrients were able to protect skin against harmful UV radiation, and help improve skin quality of women. After a few months on green tea, there was a 16% reduction in skin roughness, and a 25% reduction in scaling. Here’s micrographs showing the reduction in scaling, as well as improved skin elasticity and hydration.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to shawnandrewr; and WhiteCreek via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The skin is the largest organ in the body—about 20 square feet—and, the most vulnerable organ in the body, exposed to both the oxidizing effects of UV radiation from the sun, and the oxidizing effects of oxygen in the air.   

And, years of oxidant stress can take a toll. Over the years, skin becomes thinner, more easily damaged; loses volume, elasticity, and can sag and wrinkle.

What can we do about it? “Skin wrinkling: can food made a difference?” They measured healthfulness of skin using a microtopographic method. It’s cool; they make a mold of the back of your hand with a silicone rubber, peel it off, and then look at it under a microscope.

This is what young, tight, healthy skin looks like. But, then, as we age, our skin can get all coarse and flaccid. How can we stop it? Well, three things contribute to the aging of skin: “Oxidative stress…induced by [sun]-damage, inflammation and ischemia [lack of adequate blood flow].”

Oxidative stress means we need antioxidants. “Under these circumstances, many skin antioxidants undergo depletion…and must be replaced continuously in order to delay the otherwise inevitable deterioration which would lead to skin aging.” So, plant foods would presumably help.

And then, inflammation and lack of blood flow. And so, one might predict that saturated fat (inflammation) and cholesterol (ischemia), might be associated with adverse effects on our skin.

Let’s see if our predictions hold up. “In particular, a high intake of vegetables, [beans, peas, lentils, soy] and olive oil appeared to be protective” against skin wrinkling, whereas “a high intake of meat, dairy and butter” appeared to have an adverse effect.

Prunes, apples, and tea appeared especially protective. A recent study, for example, found that green tea phytonutrients were able to protect skin against harmful UV radiation, and help improve skin quality of women. After a few months on green tea, there was a 16% reduction in skin roughness, and a 25% reduction in scaling. Here’s micrographs showing the reduction in scaling, as well as improved skin elasticity and hydration.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to shawnandrewr; and WhiteCreek via flickr

Doctor's Note

Those same three factors—ischemia, oxidation, and inflammation—also contribute to our leading killer. See Arterial AcneBlocking the First Step of Heart Disease; and The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause Inflammation. More on the power of prunes in Dried Apples Versus Cholesterol and To Snack or Not to Snack? For an extraordinary report on green tea and skin health, check out Treating Gorlin Syndrome With Green Tea.

For more context, check out my associated blog posts: Stool Size and Breast Cancer RiskThe Anti-Wrinkle DietBest Dried Fruit For CholesterolTreating Sensitive Skin From the Inside Out; and Diet and Cellulite.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

52 responses to “Beauty Is More than Skin Deep

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  1. So a vegan diet with lots of high anti oxidant/inflammatory food, stay out of the sun and exercise. Sounds like the same recommendation for many of health benefits from a whole plant based diet. Right on!

  2. Thank you so much dr greger for these amazing video tips! Our family has seen tremendous change in our health, for the better, from simple changes we made in our own diet. Whole plant based diet is the way to go! Thanks again..

  3. Another great video. No surprise that a vascular system compromised by high cholesterol will not get enough oxygen and nutrients to the skin…or that anti-oxidants help the skin. Exericise must also help oxygenate the skin of course.
    I’d like to see some studies done on vision. I’m now 50 and since going onto an all plant based diet nearly two years ago, combined with lots of minimalist and barefoot running, my vision has improved at an age where it should be getting worse. My bifocals are around here somewhere collecting dust. :~)

    1. Dr Who, please go see someone about your homophobia. I also recommend searching this site on natural lead detoxification as I think it MIGHT help with your clinically low IQ… maybe… also throw in some B vitamins, turmeric, etc. You need help.

      OR I could have responded with a different tone of sarcasm… *ahem…

      Yeah, durr no one’s gonna take y’all sersly if ya talk all gay n shit… pshh science. Men s’posed to sound like me!

      ….Have you seen the movie Idiocracy, by chance?

  4. Hi …any thoughts on how to help with menopausal woman who are starting to lose elasticity and tone on arms/inner elbows and forarms? for alot of woman this is a problem. Ones face can look toned and vibrant into the 50’s& 60s,70s but something about the arms start age and become loose and gelatinous before the rest of the body…any thoughts on this???

    1. Dr. Greger does not recommend added fats in the form of non whole plant foods. Olive oil is empty calories and in fact, may cause health maladies “In a clinical study, olive oil was shown to activate coagulation factor VII to the same extent as does butter. Thus, olive oil does not have a clearly beneficial effect on vascular function.”
      http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/17/11/2904.long

      See Dr. G’s video on the healthiest sweetener here.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-healthiest-sweetener/

    2. Olive oil is far better for you than butter or coconut oil. If using oil, extra virgin olive oil is a good choice but should be used in very modest amounts. Whole foods are always best. I still use oil, but in very small amounts and not regularly and I no longer cook with them (I mostly just use water, works great!). Before coming here, I used to use way too much oil! Very grateful for Dr. Greger’s work and insight!

    1. s noor: Get the one you will drink! I suggest experimenting. I find that I don’t like plain green tea, but the flavored ones are pretty good. One of my current favorites is Moroccan Mint Green Tea by Stash. You also might look at something like Lemon Ginger green tea by Yogi.

      Good luck. I hope you find something that you like.

    2. I like Republic of Tea’s Double Matcha Green tea. It’s such an awesome value for the high quality product it is. And it’s organic.

    1. a healthy whole foods plant based diet with lots of antioxidants. Topically, there are many essential oils that help even out skin tone. You might want to read about sake (rice wine) too as that is supposed to be really effective at lightening (getting rid of dark spots and discoloration) the skin. I once read hemp oil is helpful for that and I think shae butter as well. As for essential oils, there are many but I know bergamont is said to be good for this (but don’t wear in the sun or use spf if you do) as well as frankincense and I think I remember reading vetiver oil was useful for this as well. There’s so many.

  5. Can nutrition prevent or reverse the skin thinning out and getting more fragile as commonly happens when people get in their 60’s?

    1. It may. I feel proper nutrition always plays a role in health and even if skin cannot be improved by a healthful diet other organs will benefit. Dr. Greger has a page on skin health and many videos. Let me know if any of these help answer your question? Thanks, David.

    2. Absolutely. We literally are what we eat. If you read Dr. Greger’s book How Not to Die, before you even get to the chapters you’ll read about what incredible things a plant based diet does to our bodies. It’s truly amazing. Also you’ll notice it in your skin after a few months of a healthy plant based diet. I’d suggest adding flax to your diet if you don’t already. The healthier your diet, the healthier and better looking your skin will be. There have been studies, such as a study done on people who ate watercress, that showed reversal of some of their sun damage and fine lines and other things. Nature is amazing and our body is made up of living cells constantly rebuilding themselves. What you put in your body has everything to do with how healthy every organ is, including and absolutely the skin.

    3. Dr. Greger actually has some videos showing before and after photos. It seems consumption of plants does improve skin health in various ways. Antioxidants protect the skin but I believe they also repair it. Consumption of vitamin c from whole plant foods is very important and so many minerals and vitamins are important for skin elasticity. Dr. Greger also has a video (Nutritional Yeast for Cancer) which talks about how a small amount a day of nutritional yeast can speed up the skin’s healing process.
      I read one doctor say he believed that blueberries could reverse sun damage. Antioxidants are powerful things! (In whole plant foods).
      There are also certain foods that help protect DNA from damage, and some foods have been studied to be particularly good at increasing DNA REPAIR as Dr. Greger has videos on.
      I believe green tea consumption is linked to better skin elasticity (going by memory), Dr. Greger talks about green tea and skin health somewhere here.

      My experience of going on a WFPB diet has been drastically improved skin and hair. I also found daily ground flax consumption to really have an impact.

      Considering our cells are constantly renewing themselves, it only makes sense to me that the more good stuff you put in your body (and the less bad) the healthier your cells will be. It could take a period of months to see improvements, that was my experience.

      It’s never too late to improve one’s overall health!

  6. I like to swim for exercise. One downside, especially in winter, is
    that it dries my skin. To moisturize, I have been using olive oil, or
    coconut oil, or over the counter skin care products. Does the use of
    these oils with fats pose problems in terms of cardiovascular health?
    Are there better alternatives?

    1. Pat – I think the bigger concern for you is absorption of chlorine. Chlorine, a huge oxidant, is absorbed through the skin, I would recommend taking 1 TBSP of Amla before and after the swim to counter the oxidation effect of the chlorine. I have my own pool and I use little to no stabilizer. I put the clorox, liquid chlorine, after sunset, I put a third of bottle for a 30000 gallon pool and then by afternoon the sun will burn off the chlorine and I can swim chlorine free and I doubt anything will grow in the few hours that there is no chlorine. btw my pool looks amazing and never any problems like when I used stabilizer and tablets.

      1. Billy – Thanks for your reply and the Amla suggestion. What form of Amla is most readily available to the body? Unfortunately, I swim at a public hot springs pool — http://www.hotspringspool.com/swim — so I don’t have control over the water treatment. Will the Amla help with dry skin that can feel itchy if I don’t moisturize? Any oil or lotion suggestions? Thank you.

        1. I use Terrasoul amla from amazon, it tastes like bitter mud, but it is a super antioxidant. My comment was not related to your dry skin issue, but rather oxidation of saturated fats leading to heart disease. I would suggest continuing to use your coconut oil for the dry skin, but take the Amla before and after to increase your antioxidant levels, as I believe that swimming in chlorinated pools will decrease the antioxidant levels. Taking Amla which Dr Greger talks about in better than Goji berries video, will reduce the damage caused by the chlorine. What I was saying was that the coconut oil is not as big a concern as the chlorine that you will absorb thru your skin. I do not want you to stop swimming but rather take Amla to mitigate the chlorine.

          1. I use the same amla powder and I really love it. If you add it to a berry smoothie, it makes it taste fantastic. Almost like an amazingly healthy sweet tart, or sour patch kids, beverage! I have one every day and even my young daughter likes the taste…and has no idea what is in it, haha.

    2. No, you have to digest fats. Fat doesn’t get into your bloodstream through skin. If our bodies were that sensitive, we would have been extinct a long time ago.

      1. I’m not so sure that i agree. Can you provide some research supporting your claim? I ask because we know that the skin is definitely a pathway for entry into the body. Nicotine patches for quitting smoking rely on transdermal transport into the body as do certain path drugs for chemotherapy nausea. Hormone patches are applied transdermally and of course we know to follow the rules of covering the body head to toe when applying pesticides because they, also, transport into the body via our skin. So I would love to see some documentation that fats applied to our skin do not transport transdermally – so many other products do.

        1. Keep in mind that those patches are designed specifically to penetrate the skin and have ingredients in them to help them do so. Even with chemicals, like BPA for example, it doesn’t penetrate into the blood or at least significantly through skin alone. I agree that we should not put toxic things on our skin (or use them in general due to environmental concerns) because it’s not only unhealthy for our skin but things are bound to be absorbed on even a superficial level, plus you have cuts and scrapes being a factor and/or handling food.
          I don’t have any links but the research I did in the past all led to this conclusion. Plus it’s just a matter of common sense too. Think of all the saturated fat people put on their skin. I’ve used SO much topical coconut oil, got my cholesterol checked (not because of the topical oil) and the results came back fabulously. We’d be keeling over if there were any sort of absorption of fats into our blood stream through skin. People use cocoa butter which is extremely high in fat and it’s a regular ingredient in many skin products that add extra ingredients which causes the aforementioned ingredient to absorb even deeper, and it doesn’t come with heart risks. Not to mention palm oil in so many skin care products which is just so unsustainable and so unethical. But when ingested, palm oil is known to raise bad cholesterol levels, so with that alone being in so many products, unfortunately, I think something would have been noted if it had an impact on fats in our blood stream. With all the fats and skincare products depending on and containing fats, people have been religiously using for decades and really since ancient times, we would have noticed something by now and it would have inevitably been addressed.
          Fat does absorb on a superficial level though and helps protect our skin.

          1. Science shows a small % absorption of sat fats via oil like coconut oil on skin. U can find the reference yrself if u care to. Cheers!

            1. Dr. Greger bases his presentation on objective peer-reviewed, published literature. This is science. Anything else is just theory or hype that often ends up being wrong. There is no peer-reviewed published literature that supports your assertion. If you are aware of a citation, and would like to post it, we’d be happy to review it for validity and clinical significance.

              Dr. Ben

              1. Ben, which commenter is your post aimed toward? I don’t believe anyone here had stated anything as a fact, but rather shared their perspectives or information that anyone could look up themselves to see if there is validity to. I didn’t see anyone state anything that deemed such a response. People here are generally well aware that things aren’t certain until put to the test. I think offering some perspective if absolutely fine, such as if we absorbed saturated fat from topical application, there would be heart disease linked to lotion application. And I think it’s generally known that chlorine is harmful to us and safe enough to share without a citation. But again, I don’t know who you were speaking to, however it seemed misplaced.
                Sometimes we post comments and theories in HOPES someone may be able to provide a citation.

        2. guest, Dr. Greger does indeed address your concern in regards to saturated fat from coconut oil being absorbed into skin. I believe it’s this video (but could be mistaken, I’d have to watch it again): https://nutritionfacts.org/video/eczema-treatment-with-coconut-oil-mineral-oil-vs-vaseline/
          Of course apparently small infants CAN absorb the saturated fat because their skin is so thin… kind of scary to think about.

          I’m no expert but what I’ve learned is that some things have particles where it is small enough to absorb from our skin into our blood stream. It’s my understanding that most substances cannot do this. This is mostly the case for lab produced things. They actually break things down to unnaturally small particles called nanoparticles which are small enough to be absorbed into our blood or may be small enough to be. I know this raises concern for certain products like chemical sunscreens, nanoparticle-sized titanium oxide, etc. I can’t post any studies as I haven’t saved this information, but you should be able to find out more about it if you search.

  7. What Topical applications are best for your skin? Such as Coconut oil or Almond oil? I now understand what’s best internally for my skin but not externally.

    1. Both of those are good for your skin, lots of different oils have various benefits though. Sea buckthorn berry oil is really good for the skin though it’s bright orange and takes a while to fade and can also stain material. Shea butter and cacao butter are also both really great for skin. Lots of essential oils have various benefits to skin and you can us the above mentioned oils (as well as others) to make your own blends. I hear argon oils is awesome for the skin as well as hemp oil. What’s also cool about hemp oil is that it’s so sustainable! A bit expensively because of ridiculous laws making it hard to farm it unfortunately, which is just insane considering what a nutritious and resourceful plant it is and one of the most sustainable crops.

    2. Gumsvibe, I’ve actually learned more since I commented here a while ago. So here’s all I can offer (that I can’t think of at the moment), it’s long but maybe will be useful to someone….

      If you use oils for skin, it’s important to get them unrefined and high quality. Also, everyone’s skin varies, but some oils clog pores whereas others don’t seem to (although too much of anything can block pores), here is a good list for that, although I’m not sure how they decide these ratings: https://www.holistichealthherbalist.com/complete-list-of-comedogenic-oils/

      From what I’ve seen, studies suggest argan oil can benefit skin elasticity and rosehip oil has been shown to help with scarring applied to scars twice a day. Both of these oils are high in vitamin A and vitamin E or at least contain significant amounts for the skin. I’m not sure if there’s vitamin C in rosehip oil, some say there is some amount but others say there is not.
      There was a Japanese study that showed that red raspberry seed oil had an SPF of 40 due to antioxidant content. Pomegranate oil is also said to have a high SPF level. Shea butter is a good moisturizer too and seems to hold in moister good, it also has a comedogenic rating of 0, which means it doesn’t clog pores. There are many other oils out there with benefits.

      Vitamin c is proven very beneficial to skin but a lot of vitamin c containing products contain harmful ingredients and ingredients that could even prevent the vitamin c from absorbing. For example, I actually found Ann Webb’s vitamin c serum in a health food store a few years ago, it’s really expensive and the company claims it has the most absorbable vitamin c, yet the first or one of the first ingredients is dimethicone which is a type of silicone and it actually sits on top of the skin creating the ILLUSION of soft, smooth skin until one washes it off. It coats the skin and prevents anything from getting out (and therefore clogs pores) and prevents anything from absorbing thus preventing active ingredients from said product from even being utilized.

      Antioxidants are great for the skin for topical use. Actually, chemical sunscreens are made to imitate the way antioxidants work, which is to neutralized free radicals and they eventually get used up, which is why for chemical sunscreens, you need to reapply. But chemical sunscreens are also harmful to skin and can be absorbed into the blood stream from what I’ve learned and some chemical sunscreens have been linked to increase skin cancer risk and skin damage.
      Zinc oxide seems to be the safest choice and it works as a sun block, which is different, so you don’t need to reapply unless sweating or being in water for a period of time.

      The antioxidants we consume protect and nourish our skin. So truly what we put in our bodies is most important, including vitamin c–while great for topical use, it’s even more important to eat vitamin c rich foods. Studies show green tea consumed for a period of weeks at about a cup a day, can give us a natural spf of 4. Consuming the amount of 3 tbsp of tomato paste a day also gives us a natural spf after a small time period (I believe 6 weeks, in the study). In these studies, these were the only antioxidants added to their diet which was likely a SAD diet with overall low antioxidant intake. Imagine eating an entire diet rich in phytonutrients and what that must do for skin!
      I also know that consuming carotenoids (natural from whole plant foods) protects our skin from UV damage really well and lycopene is the most potent but lutein and zeaxanthin are the only ones our eyes are able to use to protect the retina. All things abundant in various plants. Supplementation of antioxidants can be dangerous and at best, ineffective.

      Antioxidants used topically can help protect skin as well.

      Green tea has been shown to be beneficial for topical use, one study I read (going completely by memory, I might get it a little wrong) said they found that ingestion of green tea helped protect skin (something that was already known) as did topical use and while both ingesting and using green tea skin care moisturizers topically did the best job combined (if I’m remembering correctly), it seemed that after using green tea in topical products, the body absorbed less of it into skin from ingestion. I don’t think this would apply to splashing your face with tea as a toner or anything, it would have to be designed in a product to absorb deeply into skin from my understanding. Also this was one study.
      It’s worth noting that green tea should be consumed in its whole form and not taken as an extract, as one of Dr. Greger’s videos show that green tea extract can actually damage liver.

      Topical CoQ10 is supposed to be beneficial in skin care (so I’ve read) as well as vitamin A (but vitamin A palmitate/retinyl palmitate can actually cause sun damage), and vitamin e (though topical use of pure vitamin e doesn’t show much or any benefit from what I’ve read – perhaps it helps with UV protection but I’m not sure – when tested on scars, it seemed to not do anything or made them worse possibly by slowing the healing process but this was in pure vitamin e oil from lab produced vitamin e). A lot of natural oils contain vitamin A and vitamin e. Carrot seed oil is supposed to also help protect skin from UV damage as many natural oils do or are said to.

      Witch Hazel is a good toner.

      You can learn a lot about specific ingredients form Ann Marie Skin Care website, they do a lot of research for their products. Expensive but they’re completely natural… VERY hard to find. Mad Hippie has an amazing antioxidant serum naturally rich in vitamin c, they also have vitamin c and a vitamin a serum and other products but unfortunately they use palm oil in their products (but not in their antioxidant serum) which is extremely unsustainable and a cruel industry to both animals and humans. Leven Rose has high quality oils. Foxbrim has high quality argan and rose hip oils, they sell other products but I’m not familiar with them.

      I’m kind of rambling but the information is a bit scattered. I actually did recently learn that it’s important to wash your face before exercise, even more so than after. And that we shouldn’t apply moisturizer while our skin is hot from a steamy shower, for example, and the products are actually designed to work with our skin at normal body temperatures. I was grateful for this info which was quoted by a dermatologist, because I had been doing it all wrong for years. I will take that dermatologist’s word for it because it makes good sense. Just using those healthy practices helps maintain the integrity of our skin.

      Apparently coconut oil is beneficial in treating eczema in a notable way as Dr. Greger shows in one of his videos. The results are extremely impressive in before and after photos shown in said video. Coconut oil WILL clog pores on face though, but some people seem to do find with it.

      Many essential oils are useful for skin issues, Dr. Greger notes this to some extent in his video on honey where he mentions some benefits of lavender and chamomile.

      Aloe Vera is said to help strengthen the skin’s moister barrier when used topically.

      I started mixing my body wash with chamomile tea and sometimes green tea and sometimes both, I find it makes skin feel especially soft and is soothing and you can’t go wrong with antioxidants, plus both are anti-inflammatory, especially chamomile from my understanding.

      I love Sunfood’s shampoo, conditioner, and body wash which I actually use on my face since I couldn’t find a face wash I liked or one that was actually natural to my standards plus vegan plus palm oil free. Works better than anything I’ve used in the past! The shampoo and conditioner is the best stuff I’ve ever used in my life, as well.

      I used to use Acure lotion but I now use unrefined shea butter as a body moisturizer and sometimes blend it with other oils. The Acure lotion did work really well with a lot of impressive ingredients. I think they may use palm oil though as they do have vegetable glycerin in their ingredients, I stopped using it so I never asked the company but always meant to get around to it.

      The consumption of flax is AMAZING for skin, just going by my own experience. After taking, as a rule, 2 tbsp of ground flax a day, after a period of months, I really began to notice a huge difference in my skin and my hair had basically turned to silk. Of course this was in addition to a WFPB diet.
      It’s also my understanding that magnesium is very good for skin quality which is plentiful in plant foods, particularly high in hemp seeds but high in many other plant foods as well.

      In a product, you basically just want good active ingredients with none of the bad stuff.

      Best facial for pore cleansing in my experience is a bentonite clay facial… works amazing. You mix the bentonite clay in water but don’t get it in contact with metal or it negates what it does, and what it does is produces an electrical charge when introduced to water which allows it to absorb toxins like a magnet. It makes your skin so soft and clean!

      I would love to see more scientific research on topical skin care and would LOVE for Dr. Greger to do a video (or 12) on the subject. Not necessarily for vanity purposes but because it would be nice to learn more about what works, what is harmful to not only our skin but our internal health, and the best all natural sun protection (apart from a WFPB diet rich in antioxidants) as opposed to harmful chemical sunscreens. He does have quite a few insights about skin health throughout the site though. Oh, he also has something on how vaseline can work well to protect the skin, HOWEVER, it’s been my understanding that it also can prevent skin from producing its own natural oils and make it dependent on the product, something else I’d love for him to address, perhaps it’s not true. I do remember when I used to use vaseline for the lips, I became dependent and whenever I didn’t put it on, my lips felt dry. I have no problem with dry lips now and don’t really use anything except apply oil after a shower or here and there, but not dependently. Of course, my experience doesn’t mean vaseline necessarily does that, but it does coincide with what I’ve read.
      Even when I used to use Burts Bees chaps stick prior to going vegan (it contains bee products), I found that my lips became dryer when I didn’t use it. The only “chap stick” I use now (I also use it as natural lip gloss) is Booda Butter which is made with raw and unrefined, sustainable ingredients. They are an awesome company and I never experienced my lips feeling dryer or seemingly becoming dependent on their product.

      Oh, and recently Dr. Greger, in his Nutritional Yeast For Cancer video, explained that a small amount of nutritional yeast consumed daily, sped up the skin healing process. Speeding the healing process, from my understanding, helps prevent scarring.

      1. Thank you, S, for that comprehensive and informative post! I really appreciate that you took the time to share all of that here.
        One thing not mentioned are acrylamides in skin care products. We know from past videos the issue with them in food

    1. why do people always say this? Well ok I know why, it’s because it’s all over the internet thanks to everyone thinking they should blog their opinions and confidentially and sometimes aggressively state them as facts. Yes, extracted oils are isolated fat and if/when used should be done in moderation, but there are antioxidants and nutrients in certain fats. Extra virgin olive oil actually has significant amounts of antioxidants and vitamin e, which of course is also an antioxidant. Plus it does contain healthy fats which are good and protective to our skin. So there are benefits, but because it’s still pure fat, you obviously don’t want to over do it because that would be bad for the arteries. I like to drizzle a minimal amount on salads usually paired with red wine vinegar (Napa Valley because it’s organic and vegan), it also helps you absorb the antioxidants in the veggies in your salad. I used to use way too much though. I actually stopped (over doing it) after learning from this site :)

  8. Hi,

    Eating healthy foods, proper workout routine, and supplements with natural skin care products will complete your healthy lifestyle for a healthy glowing skin. Thanks for the video.

  9. Hi there. I couldn’t find a video that closely related to my question, so I picked a skin video to post under.

    I am a resident physician, so I’m fairly familiar with vitiligo from med school and patients. My friend happens to have vitiligo and recently started using an ayurvedic ointment called Lukoskin. Now, in medical school I could have sworn I learned that this is a permanent loss of pigmentation, but he showed me several places on his hands and a spot near his eye that have basically “filled back in” with pigmentation. The skin is a bit hyperpigmented now compared to his baseline skin tone, but it’s hardly noticeable. The website says it is derived from more than 21 plants so I’m not able to quite figure out what’s in this ointment that is creating such good results. I did a preliminary search for medications, but could only really find articles on medications that slow the progression, not reverse it.

    I’m wondering if Dr. Greger and company have any thoughts on nutrition effects on vitiligo? My friend is very interested in changing his diet as well, so would be very appreciative!

    Thanks!

  10. Hi, Amelia Durling. It appears that much of the literature on vitiligo comes from India, and it is great that your friend has found help in Ayurvedic medicine. It is my understanding that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease, and so foods that attenuate the immune response might help.
    You may be interested in this article: http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0378-6323;year=2009;volume=75;issue=2;spage=116;epage=118;aulast=Namazi
    You can find everything on this site related to autoimmune diseases here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/autoimmune-diseases/
    I hope that helps!

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